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A MAGAZINE OF THE TAMPA BAY TIMES

APRIL 2014

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April May WELCOME TO THE WATER ISSUE

34

98

SPLASH PARTY

The wreck of the Spanish galleon Atocha continues to relinquish its treasures in the waters off of Key West. For $3,000, amateur treasure hunters can be part of the hunt.

Spring temperatures give the Tampa Bay area a Mediterranean feel, amplified when lounging in elegant swimwear at the Vinoy. (On model: Voda swim ikat print bikini, Veronica M knit sweater and bracelet, from Cerulean Blu. Necklace from BeachBu. See inside for store details.)

54

112

GOING FOR THE GOLD

POWER TRIPS

VISIONS IN WHITE

MarineMax of Clearwater enters the travel business with its new fleet of custom-built fleet of power catamarans available to rent in the Caribbean.

Getting close enough to polar bears to feel their breath is the grand reward for a trip to a remote part of Canada.

86

123

MODERN CLASSIC

PATTERNS OF LUCK

Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Usonian house in 1939 to be used as faculty housing on the Florida Southern College campus but it wasn’t builty — until now.

Intrigued by the intricate patterns of traditional Indian bridal mehndi, Jennifer Garcia has built a business creating custom design for clients.

Photograph by Daniel Wallace

on the cover India’s traditional sari is 5 to 9 yards of fabric worn draped in many ways. The lovely garments swirl and flow in our underwater display. Page 70. Cover photograph by John Pendygraft


    


           

         



  

       


A MAGAZINE OF THE TAMPA BAY TIMES

EDITOR Mary Jane Park mjpark@tampabay.com PHOTO EDITOR COPY EDITOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Suzette Moyer smoyer@tampabay.com

Patty Yablonski Cathy Keim

CONTRIBUTORS Brian Bailey, James Borchuck, James Branaman, Peter Couture, Bob Croslin, Cherie Diez, Dennis Fast, Natalia Galbetti, Taylor Gaudens, Lindsey Humberg, Robert N. Jenkins, Scott Keeler, Mandy Miles, Caitlin E. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Conner, John Pendygraft, Paul J. Richards, Amy Scherzer, Chris Sherman, Terry Tomalin, Brittany Volk, Daniel Wallace, Paul Wallen, Chris Zuppa Bay is published six times a year by Times Publishing Co. and delivered to Tampa Bay Times subscribers in select neighborhoods in Pinellas and Hillsborough counties. Copyright 2014. Vol. 7, No. 4. THE TAMPA BAY TIMES CHAIRMAN AND CEO Paul C. Tash EDITOR AND VICE PRESIDENT Neil Brown VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES AND MARKETING ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bruce Faulmann

Mark Shurman

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING MANAGER TAMPA ADVERTISING MANAGER

Michelle Mitchell

Dawn Philips

National / Major Retail Advertising Manager Kelly Spamer St. Petersburg Retail Advertising Manager Andi Gordon Clearwater Retail Advertising Manager Jennifer Bonin Brandon Advertising Sales Manager Tony Del Castillo Classified Real Estate Manager Suzanne Delaney Pasco Retail Manager Luby Sidoff Hernando Retail Manager Ray Mooney Automotive Advertising Manager Larry West

      

 !        !    !           !  !     

MARKETING MANAGER

Christopher Galbraith

CREATIVE OPERATIONS MANAGER Ann Molinaro FULFILLMENT MANAGER Gerald Gifford IMAGING AND PRODUCTION Ralph Morningstar, Gary Zolg, Brian J. Baracani Jr., Robert Padgett, Orville Creary, Greg Kennicutt, Janet L. Rhodes PRINT QUALITY ANALYST Tom Frick DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Jim Thompson REGIONAL HOME DELIVERY MANAGERS Diann Bates, David Maxam

  

                      

16 bay

APRIL 2014

To view the magazine online, visit www.tampabay.com/bay To order current magazines, visit www.tampabay.com/store To advertise in Bay magazine: (727) 893-8535


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from the editor

DRAWN TO THE WATER

Only a few weeks ago, judges from the American Water Works Association, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the University of South Florida and the Southwest Florida Water Management District got together for drinks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; of tap water from 19 entrants in seven neighboring counties. The winner? The city of Dunedin, in northern Pinellas County. Water plays a starring role in many of our activities, from recreation to daily maintenance. Floridians take to it yearround, swimming, boating and paddle-boarding, even as we try to make sure our intake of the vital liquid is sufficient. This water-themed issue of Bay focuses on swimsuit styles, spa experiences and even a new charter-yacht vacation offering. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll read about an artist who uses water in her silk paintings. And youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll discover how it powers even a routine task such as washing clothes. Springtime in Florida is one of our favorite seasons, ideal for pleasurable pursuits. At a recent gathering in one of our local waterfront parks, a friend put it well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We get to live here!â&#x20AC;? she said. That we do.

Have comments, questions or story ideas? Let us know. Contact Mary Jane Park at (727) 893-8267 or mjpark@tampabay.com. To order current magazines, please go to tampabay.com/ store.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Jane Park

                  

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Floral design tends to follow fashion and interior-design trends, which lean toward minimalism these days. Cassie Osterloth, of Wonderland Floral Art and Gift Loft (2887 22nd Ave. N, St. Petersburg), says her clients are requesting soft, natural arrangements that incorporate unusual elements. “Clients love modern pieces that are like pieces of art,” she said. — Brittany Volk


Structure and simplicity are two of the distinguishing qualities of these Osterloth designs. Red ginger is the focal point of the arrangement on the previous page, rising from a base of lotus pods, ranunculus, kiwi vine and snake grass. Seeded eucalyptus, lemonlime warneckii (a member of the Dracaena family) and variegated pitt also contribute to the mix. Bamboo adds an architectural element to the assemblage at right, which includes orchids, mink protea and greenery. Osterloth, who also teaches regular classes throughout the year (see wonderlandfloralart.com for schedules), says she sets out forming a piece with unstructured balance. We think she ends up with a work of art.

Photographs by Chris Zuppa


                           

 

 

   

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drink it

C R I S P, C L E A R WAT E R

We love the elegant design of the glass vessel that is the Soma carafe ($49, drinksoma.com), which uses biodegradable filters that incorporate materials such as coconut shells and silk. The sturdy, German-engineered container fits in most refrigerators and holds more than 40 ounces of water. Filters are replaced about every two months through a subscription program. The product is dishwasher-safe, and the hourglass shape has a beveled edge that eliminates drips. The system was created by a San Francisco entrepreneur, a filtration expert for several major coffeebrewing companies and a design team. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Jane Park

Photograph by James Borchuck

32 bay

APRIL 2014


dive in

BY MANDY MILES

Long before Johnny Depp twisted his beard in Hollywood and before any X ever marked the spot, a real-life Spanish galleon left Havana Harbor with real-life treasure stowed heavily in its hull. The Nuestra Senora de Atocha sailed for Spain in 1622, carrying gold, silver and emeralds from the New World home to the king. The ship didn’t make it. A hurricane overwhelmed the Atocha on Sept. 6, 1622, killing more than 200 people and tossing its priceless cargo into the vast ocean surrounding an island known as Cayo Hueso.

GOING FOR THE GOLD Nearly three decades after the wreck of the Spanish galleon Atocha was discovered off Key West, the sunken ship continues to relinquish its treasures, piece by piece. For $3,000, amateur treasure hunters can dive alongside the professional salvagers. The legendary account of the ill-fated galleon became a modern-day fairy tale when treasure hunter Mel Fisher’s “golden crew” of divers discovered the Atocha’s $400 million “mother lode” of treasure in waters about 35 miles from Key West. Assuring his team every day that “Today’s the day,” Fisher endured 16 years of searching, skepticism and the loss of a son. The day came on July 20, 1985, when divers Greg Wareham and Andy Matroci became the first people in more than 300 years to look upon the lost galleon’s disintegrated timbers and perfectly intact “reef of silver bars.” The main treasure pile consisted of silver bars “stacked like cordwood,” as Fisher always had predicted: clusters of silver coins, gold bars, gold chains, jewels and thousands of South American emeralds. The discovery made global headlines, involved a Supreme Court decision about ownership and became a Hollywood movie, with Cliff Robertson playing Fisher, and Loretta Swit cast as his wife, Deo. Mel Fisher died in 1998, leaving the family business and his unending optimism to son Kim and grandson Sean. The

At top, a diver comes up from the Atocha with a bar of gold, among the treasures Mel Fisher long predicted the ship would yield. Above, gold chains, coins and gems were among the haul. The ongoing treasure hunt is financed by investors who buy in with a minimum $12,500 annual investment. Photographs courtesy of Mel Fisher’s Treasures

34 bay

APRIL 2014


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story of his quest is known worldwide. But a lesser-known tale is still being written. The ocean continues to relinquish, piece by piece, the Atocha’s riches, and divers for Mel Fisher’s Treasures continue to scour the ocean floor. The search now centers on the galleon’s unofficial cargo: gold chalices, rosaries and crosses that belonged to the clergy, and the gold money chains, coins and jewelry of the aristocrats, who often smuggled the wealth they acquired in Central and South America aboard to avoid paying taxes on it. That gold and its owners are thought to have traveled in the Atocha’s topside sterncastle section; the Fishers think it was ripped from the deck, its priceless, undocumented contents scattered by the storm over a watery and wavering trail. “It’s amazing how many people don’t know we’re still doing this, still finding treasure,” said Joe Beaton of the company’s investor relations team, which is charged with raising capital for the continuing search. That search is financed by investors who buy into the adventure with a minimum annual investment of $12,500 for one-eighth of one share. Thirty-five shares are sold annually, with the Fisher family retaining 65 percent of the company. The investors receive a “division” of the treasure and other artifacts recovered that year. “Once people understood that we’re still working the trail and still bringing up gold, they would always ask if they could pay us just to dive the site,” investor relations manager Shawn Cowles said. “But for years investors were the only ones allowed out there with us. A few years ago, we created the Atocha Adventure experience and opened six trips a year to the general public.” Because the company is not publicly traded, he said, it is subject to government regulations that limit its advertising options. “In essence, these trips became a way for us to advertise since we’re offering dive vacations, not investment opportunities.” The $3,000 Atocha Adventure is a six-day introduction to treasure hunting. Divers spend a week in a private condominium in Old Town Key West and three days diving alongside professional treasure salvagers at the underwater search sites around Key West. “It gives people a chance to get their feet wet before deciding whether to make the financial commitment of an investor,” Cowles said. Often convincing themselves that the sterncastle discovery will occur as soon as they walk away, about half of all Atocha Adventurers end up as investors, Beaton said, fingering the ancient coin he wore on a neck chain. Coins from the Nuestra Senora de Atocha lie in keepsake boxes all over the world, but they are more often concealed under the shirts of those familiar with Fisher’s dream.

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APRIL 2014

The legendary account of the ill-fated galleon became a modern-day fairy tale when Mel Fisher’s “golden crew” of divers discovered the Atocha’s $400 million “mother lode” of treasure in waters about 35 miles from Key West in 1985.

“They’re the single most-collectible item from the Atocha because you can wear them,” said Bill Lorraine, also a member of the investor relations team. “The coins are a combination of history and jewelry.” The 1985 excavation of the mother lode turned up 142,000 of the ship’s 230,000 documented silver coins. They sell for between $1,200 and $14,000 at Mel Fisher’s Treasures, depending on size and condition. Thousands are still unaccounted for, and no two are alike. “In the 1600s, when you bought something, people didn’t give change, they just chipped off a portion of your coin to coincide with the item’s cost in silver,” Lorraine said, explaining the coins’ irregular shapes. What we now call treasure coins once were “the most coveted and widely traded money on Earth,” said Carol Tedesco, an expert in antique coins and spokeswoman for Blue Water Ventures, a joint-venture partner with Mel Fisher’s Treasures that is excavating the wreck of the Atocha’s sister ship, the Santa Margarita, which sank in the same hurricane. The ancient coins, known locally as “Key West dog tags,” are enduring reminders of a Spanish galleon that never made it home and of the man who finally found it at the bottom of the sea. For more information about Mel Fisher’s Treasures and the Atocha Adventures, visit melfisher.com.


    

    

  

                   

 

    

                

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The Laundress is a collection of specialty detergents, fabric care and accessories for home, travel and storage.

KEEPING IT CLEAN It was a matter of necessity creating a niche. New Yorkers Lindsey Boyd and Gwen Whiting were working in the fashion industry, Boyd at Chanel and Brooks Brothers, Whiting at Ralph Lauren, labels whose offerings require both financial investments and attention to maintenance. As their website tells it, both are graduates of Cornell University’s fiber science, textile and apparel, management and design program, and “they saw an opportunity to advance the world of fabric care.” Thus began the entrepreneurial effort they named the Laundress, a line of laundry and cleaning products that is impressive by any measure. Most exceed the price of traditional offerings found in supermarkets and big-box stores. And dozens of online reviews posted over several years reveal a loyal, growing customer base. Fans rave about their oftordered Delicate Wash, Stain Solution and Wool & Cashmere Shampoo. The company also has a baby-product line. And the Laundress offers mail-in laundry service. The company’s website is thelaundress.com. In the Tampa Bay area, some products are available at Royal Tea Room and Gift Shoppe, 2719 S MacDill Ave., Tampa, (813) 837-3000. — Mary Jane Park

40 bay

APRIL 2014


drive it BY PETER COUTURE

ALONG COMES A SPIDER When your job is selling one of the world’s consummate performance cars to affluent clients, there aren’t many obstacles to closing a deal. “The only challenge I face,” Matthew Jones says, “is getting people in the car.” Jones, 43, is McLaren sales director at Dimmitt Automotive Group in Pinellas Park. The motorcar in question is the 12C, which, regrettably, sounds more like a seat assignment than an exotic supercar. The name, however — McLaren actually changed it from MP4-12C — is the only thing pedestrian about it. The 12C is a 616-horsepower bat-winged machine that is McLaren’s first road car since the legendary F1, once the world’s fastest production automobile. And there’s the rub. While the British marque carries a 50-year racing pedigree and is a storied name in motorsports, it may not be as readily known to the casual enthusiast. Dimmitt is one of only two McLaren retailers in Florida and just 13 in the United States. McLaren’s competitors are cars whose names generally end in vowels. “Usually people buying their first supercar will buy a Ferrari or Lamborghini,” Jones explains. “Car connoisseurs buy (the 12C), or Ferrari owners I get in the car.” Many of those clients are first-time McLaren customers. Depending on the 12C model

The McLaren 12C Spider looks and performs like a sports car, but has the comfort and smooth ride of a luxury car.


The McLaren 12C is the consummate performance car. Photographs by Scott Keeler


mclaren

CONTINUED

and the options they choose, the price can well exceed $300,000. “Once they test-drive a car, it’s over,” says Jones, a Welshman who brings an almost evangelical enthusiasm for the McLaren brand to his job. He can’t contain his excitement when he brings up a video on his PC and urges you to watch McLaren’s latest creation, the ultra-performance, $1.15 million P1 hybrid. “It’s going to change cars as we know it!” he says. Jones says Dimmitt has nine P1s coming; all are The McClaren 12C’s performance is as impressive as its appearance. Dimmitt’s McClaren sales director Matthew already sold, including one Jones says of his customers, “Once they test-drive a car, it’s over.” to the dealership. (Plus, two other McLaren models are on the horizon: the P13, which will sell for less than $200,000, and menacing. and the 650S, which will slot above the 12C.) Soon after rolling out of the dealership, we encounter So who are Jones’ clients? He mentions the usual sussome raised road reflectors — the kind that can really jolt a It’s the pects, such as pro athletes. stiff-suspensioned, low-slung sports car — and Jones delibsupercar you “It’s not just celebrities,” Jones says, “it’s people who erately runs over them. write the celebrities’ checks.” “Feel that?” he asks. I do, but barely. Well played, Mr. can drive every Those clients like personal attention, and Jones gives it Jones. day. It’s very to them. “The customer doesn’t come here anymore,” Jones Then there’s the performance. This is a 205-mph supercar, says, “I go to them.” after all. Jones tells me he once hit 171 mph in a 12C during a docile, one of the Jones says he has traveled as far as Ohio to take two 12Cs track session. We, of course, are not permitted to go that fast most compliant to a buyer. during our drive, which fittingly passes the Tampa Bay Auto “If they are paying a third of a million dollars on a superMuseum, but Jones pushes the 12C when we reach the selsupercars ever car, they deserve my respect to deliver it to them,” he says. dom-trafficked arteries of a nearby industrial park. When the made.” Why do buyers fall in love with the 12C? Jones says the engine roars to life, we catapult to a speed that seems impossicar behaves in ways not normally associated with such ble on a short road. A moment of concern seizes me. It appears MATTHEW JONES, high performance: lower maintenance costs, actual driver unlikely that Jones will be able to halt the car before we run out McLaren sales director at comfort, respectable (for a supercar) MPG and an innovaof asphalt. I brace, but the 12C’s stopping power is helped by an St. Petersburg’s Dimmitt tive suspension — all four wheels are independent of one air brake that automatically deploys under extreme braking. Automotive Group another — that makes for an almost luxury-car ride. There is a slight shimmy as we stop, but little drama. “It’s the supercar you can drive every day,” he says. “It’s “What this car does is flatter the driver,” Jones says. very docile, one of the most compliant supercars ever Jones says he sold 55 12Cs in 2013, as well as several premade.” owned models, and after his brief demonstration of its capaJones is delighted to demonstrate that claim when he bilities, you fully understand how he closes a deal. It comes takes me for a drive in the 12C Spider, which has a retractin the moment when Jones suggests: Why don’t you slide able hard top. Behind us is a motorized window that can be behind the wheel? lowered when the top is up. Jones lowers it so we can better I do, and by the time I back the 12C into its prime parking spot appreciate the sound produced by the 12C’s 3.8-liter twinat the dealership, I know that Jones is right about the McLaren. turbo V-8: low and throaty, a rumble that’s both pleasant I’m sold.

44 bay

APRIL 2014




                                                       

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GET A GRIP Brooklyn designer William Harvey turned to the lost-wax process to fashion the ergonomic Botero collection, which he describes as â&#x20AC;&#x153;sinuous, curvaceous and generous forms.â&#x20AC;? The pieces can be used in cabinetry for kitchens and baths, or on fine furniture. Created for Du Verre Hardware from recycled aluminum, the grouping features a small knob, a large knob that also can serve as a hook, and 4-, 9- and 17-inch pulls. Available in oil-rubbed bronze, polished nickel, satin nickel and white. duverre.com; toll-free 1-888-388-3773.

          





 





  

 

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15520 GULF BLVD, REDINGTON BEACH — Offered for $2,250,000 3 Bedrooms, 4 Baths, 2 Car Garage + Workshop, 3,569 Sq. Ft. A Tropical Oasis with Private Beachfront on the Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful interior and exceptional construction. Contact JJ and the Z at 727-344-9191 Julie Jones or Kathryn Krayer-Zimring






 

 

 

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lease it BY TERRY TOMALIN

Imagine kicking back on the deck of your own private boat anchored in a secluded cove of a tropical island where only the local fishermen know the name. Lifestyles of the uber wealthy? Not anymore. Clearwater-based MarineMax, the largest recreational watercraft dealer in the United States, prides itself on promoting the boating lifestyle. Since its formation nearly 20 years ago, the publicly traded company has worked to bring boaters together through local flotillas, rendezvous and poker runs. These days, it is jumping into the travel business. “This is just another way for people to enjoy boating, but instead of doing it in our back yard, they have the whole Caribbean to explore,” said Raul Bermudez, vice president of the company’s new charter division. Several companies offer bareboat sailing adventures, but MarineMax hopes to corner the market on powerboat charters with its new, custom-built fleet of power catamarans. “Everybody wants to cruise the Caribbean, but nobody wants to burn all that fuel to get down there,” Bermudez said. “Now with our MarineMax Vacations, we take the hard part out of it. You just fly in and hop on board — everything is ready to go.” MarineMax Vacations kicks off in the British Virgin Islands, which has more than 60 anchorages available. The new custom motor yachts, which also are available for sale, range from 38 to 48 feet in length. Customers can choose to pilot the crafts themselves; or, if they prefer, MarineMax will arrange to have a captain aboard. The cost of a charter vacation is comparable to one spent in a luxury oceanfront resort. Card rate for a week in November aboard a MarineMax 382, (two staterooms; sleeps up to six people) is $4,270, or roughly $712 per person. “But as far as experience goes,” Bermudez said, “there’s no way to be more oceanfront and private than aboard your own luxury yacht, where the dress code is yours to set, the kitchen is always open and the lounge ambiance is your own.” Investors can purchase a charter yacht in the fleet; they will get a monthly check, and MarineMax handles all operating costs. The 382, which made its international debut at this year’s Miami International Boat Show, has a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $489,000. Charter price: $419,000. With boats that accommodate up to 10 people and a flotilla that can take on groups of up to 100, MarineMax hopes to attract families for vacations and reunions and corporate

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groups eager to try everything from team-building to retreats. “A charter-yacht vacation is the only family vacation that my kids actually ask to go on,” Bermudez said. “My kids range in age from 6 years old all the way up to 18 years old. It is the one vacation we all enjoy, reconnect and have a great time. No video games that week.” Educating powerboaters has posed a challenge, Bermudez said. “When you talk to powerboaters about chartering, they usually think one of two things — a one-day fishing charter or a luxury megayacht vacation.” The qualification process is simple he said, based on potential customers’ boating experience. “The boats are very user friendly,” he added. “Everything is state of the art.” MarineMax Vacations also has worldwide destination opportunities aboard luxury crewed yachts ranging from 50 feet to more than 200 feet. For more information, marinemaxvacations.com; (813) 644-8071.


P OW E R T R I P S MarineMax of Clearwater steps into the travel business with a new, custom-built fleet of power catamarans in the Caribbean.

The new luxury yachts range in length from 38 to 48 feet. The spacious, comfortable yachts can sleep up to 10 people. Customers can pilot the rented crafts themselves, or MarineMax will arrange to have a captain on board. Photographs provided by MarineMax

APRIL 2014

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wrap it St. Petersburg artist Jill Kalber is not only inspired by nature in creating her handpainted silk scarves, but sometimes she even lets nature help do the work.

BY LINDSEY HUMBERG

ELEMENTS OF STYLE Photographs by James Borchuck

Fifteen years ago, at a roadside stand in Estonia, Jill Kalber purchased a hand-painted silk scarf that ignited her creative passion. Initially, she thought of it as an addition to her collection, but she soon was inspired by the unique design and technique. “I paid $20 and got all the way home when I thought that I really should have bought two,” she said. “(The artist’s) painting style was different than mine, but she inspired me.” Kalber began researching techniques and creating her own designs using the serti method, a French approach. She started each scarf by using a squeeze bottle filled with water-based resist to draw on a piece of stretched silk. The resist acts like a wax, leaving white lines after she brushes water-based silk dyes onto the fabric. The dye bonds with the fabric after a period of rest, and the scarf is placed in a steam box to heat-set the color. A few days after the steaming, Kalber hand-washes the fabric, which dissolves the resist. Serti was her first approach to silk painting. Her Just Jill Designs now includes other techniques, such as abstract freehand brush designs. And she has learned to control the flow of


 





 

   



 

            

           

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the dyes by thickening them with agents such as seaweed powder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I also freeze my dye into blocks of ice, then place a group of them Jill Kalberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hand-painted silk product line has on top of a piece of silk, evolved along with her technique and inspiration. and let them melt,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The result is almost like marbling.â&#x20AC;? Kalber wanted to find a way to heat-set the colors on large pieces of silk without setting in wrinkles. Because of her love for working outdoors, which has few space constraints, she quickly realized that sunlight was the answer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought about the possibility of the heat of the sun setting the dye, and for nearly two years I worked testing silk in the sun until I got the right combination of time, positioning and amount of dye,â&#x20AC;? she said. What resulted is her Just Jill Designs most popular style, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunset Silk.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I loved the idea of partnering with nature,â&#x20AC;? Kalber said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My inspiration has always been nature and the colors that surround us. Color has its own language.â&#x20AC;? She also developed a way of using another natural element in the process, soaking the fabric in seawater before she paints it, then drying it in the sun. The result, her â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sea Silkâ&#x20AC;? line, has a watery effect. Just as Kalber has evolved in technique and inspiration, she also has expanded her product line, adding kimono jackets, short capes and wraps along with the scarves. She sells her work online at justjilldesigns.com, at the Tuesday Gulfport Fresh Market and at the Saturday Morning Market in St. Petersburg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The moment I realized I had a passion for painting on silk was the first time my brush touched silk,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a calming feeling that I just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to get enough of and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think I ever will. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something about wearing a colorful piece of silk that can absolutely change the way you feel.â&#x20AC;?


        

                              

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Photographs by James Borchuck

RELAX AND UNWIND Spa treatments and bath rituals have been around for thousands of years. History tells us that Egyptians were the first to discover the uses of water and oils for therapeutic purposes. Olive and sesame oils were used first; as time went on, practitioners introduced herbs, teas and other oils. According to the Spa Traveller (thespatraveller.com), Egyptians began to produce unguents (healing ointments for the skin) in the form of a pleasant-smelling oily substance made up of myrrh, frankincense, cinnamon and cassia. The Greeks and Romans soon emulated the Egyptians, and used spa treatments to keep people clean and beautiful. Various regimens were used for healing purposes and even to ward off evil spirits. Today, as well as in 3,000 B.C., water is a key ingredient. Pure or from the sea, it is vital in healing and cleansing, whether in steam baths, water therapy, hydro and mineral pools, facials and massages. — Suzette Moyer

The living wall at the EVANGELINE spa at the Epicurean Hotel is literally just that — a structure with cilantro, mint and other herbs growing from within. There’s a freshness to the new 2,800square-foot spa, which includes products from FarmHouse Fresh (based in Texas) and Caudalie (from vineyards in Bordeaux, France). Many treatments use warm spring water, soothing for both body and mind. Mix it with healthy herbs, citrus grass sea salt, alfalfa root and rice bran oil for the Bask in the Garden Beauty treatment. Or enjoy the Dulce Delight, with a caramel-coffee salt scrub of caffeine and Arabica bean extract. Top off any treatment with a signature dessert from Chocolate Pi, now open at the hotel. Indulge. Evangeline 1203 S Howard Ave., Tampa (813) 999-8742

APRIL 2014

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Photographs by Scott Keeler

With the 50,000-square-foot spa and fitness center, the SAFETY HARBOR RESORT AND SPA is a site of bliss. Overlooking the waters of Tampa Bay, the resort has a historic past. Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto is credited with discovering five natural springs in the area in 1539. Today, that very same water is used in several spa treatments, including Lavender Dreams, above. This experience includes 25 minutes of an Espiritu Springs mineral bath and 80 minutes of the Lavender Dreams Ultimate Experience. Lavender has been used for centuries to soothe aching muscles, relieve fatigue and help with stress and anxiety. Mix with water, and feel the magic work. Safety Harbor Resort and Spa 105 N Bayshore Drive, Safety Harbor (727) 726-1161

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When you get a treatment at SPA OCEANA in the Loews Don CeSar Hotel in St. Pete Beach, plan on using all your senses to enjoy every bit of this heavenly place. The gulf waves produce a gentle, soothing sound, the view on the rooftop deck is peaceful and quiet, and the salt air is refreshing. Add in scents of pineapple, orange or coconut and the gentle touch of a therapist using pure cane sugar body polish and a creamy milk soak on your body. The Tropical Perfecting Ritual uses Pure Figi products, above. This body treatment, which removes dry cell buildup, is followed by a relaxing shower and massage. Afterward, just breathe and relax. Spa Oceana 3400 Gulf Blvd. , St. Pete Beach (727) 363-5029


APRIL 2014

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let it f low

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOHN PENDYGRAFT

TEXT BY CAITLIN E. O’CONNER

The International Indian Film Academy’s awards weekend comes to Tampa’s Raymond James Stadium later this month, the first time the Bollywood Oscars ceremonies have taken place in the United States. With thousands of visitors in the area for the festivities April 23-26 and an increasing number of families of Indian descent in the Tampa Bay area, we take a closer look at one of the republic’s distinctive clothing styles. India’s traditional dress, the sari, or saree, has a long history that encompasses numerous traditions. With a name corrupted from the Sanskrit word for cloth, a sari is not a dress in the traditional sense but between 5 and 9 yards of finished fabric that is then draped in at least 80 different methods across the subcontinent. In Maharashtra, it is tucked to form pantaloons; in Gujarat, the end is worn over the chest and abdomen; in Bengal, keys are tied to a corner thrown over the shoulder. Most commonly, saris are worn “nivi” style, with pleats tucked into the waist and the end draped over the left shoulder. The sari also has deep roots in Indian mythology. In the Sanskrit epic Mahabharata, the princess Draupadi is ordered to be stripped and publicly shamed. After she prays to Lord Krishna, her sari cannot be unwrapped, but unwinds without end.

beneath the surface Erica wears a mint-green sari with gold trim and designs on the pallu, the decorative end worn over the shoulder in the nivi style, from Traditions Boutique in Tampa, owned by Kresha Shah. (By appointment only, (813) 334-9114). All photographs were taken in the pool at Bill Jackson’s Shop for Adventure, 9501 U.S. 19 N, Pinellas Park.


Erica wears a bright yellow sari with gold and green trim from Traditions Boutique. The garments typically are sold with an extra piece of fabric to custom-tailor the choli blouse, which is often designed to contrast with and therefore show off the sari itself. Bright colors dominate Indian clothing, particularly in the summer months, partly because the hues are of great significance and symbolism in the Hindu religion. Red and saffron in particular are considered highly auspicious colors.


Renita wears a brightly colored net and silk brocade lehenga choli from Alisha’s Creations, 1517 Suite C, E Fowler Ave., Tampa. “Lehenga” refers to the skirt, while the word “choli” means blouse. The third element of this traditional outfit is the dupatta, a long scarf that is typically draped over the shoulders.


Renita wears a traditional gold-trimmed lehenga choli in purple and aqua from Alishaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creations. This style is worn for formal events and has many names in India, including lehenga choli, ghagra choli and chaniya choli. (For brides, the traditional color is most frequently red.) Such special-occasion designs tend to be more expensive than others and can cost from several hundred to several thousand dollars, depending on the amount of detail work.


Renita wears a three-piece blue-green sari with silver trimming from Alishaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creations. The three-piece sari is a more modern concept all over India, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more common in South India, Alisha Patel says. The style has gained in favor because three smaller pieces are much easier to wrap and lighter to wear than traditional 5-yard saris, she says.


Erica wears a heavy magenta sari with detailed gold trimming from Traditions Boutique. A traditional type of border known as zari is made from fine gold or silver thread. Saris are crafted from many different fabrics, from velvet to silk to chiffon.


Renita is wrapped in a light green sari with reflective silver decor and red trim from Alishaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creations. Because the garments are long stretches of fabric, they fit all sizes, a versatility that has contributed to their enduring popularity.


Erica wears a gold-speckled salwar kameez, or tunic top and pantsuit, from Traditions Boutique. Popular because of its ease of motion, it is traditionally worn with a long scarf known as a dupatta draped over the shoulders. Styles for the kameez top range from thigh-length tunics to ankle-length gowns, and salwar pant styles vary according to the region of India, from voluminous, fabric-heavy Patiala style from north Punjab to legging-style churidars.

Models: Erica Alexis and Renita Singh Makeup: Suzin Moon, LolaJanes Beauty Lounge, St. Petersburg Styling: Suzette Moyer




  


 


     

     

      



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dwelling


This Usonian house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939 to serve as faculty housing at Florida Southern College but it wasn’t built — until now.

BY CHRIS SHERMAN PHOTOGRAPHS BY JAMES BORCHUCK

The simple structure of the Usonian house illustrates Wright’s ideas for modern living: economy of space, use of locally sourced materials and distinctly American styling. The 1,300-square-foot house has two bedrooms and one bath, and this open living room and dining room combination.

MODERN CLASSIC WORTH T H E WA I T Long before the cool lines of mid-century modern graced Sarasota, the leafy Lakeland neighborhood of Dixieland could have been the site of the most imaginative residential designs of the 20th century: the Usonian houses of Frank Lloyd Wright. Scratch “could have been.’’ We have one now. A Usonian house — Wright’s dream of simple, welldesigned and affordable homes for masses of the middle class in the America some thinkers called Usonia — has been built at last from plans the architect drew 75 years ago. It is still so forward-thinking that to stand inside it is to feel the genius of Wright’s sense of space. He designed this house of 1,300 carefully outfitted square feet in 1939 as faculty housing, where professors could live close to the students at Florida Southern College. He was invited by the college’s ebullient president, Dr. Bud Spivey, to design a campus that was rooted in American material, style and spirit. The two spent 40 years designing and building it on a hill overlooking Lake Hollingsworth. What Wright called the Child of the Sun is today the largest collection of Wright buildings in the world. But as war approached, the faculty housing was never started. Until now. Under another visionary president, Anne Kerr, Florida Southern has restored and expanded its architectural legacy. Kerr had worked on beautiful campuses before and had visited FSC over the years, but says, “I never dreamed I would end up being the curator.’’ Buildings got renovated, the Water Dome’s symbolic fountain of knowledge splashed again, and Kerr and architects started sifting through Wright’s plans for structures unbuilt.

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At right, the house is constructed of nearly 2,000 interlocking, handcrafted blocks. This is the first time this particular design of a Wright home has ever been built. Below, the house also features more than 5,000 pieces of colored glass and Cherokee Red concrete floors.

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The most appealing and doable was a plan for a small faculty house that is now the Sharp Family Tourism and Education Center for the more than 30,000 architecture fans who make the pilgrimage to Lakeland each year from around the world. Admirers and critics love to explore the campus’ organic esplanades, sparkling glass in concrete block and soaring heights. Yet classrooms, auditoriums, offices and chapels are institutional spaces meant for sharing. The new building is personal; you can dream of having the space to yourself. “And now we have a house!’’ says Mark Tlachac, the college’s resident Wright scholar. The new Sharp Center that sits at the brow overlooking the sloping campus is a real house and a modest one at that. The site is about where Wright would have built it. You can feel what it would be like to live in Wright’s design on a personal scale. Not the spectacular extrava-

gance of Fallingwater or other Wright residences for the wealthy but a two-bedroom, one-bath no bigger than an old Florida ranch. The materials and principles are the same as in the larger buildings: Cherokee Red concrete floors, Florida cypress, custom-made textile block of sand and cement studded with small blocks of colored glass, overhanging eaves, light captured by narrow clerestories and expanses of folding glass doors — and fit for a small family. As always, Wright plays with light and dark, compression and spaciousness: guiding, almost forcing the occupants to live as he thought best, gathered together and engaged with nature and art, and tastefully organized. As the architect did not believe in garages, you enter from a single-space carport under a long marquee leading to the front door and a darkened entryway lined with shelves and twinkling with colored glass. Then a sharp right puts you into the heart of the house, a central space open to a vast

The warm southern cypress that trims and fills the house starts as 16-foot rough-sawn boards that are milled, sanded, shaped and machined to meet the precise specifications for ceilings, walls, doors, window frames and shelves.

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wall of windows and a raised ceiling, a room that seems twice as vast as the small house itself. Indeed it is the public space for everything a family would do: A long dining table juts out from one wall next to a tiny open kitchen; a built-in sofa could seat guests while concealing storage. There is still room for more seating clusters, a cantilevered fireplace and perhaps the fine piano Wright thought every home should have. It is also large enough that a professor could have a classful of students over. Long before any builder’s marketing brochure, Wright called it a gathering space. Off to the corner are a small bathroom and two bedrooms. Even the master bedroom is smaller than today’s preferences, yet each has floor-to-ceiling windows that enlarge the space by letting in the outside. They now are furnished with benches and video screens for visitors, but your mind can import an IKEA model room and imagine putting our gluttony for space on a diet. Even the college’s president feels the personal appeal of its scale, the beautiful woodwork, the tiny spots of color. “I love the size of the main room and the small bedrooms,” Kerr says. “It’s comforting. It just feels peaceful: No clutter. People’s personalities would be the focus. I could live here.’’ To bring this old plan to life took generous donations — the structure is named for Tampa alumnus and former trustee Dr. Robert Sharp and his wife, Peggy — and several years of effort by a team of architects, masons, carpenters, glassmakers and roofers. “The most gratifying aspect was our collective abilities to realize the same principles Wright conceived and refined throughout his career … and prove that it is possible to apply them using 21st century building technology,” according to architect Jeffrey Baker, who directed the building project. He has a keen sense of history and an appreciation for both technology and manual craftsmanship. “Everyone pulled out all the stops to ensure this would

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The Usonian house was drawn from 1939 plans by Frank Lloyd Wright but fits modern construction codes and has air-conditioning. All of the professionals who worked on the house labored almost as Wright apprentices. At left, a statue of architect Frank Lloyd Wright stands near the Usonian house on the campus of Florida Southern College in Lakeland.


be something they would be proud of for the remainder of their days.” That does not mean constructing a 1939 building was easy. Baker and his team had Wright’s floor plan, several elevations, a rendering and initial plans for the blocks, as well as the Wright buildings around them and Usonian homes elsewhere. They worked almost as Wright’s apprentices, redrawing and detailing all the plans to fit modern codes, adding air-conditioning and tweaking the flat roofs to drain Florida downpours more efficiently. The cantilevered structure for the ceiling over the gathering space was a big challenge, but the “textile” blocks were the toughest. In Wright’s vision, and in his earlier work on campus, local sand could be poured by students. Not today. Not when the plan called for 2,000 blocks in 47 configurations featuring 600 pieces of glass. In 2012 and 2013, these had to be made by artisans in Massachusetts, each single block individually numbered and shipped south. But if you skipped such elaborately detailed block, could you build a similar house today? For, say, under $250,000? “Absolutely,’’ Baker says. “Wright designed many wonderful houses using ‘common block’.’’ And local building suppliers may someday make more varieties of block closer

Above: A Wright-inspired lighting fixture fills a corner near the front door. Right: Glass saws with diamond blades are used to cut complex angles in the colored glass before they go to the bevel machine.

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to home to encourage such imaginative building. Working on the Usonian house has proven to Baker that Wright’s work remains vitally relevant. His firm, Mesick, Cohen, Wilson and Baker, has worked on buildings by American greats from Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Latrobe to H.H. Richardson and Stanford White, and he still puts Wright above and apart from the others. “His mind could envision three-dimensional space at a level of completeness and complexity that far surpasses any other architect we have encountered or likely ever will encounter,’’ Baker says. Perhaps it’s a shame that the full dream of Wright and Spivey for 20 faculty houses were never built. Baker fantasizes it would have been perhaps the “most beautiful, wonderful intriguing neighborhood that could have been produced in the 20th century.’’ Yet we at least have one, and the exciting chance to imagine that Wright designed it for you today.

ARCHITECTURAL TOURING • The Florida Southern College campus designed by Frank Lloyd Wright is at the intersection of Johnson Avenue and Frank Lloyd Wright Way east of U.S. 98, in Lakeland. The Usonian House, the Sharp Family Tourism and Education Center, is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 a.m. daily. Knowledgeable guides are available for tours of the house and the campus. For reservations, call (863) 680-4597.

Visitors who tour the house can watch a video about Wright and his architecture in one of the bedrooms.

• In Winter Haven, visitors can take a driving tour of the progressive modern architecture of Gene Leedy, a prominent member of the Sarasota school. Maps of the 28 buildings on the tour can be found at the Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce and at GeneLeedy.com. • The signature building of Florida Polytechnic University designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava is under construction and can be seen at the intersection of Interstate 4 and the Polk Parkway.

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wardrobe

splash part y PHOTOGRAPHS BY DANIEL WALLACE

TEXT BY NATALIA GALBETTI

It’s the ideal Florida weather, warm enough to enjoy the beautiful sights but with cool undertones from a summer that hasn’t yet arrived. Spring temperatures give the Tampa Bay area a Mediterranean atmosphere, amplified when sporting vibrant swimwear at the Sunshine City’s classical and charming “Grand Dame, ” the Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort & Golf Club.

MEDITERRANEAN REVIVAL Eye-catching design is everywhere, from elaborate architecture to statement accessories. Charlie Paige zebra print sheer cover-up ($29.99), and Bisi Adeshina turquoise leaf ring ($85), from Cerulean Blu Swim & Resort Wear Boutique in St. Petersburg.

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BOHEMIAN TOUCH Stacked necklaces and a bold maxi dress lend ease to a carefree vacation wardrobe. T Bag Los Angeles ikat dress ($220) from Dody boutique in St. Pete Beach. Olive wood bead necklace ($65), Santa Monica wrap ($105), olive wood bead wrap necklace ($65), and State beach necklace ($325), all from BeachBu, beachbu.com.

WALLFLOWER Gold accessories accentuate the fresh colors of spring. Trina Turk cross tie-back one-piece with gold hardware swimsuit ($134), gold and ivory disc bangles ($30/set) and gold bamboo bangle ($18/set), all from Cerulean Blu.

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UNDER WATER For a stimulating dive, energizing swim or calming respite below a waterfall, a bold print suit is ideal. Tara Grina halter one-piece ($149) from Cerulean Blu.

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WATER COLORS Turquoise, azure, jade and, of course, sea green, are just a few of the shades that keep the seaside ever present, even if a body of water is nowhere nearby. Above right: 1 Sol bikini ($70 top, $80 bottom), Leslie Houston teardrop glass and bead double strand necklace ($195), and TKEES Glitters Angel Wings sandal ($48), all from Cerulean Blu. Above center: Onda de Mar beaded collar top ($224) and Florabella straw bag ($161), both from Dody Boutique. Shorts, modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own. Leslie Houston teardrop glass single-strand necklace in turquoise ($155), from Cerulean Blu. On him: Stacked shorts ($69.50), from Dody Boutique.

UNDER COVER A cabana becomes the go-to relaxation nook in between dips in the pool. Left: Trina Turk halter swimsuit ($172) and Zenzii gold cuff ($22), both from Cerulean Blu.

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Models: Mary Rescher; Rachel Hester and Christopher Johnson from BMG Talent Group, Chicago. Styling: Valerie Romas, One2styleU.com Hair and Makeup stylist: Suzin Moon, lolajanes.com

MESMERIZING VISTAS Distressed wood leads the way to the beach. Vix ivory bikini with turquoise and gold details ($94 bottom, $88 top), Maya long crochet coat in solid aqua ($405), both from Dody Boutique. Turquoise, black and gold multi-style wrap bracelet ($24) and Enjoy black leather bracelet with gold plaque ($30), from Cerulean Blu. Left: A glance off a hotel balcony in a timeless one-piece and wide-brim hat. La Blanca cross-back swimsuit ($109), Bisi Adeshina turquoise slab-on-sterling silver cuff ($160) and Marilyn hat ($42), all from Cerulean Blu. BeachBu bracelets ($230-$560).

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destination

isions in white Encounters with polar bears close enough to feel their breath are the grand reward for making a 2,300-mile journey to a remote and bitterly cold part of Canada. BY ROBERT N. JENKINS

NORTH OF CHURCHILL, Manitoba Moments after I clambered out of the single-engine plane and realized just how cold it was on this edge of Hudson Bay, Andy MacPherson broke my heart. “To be safe,’’ MacPherson says, “we will keep you about 50 meters from the polar bears as we walk about.’’ MacPherson is saying more to the other guests at the Seal River Heritage Lodge, but I am processing that number. I do notice the 12-gauge shotgun slung over his right shoulder, I do hear the word “safety.’’ Yet all I can think is that the distance he has given — about 155 feet, more than half the length of a football field — means my single-lens Nikon probably won’t be able to capture any decent pictures of the beasts I have flown 2,300 miles to see. I stand on the graded gravel runway, now cold and grieving. That turns out to be premature, and unnecessary: That’s because MacPherson had presented the lodge’s procedures the day before Bones ambled, pigeon-toed, toward us along the edge of the frozen bay, before Greenspot moseyed around the outside of the lodge — and well before Bob came to floss for us on the lodge’s backyard fence. His announcement came before all the contacts we would have with the magnificent bears in the next four days. And the only times we were 155 feet from the bears occurred if we were that far away when MacPherson or fellow guide Tara Ryan first sighted them. Typically, the bears — usually by themselves — appeared as large ivory splotches resting or sleeping on the rock-strewn ground, with-

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Photo safaris often occur in October and November, when male and nonpregnant female polar bears are in “walking hibernation.’’ On nonaboriginal lands, the animals are protected from hunters. Photograph by Dennis Fast


bears

CONTINUED

ered shore grasses providing a pale gold accent to the landscape. MacPherson and Ryan, both in their early 40s and veteran wilderness guides, occasionally lifted their binoculars to find bears for us. And every day, the bears found us. After breakfast and lunch each day, the guests at the lodge (one of four owned by the Churchill Wild company) would head out on walks of about three hours. We would seldom trek farther than 1òmiles from the lodge, walking the frozen shoreline or the gentle ridges that in summer define bay beaches. Destinations include the large freshwater lake from which the rustic, yet modern, lodge draws its water (it is treated before being served) and an archaeological site with rough circles of stones that were used to anchor the flaps of teepees erected thousands of years ago. But always the goal was to see polar bears. During October and November, they are waiting for the surface of the bay to freeze so they can walk on it to hunt seals. During these months, the males and nonpregnant females are in “walking hibernation,’’ using as little energy as possible because they probably have not eaten meat since midsummer. Instead, they subsist on wild berries, even kelp. This is when Seal River operates “photo safaris.’’ There are an estimated 1,200 to 1,400 bears in this part of southern Manitoba, so they can seem relatively plentiful. While they are not social animals — the mothers of new cubs must protect them from males — on my trip we saw as many as three bears at once, lumbering in a widely spaced followthe-leader train. We also saw two males lying down together, apparently satisfied that they posed no threat to each other. Other times the nine of us, including our guides, would find a bear on the move, and the guides would have us walk a route to intercept it. That typically produced the exciting interactions the guests valued. Guests usually had been walking in single file, with a guide in front and back. When we encountered a bear, we would fan out behind both guides. We wanted photos, and the guides obliged us. If the bear happened to be headed straight toward us, it had to be diverted. The routine: One of the guides would talk to the bear, as if it were a domesticated animal. These first sounds were to get its attention away from the rest of the group. The bears are curious but cautious. They would rather change their course slightly than walk toward the strange A polar bear walks on thin sea ice while waiting for the Hudson Bay to freeze outside Churchill, Manitoba. The large mammals feed on seals. Photograph by Paul J. Richards


noise. If a conversational volume did not deflect them from the group, the guide would raise his voice. Escalating the auditory experience, MacPherson would reach into his parka, pull out fist-sized rocks and clack them together. Again, a sharp sound not familiar to the bear. We never saw more than these three steps used to turn a bear. Only once was I apprehensive, when the grizzled old male called Bones (short for Bag of Bones) came directly toward us. The guides had told us Bones was a no-nonsense type that the younger bears avoided. Guides also carry small pistols, from which they can fire either of two types of noise-making shells but without projectiles. And guides carry 12-gauge shotguns. The first shell is a blank, with the expectation that the sound of the percussion would frighten away a bear. Finally, the guide would fire a loaded shell toward the ground in front of the bear, so that the noise and ricocheting shot would turn the bear for good. In 20 years, MacPherson said, Churchill Wild has never shot a bear. Shooting a polar bear is banned on lands not occupied by the aborigines, who are allowed to hunt bears and walrus. Once our guides were certain we would quickly obey the calm instructions to get out of harm’s way, Ryan and MacPherson allowed us to get closer to the bears. Which left me wondering how I could describe to readers just how close I had been to a 700-pound carnivore. We were careful to give Bones plenty of room. We were less concerned about the four other males and two females we encountered, although it seemed that at least one of them, whom the guides had named Bob, wanted to hang out with us. That was obvious one morning when I went into the fenced back yard of the lodge, the only fencing anywhere. Perhaps 5 yards from the fence was Bob, estimated to weigh between 600 and 700 pounds and to be about 7 years old. The thin wire fence had holes large enough to allow a camera lens through. As I took off my outer glove and turned on the camera, Bob came toward the fence. And kept coming. Finally, he settled down almost against the fence. He opened his mouth and put his enormous upper and lower jaws into one of the holes. I snapped some photos and had my picture taken by other guests. As long as we spoke to Bob, he kept opening his mouth and clamping it gently on the fence — flossing, the guides jokingly called this. So I had a new standard of my proximity to the bears: No longer was my closest encounter to a bear about the length of a parking space. No, now I felt his breath and could have petted him. I did want to reach out to touch the top of Bob’s white muzzle, but his canine teeth were easily as long as my thumbs. And I wanted to keep my thumbs, and all of my fingers. If he kept flossing, then I could keep admiring him — an arm’s length away.

CHURCHILL WILD Owner-operators Jeanne and Mike Reimer have had 20 years to expand and renovate Seal River Heritage Lodge, which accommodates 16 in rooms sleeping two or more. (The three other Churchill Wild lodges are busy at different times of the year depending on what critters you most want to see — beluga whales, mother bears with their cubs — or to fish for.) With both a chef and pastry chef at Seal River, the meals always featured hot entrees, often a choice of soups, and rich desserts. Guests tend to burn off the calories during the five to six hours of daily frigid-weather walkabouts. Hot hors d’oeuvres, cheeses or hummus are offered at cocktail hour, as are wine, beer and liquor. (Also offered at dinner, the alcoholic beverages are included in the price, as are three meals a day and flights on small planes to reach the isolated lodge.) After dinner, guests gather in front of the wood-burning stove in the lodge’s lounge for presentations about the region’s history, animals and how the Reimers and staff restock the lodge using a tractor to haul a huge sled for 36 hours over the Hudson Bay ice.

A fence separates them, but they were so close to each other that Robert N. Jenkins could feel the breath of Bob, a 7-year-old that weighs between 600 and 700 pounds. Photograph courtesy of Robert N. Jenkins

The Churchill Wild trips are typically four days in the lodge and a day in Churchill, about 40 miles south of Seal River. The price for 2014 trips is about $9,560, including two nights in a Winnipeg airport hotel before and after the lodge trip, and round-trip flights to the lodge. For more information, go to churchillwild.com. A less costly (about $1,400 U.S.) one-day alternative is offered by longtime Winnipeg tour operator Don Finkbeiner. After a twohour flight on a twin-engine plane from Winnipeg to Churchill, passengers board a Tundra Buggy, which rolls high above the snow. The buggy travels routes where bear sightings are frequent; the buggy has large windows, is heated and restroom-equipped. For more information, go to heartlandtravel.ca.


 

 

  

  



 

     

  

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PAGE

124 Jen Garcia builds a business around traditional bridal henna. And she loves it. Photograph by Cherie Diez

ARTISTIC SINKS

DALÍ DELIGHTS

STUART SOCIETY

FAB FEMALES

Jonathan Haywood turns creative ideas into beautiful products: Page 126

The museum pays homage to “Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality:” Page 134

Patrons of the fundraiser tasted premier private vintages: Page 138

Academy Prep Center honored women community leaders:.Page 146


faces

PATTERNS OF LUCK The intricate patterns of Indian bridal mehndi intrigue Jennifer Garcia, who has built a business creating elaborate henna designs for customers. BY TAYLOR GAUDENS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHERIE DIEZ

Her first experience with henna was “terrible,” Jennifer Garcia will tell you today. The body adornment, applied at a theme park, looked nothing like she expected it to. But it sparked her interest in mehndi, traditionally used by Indian women who have elaborate patterns applied to their palms and soles before their weddings. The designs are thought to bring their wearers good luck; the longer they last, the stronger their marriages will be. Undaunted by that first application, Garcia began to experiment. “I started out with smiley faces and hearts,” she says, “the basic stuff.” During her research, she “fell in love” with intricate Indian bridal mehndi. She practiced often and learned about Indian wedding traditions, soaking in cultural details. “I guess you could call it an obsession after a while,” she says, laughing. Garcia, 23, sits at a table in a coffee shop and unpacks her pencil box of supplies. She opens a new, hot-pink tube of henna paste and begins painting, freehand, a design on her left hand. As she answers questions, she continues the design, sometimes not looking up from her work. People nearby look up from their laptops and tablets to watch. Through her business, Jen’s Henna (jenhenna.wix.com/jenshenna), she has attended numerous weddings and painted many mehndi on brides, their guests and family members. The details and levels of intricacy come from different traditions. Garcia’s favorites are

The details and levels of intricacy in Jen Garcia’s designs come from different traditions. At right: Indian bridal designs, in which fingertips customarily are filled in completely, are Garcia’s favorites. “The design on my hand was a free-style design with no particular motif, however the foot design had more of an Arabic design influence. Henna tends to stain best on the palms and the feet, ” Garcia said.

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Indian bridal designs, in which it is customary for the tips of the fingers to be filled in completely, with elaborate patterns on the hands, lower arms, lower legs and feet. Garcia offers consultations for brides, during which they discuss custom designs, the wedding party and guest-list details. She learns as much as she can about the bridal party — the number of women, their ages and relationships to the bride as well as the number of guests who will attend the wedding. And she enjoys experiencing different cultures through mehndi. “Especially with weddings,” she says, “it’s all about the relationships for me. I feel like I’m part of the wedding.” She incorporates clients’ requests — peacocks, fine lines, flowers, white space — drawing with markers or pens on paper. Afterward, she sends the bride the image, asks for feedback and adjusts as necessary. Garcia compares tubes of henna to tubes of cake icing and says applying mehndi is more easily accomplished with a pen than with a tube. A single bridal session can take eight hours or more before a wedding. She is often invited to the sangeet, or pre-wedding, party and says she has stayed as late as 3 a.m. to make sure all the wedding guests who wanted mehndi received a design. For her own wedding in May, Garcia says she is planning her own mehndi design, which she will apply to her feet.


faces Jonathan Haywood turns his creative ideas for artistic sinks and functional furniture into beautiful products crafted out of concrete.

FROM ABSTRACT TO CONCRETE Jonathan Haywood, owner of Epic Artisan Concrete, works on a sink mold at his studio in the Warehouse Arts District in St. Petersburg. Photographs by Scott Keeler

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BY MARY JANE PARK

You’ll see his work at the new Epicurean Hotel in Tampa and in the Green Bench Brewing Co. in downtown St. Petersburg. A slim, curvy chaise longue, he suggests, could be submerged in a hotel pool, where a guest might enjoy a warm-weather soak along with a cool drink perched atop one of his tables, which would be installed nearby. “It’s heavy. It won’t float away when or if a hurricane comes. You can make it into any shape,’’ Jonathan Haywood says. Stop into his studio in St. Petersburg’s Warehouse Arts District, and you may find the founder of Epic Artisan Concrete listening to Miles Davis while finishing a tabletop that represents graceful fabric folds, imagining an elegant fireplace surround or creating a mold for a bathroom sink. The sinks, some bowl-shaped, some linear, hook up to standard plumbing.


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CONTINUED

More often used as a base in architectural and infrastructure construction, concrete also has become a medium for more decorative fixtures such as countertops and furniture, although it presents a number of variables. “Concrete is a maddeningly frustrating material, from one day to the next, one batch to the next, even down to the grain,” Haywood allows. The amount of moisture can vary from one bag of cement or sand to another, and cement needs a specified amount of water to set properly for consistent workability and to cure to proper strengths. “And you’re trying to do something almost predictable” in creating designs. Now 32, Haywood once considered a college major in English. Later, he thought about architecture. He and his wife, Ashley, moved from Charlotte, N.C., to Costa Rica, where he was working with a search-engine optimization expert. After that, he helped another entrepreneur who was renovating houses to sell to other expatriates from the United States, and they began experimenting with concrete forms. The couple eventually moved to the Brandon area, spending time with one of Haywood’s sisters. After several weeks, he says, they decided to “check out St. Pete,” where they discovered a growing artistic network. “When we moved back to the United States,” he says, “I didn’t want to stop playing in concrete.” That was 2010, and he created some of his initial projects in a two-car garage. Two years later, he moved the studio into a much larger space in the warehouse district. Within several months, he hopes to open a showroom on the site. That should give potential clients the opportunity to schedule consultations and examine a range of colors, textures and finishes. His custom work includes a top for a cabinet constructed of concrete and eucalyptus wood, some of the grain of which has been filled with molten pewter. And he is refining other designs. As the sign posted outside his studio reads: “We make beautiful things out of dust.” epicartisanconcrete.com; (813) 480-6156.

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Some of Jonathan Haywood’s artistic sink creations fashioned out of concrete are bowl-shaped while others are linear.


           

       

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community TAMPA

1

2

3 4

DEBARTOLO FAMILY ALL-STAR CHARITY GALA Planes went out, and tables, stage and a dance floor went in at the Peter O. Knight Airport in Davis Islands for the March gala hosted by Eddie and Candy DeBartolo and their daughters, Lisa and Nikki. More than 700 guests attended the event, where the entertainment included performers Bob Anderson and Jay Mohr. 1. Eddie and Candy DeBartolo. 2. Amy and Darren Swander with radio host and comedian Jay Mohr. 3. Ryan Nece, Jerry Rice, Colin Kaepernick, Roger Craig, Ronnie Lott and Jaleel White. 4. Acrobatic entertainers. 5. Nikki DeBartolo hugs son Asher Heldfond. 6. Ronde Barber, center, who played 16 seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, poses with other guests at the gala. Photographs by Amy Scherzer

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ST. PETERSBURG

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2

DALÍ MUSEUM ANNIVERSARY DINNER Patrons at the St. Petersburg museum’s 22nd annual anniversary in March learned that more that 1 million visitors have been to the Dalí since its new building opened in 2011. The menu included homages to the current exhibition, “Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality.” One offering: tomato sorbet served in a tiny Campbell’s tomato soup can.

8

1. Museum staff members Leigh Wilson, left, and Amy Miller help Tom James with the Order of Salvador medallions he wears as board of trustees president. 2. Photographer Penny Rogo frames a group wearing Andy Warhol-style eyeglasses. 3. Miller and Jason Alexander. 4. Museum director Hank Hine talks about the Warhol exhibition that’s at the Dalí until April 27. 5. Cristin Bishara and Terry Igo. 6. Guests in the lobby and stairway to the galleries. 7. Debbie and Joel Momberg and Paul Sandberg. 8. Mary and Tom James, Najla and Kamal Majeed, Hine, Christina Majeed and Laura Tillinghast Hine. 9. Patrons were served in the galleries; in this case, before Dalí’s The Hallucinogenic Toreador. Photographs by James Branaman

7

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community ST. PETERSBURG

1

2

STUART SOCIETY WINE WEEKEND From destination dinners to a highoctane auction, patrons of the Margaret Acheson Stuart Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundraiser for the Museum of Fine Arts tasted fine foods and premier private vintages. The February gala wine dinner and auction were in the Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort. 8

1. Auctioneer Tom duPont and wine 3 donor Bud Risser. 2. A Dale Chihuly chandelier inside the Vinoyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grand Ballroom. 3. Ron Servidio, Hans Klenke, Chrysie Sampley and Erin Holliday. 4. A sunset sky outside a tower at the historic hotel. 5. Nicholas Allen of Carte Blanche Wine, a guest of honor. 6. Wine donors Chris and Bob Hilton. 7. Event chairwoman Dimity Carlson led a committee of more than 50 volunteers. 8. Tait Borbas serves wine at the museum benefit.

7

Photographs by James Branaman

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community

TAMPA

GASPARILA 2014 Gasparilla 101 studied the history of the piratesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; club, decade by decade, in song and dance from jazz age to disco. Nearly 1,000 guests attended the annual ceremonies at the Tampa Convention Center in March. 1. Former Gasparilla king and captain James W. Warren III and his wife, Samantha, celebrate his 50th year of membership in the pirate club. 2. Jim Judy and Ye Mystic Krewe of Gasparilla honor his wife, Bonnie Hall Judy, who was the 51st queen in 1964. 3. Royal pages to Ye Mystic Krewe of Gasparilla. 4. Ye Mystic Krewe of Gasparilla King Joseph Taggart and Queen Sara K. Ennis rule the 101st royal court.

1 4

2 3

Photographs by Amy Scherzer

        

 

    



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community

ST. PETERSBURG

1

2

ALL CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL CHARITY BALL A Marrakesh marketplace and other Moroccan accents set the stage for the 83rd annual event, presented by the All Children’s Hospital Guild Evening Branch in late January.

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1. All Children’s Hospital Foundation vice president Sylvia Ameen, foundation executive vice president Jenine Rabin, hospital president Dr. Jonathan Ellen and Dr. Laura Drach. 2. Mood lighting sets the tone in the historic Coliseum. 3. Ellen and Drach address the more than 350 guests. 4. Steering committee members Tricia Davidson, co-chairwomanelect; Cheryl Matala, chairwoman; and Janet Lynn, co-chairwomanelect. 5. Moroccan decor set the tone for the gala. 6. Blair Flowers, left, performs a tarot card reading for Pat Hilley. 7. Lee Greene with Cynthia and hospital board of trustees chairman Jay Fleece. 8. Sal and Gina Lacagnina dance to music performed by Southtown Fever. 9. The evening’s theme in lights.

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Photographs by James Branaman

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community

ST. PETE BEACH

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FIVE FABULOUS FEMALES Academy Prep Center of St. Petersburg’s annual “Friends and Flowers” event at the TradeWinds Island Grand Resort in February honored women community leaders. 1. Tonjua Williams of St. Petersburg College. 2. Honorees Beth Houghton, St. Petersburg Free Clinic; Jana Jones, Tampa Bay Times; Carol Morsani, volunteer and philanthropist; Mindy Grossman, HSN; and Williams. 3. Reciting the school pledge: current and former Academy Prep Center of St. Petersburg students with head of school Leanne Howard. 4. Television personality Rhonda Shear. 5. Morsani with Jonathan Dacres, a 2013 Academy Prep alumnus. 6. Houghton, center, and her husband, Scott Wagman. 7. Michelle Cohen, co-chairwoman for the fundraiser. 8. Grossman with Richard Spearman, Academy Prep Class of 2016.

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Photographs by Cherie Diez

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community ST. PETERSBURG

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ART IN BLOOM LUNCHEON Mixing celebrity anecdotes and floral-arranging tips at the annual fundraising luncheon, Chris Giftos, retired master floral designer and special events director at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, was a highlight of the annual March celebration. The Margaret Acheson Stuart Society produces the events to benefit the Museum of Fine Arts. 1. Art in Bloom luncheon committee co-chairwomen Glenn Mosby and Martha Buttner. 2. Maria Cantonis, center, and other patrons react to the designer’s presentation. 3. The Vinoy’s Grand Ballroom. 4. Using long-stemmed tulips, delphinium, lilies, orchids, and pussy willow, Giftos fills a tall vase. 5. Giftos’ boyhood friend Jack Contes. 6. Elizabeth Walters-Alison was co-chairwoman of Art in Bloom with Dale Wybrow (not shown). 7. Bonita Cobb, center, and other guests.

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Photographs by Cherie Diez

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’14 OCTOBER NOVEMBER

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4.13 LOS VINOS DE DALI: Annual guild benefit features food, wine, gallery access. 3 to 6 p.m. Dali Museum, 1 Dali Blvd., St. Petersburg. vinos.thedali. org.

4.17 HILLSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION PRESIDENT’S SHOWCASE: 6:30 p.m. Renaissance Hotel International Plaza, 4200 Jim Walter Blvd., Tampa. $175. (813) 253-7116. STAR POWER: Luncheon, fashion show benefit the Children’s Home. 10:30 a.m. Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort, 501 Fifth Ave. NE. $65. (727) 515-5958.

4.18 A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP LUNCHEON: Benefits CASA, Community Action Stops Abuse. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. St. Petersburg Yacht Club, 11 Central Ave. $50. (727) 895-4912, ext. 101.

4.23 SALUTE TO PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANTS: St. Anthony’s Hospital Auxiliary luncheon. Feather Sound Country Club, 2201 Feather Sound Drive, Clearwater. (727) 323-3441; (727) 545-2409.

4.26 LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS LUNCHEON: Features keynote speaker former U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder. 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. St. Petersburg Yacht Club, 11 Central Ave. $30. (727) 896-5197. CIRCLE OF FRIENDS DINNER: Benefits Friends of Joshua House Foundation; 7 p.m. Private Tampa home. $275; (813) 263-3469. NIGHT AT THE COPA: Benefits Florida Medical Clinic Foundation of Caring. 7 to 11 p.m.; TPepin’s Hospitality Centre, 4121 N 50th St,, Tampa. $200. (813) 783-9932.

5.2 BOLEY ANGELS MEMBERSHIP PARTY: Mary R. Koenig Center, 445 31st Ave. S, St. Petersburg. (727) 821-4819, ext. 5724. CHARI-TEA LUNCHEON: Fifth annual table-decorating challenge raises money toward meeting school readiness and educational needs of children in Community Pride Child Care. Table viewing: 11:30 a.m. Program and

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APRIL MAY

JUNE JULY

AUGUST SEPTEMBER

luncheon, noon to 1 p.m. Largo Community Center, 400 Alt. Keene Road, Largo. childcarepinellas.org; (727) 547-5764. WITH THESE HANDS BREAKFAST: Benefits Daystar Life Center. 7:30 a.m. Holy Name Catholic Church, 5800 15th Ave. S, St. Petersburg. Minimum $20 donation. (727) 498-8794.

5.3 MAGNOLIA BALL: 21st annual event benefits H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center; headliners Huey Lewis & the News, 5:30 p.m. A La Carte Event Pavilion, 4050 Dana Shores Drive, Tampa. Black tie. $1,000. (813) 7454860. MAN & WOMAN OF THE YEAR GALA: Benefits Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 6 p.m. Hilton Tampa Downtown, 211 N Tampa St. $150. mwoy.org/ sun; (813) 963-6461. MOTHER’S DAY LUNCHEON: Compassionate Friends support group event for parents who have lost a child. (727) 515-6336; (727) 447-0520. SEA GRAPES FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL: Benefits the Florida Aquarium, 701 Channelside Drive, Tampa. 8 to 11 p.m. seagrapes.org; (813) 273-4568. A TRIBUTE TO MOMS LUNCHEON FASHION SHOW: Benefits Brighter Tomorrows; 11 a.m.; Palma Ceia Country Club, 1600 S MacDill Ave., Tampa. $50. (813) 868-7705.

5.6 BREAKFAST OF HOPE: Fundraiser for Vincent House, which helps persons recovering from mental illnesses. 8 to 9 a.m. Pinellas Park Performing Arts Center, 4951 78th Ave. N. Free; donations received at event. Reservations accepted through April 21. (727) 541-0360.

5.8 GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON: Benefits American Heart Association; 10:30 a.m. A La Carte Event Pavilion, 4050 Dana Shores Drive, Tampa. $150; heart.org/tampabaygoredluncheon; (727) 563-8106.

5.9 TROPICAL NIGHTS GALA AUCTION: Benefits Keep Tampa Bay Beautiful. 7 to 11 p.m. Tampa Port Authority Cruise Terminal No. 3. $100. keeptampabaybeautiful.org; (813) 221-8733.


     

        

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calendar

CONTINUED

5.10 BELLA VOCE: Annual St. Petersburg Opera gala features performances by members of the company. VIP 6 p.m., general admission 7 p.m. Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First St. S. $200 VIP, $125 all others. (727) 823-2040.

 

 

5.14 CELEBRATION BREAKFAST: Seventh annual benefit for Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Club Child Care, Louise Graham Regeneration Center. Ruth Eckerd Hall, 1111 N McMullen-Booth Road, Clearwater. (727) 578-5437.

5.15 CELEBRATE ME HOME: Fundraiser for Heart Gallery of Pinellas and Pasco. 6 p.m. Tropicana Field, St. Petersburg. $100. heartgallerykids.org; (727) 456-0637.

5.17 MADAGASCAR, STORYBOOK BALL: Benefits Ronald McDonald House Charities of Tampa Bay; 6 p.m. Site to be announced. Black tie. $700 per couple. rmhctampabay.com; (813) 258-6430, ext. 2. PRIDE & PASSION: Benefits Tampa Museum of Art exhibitions. 8 p.m. 120 Gasparilla Plaza. $85 (includes one-year museum membership). (813) 421-8370.

5.24 ABILITIES WINE TASTING: 25th annual fundraiser benefits persons with disabilities, injured military veterans. Armed Forces History Museum, 2050 34th Way, Largo. VIP reception 6 to 9 p.m. $100, $150 after May 16, $175 at door. Grand tasting 7 to 9 p.m. $50, $75 after May 16, $85 at door. abilitiesfoundation.com; (727) 600-8911.

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BRINGING FRESHNESS TO THE TABLE From just-caught seafood to fresh culinary ideas, the Tampa Bay area offers a rich menu from which to choose. The June issue of Bay will focus on a variety of local food and drink options. At right, red snapper from the Gulf of Mexico, just west of St. Petersburg, from Save on Seafood Co., 1449 49th St. S, Gulfport. saveonseafoodmarket. com; (727) 323-0155.

COMING IN THE NEXT BAY Dining out locally has never been better. Join Bay magazine as it partners with Florida Trend in naming Tampa Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best restaurants. Look for the first-ever pullout section June 8. Photograph by Bob Croslin


Bay Magazine April 2014  

The Water Issue

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