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Members Build A Stronger Green Industry START ING ON PAG E 6

Update On Crapemyrtle Bark Scale PAGE 21

Is There Life After Live Oaks? PAGE 23

Thrown Into The Box With Boxwood Blight PAGE 25

New Members page 28 Calendar of Events page 29

Official Publication of the


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6 TNLA Members Continue To Build A Stronger Green Industry In The Lone Star State 2017-2018 was a great year for the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association. Check out our Annual Year in Review in this article!

14 The Gardens at Texas A&M University

This new green space at Texas A&M University is truly amazing! TNLA is proud to be a partner in this new project.

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GreenVi$ion

by Drs. Mengmeng Gu and Jim Robbins Update On Crapemyrtle Bark Scale

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Notes from SFA Gardens

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Bugs & Fuzz by Dr. Kevin Ong and Dr. Erfan Vafaie Thrown Into The Box With Boxwood Blight

by Dr. Dave Creech

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Is There Life After Live Oaks?

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New Members

New Certified Professionals Calendar of Events Classified Ads Advertiser Index

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7730 South IH-35 | Austin, TX 78745-6698 | (512) 280-5182 or (800) 880-0343 fax: (512) 280-3012 | email: info@tnlaonline.org | www.tnlaonline.org M A Y/ J U N E 2 0 1 8

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EST. 1984                             

JEMASCO, INC Premium Bark & Soil Products

Service with a Smile

Family Owned and Operated. Blessed by the grace of God. www.jemasco.com | 903-784-3014


The official publication of the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association May/June | Vol. 20 No. 3 DIRECTORS

Chairman of the Board. . . . Chairman-Elect. . . . Immediate Past Chairman. . . . President. . . .

Bill Carson, Austin Todd Kinney, TMCNP, Donna Billy Long, TCLP, San Antonio Amy Graham, Austin

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Region I. . . . Region II. . . . Region III. . . . Region IV. . . . Region V. . . . Region VI. . . . Region VII. . . . Region VIII . . . Supplier Director. . . . Grower Director. . . . Landscape Director. . . . Retail Director. . . . Director At-Large. . . . Director At-Large. . . . Director At-Large. . . .

Kevin Grossberndt, San Antionio Jay Williams, League City Herman Ray Vess, TMCNP, Edgewood Jason Craven, Dallas Jackie Smith, Santo Steven Akers, Slaton Gerry Bower, Weslaco Jared Pyka, Austin Tim Little, Dallas Kevin Norris, Coppell Scotty Rigsby, TCLP, Midlothian Joshua Bracken, TMCNP, Dallas Adrian Thomas Muehlstein, TMCNP, Carrollton Rachelle Kemp, TCLP, TMCNP, Waco Dan Green, TCLP, San Antonio

A Video Message from Amy Graham, TNLA President

TNL A STAFF President/CEO. . . . Director of Finance. . . . Accounting Assistant. . . . Director, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs. . . . Director, Industry Education and Certifications. . . . Administrative Assistant, Strategic Initiatives. . . . Director, TNLA & EXPO Marketing/ Communications . . . Director, Expo Exhibits and Membership. . . . Business Development/Sales Executive. . . . Administrative Assistant, EXPO . . . Office Operations Assistant. . . . Region Field Manager. . . . Communications Manager. . . .

Amy Graham Cheryl Staritz Aimee Luna Jeff Stokes James Theiss, TCLP, TCWSP, Certified Arborist Debra Allen Sarah Riggins ,CEM Amy Prenger, CEM Mike Yelverton , TCNP & TCWSP Trevor Peevey Nancy E. Sollohub Nathan Flint Molly Wallace

MI SSIO N STAT E ME N T

MAGAZINE STAFF

Editor. . . . Molly Wallace Graphic Designer. . . . Marie Leonard

The Texas Nursery & Landscape Association’s mission is to enhance members’ business success through legislative/ regulatory advocacy, education, networking, and promotion of professionalism.

TNLA Green magazine is a member service of the Texas Nursery & Landscape Association, and is published bi-monthly. Advertising information is available from TNLA, 7730 South IH 35, Austin, Texas 78745, online at www.tnlaonline.org, or by calling (800) 880-0343. TNLA office hours are weekdays, 8:30AM - 4:30PM CST. © 2018 Texas Nursery & Landscape Association

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TNLA Members Continue To Build A Stronger Green Industry In The Lone Star State

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FOR THE LAST 83 YEARS, THE TEXAS NURSERY & LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION (TNLA) HAS HELPED MEMBERS DO BUSINESS BETTER. LAST YEAR WAS NO DIFFERENT. FROM CULTIVATING LEGISLATIVE ENGAGEMENT TO REACHING NEW ALLIES WITHIN THE INDUSTRY TO UTILIZING NEW TECHNOLOGIES, TNLA CONTINUES TO EXPAND ITS OFFERINGS AND HELP BUSINESSES AND INDIVIDUALS GROW.

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his year, TNLA took on leadership roles at the Local, State and National levels. From participating at the National Workforce Advisory Summit and Irrigation Association Government Affairs Committee to advising the Natural Learning Environments State leadership and the Water Advisory Council to working with schools and colleges locally, TNLA has continued to lead the Green Industry in and out of Texas.

and success of programming. TNLA’s 2018 Strategic Partners – Landmark Nurseries, Inc., Southwest Wholesale Nursery, Creekside Nursery, Living Earth, Tree Town USA and​Texas Green Industry Safety Group – help raise the bar for the entire Industry by supporting TNLA’s programs and initiatives.

Cultivate Legislative Engagement TNLA Member companies faced significant legislative challenges over the last year. Labor shortages, proposed regulatory measures an d new laws gave Members the opportunity to be active in the legislative process. More than ever before, TNLA Members heeded the call to action.

It is important to acknowledge TNLA does not work alone to keep the Green Industry strong. Partnerships with government agencies, academic institutions, non-profit organizations, individuals and companies are all crucial to the development

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TNLAGREEN

(continued from page 7) From calling and emailing their representatives to donating to the TNLA Political Action Committee, Members were involved in shaping policy decisions. For the last two years, TNLA Members have reached out to their representatives asking for a permanent solution to the H2-B Guest Worker Visa shortage. Although that call has not yet been permanently answered, for the second year in a row representatives have heard the industry and given the Department of Homeland Security the ability to issue additional visas. Last year, TNLA bought in to VoterVoice software and set up TNLA’s online Legislative Action Center helping the Association alert Members

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to advocacy opportunities and making it easier for individuals and companies to create meaningful dialogue with representatives all with a quick click of a button. This new online and mobile friendly resource has already begun making an impact and we are excited to help our Members take hold of the legislative process. TNLA looks forward to continuing to work closely with legislators, regulators and Members to ensure the growth the Green Industry, and that it is able to do business responsibly and professionally in our State.

TNLA Leads in Building a Stronger Workforce Throughout the year TNLA built working relationships with new industry allies and found together we can grow a stronger industry for tomorrow.

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One of the greatest challenges facing the Green Industry is the ability of businesses to hire and retain highquality employees. TNLA has begun reaching out to new partners to help them understand and explore the potential of career opportunities in the Green Industry. TNLA and its Members were able to connect with high schools across the State, more than 250 students became Certified Professionals. Over 20 FFA programs participated in a Landscape Challenge & Skillathon where teams had the opportunity to use their skills to compete for $22,000 in scholarship funding during the San Antonio Rodeo. Several TNLA Member companies offered these students internships after seeing their ambition, drive and talent.

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TNLAGREEN

(continued from page 9) By continuing to work with educators throughout the state both at the high school, community college and university levels, TNLA developed certification modules to provide educational curricula that will assist in graduating students interested in horticulture and help to increase the professional workforce of the Green Industry. TNLA also continued to partner with the Texas Department of Justice to offer Certification programs as a part of the curriculum within State facilities. The program helps to educate approximately 200 inmates every year and nearly 100 of those students go on to become TNLA Certified Professionals. TNLA is working with the program managers, to ensure the resumes of these newly Certified Professionals are available for TNLA Member companies to find on TNLA JobLink after their release. Helping the industry retain outstanding talent is also important

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to the Association and vital for Members. Working with women in the Texas Green Industry, TNLA began offering several outlets for women to network and develop professional support systems with their peers. The Women in Horticulture Event at the Nursery/Landscape EXPO had recordbreaking attendance. The Association believes this initiative is an important effort in supporting women growing successful careers and businesses in the Texas Green Industry. Members and job-seeking professionals more than ever before utilized TNLA’s online JobLink to post resumes and position descriptions offering a winning solution for both the job-seeker and employer to find the perfect fit to add to their network.

Innovating How TNLA and its Members do Business With the high speed and rapid development of technology, TNLA has taken action to utilize new digital trends to help Members do business

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even faster and more efficiently through our member products and services. There has never been a better time for Members to join TNLA. The goal is to help members stay relevant in their business by learning about, using or observing new trends that will enhance the way you do business by incorporating new technology into your daily business practices. This year, the Association has taken the phrase “high tech, high touch,” to heart. From digitizing the Best of Texas Landscape Guide so Members can access the information online and on their mobile devices through an app to organizing Hurricane Harvey assistance efforts online, TNLA truly began a new digital era. We are also changing the way we conduct meetings offering video conferences for the TNLA Board of Directors and Committee meetings in order to provide live face-to-face connections while at a distance. This past year TNLA was able to connect

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office@athenstreefarm.com


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(continued from page 11) with more Members across the State by live streaming the TNLA Annual Business Meeting directly from mobile devices and office computers. We will also continue to provide Members the 24/7 opportunity to source a variety of educational materials online through webinars, watch video interviews from a panel of the industry’s leading experts, experience events in real time through live streams and review the videos of EXPO’s Keynote Presentations. In addition, TNLA continues to offer a mobile app for the annual Nursery/ Landscape EXPO to digitize the once printed EXPO program. TNLA continues to bring Members and their employees up-to-the minute information through weekly newsletters, targeted emails, social media, software

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platforms and more. This year, TNLA’s online reach broke records with website traffic, social media impressions and more. The Association is excited about the new audiences it is able to engage with online. All of these efforts serve the mission of TNLA to help its Members do business better. Strong relationships with the legislature help the Association and its Members protect their business interests. Engaging new groups in the Texas Green Industry helps ensure that Members businesses will have access to the best and the brightest employees for years to come. Expanding digital engagement and audiences means that our Association and its Member’s message is heard and is wellrecognized and respected across the State of Texas and the United States.

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The future is bright due to our hardworking Members. The Association has big plans for the coming year, be sure to stay on the lookout as we continue to roll out new TNLA innovations to help Members do business better. These are the highlights of last year, it doesn’t begin to talk about the Nursery/ Landscape EXPO, Texas Excellence in Landscaping Awards, our many Region activities, five IndustryRecognized Certifications, etc. The Board of Directors and TNLA Staff are committed to ensuring that Members can find the essential resources and tools for success readily available through The Association. We’re excited to get to work for you and your business. Please don’t hesitate to reach out with ideas or to ask for help, we’re here for you!

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The Gardens at Texas A&M University TNLA IS PROUD TO BE A PART OF THE GARDENS AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, BY SPONSORING THE TNLA OUTDOOR CLASSROOM! THE GARDENS WILL OPEN TO THE PUBLIC THIS JUNE, BE SURE TO STOP BY ON YOUR NEXT VISIT TO TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY!

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he Gardens at Texas A&M University will be a 40acre teaching garden and greenspace on the campus of Texas A&M University. The primary goals of the space are to help Texas A&M University expand research and outreach efforts and provide invaluable outdoor space for students, staff, faculty and campus guests. Joseph Johnson has been named Gardens and Program Manager for The Gardens at Texas A&M University. He was formerly the director of horticulture at Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in Orange, Texas. So far, he has been responsible for overseeing the design and construction in addition to assisting with fundraising efforts. Once the space opens, he will oversee the maintenance and coordinate the interns, volunteers and contractors,

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assist with budgeting and continue with fundraising efforts. Johnson has been a longtime supporter and partner of TNLA. He has worked with a number of stakeholders to bring the project to fruition. “The Gardens will open the arms of A&M to all of Texas and beyond,” said Dr. Mark Hussey, vice chancellor and dean for agriculture and life sciences at Texas A&M in an article from AgriLife Today. “We have long been a leader in agriculture, from award-winning faculty to globally recognized research. So, we are very excited for visitors to see our scientifically proven practices come to life in The Gardens. The Gardens will provide hands-on access to transformational learning experiences in areas of water conservation, nutrition, and environmental sustainability, to name a few.”

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Construction on the project began in 2015. The Leach Teaching Gardens will be the first part of the space to open. It will serve as Texas’ leading teaching and demonstration garden. The seven-acre outdoor learning environment includes a pavilion sponsored by TNLA, and themed gardens including a rain garden, food and fiber field, vegetable beds, butterfly and bee garden, and EarthKind® plantings. The space will allow Texas A&M partners to showcase their latest discoveries, technologies and much, much more. Several professors have already promised that all of their classes will utilize The Gardens in their coursework. The first areas visitors will encounter are the Edna Fuchs Memorial Rose Bed and the Leach Vineyard. Surrounding the vineyard, the Mexican Heritage Garden and the

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German and Czech Heritage Gardens, which are dedicated to preserving cultures that have influenced Texas agriculture. “These gardens will mimic much of the horticulture, architecture and landscape of the cultures that Texas was founded upon,” said Johnson, “These intimate spaces are also perfect for small weddings and receptions.” Additionally, two main pathways lead visitors into the green space. One will provide a direct path to the Pavilion and the Pavilion Terrace. A shady getaway for visitors, the octagon-shaped building will hold up to 120 people and can be used as an open-air venue or an indoor, climatecontrolled space. It will be ideal for cooking demonstrations, banquets or class lectures. The space is surrounded

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by fresh herbs and an Aggie-centric maroon and white garden. “This pavilion will be a memorable piece of architecture on Texas A&M’s campus,” Johnson said. “Just as Rudder Tower is recognized by the way it looks, one day students and visitors alike will be able to identify this pavilion.” The 40-acre master plan also includes a feed-the-world-themed courtyard that pays homage to the late Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Father of the Green Revolution, Dr. Norman E. Borlaug. “Similar to Dr. Borlaug’s philosophy, our goal with The Gardens is to share life-changing information and resources with the community at-large,” said Dr. Doug Welsh, retired professor and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension horticulturist emeritus, who has coordinated the

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efforts from the early concepts to the final design, to construction implementation. Although Phase I is nearing completion, like any project it has run into a few challenges. Johnson says the biggest challenges so far have been keeping on schedule and on budget. Like any design/build project, there are a number of factors – like weather, material availability and changes – that can impact the progress of crews. The space is set to open to the public on June 17, 2018 The primary maintenance for The Gardens will be provided by the university’s contracted grounds maintenance group, SSC Services for Education – Grounds. However, volunteers and student interns will be

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(continued from page 15) a vital to the success and growth of the space. Many individuals and groups will have opportunities to develop the space while sharing knowledge and experiences. Future phases of The Gardens project will include various educational gardens and outdoor learning laboratories, a children’s garden, and a re-creation of The Grove amphitheater to host performing arts productions, films, celebrations and social events. Meandering through the site, it’s clear to see that this space will quickly become a favorite spot on campus. The Gardens will have plenty of spaces and sanctuaries where visitors can host gatherings and students will find plenty of peaceful spots to study. In one article on the space, Laura Simmons said, “One can’t help but wonder what new tradition will be born at the Century Oak II, which will be planted to continue the legacy of the original Century Tree on main campus.”

PHASE I

A. B. C. D.

22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

The Pavilion The Event Lawn White Creek Restoration and Bridges Howdy Plaza

LEACH TEACHING GARDENS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

Rose Bed Mexican Heritage Garden Wine Grape Vineyard German and Czech Heritage Garden Butterfly and Bee Garden Grand Arbor Texas Superstar® Garden Homestead Herb Garden Century Oak II Citrus Grove Pavilion Terrace Pavilion Farmer's Market Vegetable Garden Bird Garden Overlook Tree Park Pecan Bottom Maroon and White Garden Food and Fiber Fields

The Gardens will serve as a learning facility that connects future horticulturalists with fun, real-world experience. The Gardens will be a place where Texas A&M students grow in knowledge and understanding, in community and caring, and in strength and inspiration. TNLA is proud to be a part of supporting of this wonderful project that will help inspire future generations of students to be a part of the Texas Green Industry.

Student Landscape Demonstration Fruit Orchard Outdoor Classroom Rain Garden Earth-Kind® Garden Farm Road Pavilion Plaza Garden Walk Kitchen Garden

FUTURE PHASES

E. The Grove Amphitheater F. The Boardwalk G. Wildflower Meadows H. Post Oak Savannah I. Turfgrass Display J. Great Lawn K. Floral Garden L. Children’s Garden M. Crape Myrtle Allee N. Future Themed Garden O. Garden Learning Center P. Rose Garden Q. Grand Steps To see the full names of the gardens or a list of donors, visit gardens.tamu.edu.

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The Gardens are located at the corner of Horticulture and Discovery Drive on the West Campus of Texas A&M University. To learn more about the Gardens or to find out how to give, visit gardens.tamu.edu.

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It’s showtime! Jazz Hands® Variegated Loropetalum chinense ‘Irodori’ pp#27,713

The first ever variegated loropetalum, this beauty’s dark purple foliage is punctuated with splashes of pink and white, with vivid pink flowers that appear in spring. This, and each plant in the Jazz Hands® loropetalum series, has outstanding form, flowers, and foliage. Available in 2¼”, 4”, and Quick Turn™ pot sizes.

Contact Amy Howard 616-223-3365 www.springmeadownursery.com 800-633-8859 ext.1105 TNLA March-April_SMN Jazz Hands.indd 1

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1/30/18 12:29 PM

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GRE E NV I $ IO N

Update On Crapemyrtle Bark Scale BY DR. MENGMENG GU AND DR. JIM ROBBINS Dr. Mengmeng Gu works at the Department of Horticultural Sciences at Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension. Dr. Jim Robbins is a Professor/Extension Specialist-Ornamental in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Arkansas.

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efore anything else, I want to assure you CMBS is manageable----in case you missed our half-day ‘All about crapemyrtles’ workshop at Landscape EXPO in Dallas, you could still view one of our recorded webinars, ‘Current Situation on Crape Myrtle Bark Scale’, at https://greenviion. wordpress.com/webinars/. You all are invited to our next webinar where we will update our CMBS management strategies. We could manage it better, with the grant from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Specialty Crop Research Initiative Program. You may have heard----we got $3.3M to work on crapemyrtle bark scale (CMBS)! That’s huge for the Texas green industry. In 2017, the program awarded only nine multi-million dollar projects in the whole nation, the competition came from all

aspects of horticulture industry (fruits, vegetables, ornamentals and turf), and the CMBS project was one of the nine projects. You may still remember that in its native range CMBS has been reported on plants from 13 families including economically important crops such as soybean (Glycine max), apple (Malus pumila), brambles (Rubus sp.), boxwood (Buxus sp.), cleyera (Ternstroemia japonica), fig (Ficus carica), persimmon (Diospyros kaki), and pomegranate (Punica granatum), in addition to crapemyrtles. Although not on the documented list, some of our common native plants, hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), Texas persimmon (Diospyros texana) and dewberry (Rubus spp.) could very likely be potential hosts of CMBS. We are researching what plants are potential hosts for CMBS, which could have huge implication. In the greenhouse we introduced immature CMBS to healthy plants by tying a short twig with CMBS crawlers. Then we wait to see if CMBS could complete its life cycle and the white velvety eggs are the proof. Such greenhouse screening confirmed that CMBS could complete its life cycle on several species of beautyberry (Callicarpa spp.), pomegranate (Punica granatum), henna (Lawsonia inermis), heimia (Heimia salicifolia), and winged loosestrife (Lythrum alatum). American beautyberry is native from Texas to the east coast, and infestation has been observed on American beautyberry plants in landscapes. The main production of pomegranate is in California, but it is also grown in many states across the south. Heimia is a type of weed native in Texas and winged loosestrife is native in over two thirds of the United States. Good management of CMBS on crapemyrtles could prevent its spread to these native plants and possibly other plants. For example, the (continued on page 22)

Hauling pruning debris could spread CMBS to new areas.

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infestation of CMBS on American beautyberry plants in landscapes caught us by surprise. It does not belong to any of the reported plant families. It is an additional plant family. Before we know its full harm potential, we should probably keep it under check. We often advise landscaper professionals to prune off the infested branches.

But what do you do with the pruned branches? Should you pile them all up and drag across town? Although CMBS is not a microscopic (just a fancy word for tiny teeny) insect that could be ‘gone with the wind’, hauling pruning debris like this could potentially spread many undesirable stuff. CMBS is not something too scary. It’s just another

insect, out of many, coming our way. We will figure out a way to manage it, just like we have, for many other insects. Our USDA project is a great SEC collaboration, although none of us played football for our universities. My group will focus on the plant aspects of CMBS, such as host plant preference and alternative hosts. Dr. Mike Merchant and Erfan Vafaie will continue chemical control methods. Dr. Yan Chen at LSU AgCenter and Dr. David Held at Auburn will focus on biopesticides, biologicals and possibly looking at neonicotinoids translocation into crapemyrtle pollens. Drs. Kevin Heinz, James Woolley and Steven Arthur in the Entomology Department will focus on the classic biological control and Dr. Yvette Zhang will look into the social and economic aspects of the issue. As always, we’d welcome your input! Together, we can get it done.

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We will figure out a way to manage Crape Myrtle Bark Scale, just like we have found ways to manage many other insects!

While we can’t guarantee dividends every year, Texas Mutual has returned more than $2.2 billion to safety-conscious policyholder owners since 1999. © 2018 Texas Mutual Insurance Company

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N OTES F RO M SFA G A R DE NS

Is There Life After Live Oaks? BY DR. DAVID CREECH

C Dr. David Creech is Regents Professor Emeritus at Stephen F Austin State University and the Director of SFA Gardens.

hanging the tree commodity boat is like trying to turn a freighter in the middle of the ocean. Turn the wheel and nothing seems to happen. Ask a nurseryman, landscaper or home owner, “what evergreen oaks do you think should be planted in Texas?” The answer kind of starts and ends with live oaks, Quercus virginiana. Don’t get me wrong. This is one fine tree, and it’s usually available in landscape specifications demanded, but there are other oaks that work just as well. Unfortunately, they are either just not known or aren’t available in the sizes needed for many of the mega projects in Texas. Adam Black, Director of Horticulture at Peckerwood Gardens near Hempstead, Texas, and I have been lonely voices for diversifying the oak world in Texas. There are plenty of reasons to expand the palette. A major reason is that huge plantings of just one species are rarely a good idea. There’s greater opportunity for a disease or insect to spread. Oak wilt is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum, which invades and disables the water-conducting system in susceptible trees. It’s a big problem. The disease leans to attacking the red oak group. Oak wilt has been found in over 76 counties and in almost every city in Central Texas, as well as Abilene, Midland, Lubbock, Dallas, Ft. Worth, College Station, Houston and San Antonio. The disease can be a problem wherever live oaks tend to be congregated in great numbers. That describes the urban landscape in central Texas. It attacks trees that are transplanted or naturally grown. Diversify is the solution. Another reason for diversity is that anything overused becomes boring. Variety is the spice of life.

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There are dozens of “western oaks” that do well in Texas. They’re hardy. Many are evergreen. They are characteristically drought and alkaline tolerant. There’s only one western oak that is rather well known, and that’s the Mexican white oak (Monterrey oak), Q. polymorpha. It’s tardily deciduous and in mild winters may act as an evergreen. The species is widespread in Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras and known from a single population in the United States in Val Verde County, Texas. It’s widely planted as an ornamental and tends to semi-evergreen or not, depending on the genotype.

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Our favorite western oak is the loquat leaf oak, Q. rysophylla. While seen occasionally in Texas landscapes, they are rarely available in large sizes. Native to Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, and San Luis Potisi in Mexico, this species is usually encountered in the mountains at mid to lower elevations. Planted in 1988, the largest tree at SFA Gardens is 60 ft. tall with a circumference of 64”, and it’s a striking specimen sitting in full sun. It survived the December 23, 1989 zero degree event, which is kind of a benchmark for low temperatures in our area. In fact, it was that event that led many of us to realize that many of the Mexico oaks were Texas friendly. In fact, the foliage never missed a beat when temperatures fell this past January to ten degrees two nights in a row. The tree was hit with two hurricanes in 2005 (Rita) and 2008 (Ike) and while many trees toppled over, the loquat leaf did not. Record heat and drought in 2010 and 2011 were the worst on record. New growth varies from copper to salmon to reddish new color, and old leaves are shed quickly in the spring after new growth emerges. The tree has never been affected by tent caterpillars, which have occasionally ravaged the nearby native oaks in the garden and on our campus. Another favorite oak is Q. canbyi, the canbyi oak. It’s a bit smaller statured than the loquat leaf oak, and our trees have been fully evergreen, tending to shed old leaves after the new growth has emerged. The tree has beautiful

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by the small community of oakphiles in the South. When you think about it, the sky is the limit. Mexico is home to over 160 species of oaks and most remain unexploited in the southern USA. As the climate becomes drier and warmer, the oaks of Mexico should find a pleasant new home in the landscapes of the southern USA.

glossy foliage and typically produces a bountiful crop of acorns. There are others. We love Q. germana, the royal oak, with striking foliage and an acorn bigger than a burr. Q. grisea, the gray leaf oak, has striking blue-gray foliage and is a tree of wonderful form, tending to be shrub-like in drier climes, more tree-like in better landscapes. Q. hypoleucoides, the siverleaf oak, requires the driest of spots in our garden and features white undersides of the leaves. Q. tarahumara, the basin-leaf oak, is very rare with only five specimens in the USA. Three are in Texas. Blessed with large cardboardstiff leaves, the common name fits the look of the leaf. We have six young trees of Q. insignis, which is considered the holy grail in the oak world. With an acorn the size of a squashed down softball, who wouldn’t be pleased? There are many others, most lacking a decent common name and known only

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Oaks can be quite promiscuous and seed source is a problem. Yes, the hybrids are interesting, but they’re unpredictable and highly variable. While a single tree can produce acorns, and many of them will come “true to type”, there’s a need for germplasm colonies. Most botanists think a community of 30 to 50 individual trees is large enough to capture a fairly wide swath of genetic diversity. Separated from other oak species, this would help insure the purity of the gene pool. SFA Gardens and Peckerwood Gardens are collaborating with an assortment of landscapers and nurserymen to make this happen. It’s a long term project, but we think it’s one that’s exciting, prudent and science-based. Finding climate change friendly plants is more than just another slogan; it’s a window into the future of a changing world. We would like to invite you to SFA Gardens for the third “Wild About Woodies” conference on June 30, 2018. You can gather some CEUs, learn a lot about woody trees and shrubs and get up close and personal with some amazing trees worth knowing. Until then, let’s keep planting.

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BUG S & FU ZZ

Thrown Into The Box With Boxwood Blight BY DR. KEVIN ONG AND DR. ERFAN VAFAIE

O

Dr. Kevin Ong (top) directs the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology & Microbiology at Texas A&M University. Dr. Erfan Vafaie (bottom) is Extension Program Specialist (IPM) at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

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n February 4th, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture instituted a boxwood blight quarantine where all materials known to transmit the pathogen, the fungus Calonectria pseudonaviculata is regulated – not allowed to be shipped into Tennessee unless it “is accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and cleanliness program agreement issued for the plant or article; or is accompanied by written authorization from the department for movement of the plant or article, e.g. for research, destruction, or emergency purposes”. These regulated materials include Boxwood and Sarcococca plants, any materials containing either of these two plants (eg. Compost, soil, mulch), and “any equipment, shipping material, compost, mulch or water exposed to boxwood or Sarcococca plants”.

To date, this disease has NOT been found or reported in Texas. Nonetheless, Texas nurseries are bound by this regulation IF they are sending boxwood or Sarcococca plants to Tennessee.

Leaf spots symptoms on Buxus sp.

Stem canker lesion.jpg - Black lesions are prominent on affected stems. Many of these stems are defoliated.

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What is Boxwood Blight? Boxwood blight is caused by the fungal pathogen, Calonectria pseudonaviculata. It was first reported in the UK and in New Zealand around the same time in the mid 1990s. It was first found in the United States in 2011, and reported in North Carolina and in Connecticut at around the same time. Shortly thereafter, it was detected and confirmed in 8 other states – mostly on east coast (Maryland, New York, Virginia, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Ohio) and Oregon. (continued on page 26)

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TNLAGREEN (continued from page 25)

Recently, it was confirmed in Illinois in late 2016 – the 24th state where this disease is found. Currently we are aware that of 3 host plants for this pathogen: boxwood (Buxus), Sarcococca and Pachysandra. This disease primarily affects leaves and branches. Symptoms include leaf

spots, cankers on stems, defoliation and subsequent death of the plant. It is interesting to note that the roots will retain a healthy looking appearance. This disease occurs when there is high humidity levels and free water on the plants. Infection can occur very quickly in mildly warm temperatures (64 to 77˚F). The spores of this

fungus is disseminated through water or rain splashing. Both spores and fungal mycelia can be transmitted by contaminated pruning tools or clothing.

What Can Texas Growers Do About This Disease? Remember that boxwood blight has not be detected in Texas, and we would like to keep it as such. So know your source of plant/propagation material. Avoid materials from states where this disease has been found. Source locally for planting material. If you are selling/sending boxwoods and/or Sarcococca to Tennessee, you are suppose to get a “phytosanitary certificate and cleanliness program agreement issued for the plant”. There

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Dr. Ong in the “cage” where a variety and fungicide trial on boxwood blight is conducted in North Carolina circa 2012. Notice that he is wearing protective gear (PPE and plastic to cover the shoes) so that he does not spread the pathogen once he leaves the “cage”.

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What Is The Difference? Technically there are 2 PHOTO: ELIZABETH BUSH, VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY, BUGWOOD.ORG

species of Calonectria that caused boxwood blight: C. pseudonaviculata and C. henricotiae. In 2015, a scientific report was published that identified that there were 2 different and distinct Calonectria species which caused boxwood blight, based on a study looking

Fuzzy spore cushions of Calonectria psedonaviculata on diseased boxwood stem.

at the genetic diversity of 234 fungal isolates from 15

is a boxwood cleanliness program guideline which dictate several best management approaches (BMPs) to producing disease free plants. I believe that there currently 1 nursery in Texas that is implementing this program. One option for production nurseries with cleanliness type programs is the Systems Approach to Nursery Certification (SANC) program, an initiative facilitated by the National Plant Board and AmericanHort. The SANC program was piloted in 2014

where participating plant production facilities voluntarily design an audit based pest risk management plan with guidance of the state certifying agency. In it anticipated that BMPs would be implemented to reduce pest and disease risk. Additionally, the SANC program is expected to benefit the participating grower through reduce shipping inspection and certification cost. Stay tuned from more about SANC in Texas next time.

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countries (4 continents). Both these species occur in Europe BUT only C. pseudonaviculata is found in the US. Both these species are considered to be morphological and pathogenically similar. ie. they look the same and cause similar type disease symptoms. However, C. henricotiae is reported to

R ESOURCES

be less sensitive to some triazoles and QoI (strobilurin)

For more information about Best Management Practices for Boxwood Blight, check out

http://www.americanhort.org/resource/ resmgr/docs/Advocacy/BoxwoodBlight/ BoxwoodBlightBMPs2017.pdf

For more information out the Systems Approach to Nursery Certification (SANC) program. Check out their website at

http://sanc.nationalplantboard.org

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fungicides. Additionally, C. henricotiae are considered to have a higher “thermotolerance�. ie. able to grow faster and sporulate more at higher temperatures than C. pseudonaviculata.

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N E W ME MB E R S

Welcome!

TNLA would like to welcome its new members. If you would like to become a member, or if you have anyquestions or concerns about your current membership, please contact us at 800.880.0343. Visit www.tnlaonline.org to learn about the benefits of becoming a part of TNLA.

REGION 1 Landscape

Cribley Enterprises Scott Cribley 12019 Nacogdoches Rd San Antonio, TX 78217 www.cribleyenterprises.com Serene Oaks Landscaping Jacob Sotello 24219 Palo Duro Peak San Antonio, TX 78255 www.sereneoakslandscaping.com

REGION 2

Landscape

Emilio Lopez Landscaping Darwin Lopez 9430 Crystal Cove Circle Houston, TX 77070

Weekly Floral Byron Laszlo 1438 Alaska Ave Dallas, TX 75216 www.weeklyfloral.com

Non-Profit

Buffalo Bayou Partnership Gregg Burks 1803 Memorial Drive Houston, TX 77007 www.buffalobayou.org

Pupukea Inc dba the Garden Consultant Michelle Shook 10 Forest Park Dr Richardson, TX 75080

Individual

Edward Schaper 162 Tortoise Creek Way Spring, TX 77389

REGION 5

REGION 4

April Wine Botanical Management Aaron McMurtrey PO Box 913 Hurst, TX 76053

Landscape

Landscape

Pretty Good Gardens, LLC Lauren Millar 14227 Mindy Park Lane Houston, TX 77069 www.prettygoodgardens.com

Retail – Individual

Kyle Willingham Walton’s Lawn & Garden Center 6809 Clayton Ave Dallas, TX 75214

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APOLLO DISC FILTER Reaching for the Stars

Truax Company Jake Carlen 5300 Quebec Ave New Hope, MN 55428 www.truaxcomp.com

REGION 8 Individual

Mark R. Bowers, TMCNP PO Box 1238 Marble Falls, TX 78654

Smith Distributing Company Kandis Caldwell 4110 NW 10th St Oklahoma City, OK 73107 www.smithdistributingcompany.com

Cameron Carter - Calloway’s Chad Freeman - Calloway’s

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Marci Weatherford - Calloway’s (100 micron fog)

Carson Merchant - City of Euless

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R & K Pump & Equipment, Inc. Ken Byrd 1905 NW 40th Court Pompano Beach, FL 33064 www.randkpump.com

Marshall James Grell - Rainbow Gardens mini-wobbler

• Bridgeless design - no dripping • Flat trajectory • High distribution uniformity

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Grower

Horta USA LLC, dba Botany Lane Greenhouse Mitch McDonald 5116 North Jackson Road Edinburg, TX 78541 www.botanylane.com

Supplier

Crop Insurance Solutions John Schreiter 601 1st St Milford, NE 68405 www.cropinsurancesolutions.com

TCNP

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REGION 7

OUT OF STATE

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Galvan Landscape, Inc. Mike Galvan PO Box 487 Gainesville, TX 76240 www.galvanlandscape.com

Eric Taylor - Calloway’s

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Will Williams - Lambert’s PC and non PC

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C AL EN DAR OF EV E NT S

Since 1945

May

May 8 Region IV - General Meeting

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May 23 TNLA Oversight Group Meetinsg (OSG)

for GROWERS, LANDSCAPERS & GARDEN CENTERS

ur o Y t o G We’vetilizer ! Fer

May 26-28 Lawn & Garden Water Smart Tax Holiday

June

Earth Safe Organic

June 10-12 TNLA Board of Directors Meeting & Trip

June 10 2018 Board of Directors June Meeting & Trip

June 12 Region II - General Meeting

(19 items)

Fertilizer Components (Huge Selection)

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

June 12 Region V - Social Event

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

June 15 Region IV - Selby & Taber Awards Ceremony

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

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Plant Specific Fertilizers Custom Fertilizers To see the most up to date event Micro-Nutrient Packages information please visit the Events Grower Mixes Calendar on tnlaonline.org! Vital Earth Soils Custom Mixes Available Through Your Favorite Distributor 706 E. Broadway • P.O. Box 1148 Gladewater, TX 75647 903•845•2163 C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56 C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188 C : 0 M :50 Y :98 K : 0 | R:247 G:148 B:30

C : 90 M : 33 Y : 98 K : 26 | R:0 G:104 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

C : 90 : 33 : 98 | R:0G:148 G:104B:30 B:56 0 MM:50 YY :98 K :K0: |26R:247

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

0 MM:50 YY :98 K :K0: |26R:247 C : 90 : 33 : 98 | R:0G:148 G:104B:30 B:56

C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

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C : 85 M :50 Y : 0 K : 0 | R:28 G:117 B:188

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C : 50 M : 0 Y : 99 K : 0 | R:141 G:198 B:63

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Classified Ads

A DV E RT I SE R S INDE X For media kit and advertising information, email advertising@tnlaonline.org

For the latest job listings visit our online opportunities.

Help Wanted Position Title: Tropical Specialist Start Date: 04/09/2018 Duties: Emphasis is placed on growing and maintaining the tropicals and bromeliads in the nursery. Need to be able to keep track of inventory and communicate to owners. Applicant will plant and maintain new growth of the plants. Experience Required: Previous experience with tropical and bromeliads a plus but not required. Salary: Based on experience. Approximate Work Hours: 40 How to apply: Contact Joanne at jimbos4@earthlink.net or call (409) 925-6933

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May/June TNLA Green Magazine  

TNLA presents the Year in Review - TNLA Members Continue To Build A Stronger Green Industry In The Lone Star State

May/June TNLA Green Magazine  

TNLA presents the Year in Review - TNLA Members Continue To Build A Stronger Green Industry In The Lone Star State