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See EXPO’s Highlights & More PAGE 10-31

TNLA Reveals TEIL Best of Show Winners & Summit Award Winner PAGE 28-29

CEU Quiz Inside PAGE 43

Green Vi$ion page 33 Notes From SFA Gardens page 37 Bugs & Fuzz page 39

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EXPO’s Great Adventure Report Education At Expo The EXPO 2018 Tradeshow Parks And Patio Display Pecha Kucha’s In The TNLA Hut Plant Trial Innovations & People’s Choice Winner TNLA Annual Business Meeting At Expo 2018 EXPO Best Booth Award Winners Newcomers’ Shindig Student Rally At EXPO Women In Horticulture Welcome To San Antonio Party Certified Professionals’ Reception TNLA Chairs’ Reception TNLA Awards Celebration TEIL Best Of Show Winners

X

33 GreenVi$ion by Dr. Mengmeng Gu 37 Notes from SFA Gardens by Dawn Stover 39 Bugs & Fuzz by Dr. Kevin Ong and Dr. Erfan Vafaie 43 44 45 46 46

CEU Quiz New Members

Calendar of Events Advertiser Index New Certified Professionals

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7730 South IH-35 | Austin, TX 78745-6698 | (512) 280-5182 or (800) 880-0343 fax: (512) 280-3012 | email: info@tnlaonline.org | www.tnlaonline.org S E P T E M B E R /O C TO B E R 2 0 1 8

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The official publication of the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association September/October | Vol. 20 No. 5 DIRECTORS

Chairman of the Board. . . . Chairman-Elect. . . . Immediate Past Chairman. . . . President. . . .

Joshua Bracken, TMCNP, Dallas Jay Williams, League City Bill Carson, Austin Amy Graham, Austin

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Region I. . . . Region II. . . . Region III. . . . Region IV. . . . Region V. . . . Region VI. . . . Region VII. . . . Region VIII. . . . Supplier Director. . . . Grower Director. . . . Landscape Director. . . . Retail Director. . . . Director At-Large. . . . Director At-Large. . . . Director At-Large. . . . Director At-Large. . . .

Kevin Grossberndt, Bigfoot Jim Curtice, TCLP, Houston Herman Ray Vess, TMCNP, Edgewood Craig Duttarer, Carrollton Jackie Smith, Santo Steven Akers, Slaton Gerry Bower, Weslaco Brad Seever, Austin Tim Little, Dallas Kevin Norris, Coppell Scotty Rigsby, TCLP, Midlothian Kristi Long, TCNP, Gardens at the Ridge Adrian Thomas Muehlstein, TMCNP, Carrollton Rachelle Kemp, TCLP, TMCNP, Waco Dan Green, TCLP, San Antonio Bobby Eichholz, San Antonio

A Video Message from Amy Graham, TNLA President

TNL A STAFF President/CEO. . . . Director of Finance. . . . Director, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs. . . . Director, Expo Exhibits and Membership. . . . Director, TNLA & EXPO Marketing/. . . . Communications Director, Industry Education and Certifications. . . . Business Development/Sales Executive. . . . Office Operations Assistant. . . . Region Support. . . . Accounting Assistant. . . . Administrative Assistant, Strategic Initiatives. . . . Administrative Assistant, Marketing . . . & Communications Administrative Assistant, EXPO. . . .

Amy Graham Cheryl Staritz Ryan Skrobarczyk Amy Prenger, CEM Sarah Riggins, CEM James Theiss, TCLP, TCWSP, Certified Arborist Mike Yelverton, TCNP & TCWSP Nancy E. Sollohub Sara Fern Aimee Luna Debra Allen Ashley Pettibone Trevor Peevey

MAGAZINE STAFF

Editor. . . . Sarah Riggins Graphic Designer. . . . Marie Leonard Advertising. . . . Kristie Thymes TNLA Green magazine is a member service of the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association, and is published bi-monthly. Advertising information is available from TNLA, 7730 South IH 35, Austin, Texas 78745, online at www.tnlaonline.org, or by calling (800) 880-0343. TNLA office hours are weekdays, 8:30AM - 4:30PM CST. © 2018 Texas Nursery & Landscape Association

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MI SSIO N STAT E ME N T The Texas Nursery & Landscape Association’s mission is to enhance members’ business success through legislative/ regulatory advocacy, education, networking, and promotion of professionalism.

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TNLAGREEN

Both Thursday and Friday of EXPO offered hundreds the g

chance to grab a cup of coffee and feed their minds with knowledge from EXPO’s Keynote Speakers Clint Swindall discussing the The Power of Leadership and Jack Jostes speaking on Going Digital – A New Era in the Green Industry. These Keynote presentations were not the only avenues of increasing your knowledge during the EXPO, there were also two days of jam-packed EXPO Education Conference Sessions filled with expert speakers covering over 32 breakout Sessions and offering over 100 hours of CEU opportunities. A special thanks to Landmark Nurseries, Inc. for your support and sponsorship for EXPO’s Education Conference. Also new this year, EXPO offered a complimentary session on Labor sponsored by Federation of Employers & Workers of America (FEWA).

Mid-morning at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center on Thursday at EXPO, you

g

could hear the sounds of “Jumanji-like” drums as the ribbon was cut and the Tradeshow doors were open by the TNLA State Board of Directors and members of the San Antonio EXPO Ambassador Group.

EXPO’s Opening Ceremonies were sponsored by Athen’s Tree Farm. 6

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The 2018 Nursery/Landscape EXPO truly was a Great Adventure! The journey began on Wednesday as First time Exhibitors and Attendees explored during a behind the scenes tour of the Tradeshow Floor and then kicked-off their EXPO experience while connecting at the Newcomers’ Shindig.

For three days participants walked aisles filled g

with new and innovative products and were able to make long lasting industry connections with exhibitors and source products throughout the year. The Tradeshow Floor was a great place to do business and make valuable connections, but it wasn’t the only thing going on!

Both High School and College Students were able to g

join together at the Student Rally to meet with Industry leaders as students learned more about how to start their journey in building a lucrative career in the Green Industry. (Student Rally sponsored by Landmark Nurseries, Inc. and Calloway’s Nursery) Later in the day women from all levels in their profession exchanged ideas and had fun at the Women in Horticulture Get Together. (Women in Horticulture Get Together sponsored by Landscape Art and Roundtree Landscaping) Live music from J. Abrams band filled the convention center as thousands were able to enjoy the Welcome to San Antonio Party sponsored by New Earth and Tree Town USA. A special thanks to OHP. Inc. for their partnership in bringing the Industry together by sponsoring live entertainment at this fun-filled event!

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The buzz within the convention center did not stop. On Friday of EXPO for the first g

time TNLA conducted the Annual Business Meeting to present the Year in Review and welcome incoming Chair of the TNLA State Board of Directors, Josh Bracken. (TNLA’s Annual Business Meeting sponsored by Hotchkiss Insurance) Also, on Friday, hundreds came together for the TNLA Awards Celebration as we went Running with Lions and laughed the night away with entertainment from San Antonio’s Clean Comedian Cleto Rodriguez. This year’s winners at the TNLA Awards Celebration were honored for their continuous time, devotion and passion to help raise the bar for the Green Industry. The 2018 Winners included: Rebecca Dubiski, TNLA Young Leader award winner, Mark Chamblee, TMNCP, TNLA Honorary Lifetime Membership & Arp award winner, Mortellaro’s Nursery TNLA’s Summit award winner. Also awarded were the Texas Excellence In Landscaping (TEIL) winners in which TNLA revealed this year’s Best of Show winners: Clean Scapes LP - Pearl Brewery - Commercial Maintenance; Bonick Landscaping - Ursula Lane - Design; Moss Landscaping - French Contemporary Terrace - Residential Installation: $50,000-150,000. A special thanks to our TNLA Awards Celebration Sponsors New Earth, Texas Green Industry Safety Group, Landscape Art, Peerless Farms, Trinity Packaging and Texas Chapter International Society of Arboriculture.

The Texas Nursery And Landscape Association is g

Find More Information At NurseryLandscapeEXPO.org! Email expo@nurserylandscapeexpo.org or call 512.579.3857 for information about exhibit spaces!

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already excited for next year’s EXPO, August 8-10, 2019 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio! Many booth spaces have already been sold, so be sure to reserve your booth space for 2019 now! Call 512-579-3857 to reserve today.

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TNLAGREEN

Thursday And Friday’s Keynote Speakers Packed The House! Keynote Speaker: Jack Jostes on Going Digital

Keynote Speaker: Clint Swindall on The Power of Leadership Kevin Norris, Landmark Nurseries, Inc.

EXPO Education Proudly Sponsored by:

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Two Days Of Education Brought Over 32 Breakout Sessions And Offered Over 100 Hours Of CEUs To More Than 400 Industry Professionals

EXPO Education Proudly Sponsored by:

New TNLA Labor Summit The new TNLA Labor Summit came together to help build a reliable and dependable workforce for the future. Thank you to Federation of Employers & Workers of America (FEWA) for sponsoring this year’s Labor Summit at EXPO.

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Three Days of Tradeshow = One Great Adventure 12

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Participants Set Off In Exploration As They Connected With Green Industry Professionals On The Tradeshow Floor

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A Beautiful Parks & Patio Display Designed By Texas A&M University Students Wowed Attendees!

2018 Parks and Patio Task Force

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“Lion of Judah” sculpture provided by: Max Greiner, Jr. ©

TNLA Hut Offered Participants The Opportunity To Learn More About Tnla Member Benefits And Generated Conversation During The Pecha Kucha’s S E P T E M B E R /O C TO B E R 2 0 1 8

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People’s Choice Winner - Plant Development Services, Inc.

The Plant Trial Innovations Section Gave Participants The Chance To Vote On Their Favorite Plant Material Tried And Tested In The Lone Star State, This Year’s People’s Choice Award Was: Plant Development Services, Inc. - Southern Living Collection. 16

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For The First Time TNLA Held Its Annual Business Meeting On The Tradeshow Floor With A Livestream For Audiences To Tune In From Around The Lone Star State

Annual Business Meeting Proudly Sponsored by:

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SMALL HARDLINE Austin Wood Recycling Austin, Texas

SMALL GREENLINE Leaf Landscape Supply Austin, Texas

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Exhibitors Featured Their Finest And Some Were Winners Of EXPO’s Best Booth Awards! The Winners Seriously Impressed The Judges And Attendees!

MEDIUM HARDLINE Big Bend Stone Terlingua, Texas

MEDIUM GREENLINE Magnolia Gardens Nursery Waller, Texas

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LARGE HARDLINE Keystone Hardscapes Grapevine, Texas

LARGE GREENLINE Native Texas Nursery Austin, Texas

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The Exhibitor Appreciation Breakfast Helped Exhibitors Gear Up To Embark On Their EXPO Adventure On The Tradeshow Floor. Sponsored by Haviland Plastic Products Co.

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TNLA’s Newcomers’ Shindig Gave A Warm Welcome To First Time Attendees And Exhibitors! Newcomers Got A Tour Of The Tradeshow Floor And Had The Opportunity To Network In The Explorers Oasis! 22

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Both College And High School Students Came Together For The Student Rally To Learn More About The Green Industry From TNLA’s Expert Members. Thank you to this year’s Student Rally sponsors: Landmark Nurseries, Inc. and Calloway’s Nursery

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TNLAGREEN

Over 200 Women Professionals In The Industry Came Together For The 4Th Annual Women In Horticulture Event. Thank you to the 4th Annual Women In Horticulture Get Together Sponsors: Landscape Art and Roundtree Landscaping Women’s Keynote Speaker: Julissa Carielo, CEO, Tejas Premier Contractor, Inc.

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THE WELCOME TO SAN ANTONIO PARTY FEATURED LIVE MUSIC WITH THE J. ABRAMS BAND AND LOTS OF FUN.

Welcome Party Proudly Sponsored by:

Live Entertainment Sponsored by OHP, Inc.

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Hundreds Gathered To Raise The Bar During The TNLA Certified Professionals’ Reception. TNLA Certified Professionals’ Reception partnered by: GO TEXAN

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TNLA Chairs’ Reception Brought Together Today’s Industry Leaders. Sponsored By KBW Supply and Whiz-Q Stone

Thank you to our TNLA PAC Platinum Member Donors (left to right) Steve Taber, Mark Baxmann TMCNP, Joanne Harden, James Harden Sr. TMCNP, Mark Rose, Jim Prewitt and Mark Harris, TCLP, CLP

New THIS YEAR The Texas Agriculture Lifetime Leadership (TALL) Alumni Held Their First Alumni Reception At EXPO. TALL Alumni Reception Sponsored by: Landmark Nurseries, Inc. and TNLA

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TNLAGREEN

Thank You To EXPO’s Decor And Plant Sponsor For Special Events:

Young Leader Award Winner: Rebecca Dubiski

TNLA Honorary Lifetime Membership and Arp Award Winner: Mark Chamblee, TMCNP

Summit Winner: Mortellaro’s Nursery

We Were Running With The Lions During This Year’s TNLA Awards Celebration Honoring This Year’s Texas Excellence In Landscaping Awards Along With The Honorary Lifetime Membership Award, Young Leader, Arp Winners. A special thanks to our TNLA Awards Celebration Sponsors: New Earth, Texas Green Industry Safety Group, Landscape Art, Peerless Farms, Trinity Packaging and Texas Chapter - International Society of Arboriculture.

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Texas Excellence in Landscaping Best of Show Winners

COMMERCIAL MAINTENANCE Clean Scapes LP for Pearl Brewery

DESIGN

RESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION

Bonick Landscaping for Ursula Lane

Moss Landscaping for French Contemporary Terrace

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Consistent Quality in Bulk and Bags

SOIL

MULCH

COMPOST & MORE

NewEarthCompost.com


TNLAGREEN

SPONSORS

Absolute Accents, Inc. Adams Wholesale Supply, Inc. BillyCaterpillar LongSpecifications Enterprises CMYK Gloss C0 M 29 Y 100 K0

RGB Multi-Media R 255 G 205 B 17

CMYK Matte C0 M 23 Y 100 K0

Federation of Employer & Workers of America (FEWA) Harris Landscaping Harry’s Greenhouse

Four-Color Black C 50 M 30 Y 30 K 100

Clean Scapes, LP

Landscape Art, Inc.

Color Spot Nurseries

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Magnolia Gardens Nursery

Orora Visual Horticultural

Mortellaro’s Nursery

Peerless Farms

Native Texas Nursery

Roundtree Landscaping

Nicholson-Hardie

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Southern Botanical

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The Ground Up TNLA Region I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII Trinity Packaging Wilhite Landscape & Lawn Care

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Contact Amy Howard 616-223-3365 www.springmeadownursery.com 800-633-8859 ext.1105

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TNLA Sept-Oct_SMN Purple Pillar.indd 1

7/23/18 4:13 PM

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GRE E NV I $ IO N

Plants With Potentials: Yangmei DR. MENGMENG GU

M

Dr. Mengmeng Gu is Associate Professor/ Extension Specialist, Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

ost of us are very familiar with wax myrtle (Myrica cerifera), a small tree or large shrub native in the U.S. It flowers from late winter to spring (Fig. 1) and fruits come in late summer or fall. If you have seen it, the fruits are very small, about the size of pomegranate seeds, and have a layer of waxy coat. Probably only birds eat these fruits, or when you’re EXTREMELY hungry. For human consumption, it is as good as grass. BUT, the native wax myrtle has a Chinese cousin, yangmei (Myrica rubra). It’s completely different, like night and day.

Figure 2

If we just look at the leaves of yangmei plant (Fig. 2), yo u can see the resemblance of these two cousins, dark green color, size, veination, shape, and evergreen or semi-evergreen. But look at the fruits. OMG! The fruits look like strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) fruits, but about twice the size. I never tasted strawberry tree

fruits, but yangmei is an important tree fruit crop in many areas in South China, from as north as Jiangsu Province (where I am from) to as south as Yunnan and Guizhou Province. South of these two provinces will be Southeast Asia countries). So it can be grown in almost anywhere in Texas, except for a few cold dry places. With increasing popularity of edible landscaping, yangmei could be a very valuable member of this club. I grew up enjoying these fresh juice fruits in the summer, and canned yangmei when not in season. It’s probably a perfect fruit tree for home landscaping, only. Why? It has very short shelf life. Raspberry, among many fruits available from grocery stores, probably has the shortest shelf life. But yangmei’s even shorter. There is no commercial long-distance shipping and distribution of yangmei fruits. In June, 2017, I visited one of the yangmei production areas in Zhejiang Province, just south of Shanghai. We were gifted with the fruits picked that day and about 3 days later in the hotel room, mold started to grow on fruits at the bottom of the baskets. This is a fruit that you almost have to grow for yourself. (continued on page 34)

Figure 1

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TNLAGREEN (continued from page 33) I became more convinced that yangmei plant could be part of Texas landscape plant palette, when visiting Cixi, Ningbo in Zhejiang Province known for its fruit production in June, 2017. When our view of rice paddy gave away to hills after hills of small trees, the local agriculture extension agent told us “most of the trees on these hills are yangmei plants (Fig. 3).

Other common names of yangmei include waxberry, Chinese bayberry or red bayberry. Yangmei plant could grow to big trees (Fig. 4), upright funnel shape like hackberry. The flowers are just as insignificant as wax myrtle, but it’s quite spectacular when fruits mature from green to red, crimson, maroon (as an Aggie employee, I feel obligated to use this

Blooming. Our group grows bigger dividends and a safer workplace for you. Is safety growing in your garden? Members of the Texas Green Industry Safety Group are eligible to receive extra dividends, a greater discount on their workers’ comp premiums and more. If you are committed to a higher level of safety, join other leaders in your field to maximize the rewards. Be part of a safer Texas. To learn more about becoming a member, contact your agent

word whenever applicable) and all shades in between (Fig. 5). The local yangmei extension station has over 20 cultivars, but the most commonly cultivated is ‘Biqi’ with relatively big fruits and small seeds. Yangmei plants are dioecious and male trees are needed to set fruits. The male plant has tighter growth habit (Fig. 6), compared to its ‘girl friends’ in Fig. 4 (what do you think the year-after-year childbearing would do to them?!), and could be ideal as a fruitless landscape plant. Although not ideal, pollens from wax myrtle or northern bayberry (M. pensylvanica) could help set fruits on female yangmei plants. Yangmei plants are not picky and quite problem-free. While the more productive, easy-to-cultivate flat land is used for high-profit vegetable production, yangmei as a fruit crop is almost all grown in the hilly areas. There is no restriction to the production area and you can go for an all-you-can-eat yangmei buffet, as long as you don’t leave with fruits on/ in you except your stomach. That’s ‘stealing’ there. It would be interesting to test all those cultivars in College Station and see how they perform. I hope I could share with you some plant materials in the future, but if you have plant right now, please feel free to share with me.

or Becky Walker at (972) 512-7770 or bwalker@hiallc.com.

As always, I’d love to hear from you if you agree or disagree with me. Let’s have a conversation.

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While we can’t guarantee dividends every year, Texas Mutual has returned more than $2.5 billion to safety-conscious policyholder owners since 1999. © 2018 Texas Mutual Insurance Company

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I became more convinced that yangmei plant could be part of Texas landscape plant palette, when visiting Cixi, Ningbo in Zhejiang Province known for its fruit production in June, 2017

Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 5

Figure 6

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Closer Mowing Heights Superior Turf Density

Impressive Leaf Texture Dark Green Color

Upright Leaf Blade Orientation Drought Tough Superior Sod Strength Cold Tolerant Excellent Traffic Pest Resistant Tolerance Good Lateral Vigorous Growth Root System

12 Reasons Why TifSport Bermudagrass Is the Standard For Texas Lawns & Landscaping

TIFSP RT

For More Information and a List of Licensed Growers Go to: www.tifsport.com 36

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N OTES F RO M SFA G A R DE NS

Discovering The Wilds Of Our Own Backyard BY DAWN STOVER

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Dawn Stover is a Research Associate with SFA Gardens at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, TX

he SFA Gardens is made up of a collection of several named gardens on the Stephen F. Austin State University campus. Our director, Dr. David Creech, has always said the “We will garden all of the land that touches us.” True to his word, we have grown from the original 10 acres to roughly 128 acres spanning through mostly floodplain on campus property. I’ve been at SFA long enough to have known those original ten acres, and to see the expansion to the other properties. As we’ve grown, we’ve seen staff and students come and go. We

joke now that I am the senior staff member as Dr. Creech’s retirement from his faculty position and entrance into the world of staff happened only a few years ago. We’ve seen Greg Grant come and go, at least three times, and since his vacancy at the Pineywoods Native Plant Center, I took the opportunity to move my office from the “barn” at the Mast Arboretum to the plusher, and less dusty, accommodations in the Tucker House at the PNPC.

Earn CEU credits on page 43

This move coincided with the increased public awareness of the plight of native pollinators, and gardening not only to attract them, but to save their very existence. At the same time I was learning of the concept of Designed Plant Communities proposed by co-authors Thomas Rainer and Claudia West in their book “Planting in a Post Wild World.” This concept helps lend “legibility” and design credibility to mostly native plant landscapes. When trying to implement this design concept at the PNPC, it became quickly evident that it’s hard to find large quantities of locally sourced native plants. This concept used a tight planting plan often planting herbaceous material on one foot centers. There are companies that provide plant material appropriate for this intensive planting, but they are located in places like Pennsylvania or Minnesota. And we all know what happens to a lot of Yankees when transplanted to the not so comfortable conditions of our sweltering summers. And as ecologically diverse as East Texas is, many of our native treasures aren’t represented at all in the industry. I began photographing and collecting things on my husband’s family property to grow in the gardens (continued on page 38 )

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TNLAGREEN (continued from page 37) at the PNPC. My husband has many a photo of my backside either because I was bent over taking a plant picture, or collecting something to bring back for cultivation. I also had the good fortune to receive invitations, and permission to collect at other special places in the Pineywoods, and I’m unashamed to pull my car over on the side of the road to collect something from a roadside right-of-way that was soon to be mowed. My greenhouse technician, Jordan Cunningham, and I have backpacks on-the-ready for the next opportunity. We were recently given permission to access the Winston 8 Ranch, one of the most beautiful and diverse forests I’ve ever encountered. The landowner, Simon Winston, is dedicated to fire ecology, and the diversity he has accomplished with that particular management practice is impressive. And it’s less than 20 minutes from the SFA Gardens - right in our own backyard!

Earn CEU credits on page 43

We have increased the variety of natives in the gardens and have begun to share them with colleagues in the industry. Twenty years ago, native plants were kind of a tough sell, at least to the average gardener, but today’s gardeners are a different customer. They are more educated and passionate about what they are growing. Social Media has allowed for interaction between folks who normally wouldn’t otherwise have a chance to know each other. This forum allows for not only education about and identification of native plants, it helps spread the word on where to find them. And as we embrace the current generation of Millennials, and generations beyond, it’s important for us to listen to what they have to say, and give them what they are looking for, or we risk losing our next

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generation of customers. Often times that means giving them a beautiful plant that also serves a purpose. Will it attract pollinators, produce food or clothing or dye, can it be turned into some form of spirits, and then cure the hangover? Highly bred, beautiful nursery crops still have a huge place in our business, but there is an increasing desire for a little untamed beauty as well. Visitors to the SFA Gardens are a diverse crowd. From our friends in the nursery business, to Master Gardeners, to new homeowners and parents of small children, from Boomers and Millennials, to those of us stuck in between, and from granola to high heels, we attract them all. Still, there are many natives not refined enough to make it to the mainstream market, but there are some undiscovered things that have tremendous potential, especially in the arena of drought and heat tolerance, as well as humidity tolerance speaking specifically of our East Texas treasures. Jordan and I will continue to collect genetics from the Piney Woods, and will continue to grow, plant and make selections worthy of introduction into the trade. We’ll continue to grow the unsung heroes that may not be so pretty, but nonetheless serve an important role in our ecosystem. I will likely plant refined forms of panicle hydrangea in every landscape I design, but you can be sure it will likely be

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accompanied with blazing stars, sanguine coneflower and our own blue flowering East Texas Lobelia. Come visit us in Texas’ Oldest Town, and see what the wilds of our own backyard have to offer. On October 5, 2018 the Southern Garden History Society’s State Ambassador Program will present “300 Years of Plants on the Move in Texas.” Speakers include Dr. David Creech, Greg Grant, and keynote Dr. Bill Welch, and the event will be held at our fabulously restored Fredonia Hotel. Stick around for SFA Gardens’ Fabulous Fall Festival on Saturday, October 6th. This event celebrates “Texas Tough” plants for tough Texas gardens, and serves to educate, entertain and enlighten gardeners of all kinds. Come see us behind the pine anytime; we’d love to show you around.

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BUG S & FU ZZ

New Pests on the Rise BY DR. KEVIN ONG AND DR. ERFAN VAFAIE

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Dr. Kevin Ong (right) is Professor & Director of The Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M University Erfan Vafaie (left) is, Extension Program Specialist IPM, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M University

he same old annual pests, such as aphids, thrips, twospotted spider mites, and whiteflies, can be rather annoying and a constant uphill battle to manage. For the most part, however, we have a good handle of these pests and can maintain them below economic threshold levels. We run into trouble when an irregular pest, such as a quarantine international invasive pest or a pest from a neighboring state, show up on the operation. We can fail to identify the species, and as a result, fail to act quickly to keep the pest under check. In this article, we try to provide a list of some of the rising pests and how to recognize them.

Emerald Ash Borer First recognized as a pest in the US in the Detroit, Michigan area in 2002, this borer has resulted in mortality of over 99% of ash trees in many places it has established. They are a small beetle (1/2inch long and 1/8-inch wide), a shiny emerald color on the outside, and a shiny purple on the top side of the abdomen (seen when wings are spread apart). The female adults lay their eggs on the outside of the tree and once the immatures emerge, they bore under the bark and feed on the living tissue in a serpentine pattern. Larvae

Figure 1. Adult Emerald Ash Borer. Photo: Debbie Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org.

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spend their time in the tree during the winter and emerge as adults early April to May and June. Adult emergence holes appear like a “D” shape approximately 1/8-inch in diameter. Emerald Ash Borer was first detected in the state of Texas in 2016, in traps deployed in the northeast. Currently, the only county under quarantine for Emerald Ash Borer (as of the writing of this article) is Harrison County. However, Marion and Cass counties have recently also seen Emerald Ash Borer infestations and will most likely be under quarantine by the time this article is published. Tarrant county also has an unconfirmed sighting, which raises a red flag for one of the first metropolitan areas in Texas that may get hit with Emerald Ash Borer. In short, the quarantine regulates movement of any “restricted articles” out of the quarantine zone and is very important for reducing the risk of further movement of Emerald Ash Borer. More details on the quarantine and pest can be found below found at: http://sixleggedaggie.com/2018/07/24/ movement-of-invasives

(continued on page 40)

Figure 2. Emerald Ash Borer Exit Hole. Photo: Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org

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Figure 3. Emerald Ash borer larva and serpentine tunnel. Photo: Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Forestry, Bugwood.org

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TNLAGREEN (continued from page 39)

Asian Citrus Psyllid The Asian Citrus Psyllid, less than 1/8-in long, is an invasive plant bug (sucking insect pest) that was first detected in the continental USA in 1998 in Florida. Although only a moderate and manageable pest itself, it also vectors a virus known as citrus greening, Huanglongbing or yellow dragon disease, which makes the Asian

Citrus Psyllid a pest of great concern. Symptoms of citrus greening include: yellowing of shoots, decreased foliage, tip dieback, chlorosis, and small, green, lopsided sour fruit. Infection can result in tree mortality in as little as five years. Economic loss since the first introduction of citrus greening to Florida in 2005 is estimated at over $4.5 billion in lost citrus production and 8,200

Figure 5. Nymph Asian Citrus Psyllids. Photo: David Hall, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org

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Figure 4. Adult Asian Citrus Psyllid. Photo: Jeffrey W. Lotz, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Bugwood.org

PROTECT. BUILD. GROW.

Work done by Capoor et al. (1974) showed that after only 15 minutes of feeding on an infected tree, the Asian Citrus Psyllid has a chance to pass the disease to an uninfected tree. After 1 hour of feeding on an infected tree, the Asian Citrus Psyllid has a 100% chance of infecting a clean tree. Additionally, it is thought that adult psyllids can pass the disease directly to their offspring, resulting in even greater transmission of the disease. Quarantine zones have included southern Texas counties of Hidalgo, Willacy, and Cameron. More recent quarantine counties include Fort Bend, Harris, and Montgomery.

Asian Gypsy Moth Although not (yet) known to occur in the USA, the USDA has determined this pest could wreak havoc if it establishes here – so recognizing, reporting, and eliminating any potential infestations very early 40

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Figure 6. European and Asian Gypsy Moth Adult. Photo: USDA APHIS PPQ, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org

Figure 7. Asian Gypsy Moth Caterpillar Forms. Photo: USDA APHIS PPQ Oxford, North Carolina, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org

will do everyone a great service. First identified in 1991 in West Coast Canada on shipping containers, the population was quickly eradicated before spreading. Ever since then until 2014, the Asian Gypsy Moth has been intercepted and eradicated on at least 20 occasions! Not unlike other caterpillars, the larvae are defoliators, chewing leaves of a wide host range including larch, oak, poplar, alder, willow, and some evergreens. Additionally, each egg mass can contain anywhere from 100 to over 1,000 eggs. The European Gypsy Moth, another invasive caterpillar, already defoliate approximately 700,000 acres of forest and millions of dollars of damage each year. Establishment of the Asian Gypsy Moth is anticipated to result in faster spread, greater damage, and wider host range.

Cactus Moth Ever since their introduction to Florida Keys in 1989, the moth larvae have been a major threat to the prickly pear cacti, Opuntia spp., of North America. S E P T E M B E R /O C TO B E R 2 0 1 8

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According to a document from USDA APHIS, adult moths have a wingspan of approximately 0.86 – 1.4 inches and the females lay eggs in “stick” formation made up of 70 – 90 eggs. After approximately 30 days, larvae emerge from the eggs and feed primarily on the outside on the cactus, before entering into the cactus pad. Feeding from the cactus moth caterpillars can result in mortality of the entire plant. The cactus moth has since moved westward into Louisiana. The USDA created an action plan to eradicate the cactus moth from 11 parishes in Louisiana to prevent movement of the cactus moth into Texas, Arizona, and the country of Mexico. The larvae are rather distinct, especially when seen on prickly pear cacti. If you see them, collect evidence (photo/contained specimen), let us know, and destroy the plant to prevent the larvae from developing into adults and infesting new plant materials.

Figure 8. Adult cactus moth. Photo: Ignacio Baez, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org

Figure 9. Cactus moth eggs. Photo: Ignacio Baez, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org

Redbay Ambrosia Beetle Anyone working a nursery is no stranger to ambrosia beetles. Typically, ambrosia beetles infest trees that are already dead or stressed and are merely secondary to a tree’s decline. Ambrosia beetles have a special relationship with a group of fungi known as ambrosia fungi. When the beetle infests a tree, it carries the fungi inside with it. The spread and growth of the ambrosia fungi provides the ambrosia beetle with the nutritional resources it needs to grow and develop. The Redbay Ambrosia Beetle is a bit of an exception to typical ambrosia beetles, in that it can attack perfectly healthy trees. First detected in Georgia in 2002, the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle carries a unique fungus that can result in tree mortality in weeks to months. Symptoms caused by infestation of Redbay Ambrosia Beetle and subsequent colonization of the fungus

Figure 10. Cactus moth larvae. Photo: Ignacio Baez, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org

Figure 11. Redbay ambrosia beetle adult. Photo: Michael C. Thomas, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Bugwood.org

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TNLAGREEN (continued from page 41)

Figure 12. Adult Asian longhorn beetle. Photo: Donald Duerr, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Figure 13. Red-headed Flea Beetle adult. Photo: Brian Kunkel, University of Delaware, Bugwood.org

are collectively referred to as laurel wilt. The Redbay Ambrosia Beetle is currently known to infest redbay, sassafras, pondspice, pondberry, camphor, and potentially more.

Asian Longhorn Beetle A wood borer that can result in mortality of many hardwoods, such as maple, boxelder, willow, and elm, was introduced through Brooklyn, NY in 1996. Adults are ¾-in to 1-½-in long, shiny black with white spots on the body and white stripes on the antennae. Antennae are about 1.5 – 2x longer than its body (hence the “longhorn”). According to USDA APHIS, symptoms of infestation include sawdust accumulating at the base of the tree, pencil-sized perfectly round exit holes, and yellowed/dropped leaves at the wrong time of the year. Fortunately, no signs of Asian Longhorn Beetles have been seen in Texas yet, and the beetle has already been successfully eradicated from several states, including Illinois, New Jersey,

Figure 14. Red-headed flea beetle damage. Photo: Brian Kunkel, University of Delaware, Bugwood.org and Manhattan, and eradication efforts are continuing in several areas of New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio. Signs or symptoms of infestation should be reported immediately online or via phone to USDA APHIS to prevent spread at 1-866-702-9938.

Red-Headed Flea Beetle Flea beetles are not new to the US, and neither are the Red-headed Flea Beetles. In most recent years, however, increasing damage on ornamentals has become of concern to the industry.

R ESOURCES For additional resources and links related to this article, go to:

http://sixleggedaggie.com/2018/07/24/movementof-invasives

Danny Lauderdale from North Carolina Cooperative Extension describes the adults as being 1/10 to ¼-in long, shiny black with a red head. The flea beetle larvae are found in the soil feeding on the plant roots; although not a major source of damage at this stage, controlling them in the larval stage will prevent the adults from causing defoliation later on. Flea beetle adult damage resembles a small buckshot being fired at the leaves, with several small holes all over. Seeing as how Texas is considered a part of its native range, you may already be dealing with infestations of the Redheaded Flea Beetle. Damage by the Red-headed Flea Beetles or other flea beetles should be prevented early in the season by controlling larvae in the pots. Adults migrating into the crop may also present a source of infestation, so periodic treatment for adults may also be necessary. Let us know if you think you have Red-headed Flea Beetle and whether they are a major source of damage at your operation – this would be useful information to help out our growers across the state. Go to http:// sixleggedaggie.com/2018/07/24/ movement-of-invasives for related publications on control and management of this particular pest.

Conclusion Being a grower can feel like a thankless job, especially with all of the challenges in finding reliable labor, praying for good weather, and fighting plant diseases and common insects. Taking time to become familiar with some of the new invasives can go a long way to prevent large crop loss, prevent spread, and help safeguard the green industry in Texas. The above list is a start but certainly not comprehensive. Some honorable mentions that I could not include in the article above include the Sirex Woodwasp, the Giant African Land Snail, and the New Guinea Flatworm. Whenever in doubt, don’t hesitate to contact us for help in identification.

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CE U Q U IZ Questions are worth 10 points each; must score a 70 or higher to gain 1 CEU towards your TNLA Certification. We encourage you to return the completed quiz by December 31, 2018. Generously sponsored by E. Curtis Tabor, TMCNP

1. According to the article Current and

2. According to the article Current and

5. According to the article Plants with

Potential Devastating Pests, which of the following pests was first found in shipping containers in Canada? a) Cactus Moth b) Asian Gypsy Moth c) Asian Citrus Psyllid d) Asian Longhorn Beetle

Potential Devastating Pests, which of the following pests is described to lay eggs in a “stick” formation? a) Cactus Moth b) Asian Gypsy Moth c) Asian Citrus Psyllid d) Asian Longhorn Beetle

6. According to the article Plants

9. According to the article Discovering

Potentials: Yangmei, what is Yangmei’s cousin, which is native here in Texas? a) Dogwood b) Hackberry c) Wax myrtle d) Redbay

the Wilds of our Own Backyard, what particular management practice was referenced in the article that boosted the diversity of Winston 8 Ranch? a) Seeding b) Native Flower Harvesting c) Invasive Species Removal d) Fire Ecology

10. According to the article Discovering the

Wilds of our Own Backyard, why are today’s gardeners different customers that we have seen before? a) They are less educated and less passionate about gardening and have had little interaction which gardeners from the past. b) They are more educated and passionate about gardening and have easier interaction between folks who normally wouldn’t otherwise because of social media. c) They prefer to stay out of the heat and in the house. d) They are eager find new and easier ways to garden at home.

8. According to the article Discovering the

4. According to the article Current and

Potential Devastating Pests, which of the following pests has a 99% kill record on its host trees and has unconfirmed sightings in Tarrant County? a) Emerald Ash Borer b) Asian Gypsy Moth c) Redbay Ambrosia Beetle d) Asian Citrus Psyllid

with Potentials: Yangmei, Yanmei is considered dioecious. Evaluate the following statement, “Dioecious plants need a male and female plant to fruit.” a) True b) False

7. According to the article Plants with

3. According to the article Current and

Potential Devastating Pests, which of the following pests has caused over $4 billion in loss and has caused the loss of over 8,000 jobs? a) Emerald Ash Borer b) Asian Gypsy Moth c) Redbay Ambrosia Beetle d) Asian Citrus Psyllid

Potentials: Yangmei, which popular plant group would this plant add to? a) Edible Landscaping b) Xeriscape Landscaping c) Shade Gardens d) Wetland Gardens

Wilds of our Own Backyard, what should we “embrace” in today’s market, because the market is becoming dominated by them? a) Native Plants b) Current generation of Millennials and Generations Beyond c) Baby Boomers d) Adapted Plants

Return the Completed Quiz to: James Theiss | Texas Nursery & Landscape Association | 7730 South IH-35 | Austin, TX 78745 Email: james@tnlaonline.org | Fax: 512.280.3012 NAME: ________________________________________________________

CERTIFICATION TYPE:

TCNP

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COMPANY: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ PHONE: __________________________________ EMAIL: ___________________________________________________________________________

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TNLAGREEN

Welcome!

N E W ME MB E R S

TNLA would like to welcome its new members. If you would like to become a member, or if you have any questions or concerns about your current membership, please contact us at 800.880.0343. Visit www.tnlaonline.org to learn about the benefits of becoming a part of TNLA.

REGION 1

REGION 2

REGION 6

OUT OF STATE

Jeff Hinkle PO Box 111482 Carrollton, TX 75011 www.mowcarrollton.com

Midland Natives Katie Doyen 2108 Western Midland, TX 79705

Anamese Garden & Home Nancy LaMotte 18080 LaMotte Rd. Welsh, LA 70591 www.anamese.com

REGION 7

CST Worldwide Edward Burton 1400 Dragon St. Dallas, TX 75207 www.cstworldwide.com

Jennifer Herrera Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service 28339 Doane Rd. Harlingen, TX 78552

Big John Manufacturing, Inc. Melissa Choate PO Box 960 Heber Springs, AR 725543 www.big-john.com

Victor Banuelos San Antonio River Authority 100 E Guenther St. San Antonio, TX 78204

Educator

Courtney Veselka Flatonia ISD 4939 Kainer Rd. Schulenburg, TX 78956

Landscape Artist Design Service Lynne Carpenter 4209 Village Green Dr Irving, TX 75038 MowCarrollton.com

Nathan Garcia San Antonio River Authority 100 E Guenther St. San Antonio, TX 78204

Grower - Individual

Government

Lionel Garza San Antonio River Authority 100 E Guenther St. San Antonio, TX 78204 Edward Lopez San Antonio River Authority 100 E Guenther St. San Antonio, TX 78204 Alfred Nerio San Antonio River Authority 100 E Guenther St. San Antonio, TX 78204 Samuel Ramos San Antonio River Authority 100 E Guenther St. San Antonio, TX 78204 Kendall County Daniel Vann San Antonio River Authority 100 E Guenther St. San Antonio, TX 78204 Daniel Vetter Kendall County 201 E. San Antonio Boerne, TX 78006

Landscape

Clarks Landscaping, Inc. Stewart Clark PO Box 311881 New Braunfels, TX 78131 www.clarkslandscaping.us

Student

Shennandoah Goodson Alamo College District 9827 Autumn Valley Converse, TX 78109

Retail – Individual Melanie Nations Friendly Natives 1107 N Llano St. Fredericksburg, TX 78624

Stormie Key Norman E. Borlaug’s Institute for Plant Genomics and Biotechnology 498 Olsen Blvd, TAMU 2123 College Station, TX 77843

Landscape

Day Landscape Design Kristin Baker 22726 Walden Way Tomball, TX 77375 www.daylandscapedesign.com

Non-Profit

Texas Discovery Gardens Roger Sanderson PO Box 152537 Dallas, TX 75315 www.texasdiscoverygardens.org

Austin Landscaping Claire Bland 10910 Rampart St. Houston, TX 77096 www.austinlandscaping.net

Student

Gail Gannon North Central Texas College 17515 Spyglass Circle Dallas, TX 75287

Supplier

Vanguard Truck Center Tony Castellon 5216 N. McCarty Dr. Houston, TX 77013 www.vanguardtrucks.com/houstontx/ Tree Valley Nursery Manuel Diaz 11906 Boudreaux Rd. Tomball, TX 77375 www.treevalleynursery.com

Supplier

FIS Global Payments Debra Kline 16633 Dallas Parkway Addison, TX 75001 www.fisglobal.com

REGION 5 Government

Trace Worthy City of Grapevine 501 Shady Brook Dr. Grapevine, TX 76051

REGION 3 Grower

Bella Vista Orchard and Tree Farm Mark Story 16807 CR 363 Winona, TX 75792

Monica Benavides City of Denton 1100 South Mayhill Rd. Denton, TX 76208 Lone Star Legacy James Bass 1435 Holly Ridge Dr. Keller, TX 76248

REGION 4 Landscape

Flower Child Plants Cynthia Koogler 9540 Garland Rd., Ste 381-393 Dallas, TX 75218 www.flowerchildplants.com

Student

Stephanie Schmitz Tarrant County Community College 10817 Owl Creek St. Fort Worth, TX 76179 Allyson Dunnihoo Tarleton State University 5410 Pineridge Dr. Arlington, TX 76016

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Grower

Supplier

Government

REGION 8 Educator

Austin Can Academy Joan Anderson, TCNP 2162 County Road 318 Lexington, TX 78947

Dauer Manufacturing Kino Obeso 10100 NW 116th Way #14 Medley, FL 33178 www.dauermanufacturing.com RainSoil Trent Whatcott 6960 West Warm Springs Rd., Ste 110 Las Vegas, NV 89113 www.rainsoil.com

Government

Kate Whitney Texas A&M AgriLife Extension 3151 SE Inner Loop, Ste. A Georgetown, TX 78626

Grower

Brantley Farms Pete Dunnington 1460 Birdsong Rd. Dawson, GA 39842 www.brantleyfarmsinc.com

Landscape

Woodsman Co. Judi Dezo PO Box 1366 Taylor, TX 76574 www.texastreetrimmers.com

Sebastian River Farms Jessica Lummus 5955 82nd Ave Vero Beach, FL 32966 www.sebastianriverfarms.com

Landscape – Individual Susan Harding Greenscapes By Sue 363 Waters Edge Cove Dripping Springs, TX 78620 www.greensue.com

Retail

Gaddy’s Feed, Hardware & Garden Kim Gaddy 403 FM 685 Pflugerville, TX 78660 www.gaddys.com

Retail – Individual Christopher Cessner Home Depot #514 210 Cliff Circle Marble Falls, TX 78654

Annette Yeruski 1600 S Lakeline Blvd., Apt 1321 Cedar Park, TX 78613

T E X A S N U R S E RY & L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

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TNLAGREEN

CAL ENDA R O F E V E NT S

September September 11 TNLA Region I & Region VIII Joint Gathering at the Texas Disposal Systems Exotic Game Ranch and Pavilion Buda, TX for the Sustainable Soil & Water Management Workshop 3:00pm - 7:00pm

September 11 TNLA Region II Meeting at Houston Food Bank, in Houston, TX 5:45pm - 9:00pm

September 18 TNLA Region V Meeting at Walsh Ranch from 6:00 PM - 8:00PM in Fort Worth, TX

October October 5 Texas A&M AgriLife Certified Arborist Preparation Course from 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM in Robstown, TX

October 9 TNLA Region II - General Meeting New Earth, Inc. – Katy, TX from 6:00 PM - 8:00PM

October 12 Texas A&M AgriLife Certified Arborist Preparation Course from 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM in Robstown, TX

October 16 TNLA Region V Meeting at Silver Creek Materials from 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM in Fort Worth TX

October 19 Texas A&M AgriLife Certified Arborist Preparation Course from 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM in Robstown, TX October 26 Texas A&M AgriLife Certified Arborist Preparation Course from 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM in Robstown, TX

To see the most up to date event information please visit the Events Calendar on tnlaonline.org!

WAT E R M A N A G E M E N T S O L U T I O N S

PRODUCT GUIDE

Includes all you need for the ultimate water management systems: Driplines, Valves, Sprinklers, Controllers, Injectors, Sensors, Tubing and much more. APOLLO DISC FILTER Reaching for the Stars

mini-wobbler

Greenhouse & Nursery Systems • For misting, humidifying, fogging and sprinkling

Bridgeless Micro Sprinkler

(100 micron fog)

• Bridgeless design - no dripping • Flat trajectory • High distribution uniformity

Container Systems Self-flushing

• For ponds, canals and rivers • 50 to 3,500 GPM and up • Automatic and pre-assembled • Compact - fits in 14’ x 6’ area or less • Quick backflush

Twist Weight Assemblies • On/Off feature • Highly versatile

Spray Stakes

• Unique oval pattern • Multiple flow rates

PC and non PC

3804-D Woodbury Drive • Austin, TX 78704 www.submatic-usa.com 512.440.7744 • Fax 512.440.7793

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TNLAGREEN

A DV E RT I SE R S INDE X

Since 1945

For media kit and advertising information, email advertising@tnlaonline.org

for GROWERS, LANDSCAPERS & GARDEN CENTERS

ur o Y t o G We’vetilizer ! Fer

Athens Tree Farm 8 www.athenstreefarm.com

New Earth 30 www.newearthcompost.com

Granite Trucking 45 www.granitetrucking.com

OHP, Inc. 47 www.ohp.com

Groundworks Texas 48 www.datepalm.com

Spring Meadow Nursery 32 www.springmeadownursery.com

Horizon Irrigation 2 www.horizononline.com

Submatic Technologies 45 www.submatic-usa.com

Hotchkiss Insurance 40 www.hiallc.com

Texas Mutual 34 www.texasmutual.com

Jemasco, Inc. 4 www.jemasco.com

Tifsport 36 www.tifsport.com

Living Earth 36 www.livingearth.net

United Ag and Turf 23 www.unitedagandturf.com

Netafim 32 www.netafimusa.com

Vital Earth Resources 46 www.vitalearth.com

Earth Safe Organic (19 items)

Fertilizer Components (Huge Selection)

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

Root Activator

(Organic - All Natural)

Vitazyme

(Bio-Stimulant)

Plant Specific Fertilizers Custom Fertilizers Micro-Nutrient Packages Grower Mixes Vital Earth Soils Custom Mixes Available Through Your Favorite Distributor 706 E. Broadway • P.O. Box 1148 Gladewater, TX 75647 903•845•2163 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56 C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

New TNLA Certified Professionals TCNP

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

Travis Ward - OakStreet Wholesale Nursery LLC

C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

TMCNP

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

C : 90 : 33 : 98 | R:0G:148 G:104B:30 B:56 0 MM:50 YY :98 K :K0: 26 | R:247

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

Jennifer Good - Calloway’s Nursery Laurie Holtzclaw - Calloway’s Nursery

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

0 MM:50 YY :98 K :K0: 26 | R:247 C : 90 : 33 : 98 | R:0G:148 G:104B:30 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

0 MM:50 YY :98 K :K0: 26 | R:247 C : 90 : 33 : 98 | R:0G:148 G:104B:30 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

C :: 90 0 MM:50 YY :98 K :K0: 26 | R:247 C : 33 : 98 | R:0G:148 G:104B:30 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

C : 90 : 33 : 98 | R:0G:148 G:104B:30 B:56 0 MM:50 YY :98 K :K0: 26 | R:247

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

1•800•245•7645 www.carlpool.com

A Division of Vital Earth Resources, Inc.

M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

46

Thank You Everyone who joined TNLA at the 2018 Nursery/Landscape EXPO. We can’t wait to see everyone next year in San Antonio. Mark your calendars for the 2019 Nursery/Landscape EXPO August 8-10, 2019!

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#ohpmiticides @OHPSolutions ohp.com (800) 356-4647

Notavo INSECTICIDES FUNGICIDES MITICIDES PGRS HERBICIDES

Multiple Modes of Action (MOA) Eggs through adults Spider mites, Broad mites, Eriophyid mites ohp.com

(part of OHP’s biosolutions line) © 2018 OHP, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Profile for TNLA GREEN Magazine

TNLA Green September/October 2018  

TNLA Green September/October 2018