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DRIVE TIME All you need to know about Interlagos and the 42nd Brazilian Formula One Grand Prix

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A R A B I A ’ S

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R. HADDOCK LOBO, 1397 55 11 3061 2203 JK AND IGUATEMI S H O P P I N G M A L L S ARABIA.COM.BR

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THE BEST OF THE CITY INSIDE THE CITY’S BEST HOTELS

You can also find copies of Time Out

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São Paulo magazine at the city’s best newsstands, at the SPTuris stands in Guarulhos and Congonhas airports, and at Movida Rent a Car.

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This month in São Paulo 15 November-14 December 2013

City Beat The word on the street.

www.timeout.com/sao-paulo

Shopping & Style

8

Features 10

Julia Louis-Dreyfus

The woman forever remembered as Elaine from Seinfeld speaks to us about her latest role in the new comedy, Enough Said.

Film 46 A celebration of the work of sci-fi author Philip K. Dick on celluloid, plus this month’s film reviews.

14

Driving force

São Paulo revs up for the 42nd edition of the Brazilian Formula One Grand Prix.

Gay & Lesbian49

ER COV RY O T S

Clubs, bars, cafés and outings: our pick of the city for SP’s LGBT crowd.

Food & Drink

Music & Nightlife

22

Feijoada feasts

A weekly staple across the country, feijoada is one of Brazil’s few truly national dishes, and can be sampled myriad ways in São Paulo.

Bars & Cafés

35

Football  54 Choosing Spain over Brazil has put

Occupying a former electricity substation, Red Bull Station is a brand new downtown arts space, home to artist residencies, a recording studio and more.

striker Diego Costa at the centre of a national controversy.

Sergio Coimbra/Press Image

42

50

Stevie Wonder, the legendary ‘voice of soul rapture’, comes to town.

What the recently opened ‘bar.’ lacks in naming creativity, it makes up for in deftly made cocktails.

Art & Museums

45

Pick up a one-of-a-kind gift at the annual Feira da Mata, bringing handicrafts from around 100 of Brazil’s forest communities.

SP Essentials 55 Essential information for visitors, Pest test Pineapple topped with a saúva ant from Alex Atala’s new book

and a handy city map. Also, join us on Instagram @timeoutsp for a chance to see your images in print.

Quote of the month

Cover design Bia Gomes Cover photography Shutterstock

Lost Art/Red Bull/Press Image

Look out for the magazine in Portuguese, too.

I find a lot of things funny, but I love it when I get to play humiliation and awkwardness. That really is just the best when you’re a comedian.  A room of one’s own Fabi Faleiros, a resident artist at Red Bull Station

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Actor See page 10

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Some addresses are meant to be shared

Sense of detail and service of a Palace combined with a warm and family atmosphere. Hôtel - la Grand’ViGne restaurant - la table du laVoir - Caudalie spa - and muCH more... ★★★★★

Chemin de smith Haut lafitte 33650 bordeaux-martillac t. +33 (0)5 57 83 83 83 www.sources-caudalie.com

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City Beat

Nico Nemer/Futura Press

The big Picture

Facing traffic In a city as populous as São Paulo, people watching is an easy pursuit for the observant. Twenty faces that are impossible to miss, however, are the six-metre-tall black-and-white photo portraits of inquisitive, concerned and hopeful paulistanos, dressing up the supporting columns of the Minhocão (see São Paulo insider below). The images by Raquel Brust – part of an exhibition entitled ‘Giganto’ – are part of the PhotoEspaña.br festival. Until 25 January.

catherine balston

São Paulo insider Top tips from the Time Out team Pedestrian life’s not easy in SP – except for a few hours each evening and all day Sunday when you can wander right through the heart of the city. Like a no-frills, improvised version of New York’s High Line park, the Minhocão is a raised expressway that carves a path from Barra Funda to Centro, passing just a few feet in front of people’s front rooms. Pick up a coconut water and amble alongside runners, cyclists, skaters, dog walkers and kids towards the aging downtown spires. Catherine Balston, Deputy Editor (English). The Minhocão is officially called the Elevado Presidente Costa e Silva, and is closed to traffic 9.30pm-6am Mon-Sat; all day Sunday. 8 timeout.com/sao-paulo  November 2013 200 CITY BEAT NEW_Bia_11Nov.indd 8

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Find us online … timeout.com/sao-paulo

Stay up to date with the best of what’s happening in São Paulo daily by heading to timeout.com/ sao-paulo. Join us on the social networks too: we’re on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Time Out São Paulo is published by Editora Dansville Ltda. Rua Valdir Niemeyer 58 Perdizes, São Paulo – SP 01257-080, Brasil. Tel +55 (11) 3071 3309 Email contato@guiatimeout.com.br Publisher Silvio Giannini

Follow us on Twitter for our daily pick of São Paulo’s best gigs, exhibitions and events @TimeOutSP_en

Tell us what you love about the city on our Facebook page – facebook.com/ timeoutsaopauloenglish

Snap São Paulo and share it with us on Instagram, using the hashtag #timeoutsp. Follow us at @timeoutsp

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Editorial Editor-in-Chief Claire Rigby Deputy Editor (English) Catherine Balston Deputy Editor (Portuguese) Fabiana Caso Contributing Assistant Editors Rafael Argemon, Juan Cifrian, CM Gorey Reporter Cecília Gianesi Translators Mariana Leite, Christopher Mack Proofreader Marina Monzillo Rio de Janeiro Editor Alice Moura

From art exhibitions to gigs, festivals, historic tours, and the inside track on hundreds of bars, botecos, cafés and restaurants, timeout.com/sao-paulo is packed with the best São Paulo has to offer.

Coming up online

Design Art Director Bia Gomes Design Intern Rafaela Garcez Print Production Marcus Vinicius Lopes Contributors Cath Clarke, Guy Lodge, Keith Uhlich, Tom Hennigan​ Advertising (11) 3071 3309, ext. 22 Sales Director Elcio Farigo Account Managers Luciana Gomes, Luiz Guerreiro

Press image

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Marketing and Distribution (11) 3071 3309, ext. 18 Marketing & New Business Director Virgínia Castro Administration Finance Analyst Sueli Maria da Silva

São Silvestre run A 15km

run is the last thing on most people’s minds come New Year’s Eve. Not so for the keen beans in the annual São Silvestre race. Sign up by 30 Nov. j.mp/TOSP_ssrun13

Perfume de Princesa A 300-metre olfactory installation snakes through two of the city’s historic buildings, Casa da Imagem and Solar da Marquesa de Santos. Until 2 Feb 2014. j.mp/TOSP_perfp

last month’s most viewed

Time Out São Paulo is published under the authority of and in collaboration with Time Out International Ltd London UK. The name and logo of Time Out are used under license from Time Out Group Ltd, 251 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 7AB, UK +44 (0)20 7813 3000. www.timeout.com © Copyright Time Out Group Ltd 2013 Time Out Group Chairman Tony Elliott International MD David Woodley International Content Director Marcus Webb International Editor Chris Bourn International Art Director Anthony Huggins

Vila Madalena shopping guide The hills of Vila Madale-

na are home to small designers such as Juliana Bicudo and her colourful shoes and printed scarves. j.mp/TOSP_vilamshop

No payment of any kind has secured or influenced a review in this publication. Time Out maintains a strict policy of editorial independence, and advertisers are never guaranteed special treatment of any kind: an advertiser may receive a bad review or no review at all.

Catherine Balston

Grmisiti /press image

Fernando Martins Ferreira /Press image

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the publisher cannot accept reponsibility for any errors it may contain.

Ten jazz bars With a rash of

new bars opening up over the last few years, jazz is coming back into fashion in São Paulo. Find out where to go to tune in, with a drink in hand. j.mp/TOSP_jzbrs

Printed in Brazil by Gráfica Eskenazi Distributed by Euromag (11) 3473 9178

Bolivian market For a

taste of the Bolivian altiplano, head to the small but colourful Sunday market at Praça Kantuta, in Pari, for empanadas, ceviche and lechón. j.mp/TOSPbol

The key to our five-star rating system

We love it It’s great We like it Just tepid ... meh

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LACEY TERRELL/PRESS IMAGE

The

TIME OUT interview

Just say Julia The Seinfeld star talks to David Fear about her love of comic humiliation, and working with the late actor James Gandolfini on her newest film, Enough Said

W

e’re used to seeing Julia Louis-Dreyfus humiliate herself for our amusement: That painfully bad, grandmal wedding dance on Seinfeld, or the sheer volume of scenes involving her suffering the slings and arrows of Beltway media types on HBO’s Veep. The 52-year-old comedian has no problem going to unflattering places for a laugh; as Nicole Holofcener’s Enough Said dem-

onstrates, however, she’s equally comfortable playing things closer to the heart. As a divorced massage therapist who finds love once more in the arms of James Gandolfini (in his penultimate role), Louis-Dreyfus brings a sense of pathos to this woman experiencing a second chance at romance – when she’s not trying to let on that she knows some secrets about her new potential paramour. Time Out talked to the Artist Formerly Known as Elaine at the Toronto Film Festival, where she chatted about cringe-comedy, her separated-at-birth bond with the film’s director, and working with the late, great Gandolfini.

How would you describe Eva? She’s a woman who’s facing all these changes – her daughter leaving for college, this sense of being romantically stuck in a rut – that are wreaking an emotional havoc on her to an extent she’s not even aware of. Then she meets somebody who likes her – and she proceeds to do this horrible, horrible thing. Of course she does, right? She’s got a little problem with relationship boundaries. And somebody doing some horrible, horrible thing made her easily relatable, I take it?

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The

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Naturally! [Laughs] No, I mean, I understood the character from the get-go. I’m not saying that I would do what she did in the same situation… I hope I would act better than that. But really, that’s what drew me in initially: this is not some over-the-top role; this was someone who seemed like the kind of person you’d actually meet in L.A. She’s a masseuse who takes care of everybody but who can’t take care of herself. The idea that, yeah, I know who she is … that whole idea came really quick.

Certainly not as consistently as she is. Those kinds of things have largely moved to TV now. Right. There are these very real, raw, dialoguedriven moments in her films that I don’t really see onscreen anymore. So yes, I’d wanted to work with her for a while. When we finally met, we immediately hit it off. We’re sister soul mates. We both had this reaction of, Wait, why hadn’t we met before now? Why did it take this long? Your comic sensibilities seem like they’re really similar. They are, but it’s more than that: We live in the same town, we’re roughly the same age, we each have kids that are the same age…seriously, why haven’t we been doing this for ages? And we were pretty much in cahoots with how we pictured Eva, though I felt it was important that, at one point or another, you see this character at least try to do the right thing in terms of this mess she’s in. It wasn’t really there in the beginning, but I really did think that you needed to

Lacey Terrell/PRESS IMAGE

Were you a fan of Nicole Holofcener’s work? A big fan. I was a huge admirer of her movies. I mean, is anyone besides Nicole even making these kinds of movies any more? The kind where people who are over 30 talk about bad decisions and life struggles and failures? And do it in a way that’s funny?

Comic relief Director Nicole Holofcener (left), James Gandolfini and Julia Louis-Dreyfus share a laugh

see that she wants to avoid total catastrophe, even if she doesn’t. Nicole eventually came around to that notion as well. Eva is the embodiment of that maxim about good intentions. She walks down a well-paved road, for sure. You seem to have a knack for playing characters that can seem unlikable and selfcentered. I mean, you were on a show that pushed the idea of how unlikable someone could be and still be funny… ‘No learning, no hugging.’ Yup.

Yet you manage to find both comedy and a sympathetic center in these flawed people, wouldn’t you say? It’s easier with this role, because Eva is a much nicer person than some of the other characters I’ve played. The nicest people can make mistakes. I’m counting myself in there: I’d like to think I’m a good person – and I screw up all the time. So I see where she’s coming from. I find a lot of things funny, but I love it when I get to play humiliation and awkwardness. That really is just the best when you’re a comedian.  Elaine, (Veep’s) Selina Meyer, Eva: They all seem to suffer through extraordinary moments of social embarrassment. So that’s your niche, huh?  Shame and humiliation are my comic bread and butter.

Lacey Terrell/PRESS IMAGE

You and James Gandolfini have a great chemistry here. What was it like working with him? He is such – was such – a gifted actor that it was easy to do long, conversation-driven scenes with him. I mean, I love doing those kinds of scenes anyway, and a lot of work always goes into making two people talking onscreen seem natural. With Jim, though, it really did feel natural; he was incapable of being a liar when he was acting. I know that sounds a little weird to say, right? But there was a genuineness to the way he played those moments with me that you really felt like you right there. The man was a generous actor, 100 percent. It was a joy to work with him. Sitting pretty Leading lady Louis-Dreyfus (left), director Holofcener and co-star Catherine Keener on set

Enough Said (À Procura do Amor) is released on 6 December. See review in Film.

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PLAYING IN TRAFFIC The first corner, named after Ayrton Senna, is one of the most exciting in F1

Emotion in

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tion

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SHUTTERSTOCK

WINNING FORMULA The German driver Sebastian Vettel has dominanted the last four seasons

I

t’s curious that an elite sport like Formula One draws the attention that it does in a country with a social class divide as large as Brazil’s and a population that is notoriously passionate about football. Perhaps this love for Formula One is deeply rooted in the hearts of Brazilians because they have grown used to seeing the green and yellow flag billowing high above the podium since the ’70s, first with the trail-blazing Emerson Fittipaldi, then the irreverent Nelson Piquet and finally the late, great Ayrton Senna. And yet in recent times, the country hasn’t seen another of its sons crowned as champion, which brings to light a characteristic peculiar to fans here: Brazilians value winning – even if the victor is not one of their own – as long as it’s the fruit of art and done with panache. This may explain why, despite the lack of contemporary stars and with Sebastian Vettel’s fourth consecutive championship already in the bag, the unpredictable nature of the traditional circuit at Interlagos – which once again brings the Formula One season to a close – still draws crowds to spectacular races as it did in 2007, when Finn Kimi Raikkonen, a longshot title contender entering the race, surprised everyone, and in 2008, when Brit Lewis Hamilton snatched the cup from the hands of Brazilian Felipe Massa on the last bend of the last lap. As for Massa, this could have been his Formula One swan song, having lost his ride at Ferrari to Raikkonen, his former teammate on the Italian team during the 2007 and 2008 seasons. But for the 45th consecutive season, Brazil will have a local Formula One driver, as Massa has since signed a three-year deal with the now-decadent Williams team, which has seen better days with Brazilian pilots such as Senna, Piquet and Rubens Barrichello. Massa will replace the Venezuelan driver, Pastor Maldonado, who swooped into Raikkonen’s vacated spot at Lotus.

RAIN, SWEAT, AND BEER

Sebastian Vettel is following in the footsteps of his compatriot, seven-time champion Michael Schumacher, to become one of the most frequent winners in the sport’s history. With his fourth Formula One crown already guaranteed at only 26 years of age, the youngest four-time champion of all time returns to Interlagos in search of his second victory on the iconic race course. But despite his dominance throughout the year and his desire to close out his 2013 campaign with an emphatic win, the German driver’s victory is far from guaranteed. Be it down to the traditionally irregular surface at Autódromo José Carlos Pace, or Sao Paulo’s erratic climate, where scorching sun and torrential rain change places with impressive speed, the Interlagos circuit is one of the most unpredictable ones on the race calendar. No one embraces that more than the rowdy Interlagos crowd. Aided by healthy doses of ice cold beer, the exuberant fans bring the grandstands to life, especially when they witness sudden changes to the outcome of the race. Because whether the winner is Vettel, Spaniard Fernando Alonso, or Lewis Hamilton, it’s the performance – in which the supporters play a vital role – which reigns supreme. Unless, of course, the local favourite Massa takes the checkered flag – in which case, all bets are off. Rafael Argemon

RACE SCHEDULE FRIDAY 22/11 • 10-11.30am – F1 Practice 1 • noon-12.35pm – Porsche Cup Practice • 2-3.30pm – F1 Practice 2 • 3.55-4.30pm – Porsche Challenge Practice

SATURDAY 23/11 • 11am-noon – F1 Practice 3 • 2-3pm – F1 Qualifying • 3.30-4.05pm – Porsche Cup Qualifying • 4.35-5.10pm – Porsche Challenge Qualifying

SUNDAY 24/11 • • • •

9.15-9.50am – Porsche Challenge Race 10.15-10.50am – Porsche Cup Race 12.30pm – F1 Drivers’ Parade 2pm – 42nd Brazilian F1 Grand Prix

The 42nd Brazilian Formula One Grand Prix is at the Autódromo José Carlos Pace, Avenida Senador Teotônio Vilela 261, Interlagos (5666 8822/gpbrasil.com.br) on 24 November, 2pm. Tickets R$262-$2,720 (see opposite page).

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INTERLAGOS

by Tom Hennigan

The historic, illustrious course is a perennial highlight on the F1 calendar To the uninitiated, the Autódromo José Carlos Pace (to give Interlagos its full name) might look like a scruffy, elderly relative of F1’s gleaming newcomer circuits like Abu Dhabi and Shanghai. But it’s one of the sport’s most beloved venues, and the Brazilian Grand Prix an eagerly anticipated weekend in the year’s racing calendar, thanks to the country’s fame as a party kind of place. The atmosphere at Interlagos on race day is proof enough that Brazilians do indeed know how to party. Things get started early, with people passing the time between bagging a good seat and the start of the race by downing gallons of beer. It continues, famously, away from the track when, so it’s said, São Paulo’s sex industry is stretched to the limits to keep up with demand, despite reinforcements arriving from beyond the city limits.

Beyond the less salubrious details of the annual event’s charms, the secret to the spell Interlagos casts over the racing community is something increasingly rare in F1: it’s a venue steeped in history. Many of the sport’s most famous drivers have raced and won on this track, which is renowned for producing memorable contests and – thanks to its position towards the end of the F1 calendar – for crowning new champions. This is also the same circuit on which local boy and racing legend Ayrton Senna won in 1991 and 1993, after honing his skills as a kid on the kart track behind the main course. Safety concerns have led to many of the sport’s traditional circuits being modernised beyond all recognition, while F1 chief Bernie Ecclestone’s plans to conquer new markets in the Middle East and Asia have seen his favourite architect, Hermann

Tilke, build a string of new tracks there that are dismissed by race fans and commentators alike as sterile products designed for the demands of television. In contrast, at Interlagos, hemmed in on all sides by São Paulo’s sprawl, there has been no redesign, helping to preserve the track’s mystique. Its old-school days are now numbered, though: in October, SP’s Mayor Haddad signed a contract with Ecclestone that guarantees F1’s continuation in SP up to 2020, as long as the circuit is brought up to standards. As part of the deal, Haddad has committed to reforms in time for 2015’s Grand Prix. For now, the garages are still crammed close together in what is one of F1’s most claustrophobic pit lanes – and with the competing teams of mechanics and engineers at such close quarters, Interlagos is famous among the crews for the banter missing from the new and spaciously-redesigned courses. The crowd, too, is packed in close to the track, and enjoys some of the best views in F1. The first corner – now named after Senna – is one of the most exciting in the year’s racing calendar; while the final uphill bend, swinging into the home straight with the stands towering above, is one of the most glorious sights and awesome sounds in racing. The crowds on race days are, along with the tifosi in Italy, the sport’s most fanatical, raised on the stories of local champions such as Emerson Fittipaldi, who won the inaugural Brazilian Grand Prix back in 1973 – and of course Senna, who no Brazilian can think of as anything other than the all-time greatest. ‘The Brazilians are more passionate than most other fans. They live and breathe the sport, like they do with football. Walk into any lanchonete around the circuit, and there are pictures of Senna on the walls,’ says Stuart Turvey, an English driver with Dragão Motorsport. Dragão is one of the many teams that makes up the racing community based in Interlagos. Many fans only visit the neighbourhood once a year for the Formula One jamboree, but for teams like Turvey’s Dragão, racing in the sport’s lower divisions such as Formula 3, the neighbourhood is the hub of a year-round industry. Those with tickets for Saturday’s racing are invited to visit the Dragão Motorsport garage at the Senna kart track behind the main course, where Dragão will be competing in the F3 race after the F1 time trials.

GUIDE TO THE STANDS

A

Located just before the final straight, this is a good spot to watch the start. You can also see the ‘Curva do Café’ where drivers jockey for position before going into the ‘Senna S’. TV screens display the action at other points in the circuit. This is one of the longest grandstands, and runs alongside a good portion of the pit-lane, one of the longest pit-lanes of all Formula One circuits. R$695, R$347.50 reductions (tickets sold out).

B

A covered, concrete grandstand, it has a view of all the cars on the starting grid. Food and refreshments are included in the ticket price, with sandwiches, fruit, yogurt, water, juice, soda and beer available. R$2,630 (No disabled access).

D

Located bang on the ‘Senna S’, this covered grandstand has a head-on view of the start as cars accelerate off the grid, and as they

brake hard to go into the first bend of the ‘S’ – a classic overtaking spot. R$2,260, R$1,230 reductions.

E

This covered, tubular grandstand, at the end of the ‘Senna S’, has TV screens so that audiences can watch other points on the circuit, and keep track of lap times. The same food and refreshments as grandstand B are available and included in the ticket price. R$2,720.

F

This small covered grandstand is right at the start of the ‘reta oposta’ – the straight just after the ‘Senna S’. It affords a great view of the cars in the pit lane, and their jockeying for position as they exit the pit back onto the circuit. R$1,350, R$675 reductions.

G

As the grandstand with the cheapest tickets, G is a safe bet for the stand with the liveliest atmosphere. The lack of cover means no shelter from the sun or rain, but its location on the ‘reta oposta’ has some good viewing spots: at one end you can see the cars that are first out of the ‘Senna S’ and the other end has a good view of the overtaking tussles in the middle of the circuit. R$525, R$262 reductions.

offer a fine view of the checkered flag. R$1,450, R$725 reductions.

V

At the end of the ‘reta oposta’, this grandstand offers the best view of the middle section of the circuit, where some of the most exciting parts of the race take place, particularly when it rains. The covered grandstand has the same food service as in grandstand B. R$1,990.

M

Right in front of the pits, this grandstand gets you up close to the adrenaline as the teams rush to get fresh tyres on in record time. The covered grandstand’s location at the start/finish line

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WHERE TO BUY TICKETS

RAIN OR SHINE Interlagos is notorious for its erratic weather, so it’s prudent to pack rainwear

ONLINE Online at gpbrasil.com.br. A Brazilian CPF number is required to buy online.

SHOPPING IGUATEMI (2nd floor), Avenida Brigadeiro Faria Lima 2232, Jardim Paulistano (3048 7305/ iguatemisp.com.br).

SHOPPING JK IGUATEMI (3rd floor), Avenida Juscelino Kubitschek 2041, Vila Olímpia (3152 6800/3152 6809/ jkiguatemi.com.br).

BETO ISSA/F1 GP BRASIL

SHOPPING IGUATEMI CAMPINAS

GETTING THERE

(1st floor) Avenida Iguatemi 777, Vila Brandina, Campinas (3131 4646/Iguatemi. com.br/campinas).

CAÇULA DE PNEUS STORES Citywide (3040 6464/ caculadepneus.com.br).

DON’T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT

BY TRAIN Take the Line 9 CPTM train (Esmeralda) towards Grajaú and get off at Autódromo station. It’s 600 metres’ walk to the racetrack – follow the crowds.

BY BUS Check the SPTrans website for information on regular shuttle buses (sptrans.com.br).

BY TAXI Ask the driver to take you to Autódromo de Interlagos. Coming back the other way, you’ll find taxi stands close to the track.

SUN SCREEN

Better safe than sorry: most grandstands are uncovered

EARPLUGS

The engine roars at close range can be deafening

RAINCOAT

Umbrellas are not allowed in the Autódromo

BY CAR Follow signs along Avenida das Nações Unidas and Avenida Interlagos.

OTHER EVENTS

There’s no substitute for Formula One’s main event, but race fans may enjoy these alternative Interlagos events

LUCA BASSANI/PRESS IMAGE

categories. Don’t miss Saturday’s qualifier, where points will count towards the championship. See porschegt3cup.com.br for more information.

PORSCHE GT3 CUP Formula One isn’t the only game in town over the Grand Prix weekend – Brazil’s Porsche GT3 Cup will rev things up in between the F1 events from Friday to Sunday with its Cup and Challenge

THE 10TH AYRTON SENNA RACING DAY With the dust still settling after the Grand Prix’s dazzling display of speed, Interlagos will once again honour one of F1’s all-time greats, Ayrton Senna, by welcoming people to circle the track in a different way – with their feet. The annual 42-km road race can be run by groups of two, four or eight people, who will have the chance to cross the

track’s finish line. Proceeds go to the Instituto Ayrton Senna, helping young Brazilians. Autódromo José Carlos Pace, Avenida Senador Teotônio Vilela 261, Interlagos. 1 December, 8am. R$110 per person. Registration at ayrtonsennaracingday.com.br.

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Food & Drink

The best restaurants, bars and cafés 22 35

ALEXANDRE SCHNEIDER/PRESS IMAGE

Eating Out Bars & Cafés

Made in Brazil ‘Arroz de Carreteiro’ rice dish (R$75), on a limited-edition menu at Brasil a Gosto

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Eating Out Melting pot

meat free Veget arians m c

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Wednesdays and Saturdays are the days when pots filled with sausages, black beans and nose-to-tail pieces of pork bubble away for hours up and down the country. They’re the traditional days for eating feijoada – one of just a handful of dishes here in Brazil, where regional cuisines are as diverse as the origins of their people, that might be called a truly national dish. Served up as a combination of dark, savoury pork stew, rice, golden farofa (toasted manioc flour), orange slices and piles of bright green kale, the dish is colourful, varied and well balanced. Its origins, however, divide: it’s popularly thought to have been invented by Afro-Brazilian slaves, who devised the dish using different food scraps in the cauldron of black beans. History, on the other hand, suggests that the dish is derived from the Portuguese white-bean dish of the same name; the reality may be a combination of the two. Where there is more consensus, however, is around how it should be eaten: slowly, in good company, over the course of an afternoon; kicked off with cold beer and topped off with a dose of cachaça in a favourite spot. And in an ideal world, with someone else having done all the hard work: this is the epitomy of slow food, involving – if done the traditional way – the overnight desalting of pork and the soaking of beans, followed by hours of simmering before serving. Read on for some of our favourite spots for indulging in a rich, savoury feijoada. At the top of the scale, whitetable-clothed establishments charge premium prices for their feijoadas. Dinho’s (Alameda Santos 45, Vila Mariana, 3016 5333, dinhos.com. br), famed for its steaks, turns its menu over to feijoada (R$96) on Wednesdays and Saturdays, serving a buffet of salads and

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Set aside a few hours to enjoy one of Brazil’s national dishes, feijoada. Juan Cifrian, Catherine Balston and Marina Monzillo lead the way

Meat feast The award-winning feijoada at Bolinha is one of the more varied, albeit pricey, options in São Paulo

antipasti alongside the steaming pots of stew. The creative salads are one of the big draws at the lunch-only Beth Cozinha de Estar (Rua Pedroso Alvarenga 1061, Itaim Bibi, 3073 0354) to accompany the Wednesday and Saturday feijoada (R$53 and R$68 respectively), laid out in separate pots, for diners to pick and mix the bits of sausage and pork they want;

places to go. Their version is served at the table and comes complete with pork chops, ribs, and leg, as well as bacon, sausage, breaded, fried banana, kale, rice and orange. At the more modest end of the scale, you’ll find an abundance of spirited bars and restaurants, packed with character, where feijoada goes hand in hand with a caipirinha and perhaps a spot of

If you end up lingering for the whole afternoon, the waiter may just bring you a saideira – one for the road, on the house a get-out clause for those put off by the nose-to-tail eating – think ears, tongue and other offal – that traditionally comes as standard. At nearby Bolinha (Avenida Cidade Jardim 53, Jardim Europa, 3061 2010, bolinha.com.br), the feijoada doesn’t come cheap (R$98 Mon-Fri; $116 on weekends and public holidays) and is served every day of the week, and not just at lunch, either. When it comes to quality, this is one of the best

samba, fuelling partygoers well into the evening. Loosen your belt, clear your schedule and read on for some of the more fun places at which to indulge. Bar do Betinho This is a real family affair, with grandpa Betinho on caipirinha detail at the bar, son Betinho manning the kitchen, and grandson Ricardo running all other aspects of the business. Bar do Betinho

boldly claims to serve the best feijoada in bustling Vila Madalena, and judging by the crowds on Wednesdays and Saturdays, they may just be right. Something of an institution, Bar do Betinho has been serving cold chope since 1952, introducing a set lunch option in 1988, and just last month upscaling to a larger location across the road. With little of the homely ambience of the original, the new location spans two floors, with bicycle-themed decor (the younger Betinho is a bike enthusiast and blogger), such as stair-rails fashioned out of bike frames, adding a little interest to an otherwise sparse space. The family feijoada recipe, however, is as good as ever. By slow-cooking the beans and meat separately, Ricardo says they’re able to strip out more fat than competing feijoadas, resulting in a lighter meal and a less lethargic aftermath. The feijoada isn’t the only thing worth queuing up for here, however: don’t miss the fried manioc – crunchy batons with meltingly soft centres (R$18, or included in

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Feijoada da Lana Dispensing with the twice-weekly protocol, you can eat feijoada any day of the week at this no-frills Vila Madalena spot, set in a small bungalow, where the best tables are to be found out in the bright, leafy covered yard. A lighter feijoada is served during the week (R$37), while the weekends see the fixed price rise to R$60, with added extras thrown in, including all-you-can-drink caipirinhas (the all-you-can-drink-aspect being best approached with prudence) – a watery version of the cachaça, sugar and lime favourite, served in jugs at the bar. Fried manioc and bean soup are also weekend extras. The latter might seem like an odd precursor to a bean stew, but roll with it. Ladle yourself a mug full and sprinkle on a choice of chopped raw garlic, spring onion and dedo de moça chilli slices. And load a plate with salty, crunchy chunks of pork scratching on your way back to the table. Service is distinctly hands-off here – as is often the case with buffets. The feijoada takes centre stage inside, with clay cauldrons bubbling away, each loaded with a different type of pork, such as ribs, ears, sausage or loin, flanked by the requisite accompaniments – and if you’re along for the ride but in the mood for something other than feijoada, there are à la carte options too. In the unlikely scenario that

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Bar do Giba The saying goes that cariocas – Rio de Janeiro natives – who move to São Paulo, tend to live in the Southern neighbourhood of Moema. That way, they’re just a short hop to the domestic airport Congonhas and can beat a hasty retreat to the beaches back home as soon as the weekend comes around. But there is one reason to stick around, and it can be found right in the heart of Moema. Bar do Giba is a boteco with the same laid-back vibe and the same perfectly-seasoned feijoada as you’ll find in the most popular Rio feijoada spots, such as Bar do Mineiro, in Santa Teresa, and Academia da Cachaça, in Leblon. The charismatic Giba opened this bar on a quiet corner back in 1987 and decked it out like a traditional grocery, with bottles, photos and football memorabilia lining the walls. There’s no menu, just suggestions scribbled up on blackboards, and you’ll only discover the prices if you ask. Feijoada is served on Saturdays, and you’ll need to get there bang on opening (1pm) to bag a table out on the street. If faced with a wait, get started with an order of the excellent mixed pastéis (R$45.60 for 12) – deep-fried pastries stuffed with either beef, cheese, creamy palm heart or prawns with a hint of Bahian seasoning. The full feijoada may seem steep at R$108, but it’s generously proportioned, with the pot of meat and beans easily feeding three to four people, though the side orders of rice, farofa, kale, orange slices

and fried banana are scarcely enough for two. Extra portions of rice can be ordered for R$12. If you end up lingering for the whole afternoon, the waiter may just bring you a saideira – one for the road, on the house. Avenida Moaci 574, Moema (5535 9220). Open 5.30pm-1am Tue-Fri; 1pm1am Sat; noon-7pm Sun. Prices feijoada R$108.

Food & Drink

the fixed price on Saturday). Rua Wisard 264, Vila Madalena (3813 4037/bardobetinho.com.br). Open 11.30am-3pm Mon-Fri; 12.30pm5pm Sat. Prices feijoada R$31.70 Wed, R$45.90 Sat.

Swine time Each cut of pork is served in a separate pot at Genuíno

you’ve got room left, help yourself to the buffet of traditional Brazilian desserts included in the price, such as pudim de leite (custard flan) and coconut and egg quindim – though be warned, if you didn’t grow up eating these desserts, the sugar levels might make your eyes water. Rua Aspicuelta 421, Vila Madalena (3814 9191). Open noon-3.30pm Mon-Fri; noon-5:30pm Sat, Sun Prices feijoada R$37-$60; main courses R$23-$33.

Breaking it down

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Maní gives feijoada a contemporary facelift With more and more comfort foods getting contemporary makeovers in SP, it’ll come as no surprise to discover that feijoada has already followed suit. At the award-winning Maní, the same creative approach that pervades its menu is applied to its feijoada deconstruída (deconstructed feijoada) – a dish in which pig’s trotter carpaccio is served with black bean spheres, mini cubes of orange, fried kale and toasted manioc flour (farofa) Price R$40. See listings.

Genuíno Flanked by bars and restaurants on a busy Vila Mariana strip, Genuíno draws a young crowd for its Saturday feijoada. The combination of live music – the same band, Varanda Paulista, have been playing chorinho and MPB here on Saturdays for more than 12 years – the verdant setting, with tables out in the back garden amongst the bamboos, ferns and ipê trees, and the excellent feijoada, encourage groups to make an afternoon of it. A retractable roof ensures that the feast goes on, come rain or shine. The pork is sourced from the Mercado Municipal, with the preparation of the meat beginning on Monday, and the slow-cooking on Thursday. And the result is a deliciously rich and nourishing stew. A pig’s head may crown the buffet table but you won’t find any offal in the feijoada – each lean cut of pork, as well as sausage, is served in a separate pot. To drink, Brahma is on tap (R$6.90), or help yourself to the complimentary batidas – little mugfuls of creamy fruit and cachaça cocktail – to bookend the feast. Rua Joaquim Távora 1217, Vila Mariana (5083 4040/genuinochopp.com.br). Open 5.30pm-1am Mon-Fri, noon1am Sat, Sun. Prices feijoada R$59.80; main courses R$28$82.50; cover R$12 Sat, Sun.

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Diner’s digest

D.O.M. Rediscovering Brazilian Ingredients

Culinary comings and goings around town

Alex Atala opens the door to Brazil’s larder, says Catherine Balston

aims to create fair and sustainable supply chains for those ingredients. Atala has got a long way still to go with this ambition, as readers will realise to their frustration when they dive into the book’s recipes. Of the sixty recipes, more than half feature ingredients that you won’t find in São Paulo’s wealth of supermarkets and delis. And only a handful – those using Brazil’s few successful exports, namely cachaça, Brazil nuts and tapioca – are doable abroad. Some are one-liners – take the cube of pineapple topped with a lemongrass-tasting saúva ant, for example. Others fill entire pages and involve the mastery of modern techniques like sous vide and foams, using

Toasty Alex Atala, snapped round the camp fire by photographer Edu Simões

the sorts of gadgets – Pacojet and Thermomix, for example – that you won’t find in most kitchen cupboards. Others open with instructions to pickle, infuse or cure for as many as 30 days. But then, nobody gets to be one of the top chefs in the world by keeping things simple. Those not up for the recipe challenge will still find Atala to be a natural storyteller and a passionate advocate for his country’s cuisine; and his food – photographed in dramatic, sharp focus, with vibrant colours against black backgrounds – to be fascinating. So look, read, salivate and learn. And then book a trip to the North, or a table at D.O.M., to continue the culinary adventure.

D.O.M. – Rediscovering Brazilian Ingredients is published by Phaidon (RRP £35; $49.95 US); and in Brazil by Editora Melhoramentos (R$149).

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Gilded Lime and banana ravioli with crème pâtissière and priprioca caramel

Edu Simões/press image

Chayote, bacuri, cumaru and priprioca: heard of, let alone tried, any of these? You’re not alone. Most Brazilians, and 99.99 per cent of foreigners haven’t either. Which is what chef Alex Atala is hoping to change with his new book D.O.M. – Rediscovering Brazilian Ingredients, published internationally, in English, by Phaidon in September, and in Portuguese by Editora Melhoramentos in November. It’s a thrilling immersion into Brazil’s larder of native ingredients – one that is amongst the most diverse in the world, with the country’s jungles, forests, mountains, rivers, coasts and vast expanses of backland. Each ingredient is the theme for a section – with over forty in total – starting with a personal account by Atala and followed by a handful of recipes, some of which feature on the menu at his highly acclaimed São Paulo restaurant D.O.M. (see listings). A weighty hardback, the book looks like it was carved straight from the forest, with a rough, woody cover and lime-green edging. Atala writes in an easy yet informative way, sharing memories from throughout his career, from his research trips to the North of Brazil and recalling the characters he has met along the way. More importantly, perhaps, Atala shares his treatise on ingredients as a way to maintain local cultures and traditions, and to protect the land – something that he works towards through his ATA Institute, which

Jardim Ô Fiô From the team behind the craft beer bar Cervejaria Ô Fiô (see Bar listings), comes this pizza joint, where a beer sommelier advises diners on which one of 60 or so bottled brews to pair with each pizza. The restaurant boasts a handful of leafy outdoor seating spots, and its signature dish is stuffed pizza. Which are pies, in our book at least. Either way, they sound good. Rua José Jannarelli 437, Morumbi (3721 6636). Tempranillo Vinho & Cozinha Itaim Bibi is ground zero for the city’s burgeoning wine scene (see our round-up of the best wine bars j.mp/TOSP_10wine). Just a few blocks east, in Vila Nova Conceição, Tempranillo Vinho & Cozinha joins the ranks, serving up Iberian and Italian dishes, while to drink, there’s a single-minded approach with over 140 vintages of tempranillo, the Spanish grape variety used to make Rioja and the trendy Ribera del Duero, as well as some new world wines – all present on the menu here. Rua Jacques Felix 381, Vila Nova Conceição (3926 5121). Tokyo Rose Another sushi joint to get the gourmet-meets-glam treatment, Tokyo Rose looks set to be the trendiest restaurant opening in São Paulo this spring. With all the hallmarks of a no-expensesspared build, the two-storey space is striking, clad in black oriental trellising, with velvet banquettes and soft yellow lighting throughout. No-expenses-spared is one route into the menu, too, if you order the likes of wagyu beef in a sushi pair with black garlic (R$32) or with a ponzu sauce (R$36 for four slices). Rua Jerônimo da Veiga 457, Itaim Bibi (3168 9580/tokyorose.com.br).

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Food & Drink

Book review

Open Outdoor eating at Tokyo Rose

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Food & Drink

Restaurant listings How to use the listings This section lists our pick of the city’s restaurants, updated monthly to include new spots and rotate in other favourites. For each, we give a range of main course prices, disregarding unrepresentatively expensive dishes. We give a lunch price if available, and the cover charge (couvert), which includes bread, dips and so on, and which is always optional. If you don’t want it, just say so.

Food fair Feirinha Gastronômica

NEW means the restaurant has opened in the last couple of months. is for highly recommended. denotes restaurants with particularly good options for vegetarians. signals that the restaurant is popular with a gay crowd. means the restaurant has a bar worth visiting in its own right, whether or not you stay for dinner. signals free Wi-Fi for customers. BARGAIN marks budget dining spots.

Centro, Luz & Bom Retiro FRENCH La Casserole It first opened in 1954, and since then little has changed in this frozen-in-time bistro – which is no bad thing. The service is friendly and charming, and the food is good, solid, bourgeois cooking. The menu doesn’t pander or dumb down, though – there are classics like tripes à la mode de Caen and kidneys in beaujolais wine, alongside well cooked lamb and the tried-and-tested coq au vin. It’s worth spending a little time walking round the neighbourhood by day (be careful in the area after nightfall) to enjoy the small flower market nearby, and to get a flavour of the way São Paulo was before the wreckers’ balls took over. Largo do Arouche 346, Centro (3331 6283/ lacasserole.com.br). Metrô 3, República. Open noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight TueFri; 7pm-midnight Sat; noon-6pm Sun. Main courses R$38.50-$72.50; lunch R$42-$52; couvert R$10-$14. BRAZILIAN Varanda Copan Sitting at the foot of the Niemeyer-designed Copan, Varanda makes for a solid dining option should you find yourself famished on a busy night in Centro. A mix of professionals as well as groups of friends congregate mid-week to drink, chat and snack. Floor-to-ceiling windows offer wide views of the streetscape, still abuzz until late evening. The low-key menu matches the low-key vibe, with à la carte options including pasta and beef, or fish dishes such as grilled salmon topped with a tangy caper sauce (R$42). If you’re in that

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We visit restaurants anonymously and pay for our own food and drinks, and our listings are chosen entirely at the editors’ discretion. Unless marked ’No credit cards’, all these establishments accept major credit cards.

Settling into its new home in Praça Benedito Calixto, the Sunday food fair, the Feirinha Gastronômica, welcomes in a glut of new vendors in November, including the Argentinian Hugo Giordano, serving up his baked empanadas (R$6 each), with myriad fillings including ham, beef, and spinach and cheese. Keep an eye out in the coming months, too, for vendors from New York’s open-air epicurean extravaganza, the weekly Smorgasburg Market, as part of an ongoing exchange between the two fairs. The first import was chef Keizo Shimamoto, on 3 November, and his hyped hybrid, the ramen burger, with beef patties packed between fried noodle mounds in place of buns. 11am-7pm Sundays. Praça Praça Benedito Calixto 85, Pinheiros (feirinhagastronomica.com.br). See j.mp/TOSP_gastron.

part of town come the weekend, settle in for the popular lunch buffet (loaded with all the Brazilian favourites, and then some). Just don’t expect the best service in the world. Avenida Ipiranga 200, República (3120 4442/varandacopan. com.br). Metrô 3, República. Open 11.30am-midnight Mon-Sat. Main courses R$25-$40, lunch R$35.90 per kilo; couvert R$5-$10.

Consolação & Higienópolis AMERICAN 210 Diner Done out in the style of a classic American diner, albeit a swish, upgraded one, 210 Diner has quickly become a go-to spot in

Higienópolis for those in search of a hearty slice of Americana. We’d consider the mushroom-flecked macaroni cheese as a possible side order for our last-ever meal – consider, we said; and the tuna-melt sandwich ain’t half bad either. Burgers are a good choice too – get us a piggie burger while you’re in there, will you? It’s hunky and char-grilled, and topped with deboned pork ribs in barbecue sauce. Rua Pará 210, Higienópolis (3661 1219/210diner. com.br). Metrô 4, Paulista. Open noon3pm Mon; noon-3pm, 7-11.30pm Tue-Fri; noon-4pm, 7-11.30pm Sat; noon-4pm, 7-10.45pm Sun. Main courses R$16$52; lunch R$27-$49. FRENCH La Tartine You can’t go wrong with friendly La Tartine for an informal

bite to eat with friends. This small bistro has three cosy rooms: two on the ground floor and one upstairs, where you can also settle into one of the sofas while you wait – although don’t be surprised to find a queue forming down the stairs at weekends. The menu is small and reasonably priced, featuring traditional French fare such as quiche and salad, steak au poivre and coq au vin. Rua Fernando Albuquerque 267, Consolação (3259 2090). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open 7.30pm-12.30am MonSat. Main courses R$24-$38. BARGAIN INDIAN Madhu In a city as cosmopolitan as São Paulo, it’s a surprise to find so few options for food from the Indian subcontinent. So it’s an even bigger surprise to find a fast-food Indian restaurant that not only serves damn good curry, but serves it in combos featuring a top-notch array of side dishes. Chapatis come as standard, but there are tough choices to be made: which chutney? Rice, or flat appam rice-bread? Samosa or kofta? The easy bit is the bill – you can have the lot with change from a R$20 note. Rua Augusta 1422, Consolação (3262 5535/madhurestaurante.com.br). Open noon-10pm Mon-Wed; noon-11.30pm Thu; noon-midnight Fri; 1pm-1am Sat; 1-10.30pm Sun. Main courses R$12.90BARGAIN $24.90. ECLECTIC Mestiço A grand dame of fusion restaurants, GLS-friendly Mestiço continues to update itself by regularly changing the artwork and trying out new menu items, while sticking to its guns of good cooking. The water feature at the back and the table layout might be a tad dated, but the food continues to be a draw. Order the krathong thong – crunchy pastry with spicy Thai chicken and corn, with an extra sprinkle of chilli dust – and then a veggie or Thai curry for mains, and you’ll get decent portions served with steaming jasmine rice. Chocoholics will love the brownies – ask the waiter to load up on the sweet, custardy chocolate sauce. And as a finishing touch, the bill shouldn’t break the bank – a bonus in a city where restaurant prices can occasionally seem tantamount to daylight robbery. Rua Fernando de Albuquerque 277, Consolação (3256 3165/mestico.com.br). Metrô 4, Paulista. Open 11.45am-midnight Mon; 11.45am-1am Tue-Thu; 11.45am-2am Fri, Sat; 11.45am-midnight Sun. Main courses R$34-$72.50; lunch R$41-$44.

CONTEMPORARY Rex Restaurante Few things warm the heart more than a tale of one man and his dog. In the case of Rex, the funky late-night supper club from the chef Cassio Machado, the dog in question is one Baboo, Machado’s late Rottweiler. Baboo is reproduced in kitschy sculpture form by a number of local artists in the narrow, whimsical space. Soak up the eclectic, sensory overload decor as you browse the menu of creative burgers and simple bistro fare with a twist, like filet mignon with wasabi,

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Food & Drink

Lapa, Perdizes, & Barra Funda

ginger and rosemary (R$49), or salmon tweaked with a tart raspberry vinaigrette (R$54). Another pleasant surprise, beyond the sophisticated dining at 4am, are the wines by the glass, which you can try before you buy. Rua da Consolação 3193, Jardim Paulista (2506 7386/ rexrestaurante.com.br). Open 8pm-4am Mon-Sat; 6pm-2am Sun. Main courses R$28-$55; couvert R$6.50.

PERUVIAN Killa The food at this amiable

local eatery is not just Peruvian, but novoandina – ‘new Andean’. Peruvian cuisine is increasingly important and the novoandina concept is to mix pre-Hispanic cooking techniques with other elements like European cooking. Here at Killa, the emphasis is on Peru’s wonderful signature dish: the raw fish salad, ceviche. And it’s delicious, with lightly-flavoured, delicate flakes of fish gently bathed in citric flavours. Our only criticism? The small portions, which might leave customers with a big appetite still hungry after lunch. Rua Padre Chico 324 (08551 8511/killa. com.br). Open 7.30-11.30pm Tue-Thu; 7.30pm-midnight Fri; 12.30-4.30pm, 8pmmidnight Sat; 12.30-4.30pm Sun. Main courses R$28-$39.

CONTEMPORARY Sal Gastronomia From the outside, the black façade looks more like the entrance to a deviant dungeon than a fine dining experience. Venture round the back, and grab a seat in the courtyard – a space that the restaurant shares with cutting edge Galeria Vemelho – or inside where the narrow space would be claustrophobic were it not for the bustle of the kitchen seen behind a glass wall. The gnocchi were excellent, in a rich, tomato and lamb sauce, and the cupim – a cheap cut from the hump of the zebu cow, which can be tough – was served semishredded and wholly delicious. This is good eating that is easy on the pocket too, right down to the wine menu with its simple sauvignon blancs. Rua Minas Gerais 350, Higienópolis (3151 3085/ salgastronomia.com.br). Open noon3pm, 8-11.30pm Tue-Fri; noon-3pm, 8.30pm-midnight Sat. Main courses R$38-$68; couvert R$6-$12.

Thai Namga Satisfying a craving for Thai food in São Paulo is no easy task, so when we heard about this progeny of the much-loved takeaway Tele-Thai, we were in there like a shot. The trickling fountains, candles and ambient music might give it the slight air of a spa, but it’s all about the food here, which, while neither wholly authentic nor generously proportioned, is delicious. Thai classics like fragrant green curry, light and crunchy pad Thai and khao soi kai – a

mild curry noodle soup – are on the menu alongside more inventive dishes like the succulent pork-filled squid. For a sensory overload, order the miang kham – buildyour-own bundles of Japanese spinach filled with lemon, chillies, coconut and nuts. Round things off with the chef’s dessert, khanom kluay, whose black rice and coconut ice-cream combo is a sensation in both texture and taste. Rua Apiacás 92, Perdizes (2507 1774/namga. com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7-10.30pm Mon-Thu; noon-3pm, 7-11.30pm Fri, Sat. Main courses R$23-$39. Japanese Zendô Head straight for a seat at the counter, order the combinado do chef (R$80) and prepare to be immersed in the Brazilian-Japanese creations that sushi purists would call sacrilege; others, a damn good contemporary twist. The sashimi here is fabulously fresh. We tried haro hot – shimeji mushrooms wrapped inside crunchy spring-roll batter, followed by the pantanal – salmon uramaki topped with deep fried kale. Be prepared to arrive with an open mind, and leave with a belly swelling to sumo-sized proportions. Rua Desembargador do Vale 438, Perdizes (3554 3433/zendosushi.com.br). Open 7-11pm Tue; noon-3pm; 7-11pm Wed, Thu; noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight Friday; 1-4pm, 7pm-midnight Sat; 1-4pm Sun. Main courses set for one from R$44.90; lunch R$29.

BARBECUE Sujinho The best time to get

ITALIAN Tappo Trattoria This dinky corridor of a restaurant, only ten tables long, serves fantastic Italian food and has a surprisingly romantic and cosy ambience to match. The carpaccio of filet mignon is succulent, while the ricotta balls cooked in a rich tomato sauce are tasty without overloading the palate. The main courses of lasagne Bolognese and spaghetti all’ amatriciana (with bacon, tomato and onion) are surprisingly light, defying the stereotype of carb-heavy Italian cooking. Rua Consolação 2967, Consolação (3063 4864/tappo.com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open noon-3pm, 7.30pm-midnight TueFri; 12.30-4pm, 7.30pm-midnight Sat; 12.30-5pm Sun. Main courses R$39$74; couvert R$6.

Bookish Brasil a Gosto

BRAZILIAN Chef Vivi Set in simple

premises on a quiet corner of Vila Madalena, the concept is refreshingly spontaneous here: organic, seasonal ingredients on a small, daily-changing menu. On our visit, we tried the tasty chancliche cheese starter with zaatar spice mix, grilled mango and sautéed radishes (R$27.50) followed by a perfect oven-roasted rack of lamb in red wine sauce (R$67.50). Whatever you go for, save room for the dessert tasting menu (R$20), which features five colourful delights that should help offset the depression caused by a hefty bill. Alternatively, hunt out the weekday set lunch: an appetiser, main course and dessert for a more modest R$39.50. Rua Girassol 833, Vila Madalena (3031 0079/chefvivi.com.br). Open noon3pm, 7-11.30pm Tue, Wed; noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight Thu, Fri; 1-4pm, 8pmmidnight Sat; 1-5pm Sun. Main courses R$39.50-$67.50; lunch R$39.50.

JAPANESE Dô Hidden away on an unprepossessing back street of Pinheiros, Dô offers a good deal in a bijou package: quality Japanese food at comparatively reasonable prices, in a dining room with a cool, modern design aesthetic. The combo platters are flexible, and traditionalists will delight in the dearth of cream cheese and mayonnaise. It’s also one of the few places in which the succulent white fish sashimi is a highlight rather than a disappointment. The location, low lighting and intimate size make this an ideal trysting spot. Rua Padre Carvalho 224, Pinheiros (3816 3958/ restaurantedo.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight Mon-Fri; 1-4pm, 7pmmidnight Sat. Prices sushi set for one from R$61; lunch R$34. CHILEAN El Guatón You may be greeted

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down and dirty at Sujinho is in the small hours of the morning before it shuts at 5am, when you’ll find meat-hungry punters tucking in to big hunks of picanha and espeto misto (mixed grilled meats). This traditional bisteca is still known to many old-school paulistanos as ‘Bar das Putas’ (the whores’ bar) for its clientele, who would come to relax after work back in the ’70s and ’80s, when Consolação was a place to pick up prostitutes. These days Sujinho has smartened up its image considerably. This, the original restaurant – there are now three of them, plus a hamburger joint – has a roof terrace on the third floor, where by day you can watch the hubbub of Rua da Consolação below and graze on free torresmo (pork scratchings) and caldinho de feijão (bean soup) whilst you wait for a table. Rua da Consolação 2078, Consolação (3231 1299/sujinho. com.br). Metrô 4, Paulista. Open 11.30am-5am daily. Main courses R$30.25-$78.75 (for two); couvert R$9. No credit cards. Other locations Rua da Consolação at 2063 and 2068 (3231 1299); Avenida Ipiranga 1058, República (3229 9986).

Vila Madalena & Pinheiros

A young achiever with energy in abundance and a passion for Brazilian cuisine, chef Ana Luiza Trajano opened the restaurant Brasil a Gosto while still in her twenties, and published the eponymous book just a couple of years later, documenting much of her research into the country’s diverse regional cuisine, gleened on travels across 24 states. That research, over the years, has inspired a number of limited-edition menus at the restaurant, and now, her second book, the glossy tome of recipes, ingredients and techniques from around the country, Cardápios do Brasil (Editora Senac, R$249

RRP). Celebrating the book launch, Trajano has devised a five-course menu, featuring some of the book’s most emblematic recipes. Start with a taste of Maranhão with the casquinha de siri com farofa de sururu (crab pastry parcels with a sururu mollusc crumb topping, see photo), rounding off with a taste of the Amazon in a trio of desserts, including a bacuri fruit pudim (caramel flan) and the sticky banana paste bananada. See listings. Prices Cardápios do Brasil tasting menu R$175; R$205 with wine. Available 29 Nov–29 Feb 2014. Dishes can also be ordered individually.

and seated here by a portly moustachioed man with specs: that will be Señor Guatón. He’s from Chile, and has been running the front of house of this husband-and-wife neighbourhood restaurant for nearly 15 years. His wife, Dona Elba, keeps regulars happy with deliciously simple homemade Chilean food: ceviche (raw white fish with lime, onion and coriander), baked empanadas, and the comforting pastel de choclos – a chicken pie topped with a gratinated corn puree – are our favourites. Look out when Señor Guatón, with a twinkle in his eye, offers you one of his fiery homemade chilli oils. Rua Artur de Azevedo 906, Pinheiros (3085 9466/ elguaton.com). Open noon-3pm, 5pm-1am Mon-Fri; noon-midnight Sat; noon-4.30pm Sun. Main courses R$25-$75; lunch R$13.50-$25.

JAPANESE Hideki Don’t let its rather modest exterior, or its location on a busy party street, put you off: inside Hideki, the focus is on the freshest of fresh fish, served in a convivial, family-friendly and decidedly non-trendy atmosphere. The sashimi and sushi are a cut above, albeit with prices to match, and the tempura is light, crispy perfection. The emphasis here is on quality rather than quantity, though the lunchtime buffet is a relatively economical way to sample Hideki’s delights. To drink go for saké, which is served in a masu – a square cup – with the chilled liquid spilling out over the sides. It’s all in the name of good luck, apparently. Rua dos Pinheiros 70,

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t all started in March 1939, when Bruno Bertucci and João Machado de Siqueira founded a Pizzeria in a shed at Largo da Matriz de Nossa Senhora do Ó. This is where, still today, they are established. Since then, the house has been experiencing a tremendous success among gastronomy lovers, which gather to taste their famous pizzas, carefully made following orginal Tuscan recipes. Throughout those years though, a lot has changed. The city has grown, Freguesia do Ó is no longer a distant neighborhood and there are new and sophisticated pizzerias opening their doors every day. However, Pizzeria Bruno, which will celebrate its 75th birthday in 2014 not only kept its loyal customers, but also attracted lots of new pizza aficionados and, among them, a large number of foreigners. The secret to that is maintaining the same old love and care when preparing the most beloved pizzas Paulistanos have been appreciating for so many years. “We’ve been through hard times, but never gave up on preparing our pizzas with first class ingredients only” , says Rui Gomes de Siqueira, one of the partners. The fact is that Pizzeria Bruno still holds a little secret that makes all the difference on how it tastes: The thin dough is wide open in an Olive Oil filled mold, which is later put on to an iron grill and baked at a temperature of 300 celsius in an oven, frying it and making it deliciously crunchy, apart from perfectly heating the toppings resulting in a nothing but absolutely delicious taste.The house counts with three nicely furbished spaces with a breathtaking view of the city. On summer time, there are also tables on the outside, face front to Largo da Matriz. These are an absolute success , crowded with people who come to appreciate the pizza, as well as to enjoy the environment, a new gastronomical Mecca in São Paulo. And get ready, in 2014 our menu has a new star: The celebrating PIZZA BRUNO 75 YEARS. Largo da Matriz de Nossa Senhora do Ó, 87 Freguesia do Ó | Phone: (11) 3932-2261 Monday from 6p.m. to 11p.m. Tuesday to Thursday and Sunday from 11a.m. to 12p.m. Friday and Saturday from 11a.m. to 1a.m. We accept all credit cards. Parking Vallet.

Publi Editorial

Food & Drink

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PIZZARIA BRUNO, A REAL CLASSIC IN SÃO PAULO’S HISTORY, CELEBRATES ITS 75th BIRTHDAY

Pinheiros (3086 0685/hidekisushi.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight MonSat; noon-4pm, 7-11pm Sun. Prices sushi set for one from R$90. Other locations Rua dos Imarés 542, Moema (5049 3224); Rua Treze de Maio 1050, Bela Vista (3283 1833). VEGETARIAN Integrão This simple family restaurant has been serving fantastic vegetarian and macrobiotic dishes for more than thirty years. Try the grilled salmon with wholegrain rice or the delicious prato normal, with rice, manioc balls, a tofu pancake and a green side salad. This is one of the few à la carte vegetarian spots in town, but while you’ll find juice and (non-alcoholic) beer on the menu, the restaurant’s macrobiotic focus means that no sodas are sold here. Rua Joaquim Antunes 377, Pinheiros (3085 3707/integrao.com.br). Open 11.30am7.30pm Mon-Fri; 11.30am-5pm Sat. Main courses R$19.25-$36.

ECLECTIC Miya This small eatery has an unassuming charm, with a long, brown leather banquette lining one of the exposed brick walls, while upstairs, an intimate cluster of tables leads through to the waiting area-cum-bar, set on an open-air terrace. As for the food, the menu is compact and eclectic. Don’t miss the foie gras terrine starter (R$42), or the crispy squid tempura. For mains, the pork with miso, Japanese chard and a sesame sauce (R$38) is a good choice. Rice dishes – creamy rice with duck, and a dark beer risotto with caramelised onions – are delicately sized, and served on striking, curved-rim plates. Rua Fradique Coutinho 47, Pinheiros (3259 8760/restaurantemiya. com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight Tue-Fri; 1-4pm, 8pm-1am Sat; 1-5pm Sun. Main courses R$27-$79; lunch R$45 (Tue-Fri). CONTEMPORARY Rothko Artist Diego

Belda has turned his creative hand to cuisine at his restaurant Rothko, which opened in early 2011. Drawing inspiration from a number of cuisines, each dish is a beautiful composition of flavours and vibrant colours. Order a selection of small dishes – bocadilhos – or go for a less creative but equally tasty main course. The downsides? Slow service, and a fair few items missing from the menu. Teething troubles, we hope. Rua Wisard 88, Vila Madalena (3032 4295). Open 6pm-midnight Wed-Fri, noon-midnight Sat; noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$25-$43. ITALIAN Spadaccino The sight of Spadaccino – a traditional Italian family restaurant with a yard out front – in the midst of the Vila Madalena night-time chaos is like coming across the Red Cross in the midst of battle. It’s the sort of place where the sight of three generations of the same family eating together is the rule, rather than the exception, and where they know how to do traditional Italian food brilliantly. The prawn risotto is tasty and has half a dozen big meaty prawns in it, and the crème brûlée is deliciously rich, and green – yes, green – with a perfectly crunchy crust on top. Rua Mourato Coelho 1267, Vila Madalena (3032 8605 /spadaccino.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7-11pm Tue-Thu; noon-3pm, 7pm-1am Fri; 10am-1am Sat; noon-11.30pm Sun. Main courses R$30-$53; lunch R$32$42; couvert R$8.

Jardins VEGETARIAN Apfel It’s food with a conscience at Apfel, whose philosophy goes beyond just vegetarianism: the restaurant’s cultural agenda includes hosting evening walks around the Centro as well as funding small theatre groups. Set in a delightful ivy-covered townhouse in Jardins, with a second location downtown, Apfel’s service is efficient and its friendly and the seasonally-changing menu spot on, featuring delights such as garlic mushrooms on wholemeal toast, and cauliflower gratin. But take it from us: when the nhoque de mandioquinha recheado com queijo de cabra (sweet parsnip gnocchi with goat’s cheese filling) is on the menu, you’d be a fool to resist. Rua Bela Cintra 1343, Jardim Paulista (3062 3727/apfel.com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação and 4, Paulista. Open 11.30am-3pm, 7.30-11.30pm Mon-Fri; 11.30am-4pm, 7.30-11.30pm Sat; 11.30am-4pm Sun. Main courses R$28-$38; lunch R$24. Other location Rua Dom José de Barros 99, Centro (3256 7909). BRAZILIAN Bolinha Set up in 1946 by

taxi driver Affonso Paulillo, and now run by his two sons, Bolinha is all about feijoada. The service is top notch (as you’d hope, given the hefty prices), and when prompted, the waiters will happily tell you more about the humble slave origins of this hearty black-bean-and-pork stew, guiding you through choices including the classic, old-fashioned version of the dish – nose-to-tail eating, Brazilian style – a more modern version, without the scary bits; and a ‘light’ version. Avenida Cidade Jardim 53, Jardim Europa (3061 2010/ bolinha.com.br). Open 11am-5pm Mon; 11am-midnight Tue-Sun. Main courses R$52-$97.

BRAZILIAN Brasil a Gosto Ready for a taste of the Amazon? Chef Ana Luiza Trajano floats the finest ingredients of the jungle river to your table. Start your adventure by ordering the lovely strawberry and caju caipirinha, artfully decorated with the head of the caju fruit (the unfamiliar, inedible cover of the cashew nut). The mini acarajé appetiser is a treat in which you assemble shrimp, avocado, pumpkin and the delicious hot sauce and onion vinaigrette into a brilliant, self-made recreation of the classic Bahian sandwich. For a main course, try the abadejo grelhado com crosta de baru (grilled haddock with a crust of Brazilian baru nut), or the grilled pirarucu – the largest freshwater fish in the world. Finish off with a tasting of the plum or banana cachaça – the sugar-cane tipple here reaches the level of a fine cognac. Reservations are recommended. Rua Azevedo de Amaral 70, Jardim Paulista (3086 3565/brasilagosto.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7pm-1am Tue-Thu; noon-5pm, 7pm-1am Fri-Sat; noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$46-$90; lunch R$44; couvert R$8-$12. BRAZILIAN D.O.M. D.O.M. is the fiefdom of tattooed celebrity chef Alex Atala, who absorbs molecular gastronomy tendencies and gives them a very Brazilian twist. The food is balanced and harmonious, particularly in the tasting menus, and the vegetarian version is served with carefully selected juices and fruit essences to provide contrasts of colours and textures. If

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ITALIAN Domenico Joining a small rash

of new restaurants in the hushed environs of Rua Melo Alves, this upmarket Italian eatery takes its name from the Sicilian owner, Domenico Masi. If there’s a wait for a table, pull up a pew at the bar and order a portion of piping hot, crispy arancini (R$28) – beef and mozzarella saffron risotto balls – teamed with an Orange Dream (Campari and orange juice cocktail, R$26). To eat, the lobster tagliolini with a creamy rocket, tomato and shellfish sauce (R$86) is unmissable. Wood-tiled floors, exposed brick walls, starched white tablecloths and leather-backed chairs strike a pleasant balance between elegance and informality. But for a more Italian ambience, weather permitting, head to the upstairs terrace for alfresco feasting. Rua Doutor Melo Alves 674, Jardim Paulista (3037 7323/domenicoristorante.com.br). Open noon-3.30pm, 7pm-midnight Mon-

Thu; noon-5pm, 7pm-midnight Fri, Sat; noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$46$94; couvert R$14.50.

the sushi counter at his eponymous Jardins eatery since 2000. The small, stylish yet under-stated restaurant is well established as a favourite among the paulistano elite. ITALIAN Italy Chef Paulo Barros is one of Which means you’d be wise to book ahead, the shining stars in São Paulo’s burgeoning especially if you want to worship at the Italian restaurant scene, notching up temple of Sakamoto with a seat at the numerous ‘best Italian restaurant’ badges counter, where the master himself prepares at the popular Due Cuochi. At this, his sushi. One of Sakamoto’s best-known newest venture, you’ll find some of his dishes is the tartar de atum com foie gras signature dishes like egg yolk-filled (tuna tartare with foie gras, R$27). Another ravioline (R$38), each carefully packed unexpected combination is the vieiras with spinach, ricotta and an entire egg com sal trufado (scallops with truffle yolk, alongside a large selection of pastas salt, R$12 per piece). Side step the almost and risottos. Unorthodox combinations imcomprehensible menu and ask the staff include tagliorini with prawns, for their recommendations on artichokes and shitake what’s good that day, or go mushrooms (R$51) – a straight for the tasting generous bowl of pasta menu (R$260). Round with a satisfying number things up with the of large, juicy prawns. A delicious tempura de shiny elevator connects figo com sorvete de d o the three floors of matchá (fig tempura des Wo cuttingn e M the restaurant which, with green tea icemore s. e th f o e combined with the cream, R$18.50). Rua One galleri rt a e g d e fierce air-conditioning Lisboa 55, Jardim See Art and charmless decor, Paulista (3088 6019). lends it the slight air of Open 7pm-12.30am Mona hotel lobby. The roof Thu; 7pm-1am Fri-Sat. Main terrace, and the simple meat of fish of courses R$43.50-$63; couvert the day, are redeeming features. Rua Oscar R$18. Freire 450, Jardim Paulista (3168 0833/ BURGER Lanchonete da Cidade italyrestaurante.com.br). Open noonThis is one of the best of São Paulo’s midnight Mon-Thu; noon-1am Fri, Sat; many ’50s-style diners: the originals, noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$33-$59; of course, are the city’s thousands of couvert R$5.90. humble street-corner lanchonetes. Here at JAPANESE Jun Sakamoto Chef-inthe slightly more upmarket Lanchonete fashion Jun Sakamoto has been manning da Cidade, it’s all about the burgers, with

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the succulent Bom Bom most in demand – a 220g churrasco-style burger with homemade tomato sauce. Lanchonete’s french fries are also good, but paulistanos swear by the batatas rústicas – crispy fried discs of crunchy potato scattered with rosemary and cloves of sweet, juicy garlic. Alameda Tietê 110, Jardim Paulista (3086 3399/ lanchonetedacidade.com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open noon-1am Mon-Thu; noon-3am Fri, Sat; noon-1am Sun. Main courses R$14.50-$41. Other locations Rua Amauri 334, Itaim Bibi; Shopping Higienópolis, Avenida Higienópolis 674, Higienópolis; Shopping Morumbi, Avenida Magalães de Castro 12.000, Morumbi; Avenida Macuco 355, Moema.

Food & Drink

you’re prone to passing out at the sight of large bills, try the lunchtime executive menu, which gives a beautifully presented spin on home-made Brazilian food, using crunchy, toasted manioc farofa with beans, rice and chicken or John Dory. It sounds simple, but Atala takes it to a different level, earning the restaurant the number six ranking in the San Pellegrino world’s 50 best restaurants award, in 2013. Rua Barão de Capanema 549, Jardim Paulista (3088 0761/domrestaurante.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight MonThu; noon-3pm, 7pm-1am Fri; 7pm-1am Sat. Main courses R$107-$145; lunch R$59; couvert R$20.

BRAZILIAN Maní Tucked away on a classy, quiet street in Jardins, Maní manages to be contemporary and sophisticated and yet artfully unpretentious. Whether you choose a table inside or out, you’re assured of an excellent meal amid the natural, earthy ambience of one of São Paulo’s most popular and innovative restaurants. The modern cuisine is served here with flair, and chefs Daniel Redondo and Helena Rizzo deserve all the praise they’ve received for their creative, wideranging menu. Try their award-winning fish entrée served with tucupi and bananas; or the roast beef in a lapsang souchong crust. Reservations strongly recommended. Rua Joaquim Antunes 210, Jardim Paulistano (3062 7458/

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Food & Drink

manimanioca.com.br). Open noon3pm, 8-11.30pm Tue-Thu; noon-3pm, 8.30pm-12.30am Fri; 1-4pm, 8.30pm12.30am Sat; 1-4.30pm Sun. Main courses R$35-$68; lunch R$35; couvert R$13-$15.

Fresh talent Tappo Trattoria

ITALIAN Margherita Allow yourself to be drawn to the brightly-lit, inviting aspect of this pizzeria, just off Avenida Paulista. Inside, red-and-white checked tablecloths are reminiscent of a traditional Italian pizzeria, though the menu also includes Brazilian touches such as requeijão (cream cheese) toppings. The namesake pizza is a must, while slightly more adventurous diners might like to try the Campesina, featuring aubergine, parmesan cheese and olives. Alameda Tiête 255, Jardim Paulista (2714 3000/ margherita.com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open 6.30pm-1.30am Sun-Thu; 6.30pm2am Fri, Sat. Main courses R$42-$59.

AMERICAN Butcher’s Market Chalkboard walls, phonograph lampshades and meatpacking brica-brac bring a slice of the Big Apple to the bustling Butcher’s Market, where carefully prepared gastronomic Americana – spicy chicken wings, toasted marshmallow milkshakes, pork ribs with hash browns – can be scarfed down at prices just high enough to stave off addiction. English-language menu items include the succulent mushroom burger – a thick patty of grilled prime beef smothered with melted mozzarella and tasty, seasoned mushrooms – and artery-clogging but oh-so-good cheese chilli fries (aka chilli cheese fries in the USA). If you’re not the type to be kept waiting, the less-crowded lunchtime seating might be your best bet. It’ll also give you the rest of the day to work off those happily ingested calories. Rua Bandeira Paulista 164, Itaim Bibi (2367 1043/butchersmarket.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7pm-1am Mon-Fri; noon1am Sat. Main courses R$23-$43; lunch R$30.

Itaim Bibi & Vila Olímpia ITALIAN Attimo Set in a 1950s Modernist house, this newish restaurant (winner of Wallpaper* magazine’s prestigious Best New Restaurant award in 2012) retains many of the building’s original features, with a contemporary bar, decked out in swathes of stainless steel, tacked onto the side. Just as interesting as the design is the cuisine – a fusion dubbed ‘Italo-caipira’, blending Italian cooking with that of the ‘hick’ cooking of rural, inland São Paulo where the chef, Jefferson Rueda, grew up. Standout dishes include the sweet-potato gnocchi with pigs’ ears (R$43). To finish, don’t miss the Romeo and Juliet pavê (R$18) – a flamboyant remix of a simple Brazilian cheese-and-guava dessert, served here with a Catipury cheese cream and six textures of guava. Rua Diogo Jácome 341, Vila Nova Conceição (5054 9999/attimorestaurante.com.br). Open noon-4pm, 7pm-midnight MonSat; noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$39-$79; couvert R$12.80. FRENCH/ITALIAN Bar des Arts It’s

a feast for all the senses here, from the postcard perfection of this old mansion with its manicured garden and the gentle gurgle of water in the marble fountain to the delectable food. Go for lunch on a sunny day, when you can choose

tadeu brunelli/PRESS IMAGE

FRENCH Robin des Bois This cosy,

candle-lit bistro named after Sherwood Forest’s most famous bandido, with antique-frame mirrors and an intimate outdoor space. Don’t miss the Sherwood Special sharing platter (R$62) laden with pâté, creamy French cheeses, salad and dried fruits and nuts. The mussels in cream and white wine sauce (R$36) easily feeds two, and other hearty dishes include cassoulet and boeuf bourguignon. And if, like Friar Tuck, you should wake up with a sore head of a Sunday, their brunch (R$33, until 4pm) is a good hair of the dog with either a Bucks Fizz or Absolut Pepper Bloody Mary included. Reservations needed for Friday nights. Rua Capote Valente 86, Jardim Paulista (3063 2795/robindesbois.com.br). Metrô 2, Clínicas. Open 7pm-midnight MonThu; 7pm-2am Fri; noon-2am Sat; noon11pm Sun. Main courses R$29-$49; couvert R$5.80.

started with a Caprese salad and ended on a trio of panna cotta, via a series of pasta, seafood and meat dishes. The setting is elegant, all hushed tones, woods and beige leather. Floor-to-ceiling windows make for a bright, airy space during the day, while in the evening, large lamps and naked lightbulbs lend an intimate glow. On the refreshingly simple à la carte menu, the rich creamy porcini risotto is a great choice. Rua Pedroso Alvarenga 1026, Itaim Bibi (3078 5273/biondirestaurante.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7.30pm-midnight TueFri; 7.30pm-1am Sat; 1-5pm Sun. Main courses R$46-$79.

We’ve had our eye on the young Italian chef Rodolfo De Santis since trying his divine dishes at Biondi, which he opened with paulistano restauranteur Bruno Previato at the end of 2011. We followed him – metaphorically speaking, of course – to the Sicilian newcomer Domenico. And after a spell working at Italy, he is on the move again, this time taking the helm at the diminutive Tappo Trattoria, where you can expect classic Italian food, cooked to perfection. See listings for all restaurants mentioned. between the excellent lunch buffet and à la carte options, or at night when the candlelit setting makes for a magical date. The menu features mostly French and Italian cuisine, with the odd touch of Brazilian. If you’re just stopping by for a drink, the appetiser menu is well worth a look too. Rua Pedro Humberto 9, Itaim Bibi (3074 6363/bardesarts. com.br). Open noon-midnight Mon-Fri; noon-1am Sat; noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$42-$128; lunch R$66-$92; couvert R$8-$12.

creations, and comforting sides such as spinach or corn in white sauce, kale, or grilled vegetables and bananas. Wednesdays and Saturdays feature the traditional feijoada, and a light version with the pork and black beans served separately. If you have room for dessert, you won’t be disappointed by the flan or the coconut mousse. Rua Pedroso Alvarenga 1061, Itaim Bibi (3073 0354/ bethcozinha.com.br). Open noon-3.30pm Mon-Fri; noon-4.30pm Sat. Prices fixed-price buffet R$52-$74.

BRAZILIAN Beth Cozinha de Estar Beth is in her fifties and is almost always behind the self-service counter, helping her diners decide on the best homecooked option. Catering mostly to suits who work in Itaim Bibi, this buffet joint offers a selection of salads and dressings, fish, chicken and beef

ITALIAN Biondi Whether you go for the

simple lunch menu or the full tasting menu (surprisingly good value, at R$140 for 6 courses), this is glorious good Italian food. In the tasting menu, a series of finely crafted dishes – classic Italian cooking adapted to Brazilian ingredients – arrive beautifully presented. We

PERUVIAN Chifa Wok Of all possible fusion-food combinations, few feel as right as the type practised in Lima’s many ‘chifa’ restaurants, blending Chinese and Peruvian cuisine with artful simplicity. The pleasant, low-key Chifa Wok specialises, as its name suggests, in unpretentious dishes filled with fastcooked, wok-fried goodies. You can’t go wrong with a classic arroz chaufa (R$30-$36) – fried rice with a choice of meat or seafood. We went for the roast pork one to accompany a kam lu wantan (R$36) – a colourful jumble of flavours, featuring morsels of duck, chicken and pork flash fried with veggies and slivers of peach, topped with a tamarind sauce and a crown of light fried won tons. Rua Ministro Jesuíno Cardoso 513, Itaim Bibi (4324 7868/chifawok.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 7-11pm Mon-Fri; 1-4pm, 8-11pm Sat. Main courses R$20-$48; lunch R$30. STEAKHOUSE Dinho’s The star of the

meaty menu at Dinho’s is the US-style prime rib – all 700g of it, packed with flavour and an immense Fred Flintstonestyle bone. The steakhouse, which was recently given a modernising makeover, draws a lunchtime crowd of top execs from the nearby Avenida Paulista. For a younger crowd, head to the former Mabella e Ton Ton in Itaim Bibi, owned by the same family and rebranded in 2012 as Dinho’s Steak House (Rua Jerônimo Da Veiga 153). Alameda Santos 45, Paraíso (3016-5333/dinhos.com. br). Open noon-3.30pm, 7pm-midnight Mon-Thu; noon-3.30pm, 7pm-1am Sat;

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JAPANESE Nagayama Proudly serving

some of the tenderest, freshest fish in town, the thoroughly authentic Nagayama isn’t cheap; but it’s a pure delight, from the cosy, comfortable space and the welcoming service to the virtuoso sushi and sashimi. The delicious sushi and sashimi set for two (R$124) is easily enough for three; and try, too, the exquisite baterá – it’s a pressed rice disc jewelled with chives and dotted with tiny crunches of salmon roe, topped with even crunchier tempura (R$16 for two). Brilliant. Rua Bandeira Paulista 355 and 369, Itaim Bibi (3079 7553/nagayama.com.br). Open noon3pm, 7-11.30pm Mon; noon-3pm, 7pmmidnight Tue-Thu; noon-3pm, 7pm12.30am Fri; noon-4pm, 7pm-12.30am Sat. Main courses R$37-$72.50; lunch Other R$45.50; couvert R$6. location Rua da Consolação 3397, Jardim Paulista (3064 0110). SEAFOOD Rufino’s Considered by many

of its regular customers to be the best restaurant in its native Guarujá – the coastal city 90 km south of São Paulo – Rufino’s well deserved reputation comes from a simple formula of preparing its ultra-fresh fish using classic Spanish recipes. Luckily for those of us in SP, Rufino’s has branched out of its seaside home to establish itself here as well.

Try the tranche de badejo (a slice of grilled white fish) or the bountiful grilled seafood platter. Rua Doutor Mario Ferraz 377, Itaim Bibi (3074 8800/ rufinositaim.com.br). Noon-3pm, 7pmmidnight Mon-Thur; noon-4pm, 7pm1am Fri; noon-1am Sat; noon-11pm Sun. Main courses R$49-R$148; couvert, R$ 17.50. Other location Shopping Morumbi, Avenida Roque Petroni Jr 1089, Morumbi (5182 8599/ rufinosmorumbi.com.br). ITALIAN Tre Bicchieri If cooking

were a Shakespeare play, fish would probably be its Hamlet. Done right, the most difficult of the Bard’s works will slay audiences. Done wrong, and it can lapse into pomp and absurdity. Tre Bicchieri serves a delicious robalo – a rich, flaky sea bass – in a light crust with perfectly crisped vegetables. For dessert, a Tre Brûlée: three pots of crème brûlée in vanilla, pistachio and orange flavours. The orange was just a touch too sweet; the pistachio crème had just the right nutty tang, and the vanilla pud was creamy perfection – emblematic of a restaurant that doesn’t need to twist food into contortions to draw a crowd; that’s swanky without being ostentatious; and that does an excellent Hamlet without unnecessary drama. Rua General Mena Barreto 765, Itaim Bibi (3885 4004/trebicchieri.com. br). Open noon-3pm, 7pm-midnight Mon-Thu; noon-4pm, 7pm-1am Fri, Sat; noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$41-$75; couvert R$9.

Ibirapuera & Moema BUFFET Prêt no MAM Hobnob with

designers, journalists, artists and fashionistas dressed to kill at this stunning architectural gem with a fantastic (if pricey) lunch buffet, set inside the small Museu de Arte Moderna in Parque do Ibirapuera. The bright and lovely modern dining room is half-moon shaped, with glass walls that afford fantastic views of the sculpture garden designed by Roberto Burle Marx. On any given day, the dishes might range from ocean-fresh salmon to mouth watering meatloaf (the restaurant boasts that the chef’s daily picks come from an archive of 1,600 international recipes). This is your best bet for quality food if you’re spending the entire day at São Paulo Fashion Week, the Art Bienal, or one of the myriad other cultural activities that take place in the park. MAM, Parque do Ibiraupera (no number), Ibirapuera (5085 1306). Open 10am-6pm Tue-Sun. Buffet R$49-$56.

MEXICAN Sí Señor This lively Tex-

Mex themed bar is equally popular with couples, big groups and families. The menu varies slightly at each of the chain’s nine branches, but expect the usual cheeseand-bean-based suspects like nachos, tacos and burritos, accompanied by a fun, fairly lowbrow selection of cocktails. A lunch buffet lineup adds interest to the menu, while any main course ordered on a Wednesday, Thursday or Sunday evening earns you a voucher to have the same again free on a Monday or Tuesday.

Arriba! Alameda Jauaperi 626, Moema (3476 4650/sisenor.com.br). Open noon3pm; 6pm-midnight Mon-Fri; noon-2am Sat; 1pm-midnight Sun. Main courses R$25-$85 (for two); lunch R$32-$42. Other locations Citywide.

Food & Drink

noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$58$110; couvert R$18. Other location Rua Jerônimo Veiga 153, Itaim Bibi (3079 1049).

Liberdade, Bela Vista & Vila Mariana ITALIAN Cantina Roperto When

choosing a restaurant from a street chock-full of options like Bixiga’s 13 de Maio, the time-honoured trick of opting for the one with the longest queue is not one for the hungry. But for those willing to be patient, the huge portions of excellent pasta at this old-school classic are well worth the wait. At Sunday lunch, expect a roaringly full restaurant (and up to an hour’s wait); but once you’re seated, the good couvert and the poignant pictures of the oncesemi-famous on the walls should keep you entertained until the mains arrive. Each pasta dish is plenty for two: give the spaghetti with homemade pesto or the carbonara a whirl, though nonBrazilian palates may find the penne alla puttanesca over-salted. Choose your wine with care: some of the Italian reds can be an unwelcomingly attention-grabbing part of the meal. Rua 13 de Maio 634, Bixiga (3288 2573/cantinaroperto.com. br). Open 11.30am-midnight Mon-Thu; 11.30-1am Fri, Sat; 11.30am-11.30pm Sun. Main courses R$29-$130 (for two); couvert R$7-$9.50.

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Food & Drink

CHINESE Chi Fu Just a quick hop from Liberdade Metrô lies the recently renovated Chi Fu. The clientele, almost exclusively Chinese, sit at vast tables with a minimum of six diners at each (memo to self: it’s not the spot for a romantic date). There are a paltry 201 dishes to choose from on the telephone-directory-sized menu – it’s just that if you can’t speak Mandarin, it’s going to come down to pointing at the images on the menu and hoping for the best. The exotica comes at a price (R$180 or so), but for the mains, Chi Fu is luxuriously cheap. Praça Carlos Gomes 200, Liberdade (3112 1698). Metrô 1, Liberdade. Open 11am4pm, 6-10pm Mon-Fri; 11am-5pm Sat, Sun. Main courses R$20-$100. BARGAIN KOREAN Cho Sun Ok Korean-food

virgins can’t go wrong at this Liberdade local: just order the Korean barbecue. It comes with sweet beef and a huge helping of mushrooms and vegetables, cooked right there at the table (R$85), and is served with an array of side dishes including kimchi (fermented vegetables). Pure shots of Soju (R$24, 360ml bottle), Korea’s national tipple – a kind of smooth saké, distilled from cereals – are de rigueur. Thankfully for your brain cells, the evening session closes early; but Cho Sun Ok also does a weekday executive lunch (R$48) with a spreads of hot and cold dishes chosen by the chef. Avenida da Aclimação 502, Liberdade (3271 9621/3208 2116). Open noon-3pm, 6-10pm Tue-Sun. Main courses R$29$50; lunch R$48.

ITALIAN Speranza This is one of the most famous pizzerias in the city, founded in

the late-1950s in Bixiga, one of the city’s Italian neighbourhoods per definizione. Order a hunk of sausage bread as a starter, pending the arrival of the pizza of your dreams. Because take it from us: the pizza marinara DOC and the margherita caprese – made with an exquisite tomato sauce, all Italian ingredients and within the norms established by the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana – are the kind of pizza you could find yourself dreaming of, once you’ve sampled one, for a very, very long time. Rua 13 de Maio 1004, Bela Vista (3288 8502/pizzaria.com.br). Open 6pm1.30am Mon-Fri; 6pm-2am Sat; 6pm-1am Sun. Main courses R$42-$68.50. Other location Avenida Sabiá 786, Moema (5051 1229). INDIAN Tandoor With only a handful of

Indian restaurants in São Paulo, curry cravings can be hard to satisfy unless you go the home-cooked route. However, with fresh flavours and an impressive range of dishes, Tandoor is a good choice. To try a good mix, go for the meat-based thali – a mixed platter that includes rice, samosas, lentils, raita, lamb curry and tandoori chicken. Our favourite dish, though, was the perfectly spiced chicken karahi – a genuine taste of India. Our only criticisms were the over-cooked naan bread, slow service and a less-than-lively atmosphere. Though given the lack of competition, this is probably your best bet for a curry fix in São Paulo. Rua Doutor Rafael de Barros 408, Paraíso (3885 9470/tandoor.com. br). Open noon-3pm, 7-11pm Mon-Fri; noon-4pm, 7pm-midnight Sat; noon-4pm, 7-10pm Sun. Main courses R$25.90$55.90; lunch buffet R$29.90.

Brooklin, Morumbi & Berrini

de toro (oxtail), cooked in red wine. Rua Alexandre Dumas 1152, Santo Amaro (5181 4422/maripili.com.br). Open noon5pm, 6-11pm Tue-Fri; noon-5pm, 7-11pm Sat; noon-4pm Sun. Main courses R$10-$34.

VEGETARIAN Recanto Vegetariano

Overshadowed by skyscrapers along Avenida Berrini, this pleasant, allinclusive vegetarian buffet serves some of the best organic food in town. Recanto Vegetariano exemplifies the energy of natural food lovers the world over: frustrated by the lack of fresh ingredients, these enterprising locals decided not only to open their own restaurant, but to also supply it with their own homegrown organic vegetables – the owners even provide photo proof of their agricultural prowess. Rua Flórida 1442, Brooklin (5506 8944/recantovegetariano. com.br). Open 11.30am-3pm Mon-Fri; noon-4pm Sun. Main courses R$26$29. No credit cards.

The North BRAZILIAN Mocotó Serving up arguably the best Brazilian food in the city, Mocotó is a foodie’s delight. Located in the anonymous mass of higgledy-piggledy houses in the far northeastern suburbs, what it takes to eat at Mocotó is time, both in getting there and waiting for a table. The restaurant’s young chef, Rodrigo Oliveira, creatively updates traditional North Eastern dishes such as baião de dois (black eyed peas, rice and a rennet cheese) or carne de sol – sun-cured beef – served with a whole head of garlic and baby chillies on the side. Oliveira even makes his own pork scratchings – torresmo. To finish, don’t miss the homemade icecream studded with pieces of rapadura – a solid fudge of unrefined sugarcane juice. And a shot or two of cachaça, don’t you think? – to aid digestion, of course. Avenida Nossa Senhora do Loreto 1100, Vila Medeiros (2951 3056/mocoto.com.br). Open noon-11pm Mon-Sat; noon-5pm Sun. Main courses R$15-$60; couvert R$3.90-$6.90.

ITALIAN Vicolo Nostro Hidden amongst the gleaming corporate towers of Berrini, Vicolo Nostro is one of the few quality restaurants in the area that opens beyond lunchtime. The vast terracotta-coloured space, with creepers growing up the walls, is popular for power lunches and business dinners, but not exclusively so. Expect authentic Italian food: it won the Ospitalità Italiana seal of approval in 2011 for following the traditions of Italian cuisine to the letter. Start with the divine couvert of Italian breads, goat’s cheese and olives. For mains, the chef’s recommendation of conger eel with a crab crust and black rice was impressive, though the cappelletti a little over-salted. It’s a touch on the pricey side, but if you’re good for it, the charm and good food make this an excellent choice for toasting that million-dollar contract. Rua Jataituba 29, Brooklin (5561 5287/vicolonostro.com.br). Open noon3pm, 7pm-midnight Mon-Thu; noon-3pm, 7pm-1am Fri; noon-4.30pm, 7pm-1am Sat. Main courses R$39-$105; lunch R$38-$56; couvert R$16.

Critics’ choice Old timers

Brás, Mooca & Tatuapé restaurant, located in one of the city’s traditional Italian neighbourhoods, was founded in 1924, and its dusty decor and antique pictures give it an authentically nostalgic feel that many newer pizzerias try and fail to copy. The Castelões pizza, with handmade sausage and mozzarella, is recommended, as is the house margherita; but no matter which one you pick, rest assured that the dough will be light, the crust scorched and sensual, the tomato sauce packed with basil, and it’ll be topped off with cheese of impeccable quality. Rua Jairo Góis 126, Brás (3229 0542). Metrô 3, Brás. Open noon-4pm, 7pm-midnight daily. Main courses R$39-$64; couvert R$9.

The South SPANISH Maripili Paulistanos in search of

authentic Spanish grub head straight for Maripili – a small, simple restaurant whose owner, chef and waiting staff all have Spanish roots. Try a pintxo de tortilla and follow it up with a nice cup of espresso; then close your eyes and imagine you’re in Madrid – because this potato tortilla has all the volume, texture and moisture you’d find at any good Spanish diner. Maripili also serves a very good gazpacho and rabo

tadeu brunelli/PRESS IMAGE

PIZZA Castelões This classic Italian

La Casserole Located in the old centre of São Paulo, this French bistro has – thankfully – remained frozen in time since it first searing steaks in 1954. Speranza Celebrating more than fifty years in business in its current location in one of the city’s little Italys – Bixiga – Speranza remains one of São Paulo’s firm pizza favourites. Sujinho Around since the 1920s, Sujinho was once a popular after-work hang-out for prostitutes, hence its moniker, ‘Bar das Putas’ amongst oldschool paulistanos.

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Bars & Cafés Reviews

Bar listings

bar.

How to use the listings This section lists our pick of São Paulo’s bars, updated to include new spots and rotate in other favourites. We visits bars anonymously and pay for our own food and drinks. For each bar, we give the cost of a beer and a caipirinha, a cover charge or a minimum spend at the bar if applicable. Note that a cover charge sometimes includes credit at the bar. Unless marked ‘No credit cards’, all these establishments accept major credit cards.

press image

NEW means the bar has opened in the last few months. is for highly recommended. means the bar is popular with a gay crowd. means the menu has full meal options is for regular live music. signals free Wi-Fi for customers.

Centro, Luz & Bom Retiro

Steam room Bare timber walls and naked lightbulbs are hallmarks of the pared-down décor at this Jardins newcomer

Low lighting, leather seating and a discerning hush are the usual hallmarks of a classic cocktail bar. Not here. At bar. – cue confusions of the ‘let’s meet at bar.’, ‘which bar?’, ‘it’s just called bar.’ variety – it’s lively and loud, and packed with a flashy, good-time crowd. Coiffeured girls in heels and guys sporting pressed shirts flit between the bar’s two floors, where long, standing-roomonly counters, and a smoking den out front under the striking jabuticaba tree, make mingling all the easier. The drinks menu – which you may need to a torch to read, printed as it is on black card – is extensive without quite straying into eccentricity. Of the fifty-odd cocktails on the menu, we tried a few stand-outs: the refreshing Smash de Pepino (R$25), with Tanqueray Ten gin, cucumber and lemon juice; the Scarface (R$29), a perfectly balanced take on a Negroni with whisky, red vermouth, Angostura bitters and orange essence (R$27); and the Bramble de Gengibre (R$27), a sweet blend of Tanqueray gin, Chambord, lemon juice and a delicate tang of ginger syrup.

This is not the sort of place you drop in at for just one drink, however: there’s a cover charge for live jazz and groove after 8.45pm on Wednesdays and Thursdays (R$30), and a minimum spend (R$60 women, R$120 men) after 8.30pm on Fridays and Saturdays. On Sundays, when the party vibe ramps up, the cover charge is R$30. Start things off with a bite to eat on the bright ground floor, where timber-clad walls, wooden tables and cream canvas chairs lend a Scandinavian minimalist air. The menu is an odd mix of upmarket bar food and ambitious novelties, such as the wasabi-stuffed lychees (R$23) or the slow-cooked pork (R$43), served in a cloying sweet raspberry sauce with Chinese buns. Stick to the bar food, which is prepared to perfection, from the moist mini hamburgers (R$33) to the moreish oriental beef sandwich (R$33) – strips of soymarinated beef, Dijon mustard and emmental cheese on toasted onion bread – or the bite-sized, deep-fried mushroom croquetas (R$25), with a sublime savoury mushroom filling inside a crunchy golden shell. Leave your inhibition downstairs as the night draws on, and join the party people upstairs, getting their

groove on in the black-walled back room, lit only by a handful of naked lightbulbs and dazzling white teeth. Catherine Balston Rua Joaquim Antunes 248, Jardim Paulistano (3061 3810/barbar.com. br). Open 7pm-late Tue-Sat; 4pm1am Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$9; caipirinha R$17.

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Join the party people for a night of cocktails, flirting and dancing

Bar da Dona Onça Don’t be misled by the ‘bar’ in the name – this classic Centro destination is as much restaurant as watering hole, and its extensive menu draws crowds for both lunch and dinner. It’s well worth a visit even if it’s only to suss out the location, tucked in on the ground floor of Niemeyer’s iconic Copan building, and within walking distance of many of the city’s historic sights. Inside, tongue-in-cheek leopard-print decor and wood panelling lend a cosy charm. Don’t miss the cashew caipiroska, or one of the delicious sharing dishes like the aptly named croc milanesa – a sensationally crunchy beef schnitzel sliced up for sharing. Rua Ipiranga 200, loja 2729, Centro (3257 2016/bardadonaonca.com. br). Metrô 3, República. Open noon11pm Mon-Wed; noon-midnight Thu-Sat; noon-5pm Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$7, caipirinha R$18.

Minted Passion fruit mojito (R$23)

Papo, Pinga e Petisco This informal, lively bar is right on São Paulo’s bohemian frontline – on the bustling pavement of Praça Roosevelt, alongside a handful of alternative theatre companies. The bar’s name means ‘chat, cachaça and snacks’. There’s a cut-out of Elvis surrounded by flashing lights outside, racks of old vinyl inside, and its big wooden tables are invariably full of loud chat, expansive gestures and oh, go on then, a saideira: the Brazilian version of one for the road. Praça Roosevelt 118, Centro (3257 4106). Metrô 3, República. Open 6pm-1am Mon-Thu; 6pm-2.30am Fri, Sat. Prices small bottle beer R$4.50; caipirinha R$11. No credit cards.

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Lapa, Perdizes & Barra Funda

Vila Madalena & Pinheiros

Bravin Wine devotees of the city unite at the bar and restaurant Bravin, where the unconventional owner, the shavenheaded, tattooed sommelier, Daniela Bravin, has an approach to wine that’s as non-conformist as her appearance. There is no list. Patrons place themselves completely in her hands, accompanying her to the cellar for the night’s best choice based on price, preference and – let’s be honest here – Bravin’s whim. If you don’t want to opt for a whole bottle, choose one of around six wines, opened each night and available by the ‘glass’, served in very generous 250ml mini decanters. An insider, speakeasy air pervades the downstairs bar, separate from the more elegant restaurant above. Rua Matogrosso 154, Higienópolis (2659 2525). Metrô 4, Paulista. Open 7pm-1am Mon-Thu; 7pm-1.30am Fri, Sat. Prices wine glass R$21-$22.

Dona Felicidade Vila Romana, near Perdizes, is off the central São Paulo beaten track, but regulars of this friendly, down-home establishment say Dona Felicidade (‘Mrs Happiness’) is worth the trek for the milk pudding with coconut (R$8) she serves. The lady herself declares it will make you faint; but diehard clubbers swear by its restorative powers after a heavy night out. Rua Tito 21, Vila Romana (3864 3866/donafelicidade. com.br). Open 11.30am-1am TueFri; 11.30am-8pm Sat, public holidays; 11.30am-6pm Sun. Prices chope R$6; caipirinha R$12.

Artilheiros Football is at the heart of this laid-back bar, from the team scarves and vintage football magazines adorning the white-washed brick walls, to its commitment to broadcasting all the major football games. You won’t find rowdy fans in here, though – it’s not that kind of place. A R$5 surcharge on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays covers live MPB and samba rock, when the football’s not on, that is. The only downside here is the limited menu and beer selection. Rua Mourato Coelho 1194, Pinheiros (2922 0314/ artilheirosbar.com.br). Open 8pm-midnight Wed, Thu; 8pm-3am Fri; 3pm-3am Sat; 4pm-10.30pm Sun Prices 600ml beer R$7.60; caipirinha R$16.

Tubaína Decorated with celebrity posters from the ’80s, Tubaína mixes up tasty regional cocktails like the Cosmopolitan do Agreste – a passion-fruit, strawberry, chilli and cachaça creation. It also offers more than twenty types of Tubaína – a brand of soft drinks, made in inland São Paulo state. Following the caipira (rural) theme, traditional country dishes like pamonha (creamed corn) aren’t bad either. Rua Haddock Lobo 74, Consolação (3129 4930/tubainabar.com.br). Open 6pm-1am Mon-Thu; 6pm-3am Sat, Sun. Prices chope R$6.50; caipirinha R$14; cover R$0-$4.

Pé Pra Fora Stuck out on its lonesome, just far enough off the beaten track to have a Cheers-like quality, this bar is frequented by neighbourhood regulars. Pé Pra Fora has been serving cold ones for 42 years, and with quality service too – when the waiters haven’t got one eye on the football match, that is. On the flipside, this is an excellent, no-fuss place to catch a game. The tables are scattered across the pavement in a large, airy space dominated by a wall painting of a bare foot kicking you onto the street, and the place is reliably bustling on lazy Saturday afternoons, when you can feast on what some hold to be the best feijoada in the city. Avenida Pompéia 2517, Perdizes (3672 4154/pepraforabar.com.br). Metrô 2, Vila Madalena. Open noon-midnight Mon-Fri; noon-8pm Sat, Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$4.70; caipirinha R$11.10.

little bar; and the food’s not bad, either, covering Brazilian bar snacks, paninis and comforting classics like fish and chips, served wedged into a pint glass. The beer menu was relaunched in 2012 with a smaller but still impressive selection of 130 brews, some of which are grouped into setprice tasting menus. Rua Aspicuelta 436, Vila Madalena (3031 2921/melograno. com.br). Open 6pm-midnight Mon-Thu; 6pm-1am Fri, Sat. Prices chope R$7; caipirinha R$18. ¡Venga! A big hit when it first opened in 2011, Venga tapas bar is by the same team as successful nightspots like Bar Original and Astor. Despite having the same top-drawer service and decor as its sister establishments – here, it’s a rusting warehouse chic – the food on our visit didn’t quite live up to the hype. The Catalan classic pan con tomate (R$8.50) came studded with inedible rocks of salt. The rabo de buey (R$27), however, was a highlight, with oxtail falling apart on a rich, creamy mash. Beware: portions are small, so big eaters will need to spend big bucks. To drink? Keep it Spanish with fruity sangria (R$29) or one of an extensive selection of Spanish wines (bottles of Rioja start from R$69). Rua Delfina 196, Vila Madalena (3097 9252/ venga.com.br). Open 6pm-2am Mon, Tue; 3pm-2am Wed, Thu; noon-3am Fri, Sat; noon-7pm Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$7.90.

Astor/Sub Astor The casual grandeur of Astor, its bustling bow-tied waiters and the towering edifice of a bar brought over from Philadelphia by boat give this fine establishment a vintage feel. But the crowd is mixed and modern, with plenty of jazzy youth to liven up the more mature patrons. The food is excellent too – try a portion of the mouth-watering caldo de feijão (bean, pork and garlic soup): it’s a national gastronomic icon. Downstairs is Sub Astor, a ritzy, decadent red-and-black bar with some of the best cocktails in town. Rua Delfina 163, Vila Madalena (3815 1364/barastor.com.br/subastor.com. br). Open 6pm-1am Mon; 6pm-2am Tue, Wed; 6pm-3am Thu; noon-3am Fri, Sat, noon-6pm Sun. Prices chope R$5.90; caipirinha R$16.50. Donostia Named after the Basque seaside town reputed to have the most bars per square kilometre, this pintxo (Basquestyle tapas) bar is as much about eating as it is drinking. Legs of imported jamón Ibérico (R$125 per serving) and jamón serrano (R$56 per serving) as well as artfully presented plates of pintxos – thick wedges of tortilla, stuffed roasted peppers and the like – top the L-shaped wooden bar. Pull up a stool and graze your way through the varied options on the menu, or just help yourself to whatever catches your eye on the bar. With six different red wines by the glass, and cava at R$9 per glass, the evening’s only challenge is what to choose first. Rua Simão Álvares 484, Vila Madalena (3034 0996/donostia.com. br). Open 7pm-midnight Tue-Wed; 7pm1am Thu-Fri; 1pm-1am Sat. Prices small bottle beer R$12. Filial This bar is owned by the Altman brothers, who opened their first Vila Madalena bar in 1980 and dedicated it to choro. Since then the bar, once called the Clube do Choro and now known as Filial, has moved around the area, but it’s still the after-show bar of choice for local musicians. There’s an impressive list of caipirinhas – try the cachaça with lima da pérsia (lime). Sit outside and watch the Vila Madalena wildlife stumble by. Rua Fidalga 254, Vila Madalena (3813 9226/ barfilial.com.br). Open 5pm-4am Mon-Fri; noon-3am Sat, Sun. Prices chope R$5.90; caipirinha R$15.50. Melograno In this oasis of calm in the midst of the Vila Madalena chaos, you can find a comprehensive menu of beers from around the world and, if you’re lucky, settle at a table in the leafy garden at the back. Melograno is a discreetly stylish

Critics’ choice Summer jugs

Rodrigo Capote/PRESS IMAGE

Food & Drink

Consolação & Higienópolis

Bar da Dona Onça Saké, lime soda, pineapple chunks and ice are the refreshing combo in the Jun Daiti Soda (1 litre jug R$59), new on the menu at this gourmet downtown hangout. Donostia Keep it simple at this Basque pintxo bar with the Água de Valência (glass R$14; 750ml jug R$69) – a blend of bubbly cava and orange juice. ¡Venga! Choose from red, white or sparkling wine for a jug of summery sangria at this trendy tapas spot, in half-litre (R$35$38) or litre (R$50-$55) jugs.

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Food & Drink

Jardins

Brazilian dish

es and snacks

the most charming corner in Vila Madalena

Bar Balcão Find a space at the curvy wooden counter that snakes all the way around the ground floor of this welcoming, friendly bar. Then settle in with a chope and soak up the atmosphere. Popular with journalists, artists and descolado Jardins residents, the twists and turns of the communal bar and the convivial atmosphere make this the best bar in town for conversation, including those struck up between customers, cheek by jowl at the bar. There’s no music and no fuss here – it’s simple and stylish, attracting a slightly older, funky crowd. The food, like the service, is simple but good quality – and that giant pop art painting on the wall? It’s a genuine Roy Lichtenstein. Rua Dr. Melo Alves 150, Jardim Paulista (3063 6091). Open 6pm-1am Mon-Sun. Prices chope R$5.60; caipirinha R$11.80. Brown Sugar A beautiful crowd fills this ’70s lounge bar tucked away at the back of an Italian restaurant. Head straight through the restaurant to the lowlit, low-ceilinged space where the barman, raised up like a DJ in a booth, spins his cocktail shakers. To drink? The apple martini is a good choice from a small but classic cocktail menu. Complementing the quaffs, choose from one of the sharing dishes like flavoured foccacias or bruschettas. Rua Padre João Manuel 1055, Jardim Paulista (3063 4249/ brownsugar.com.br). Open noon-3pm, 6pm-1am Mon-Thu; noon-2am Fri, Sat; noon-3pm, 6pm-1am Sun. Prices 600ml beer R$8; caipirinha R$17. Noh On first impressions, Noh is exactly what you might imagine an upmarket bar in an expensive city to be – classy, low-lit and peopled by attractive punters clutching sophisticated drinks. But as the evening wears on and the covers band starts up, the bar’s true colours came shining through – more upscale Cheers than high-flying Gordon Gecko hangout. The decent, at times ambitious cocktail menu never quite hits the high notes the bar is going for – molecular flourishes like the Fresh Hot (R$23), a grape martini accompanied by a strawberry injected with chilli, are passable rather than revelatory. And the food – an international roll call of snacks from mini burgers to batatas bravas – was tasty, but nothing to write home about. Rua Bela Cintra 1709, Jardim Paulista (2609 3673/nohbar.com.br). Open 6-12.30pm Mon-Fri; 7pm-1.30am Sat. Prices small bottle beer R$7.90; caipirinha R$18, cover R$20-R$70.

Imagine somewhere arretado! Rua Medeiros de Albuquerque, 471- Vila Madalena Reservations: (11) 3813-6814 | facebook/cantomadalena

O’Malley’s This big, noisy gaff would love to be called a traditional Irish pub, and a home-from-home for every expat in town. But O’Malley’s is just as popular with Brazilians as it is with homesick airline pilots looking for someone to talk to – or more – on a layover. It’s more like one of the chain pubs you find inside London railway stations than a cosy country boozer; but there are beers from Mexico, the Czech Republic and Belgium, and there’s nowhere better to get drunk while watching Irish rugby, if that’s your bag. Alameda Itú 1529, Jardim Paulista (3086 0780/omalleysbar.net). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open noon-4am Mon-Thu; noon-5am Fri, Sat; noon-4am Sun. Prices pint of beer R$7-$20; caipirinha R$13; cover R$10-$35 (after 10pm).

Itaim Bibi & Vila Olímpia Bottagallo It’s easy to be misled by the hum of chatter as you approach Bottagallo, or by the huddles of people outside, relaxing on the long benches with a beer or standing around chatting. Well-fed diners, you conclude, having a post-meal smoke. But no. They’re waiting; and happily – because the wait is well worth it. Kick off with one of the no-fuss house cocktails to get things going – the Vesper martini, with a hint of lemon, is a good call, whether piccolo (R$18) or regular (R$23). Once inside and settled at one of the rustic wooden tables, just let the efficient, friendly waiters keep the cold chope coming, and order a plate or two of the delicious, made-for-sharing tapas. Rua Jesuíno Arruda 520, Itaim Bibi (3078 2858/bottagallo.com.br). Open 6.30pmmidnight Mon; 6.30pm-1am Tue-Thu; 12.30pm-3.30pm, 6.30pm-2am Fri; noon2am Sat; noon-11pm Sun. Prices chope R$6; caipirinha R$16.50. Seo Gomes The Fifties-inspired decor and warm, inviting glow makes walking past Seo Gomes a tricky proposition. Sparkling tiles line the walls and floor, set off by a decidedly retro shade of green paint. And with smart waiters in flat caps buzzing around with trays of chopes, it wouldn’t seem out of place if Mad Men’s Don Draper were to walk in, light up a ciggie and order himself a whisky. A predominantly male (and often loud) crowd can drown out the live bossa nova; but the evening buffet is a definite plus for hungry drinkers. Rua Gomes de Carvalho 1214, Vila Olímpia (3846 3625/seogomes.com. br). Open noon-3pm, 5pm-1am Mon-Sun. Prices chope R$5.90; caipirinha R$15; cover R$7. Wall Street Bar Feeling like Gordon Gekko on a weekday night? That’s Michael Douglas’s era-defining character in the 1987 Wall Street movie, not the recent sequel, by the way. Then head down to Itaim’s Wall Street Bar and join the shirt-sleeved business folk as they loosen their ties and gamble on drinks prices while they rise and fall depending on who’s buying what. It’s black and tiled with a big bull statue outside, but don’t fret – lunch isn’t for wimps at Wall Street: they do serve food. Rua Jerônimo da Veiga 149, Itaim Bibi (3873 6922/ wallstreetbar.com.br). Open 6pm-2am Mon-Sat; 3-11pm Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$7.90; caipirinha R$18; minimum spend R$15-$30.

Ibirapuera & Moema Bar Ao Vivo This charming little nightspot is somewhere between dark jazz bar and cheerful little pub, and as its name – which roughly translates as Live Music Bar – suggests, it’s a good place to catch musicians doing their thing. And those can include respected Brazilian performers like bossa nova veterans Zimba Trio. For drinks, try the chef’s martini, made with premium vodka, Cointreau and Blue Curaçao. Rua Inhambu 229, Moema (5052 0072/aovivomusic.com.br). Open 7pm-2am Mon-Sat. Prices chope R$5.50; caipirinha R$15.90; cover R$10-$40. Bar do Juarez There is a subtle art deco-aesthetic at work in the ever-popular

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Liberdade, Bela Vista & Vila Mariana As Mineiras Set on a quiet residential street, this bar and its adjacent store are a twin homage to São Paulo’s neighbouring state of Minas Gerais. Folk art chickens and bottles of hot peppers from Minas adorn the shelves around the bar. Take a seat beneath the wagon-wheel chandeliers and take your pick of shareable mineiro staples like pastel de angú (corn meal fritters) and bolinhos de feijão (bean balls). The real draw, though, is the drinks menu, with a comprehensive selection of cachaças and bonus happy hour specials that includes 2-for-1 caipirinhas every day except Saturday. Rua França Pinto 965, Vila Mariana (5083 5835/asmineiras.com. br). Open 4-11.30pm Tue-Sat. Prices chope R$5.50; caipirinha R$12. Barnaldo Lucrécia This beautiful yellow period house in Paraíso is where many paulistanos go to celebrate their birthdays around the big wooden tables upstairs – with pastéis, plenty of beer, and if the live band playing Brazilian hits is good enough, a conga around the bar. And with the bar staff acting as cheerleaders and distributing party hats and streamers, be warned: there’s no graceful way to avoid getting involved. Rua Abílio Soares, 207, Paraíso (3052 2145/barnaldolucrecia. com.br). Metrô 1, Paraíso. Open 7pm1am Tue, Wed; 7pm-1.30am Thu; 7pm3am Fri; 8pm-2.45am Sat; 7.30pm1.30am Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$7.80; caipirinha R$17.80; minimum spend R$0-$35. Ludus Close to Avenida Brigadeiro, Ludus is a convivial bar in which the games people play are about as simple and easy to discern as they could possibly be. The bar staff will even come round and explain the rules, for heaven’s sake – we are speaking, of course, of board games, which is what Ludus is all about. There are hundreds of games in the three-storey bar’s games cabinet, and they’re being played at every table, whether it’s couples strategising over battleships, realpolitikal workmates frowning over games of Risk, or jolly groups of friends bumping elbows over Monopoly. Rua 13 de Maio 972, Bela Vista (3253 8452/ludusluderia.com.br). Open noon-3pm Mon, Tue; noon-3pm, 6pm-midnight Wed, Thu; noon-3pm, 6pm3am Fri; 6pm-3am Sat; 11am-11pm Sun. Prices 600ml beer R$6.80; caipirinha R$12.80; cover R$10-$25. Veloso The renowned caipirinhas at this friendly boteco live up to the hype,

with weird and wonderful flavours. Go for the jabuticaba (a grape-like fruit), or the tangerine with chilli peppers, but give the bland pomegranate (romã) with lime a miss. There’s limited space inside, so expect to wait for a seat, or settle for standing-room on the pavement outside. The plump yet delicate bolinhos de bacalhau make the perfect accompaniment to the caipirinhas, as do the creamy coxinhas (chicken croquettes). Rua Conceição Veloso 56, Vila Mariana (5572 0254/velosobar.com.br). Open 5.30pm12.30am Tue-Fri; 12.45pm-12.30am Sat; 4-11pm Sun. Prices chope R$5.30; caipirinha R$15.

Food & Drink

Bar do Juarez. Both get packed with older crowds drawn to the wide selection of whiskies and cachaças, and the table-top mini grill for juicy beef cuts always goes down a storm, even if it tends to fill the secondary salon at this, the original Moema branch, with a rather unsavoury smell. Avoid the watery caipirinhas with their thin-sliced lime. Avenida Jurema 324, Moema (5052 4449/bardojuarez. com.br). Open 5pm-1am Mon-Fri; noon-1am Sat, Sun. Prices chope Other R$5.30; caipirinha R$14. locations Avenida Deputado Franco de Lacerda 642, Pinheiros (3578 5228); Avenida Juscelino Kubitschek 1164, Itaim (3078 3458); Rua Joaquim Nabuco 325, Brooklin (3969 4988).

Brooklin, Morumbi & Berrini Cervejaria Ô Fiô Ale aficionados and will be drawn to this bar’s more-thancomprehensive beer menu. Come on a sunny afternoon to enjoy the pleasant outdoor patio space while you make a start on trying the hundreds of Brazilian and international beers. The Brazilian beers are divided by region, with more than 25 beers from São Paulo state alone. A varied clientele comes on Saturday afternoons to listen to live samba de raiz while lining their stomachs with a filling feijoada (R$32). Rua Lício Marcondes Amaral 51, Morumbi (3721 6636/cervejariaofio.com. br). Open 6pm-late Mon-Fri; noon-late Sat, Sun. Prices 600ml beer R$6.50$200; caipirinha R$12; cover R$7-$9. Verissimo As far as theme bars go, this happy-hour favourite requires a little homework, unless you’re already familiar with the work of Brazilian author Luís Fernando Veríssimo. References to his work pepper the bar, from his cheery face in photos and caricatures lining the walls to excerpts from his books on the napkins, and even in the menu too, in cocktails like Sexo na Cabeça (sex on the brain) – a pineapple and lime caipirinha (R$14) that’s as sweet and sharp as Veríssimo’s humour in that eponymous book. Find savoury snacks like the delicious battered brie with chilli jam (R$30) on the menu under ‘piriris’ – a word of Veríssimo’s own invention, meaning little bites to eat. Rua Flórida 1488, Brooklin (5506 6748/verissimobar. com.br). Open 11.30am-1am Mon-Wed; 11.30am-2am Thu-Sat. Prices chope R$5.50; caipirinha R$12.

The North Frangó Perched on a hill overlooking the city in northern suburb Freguesia do Ó is a São Paulo mecca for chicken and beer. Go early on a sunny afternoon and bag a table outside on the square overlooking the church. Kick things off with the infamous chicken and catupiry coxinha. Beer lovers should try one of the beer-tasting menus, which meander through Brazilian, British and even rare Trappist beers. Each one is served at the right temperature and in the correct shape of glass. Consider lining your stomach first with a frango completo – a spit-roast chicken served with polenta, farofa and salad. Largo da Matriz Nossa Senhora do Ó 168, Freguesia do Ó (3932 4818/frangobar.com.br) Open 11am-midnight Tue-Thu; 11am-2am Fri, Sat; 11am-8pm Sun. Prices chope R$7.60; caipirinha R$14.

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Food & Drink

The hot list – cafés How to use the listings This section lists our pick of the city’s cafés, padarias (bakeries), juice bars, lanchonete diners and ice-cream parlours, updated monthly to include new spots and rotate in other favourites. For each, we give the price of a small coffee – cafezinho – and of a range of sandwiches.

New in town Deliqatê

Vila Madalena & Pinheiros CAFÉ Coffee Lab If you’re looking

Keiny Andrade /PRESS IMAGE

NEW means the café has opened in the last couple of months. is for highly recommended. is for good veggie options. signals free Wi-Fi for customers.

CAFÉ Café Girondino Named after a famous café from the days when chic hotels were located in the centre and their clients needed an elite spot for a caffeine fix, today’s Girondino is more of an island outpost. It’s one of the few places in the area where you can go for a coffee on weekends or evenings after hitting an exhibition or a film at the CCBB or one of the other cultural institutions nearby. Rua Boa Vista 365, Centro (3229 4574/ cafegirondino.com.br). Metrô 1, São Bento. Open 7.30am-10.30pm MonThu; 7.30am-11pm Fri; 8am-8pm Sat; 8am-7pm Sun. Prices cafezinho R$3.20; sandwich R$9.50-$31.90.

BAKERY Saint Germain Smack bang

in the middle of the bustling business neighbourhood of Itaim, this bakery makes for a perfect pitstop between meetings. Look past the kitsch, alpinestyle façade: originally from Curitiba, Saint Germain in São Paulo has kept its reputation for both the quality and variety of its breads, and has one of the crispiest pães na chapa (buttered toast, R$1.80) we’ve had the good fortune to try. The espresso (R$2.80) comes with a little chunk of homemade brownie. Sweeten up an afternoon back at the office by taking away one of the incredible chocolate-covered carolinas (cream puffs, R$56 per kg). Rua Manoel Guedes 110, Itaim Bibi (3167 5400/ saintgermain.com.br). Open 6am10pm daily. Prices cafezinho R$2.10; sandwiches R$12.20-21.50.

We visit cafés anonymously and pay for our own food and drinks, and our listings are chosen entirely at the editors’ discretion. Unless marked ‘No credit cards’, all these establishments accept major credit cards.

Centro, Luz & Bom Retiro

Itaim Bibi & Vila Olímpia

Ibirapuera & Moema

The cultural baggage of the British-Brazilian-Japanese couple behind the three-month old café-restaurant Deliqatê is evident in its eclectic offering, with many of the gourmet ingredients made on site. Cocoa from Bahia is used to make the chocolatey condensed-milk brigadeiros (R$3.50). Homemade Greek yoghurt goes into the cheesecake (R$12) while home-cured bacon and salmon are the stars of sandwiches and scrambled eggs (R$14-$18). Despite the homely charm, don’t expect any chintz or net curtains; an industrial style pervades, with white-washed brick walls, spotlights and iron shelving. Alameda Jaú 1191, Jardim Paulista (3063 4988). Open 8am-3.30pm Mon, Tue; 9am-8pm Wed-Sat; 10am-5pm Sun. Prices cafezinho R$4.50; sandwiches R$21-$26.

for a full immersion in the world of Brazilian coffee, this is the place. Isabela Raposeiras, the renowned barista and proprietress, has created a quirky space here in Vila Madalena, complete with a Diedrich coffee roaster. That’s one of the best roasters in the world, FYI, and a wonderfully Heath-Robinson looking contraption it is too. Fittingly, the café resembles a lab, with staff Jardins kitted out in overalls making coffee BAKERY Pão ­­– Padaria Artesanal with a nerdy attention to detail. The Orgânica This small but charming, coffee-zealot menu boasts organic bakery has a counter all manner of brewing packed full of tempting methods as well as beans, brownies, cakes and bread. including a ‘ritual’ (R$9Order something to go; or if $13), in which two cups you’re in luck, you’ll find a seat of the same coffee are hanging c re v e at one of the hotly disputed presented, one made with The f freshly o e ic o ch tables. Rua Bela Cintra 1618, a French press and the beans d te s a ro Jardim Paulista (2193 2116/ other with an AeroPress. padariaartesanal.org). Metrô 2, Rua Fradique Coutinho Consolação. Open 8am-10pm Mon1340, Vila Madalena (3375 Sat; 9am-6pm Sun. Prices cafezinho R$4; 7400/coffeelab.com.br). Open 10amsandwiches R$15-$20. Other location 7pm Mon-Fri; 11am-8pm Sat. Prices Shopping Iguatemi (3031 5715). cafezinho R$4.50.

GO FOR

CAFÉ Paris 6 Café Imagine you are an

extra in Midnight in Paris as you slide in to the red leather banquette in this Art Nouveau-style café. Literary genius here may be restricted to postcards, but it’s a cosy spot nonetheless to enjoy a coffee and a Nutella crêpe. For more substantial eats, the bistro-style menu includes sandwiches and quiches. Ponder the flamboyant decor, with marble floors and colourful paintings, as you try and decipher the fresh juice options: each is named after a minor Brazilian celebrity. Alameda Tietê 279, Jardim Paulista (3085 1595/paris6.com.br). Open 8-1am daily. Prices cafezinho R$4.80; sandwiches R$25-$35.

CAFÉ Pain et Chocolat This is the place for a blowout weekend breakfast (R$32.90), with everything from cakes, breads, fruits and cheeses to eggs and crêpes. Amongst the treats on the menu are the Maria Fernanda (R$8.90) – chocolate mousse with banana crème brûlée. Rua Canário 1301, Moema (5094 0550/painetchocolat.com.br). Open 11am-10pm Tue-Fri; 8.30am-10pm Sat, Sun. Prices cafezinho R$3.50; sandwiches R$16.50-$19.90.

Liberdade, Bela Vista & Vila Mariana café Nicecup One of the best cafés in the Vila Mariana and Chácara Klabin area, Nicecup has something of a retro air, its ample space replete with varnished wood, and red armchairs. The espressos (R$4.30) are made with their own brand coffee and team up well with a plate of mini churros (R$17,50) and hot chocolate sauce. Rua Pedro Nicole 1, Vila Mariana (5083 1012/ nicecup.com.br). Open noon-11pm MonThu; noon-midnight Fri-Sun. Prices cafezinho R$4.30; sandwiches R$19-$28.

Santo Amaro & Campo Belo café Café des Fleurs What Café des Fleurs lacks in space – there are just seven tables – it makes up for in cosy ambience, with a cute Provençal décor. The espresso (R$3.90), made with Orfeu beans, as well as Nespresso options, go well with the homemade croque monsieur (R$23.90), followed by a mil-folhas – custard cream (R$13.50). Divine. Rua Gabriele D’annunzio 1291, Campo Belo (5093 2003). Open 11.30am-10pm Tue-Fri; 9am-10pm Sat, Sun. Prices cafezinho R$3.90; sandwiches R$8.90-$19.90

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Out & About This month in S達o Paulo

42 45 46 49 50 54

LOST ART/RED BULL/PRESS IMAGE

Art Shopping & Style Film Gay & Lesbian Music & Nightlife Football & World Cup 2014

Short circuit With a focus on the arts, Red Bull Station gives new life to a former substation

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Art & Museums

claire rigby

Play station

Occupy São Paulo Red Bull Station opened after more than two years of planning and a large scale restoration

With remarkably little fanfare, after more than two years’ planning and six months’ restoration and construction, a major new cultural venue opened in São Paulo last month in the form of Red Bull Station, in the heart of the city’s downtown in a stunningly repurposed, previously neglected 1920s building. Two main differences mark Red Bull Station out from the rest of the city’s sterling array of cultural hubs: it was conceived as a space for the production of culture, in the form of music and art, rather than as a platform for ready-made exhibitions and shows; and it’s sponsored – or to be more exact, 100 per cent paid for – by the makers of a well-known energy drink. With a long-standing track record of investing in edgy sports and the arts – part of a hipstertargeting marketing strategy – Red

Bull has long been active in the São Paulo art scene. Its Red Bull House of Art artists’ residency programme has held three previous editions here since 2009, including two at Centro’s magnificent Sampaio Moreira building, which is now set to become home to City Hall’s Cultural Secretariat. When the process of seeking out the next venue began some two years ago, and the team was shown the former electrical substation that was to become Red Bull Station, the decision was taken to create a permanent space this time, which would also be home to a recording studio, with space for exhibitions, workshops, gigs and other events. The building’s surroundings could scarcely be more urban, and hardly more São Paulo, set close to the intersection between the mighty 9 de Julho and 23 de Maio avenidas, on a sweeping curve on the valley of Anhangabaú heading out towards Liberdade. Caught in a web of heavily trafficked roads, flyovers and pedestrian walkways adjacent to the Terminal Bandeira bus station, it’s an inhospitable spaghetti junction of impressive proportions.

TRANSFORMERS The ‘station’ itself, once owned by the São Paulo Tramway, Light and Power Company, had the task of distributing the electricity to São Paulo’s fleet of trams, hence its location at this arterial spot. The sleek fountain on the building’s roof, beside a terrace shaded by a sweeping new ‘marquise’ (a pouredconcrete covering, also used to collect

claire rigby

A former electrical substation has been reborn as a new cultural hotspot, Red Bull Station. Claire Rigby reports

rainwater for later use), was once an essential element in the substation’s functioning: it was part of a cooling system in which water was pumped through the building to cool the immense transformers. The building’s deft, beautiful retrofit, which has restored the listed façade but created the interior almost anew, was done by none other than Triptyque, a quartet of young French and Brazilian architects who have become, in recent years, some of the most sought-after architects in Brazil. The team added a colossal set of metal platforms and stairways down one side of the building, linking its five levels and providing an easy flow of visitor circulation up, down, in and around the building. But perhaps the most impressive architectural aspect of the project – aside from the très Triptyque blend of sheer concrete and beautifully restored or otherwise exposed original elements, which include panels of distressed, stippled paintwork built up over years of repainting – is the stunning recording studio on the ground floor. The studio, which will be home to Red Bull’s Bass Camp in the next few weeks – an immersive programme for would-be music professionals – is a heavyweight concrete module which has been inserted into the heart of the building. Self-contained and sound-proofed by thick walls, the studio is given real transparency by plate-glass windows looking straight into the recording area and into the

City view Glance out the window for a new angle on Anhangabaú

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claire ricby

Art & Museums

Strike a pose The ‘mannequin’ Fancy, Rodolpho Parigi’s alter-ego

mixing room, where an immense analogue mixing console – a 1980s behemoth, bought secondhand from a music school in London’s Islington – takes pride of place. RESIDENT ARTISTES Meanwhile upstairs, the six artists selected for this cycle of Red Bull’s residency programme include Ale Domingues, working with innovative forms of lighting media; the edgily compelling performance artist, Fabiana Faleiros; and Chico Togni, whose work incorporates cardboard and other salvaged materials to surprising effect. Raquel Uendi works with photography as a form of sculpture, using a high-resolution printer to ‘develop’ some of her

individual ateliers, with access too to a digital workshop and an ‘analogue workshop’, for work in ceramics and such, the artists are also given the chance to attend workshops and talks. It’s impossible to doubt Red Bull’s sincerity and deep-pocketed generosity when it comes to its sponsorship of this and other inventive sporting and arty endeavours around the world. What’s harder to work out is how it all translates into sales of those slim cans of fizzy pop, which is, after all, the company’s line of business. A clever mesh of coolhunting and stealth-marketing with old-fashioned arts endowment,

Long-legged Fancy, who walks the hallways in full drag, is emblematic of the experimental nature of the art being promoted images before folding and arranging them on the wall; Thiago Honório works in a number of media, creating thoughtful, thought-provoking installations; and Rodolpho Parigi, perhaps the best known of the bunch, with a successful career as a painter in full swing, is experimenting with an alter ego, a mannequin called Fancy. Long-legged Fancy, who walks the hallways in full drag, and who made an appearance at the opening night, striking a series of rigid, tragical poses on a pedestal in one of the exhibition spaces, is emblematic of the experimental nature of the art being promoted during the residencies. The idea, says the residency’s young curator, Paula Borghi, is that the artists are given the chance to work with experimental practices that might not be saleable, but that contribute to their development in the long run. Given ten weeks and one of six

Red Bull Station is emblematic of a very modern world, in which advertising, marketing and ‘content’ creation bleed seamlessly into one. If it’s free, you’re the product, goes the internet-age adage. At Red Bull Station, almost all the activities are free, from the art residencies and music programmes to the talks, workshops, gigs and exhibitions – but they’re not only free of charge, they’re also open to one and all, with almost the entire building intended to be open for free circulation. The only thing, as it happens, that’s not free here are the fizzy drinks: the small café sells simple meals and snacks – and, naturally, those ubiquitous, blueand-silver cans of energising drink. Red Bull Station is at Praça da Bandeira 137, Centro (redbullstation. com.br). Open 11am-9pm Tue-Sat. The results of the artists’ residency are on display from 14 December. FREE

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Art listings Memorabilia Lúcio Carvalho How to use the listings This section rounds up a selection of the city’s commercial galleries, ordered by area, followed by its museums and cultural centres. Recommended institutions are marked with a .

Pinheiros Galeria Estação Gallery director Vilma Eid’s focus is on the cream of Brazilian popular art, displaying a collection of fascinating works, including sculpture and painting by artists such as José Antônio da Silva and Nuca. Books and local crafts are also for sale. Rua Ferreira de Araújo 625, Pinheiros (3813 7253/galeriaestacao.com.br). Open 11am-7pm Mon-Fri; 11am-3pm Sat. No credit cards.

Santa Cecília

How to submit potential listings Please submit suggestions to arte@ guiatimeout.com.br.

Baró Galeria Baró is an important player in SP and beyond, and it does things on a grand scale, with a constantly changing programme and a hallmark dash of daring. The stylish Spanish owner, Maria Baró, has also developed particularly good connections with artists from other Latin American countries. Her gallery occupies a large, airy, industrial space, where it has the room for large installations. Rua Barra Funda 216, Santa Cecília (3666 6489/barogaleria. com). Metrô 3, Marechal Deodoro. Open 11am-7pm Tue-Fri; 11am-5pm Sat. No credit cards.

Butantã

Consolação Galeria Vermelho One of the most consistently interesting galleries in São Paulo, 10-year-old Galeria Vermelho sits at the top of imposing Avenida Paulista behind a blank façade that the gallery sometimes uses as a canvas. Inside, in a set of spaces designed by the architect Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the gallery has a well earned reputation for championing emerging artists, investing care and effort into their careers. Rua Minas Gerais 350, Higienópolis (3138 1520/galeriavermelho. com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open 10am-7pm Tue-Fri; 11am-5pm Sat.

Itaim Bibi & Vila Olímpia Casa Triângulo This big, stylish white gallery is strong on Brazilian and international names, unafraid to shock, and doesn’t shy from variety. Founded in 1988, the gallery continues to play an essential part in championing emerging artists, Brazilian and otherwise, and takes part in a number of important international art fairs. Rua Paes de Araújo 77, Itaim Bibi (3167 5621/ casatriangulo.com.br). Open 11am-7pm Tue-Sat. No credit cards. Galeria Marília Razuk Currently based in a highly discreet Itaim Bibi location, Marília Razuk has been showing Brazilian and international artists of great stature since 1992. An impressive roster includes the neo-concretist maestro Amilcar de Castro. Rua Jerônimo da Veiga 131, Itaim Bibi (3079 0853/ galeriamariliarazuk.com.br) Open 10.30am-7pm Mon-Fri; 11am-3pm Sat.

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Art & Museums

Listings are chosen at the editors’ discretion, and Time Out São Paulo does not accept compensation of any kind in exchange for listing events or venues. Times and other details can change at short notice, so it’s a good idea to call ahead and check.

Galeria Leme This bare concrete space, originally designed by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, winner of the 2006 Pritzker Prize for architecture, houses a dynamic outfit representing local and international artists, with a special focus on Latin America. At the beginning of 2012, the gallery upped sticks and moved to this new space, two blocks away from its original location. Avenida Valdemar Ferreira 130, Butantã (3093 8184/ galerialeme.com) Open 10am-7pm MonFri; 10am-5pm Sat . No credit cards.

gravurabrasileira.com). Open 11am-6pm Mon-Fri; 11am-1pm Sat.

With a collection of 16 new photographs, sculptures, paintings and backlit semi-transparent digital photos, Lúcio Carvalho’s childhood memories come jumbled in unlikely combinations that reveal new expressions from an otherwise simple nostalgia. By depicting anatomically detailed hearts and skulls with flowers, toys and teacups, ‘Avessos’ (the wrong sides, or insides-out) explores the sentimentality given to objects from the past. Galeria Lume, Rua Joaquim Floriano 711, Itaim Bibi (3704 6268/ galerialume.com) from 29 November to 21 December. FREE Galeria Oscar Cruz Oscar Cruz has been dealing in contemporary art in São Paulo for over 15 years, and takes part in the major international art fairs. The large gallery space focuses on the work of contemporary Brazilian artists, covering a broad range of media from painting and photography to installation and sculpture. Rua Clodomiro Amazonas 526, Itaim Bibi (3167 0833/galeriaoscarcruz.com. br). Open 11am-7pm Tue-Fri; 11am5pm Sat.

Jardins Arte Aplicada Galeria Brazilian contemporary artists using techniques including painting, drawing, sculpture and photography, are represented at this glass-fronted two-storey gallery. Rua Haddock Lobo 1406, Jardim Paulista (3064 4725/arteaplicada.com.br). Open 10am-7pm Mon-Fri; 10am-2pm Sat. Cartel011 This long, thin, two-floor building in Pinheiros is a multi-purpose space that contains a stylish shop as well as a salon, a restaurant out back (Feed Food), and the gallery space. Rua Artur

de Azevedo 517, Pinheiros (3081 4171/ cartel011.com.br). Open 10am-6pm Mon-Sat. Mendes Wood Injecting a dash of youthful zest and daring into the city’s art scene, Mendes Wood is owned by galleristas Pedro Mendes, Felipe Dmab and Matthew Wood, the latter from the USA. This is a cutting-edge gallery whose artists now include Brazil’s foremost conceptual artist, Tunga. Rua da Consolação 3358, Jardim Paulista (3081 1735/ mendeswood.com). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open 10am-7pm MonSat. No credit cards.

Perdizes & Pompéia Gravura Brasileira Opened in 1998 to showcase classic and contemporary print art, Gravura Brasileira has since staged more than 100 exhibitions from its Perdizes headquarters. This is one of precious few print-only galleries in Brazil, and its exhibitions are both reliably interesting and of consistently high artistic quality. Rua Dr Franco da Rocha 61, Perdizes (3624 0301/

Vila Madalena Choque Cultural This unpretentious, influential gallery is dedicated to Brazilian urban art from graffiti artists to skateboard designers and printmakers. It has played a significant role in promoting the city’s street art, and if you find live-wire curator/co-owner Baixo Ribeiro on the premises and up for a chat, you’ll come out wiser on this and many other art-related subjects. Rua Medeiros de Albuquerque 250, Vila Madalena (3061 2365/choquecultural.com.br). Open 10am-6pm Tue-Fri; 1-6pm Sat. Central Galeria With a mission to discover some of the talent emerging from São Paulo’s art schools, the gallery represents a varied line of young artists. Rua Mourato Coelho 751, Vila Madalena (2645 4480/centralgaleriadearte.com). Open 10am-7pm Mon-Fri; 10am-5pm Sat. No credit cards. i Fortes Vilaça Even an art ignoramus will feel the quality at this gallery, one of the most established Brazilian names on the international circuit. They’ve got some big names on the roster: São Paulo graffiti stars OsGemeos (though graffiti doesn’t accurately describe their magicalrealist paintings), the world-renowned installation artist Ernesto Neto, and Beatriz Milhazes and her beautiful, colourful paintings. Look out too for the work of the always interesting Adriana Varejão. If there’s something on in particular, the Galpão (warehouse) is well worth a visit, too – but the area isn’t great, so it’s probably best to take a taxi there. Rua Fradique Coutinho 1500, Vila Madalena (3032 7066/fortesvilaca. com.br). Open 10am-7pm Tue-Fri; 10am-6pm Sat. No credit cards. Other location Galpão Fortes Vilaça (warehouse), Rua James Holland 71,

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11/11/13 17:33


Shopping & Style Forest fair

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Shopping malls

Four sale The festival organisers (above) and eco-T-shirts (below right)

Eco essentials A basket from Vila Amazonas in Santarém, a pot from the Baniwa tribe and a bag from a São Paulo quilombo.

programme of debates and cultural events will accompany the bazaar, with one of the highlights being a series of tastings, on 28 November, that include mangrove oysters from the oyster cooperative of São Paulo’s coastal town of Cananéia. Design da Mata is at Avenida Pedroso De Morais 1684, Pinheiros (facebook.com/DesignDaMata). Open 5pm-9pm, 27 November; noon-9pm, 28-30 November.

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Combine an ethical shopping spree with the chance to acquire some unique Brazilian gifts at the third edition of the craft fair, Design da Mata. Bags, wallets, clothes, toys, placemats, baskets, jewellery and sculptures will all be on sale, handmade by around 100 producers from the Amazon and communities within Brazil’s Atlantic forest region, using natural materials such as banana straw and palm fibres. Revenue covers the cost of this and some of next year’s event, with the rest – approximately 70 per cent – going back to the producers. A

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Design da Mata brings ethical consumption to the festive season, says Catherine Balston

Cidade Jardim This lavishly swish mall, with its picturesque roof terrace, features Hermès, Giorgio Armani, Montblanc and Brazilian designer Carlos Miele. Don’t miss Chocolat du Jour, possibly the best chocolate store in town. Taxi, private car or helicopter are the only means of arrival allowed. Avenida Magalhães de Castro 12000, Morumbi (3552 1000/ shoppingcidadejardimjhsf.com.br). Open 10am-10pm Mon-Sat; 2-8pm Sun, holidays. Hours at food kiosks and restaurants vary. Frei Caneca Located close to Avenida Paulista, this mall is at the heart of São Paulo and has numerous shops, nine cinemas and two theatres. Its cinema is known for being eclectic, with national and international movies on the menu, whether commercial or cult. The food court tends to get a bit crowded at lunchtime, so you might find yourself sharing a table. Rua Frei Caneca 569, Consolação (3472 2000/freicanecashopping.com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open 10am-10pm MonSat; 2-8pm Sun. Hours at shops, bars and restaurants vary. Galeria Ouro Fino São Paulo’s wealthier alternative crowd heads to this gallery. There are tattoo studios, lingerie shops and hairdressers; and above all, there are small-scale designer shops selling creative or unusual outfits like US Army-inspired fatigues at the appropriately named US Army. Rua Augusta 2690, Jardim Paulista (3082 7860/galeriaourofino.com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open 8am-8pm Mon-Sat. Galeria do Rock A haven for rockers and emos, affectionately known as ‘emoland’ by city satirists, the Galeria do Rock is a collection of 450 shops, 190 of them dedicated to the various facets of the music scene. CDs, vinyl, T-shirts, accessories, flags and posters – you name it, it’s here and it’s ready to rock. The bottom floor is dedicated solely to hip hop and ‘black music’, as Brazilians term it. Rua 24 de Maio 62, Centro (3337 6277). Metrô 3, República. Open 10am-6.30pm Mon-Fri; 10am-6pm Sat. Ibirapuera One of the biggest shopping centres in town, Ibirapuera has more than 400 stores plus a food area. Charming small shops can also be found outside the mall, on avenidas Bem-Te-Vi and Gaivota, and ruas Pavão and Normandia. Avenida Ibirapuera 3103, Moema (5095 2300/ ibirapuera.com.br). Open 10am-10pm Mon-Sat; 11am-10pm Sun. Hours at stores, bars and restaurants vary. Iguatemi This, the city’s oldest shopping centre, still manages to hold its own in terms of sophistication and class, despite a rash of new high-class malls. Emporio Armani, Louis Vuitton and Ermenegildo Zegna are just some of the designer dreams on display, while Tiffany & Co

has a street-front store on the ground floor. Check out the Brazilian high-fashion shops like Rosa Chá, or for slightly more affordable international style, head for Zara and Diesel. Avenida Brigadeiro Faria Lima 2232, Jardim Paulistano (3816 6116/iguatemisaopaulo.com.br). Open 10am-10pm Mon-Sat, food court 11am10pm; shops 2-8pm Sun. Hours at stores, bars and restaurants vary. Market Place This is a small, bijou mall that goes for quality, not quantity of stores. A middle-upper-class stamping ground with beautiful décor, it also has an excellent food court with a huge variety of options. Go for baby back ribs at Outback, check out Mango’s Smoothies and Brigaderia, and don’t miss the shops Doc Dog and Calvin Klein. Avenida Doutor Chucri Zaidan 902, Brooklin (3048 700/ marketplace.com.br). Open 10am-10pm Mon-Sat; 11am-8pm Sun. Hours at stores, bars and restaurants vary. Pátio Higienópolis Located on a leafy boulevard in this upmarket neighbourhood, this mall is at first hard to distinguish from the mansions and 1950s residential buildings around it. It’s popular for its branch of the high-end pizza joint Bar des Arts, and brands like L’Occitane. Avenida Higienópolis 618, Higienópolis (3823 2300/patiohigienopolis. com.br). Metrô 3, Marechal Deodoro. Open 10am-10pm Mon-Sat; 11am-8pm Sun & holidays. Hours at stores, bars and restaurants vary. Pátio Paulista The largest mall on Avenida Paulista is home to chains like Zara, Luigi Bertolli and Hering. The sleek interior appeals to Avenida Paulista businessmen, primarily for midday trips to the food court, while kids flock to its small three-screen movie theatre. Rua Treze de Maio 1947, Paraíso (3191 1100/ shoppingpaulista.com.br). Metrô 2 & 1, Paraíso. Open 10am-10pm Mon-Sat, 11am-8pm Sun & holidays. Hours at stores, bars and restaurants vary. Top Center After being acquired in 2007, Top Center has had a facelift and become a modernised option for those in search of shopping options around Avenida Paulista. Casual urban fashion is catered for by stores such as M.Officer, Any Any and Hering, amongst others. Services handy for tourists include a Bureau de Change, car rental (Localiza) and travel agencies (CVC and H.I.S. Turismo). Avenida Paulista 854, Bela Vista (3145 1819/topcentershopping. com.br). Open 9am-9pm Mon-Sat; noon6pm Sun and holidays. Food court 11am9pm; shops noon-6pm. Villa-Lobos Close to Parque VillaLobos, this mall has a good selection of quality shops and restaurants. Check out Arezzo, arguably Brazil’s best chain store for gorgeous leather bags and shoes (prices rarely dip below R$100 for shoes and R$250 for bags); and Folic, another Brazilian chain with beautifully designed clothing and great bags. Avenida Das Nações Unidas 4777, Alto de Pinheiros (3024 4200/shoppingvillalobos. com.br). Open 10am-10pm Mon-Sat; 12-9pm Sun. Hours at stores, bars and restaurants vary.

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Film Reviews film e of th h t mon

imovision/press image

Blue is the Warmest Colour

Hello, young lovers Adèle Exarchopoulos (left) and Léa Seydoux bring a convincing sensitivity to director Abdellatif Kechiche’s detailed romantic epic

Dir. Abdellatif Kechiche, France, Belgium, Spain, 2013. Adèle Exarchopoulos, Léa Seydoux, Jeremie Laheurte. 179 mins.

Blue is the Warmest Colour is a minutely detailed, searingly erotic three-hour study of first lesbian love. Its writer-director, the French-Tunisian Abdellatif Kechiche, had a setback with his last film, 2010’s Black Venus. An imposing biopic of the 19th-century South African slave-turned-freakshow-act Saartjie Baartman, it proved too harrowing a vision for British or US distributors. Most directors would retreat into safer territory after an experience like that, but most directors aren’t Kechiche. Blue is the Warmest Colour is the most brazenly singular return

the Couscous director could have made, and the richest film of his career to boot. Nothing about the film’s coming-of-age narrative, nor the rise and fall of its core romance, is intrinsically new or daring, yet Kechiche’s freewheeling perspective on young desire is uncommon in its emotional maturity. Our heroine, Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos), begins the film as a precocious high-schooler and ends it as a grown woman still with plenty to learn about herself. Unlike so many same-sex-themed films that focus on coming out as the defining gay experience, Blue is the Warmest Colour glides past that stage of Adèle’s life in a bold chronological leap, finding more nuanced drama in the evolving challenges

of maintaining an unfixed sexuality. Adèle is 15 when she senses something amiss in her dating life. Dreamy schoolmate Thomas (Jeremie Laheurte) is all over her, but she can’t get a fleeting pavement encounter with blue-haired art student Emma (Léa Seydoux) out of her mind. The girls meet again on Emma’s timid first trip to a lesbian bar, and love swiftly blossoms – leading into some of the most graphically sensual girl-on-girl sex scenes in screen history. Yet in contrast to the older, more cosmopolitan Emma, Adèle never entirely relaxes into her sexual identity, and is still keeping it carefully guarded when the film skips forward several years to find the couple living together in fragile domestic bliss.

From this simple, not especially unique love story, Kechiche has fashioned an intimate epic in every sense of the term, its every subtle emotional turn rendered widescreen on Exarchopoulos’s exquisitely expressive face. Just 19 years old, the actress effortlessly charts Adèle’s growth from young adult to young woman. Typically for a Kechiche film, meanwhile, her individual journey is set within a bustling, articulate network of friends, family and food. He remains a most sociable filmmaker, which makes his new film’s tingly behind-closeddoors tenderness all the more remarkable. Guy Lodge Blue is the Warmest Colour (Azul é a Cor Mais Quente) is released on 6 December.

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11/11/13 12:06


Don Jon

Showtime Gordon-Levitt as a porn-addicted mook feigning interest in a rom-com with love interest Scarlett Johansson

comedy (star cameos abound) that they proceed to deconstruct from their very specific points of view. But then Gordon-Levitt introduces Julianne Moore’s fragile Esther, who Don Jon befriends in a college night class. Meant as the conduit between the film’s stylised satirical surface and its more complicated undercurrents,

this damaged older woman instead comes off as a fantasy of a different sort – the flawed mother figure who will show our cartoon hero what it means to really connect with someone, sexually and otherwise. She’s the (un-)Virgin Mary to his babe in the virtual woods, and as much of a contrived construction as any of the bootylicious babes the

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Blustery Jersey guy Jon Martello (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is obsessed with his physique, dedicated to his friends and family, and the very definition of a chick magnet. (He isn’t nicknamed ‘Don Jon’ for nothing.) He’s also addicted to what the easily offended old biddies among us would call ‘dirty movies.’ Yes, Don Jon really likes his porn, to the point that genuine human interaction seems like an obligatory distraction between smut-assisted orgasms. Then he meets Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson), his seeming ideal, cut from the mold of Snooki and JWoww. She’s ready to settle down, he thinks he is too, but his online-erotica dependence is likely to put a crimp in their fairy-tale romance. As with many a first feature, Gordon-Levitt’s so-so directorial debut is pumped up with ambition. The early scenes, heavy on caricature, promise to puncture much of the cocky illusions surrounding modern relationships. Don Jon’s suffocating clan – very nicely played in an exaggerated, when-ya-gonna-marry-a-nice-goil? register by Tony Danza, Glenne Headley and Brie Larson – could have stepped out of an R. Crumb comic. There’s also a funny scene in which our macho hero and his ladylove go to a screening of a bullshit Hollywood romantic

imagem filmes/press image

Dir. Joseph Gordon-Levitt, USA, 2013. Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Tony Danza, Glenne Headley, Brie Larson. 90 mins.

film ultimately views, with rather off-putting contempt, as figures for all truly grown men to rebuff. Don Jon – and Don Jon – merely ends up trading one beefcake delusion for another. Keith Uhlich Don Jon (Como Não Perder Essa Mulher) is released on 6 December.

Enough Said

Lacey Terrell/press image

Dir. Nicole Holofcener, USA, 2013. Julia Louis-Dreyfus, James Gandolfini, Toni Collette, Catherine Keener. 93 mins.

Getting to know you Louis-Dreyfus (left) stars alongside James Gandolfini

Nicole Holofcener has a reputation for making Woody Allen-ish chick-flicks. Which sounds like a snidey compliment. Enough Said is her best yet – it’s what we wanted from the new Bridget Jones book, a smart comedy about dating in your 50s. It’s also sad because this is James Gandolfini’s second-last film. He’s arty Albert – a million miles from Tony Soprano (and maybe closer to Gandolfini, who said, ‘I’m basically like a 260-pound Woody Allen’).

When Albert meets Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) at a party, something clicks. Trouble is Eva has just met his ex-wife Marianne (Catherine Keener) and has a huge girl crush on her. At first Eva doesn’t make a link between the Albert she’s dating and the loser slob Marianne describes. When she twigs, she’s hooked on Marianne’s list of his failings. If you’ve ever sat watching your other half at dinner wondering how much longer you can stomach them using a finger as a knife, this is for you. Cath Clarke Enough Said (À Procura do Amor) is released on 6 December.

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11/11/13 12:06


Main cinemas

Sci-fi influence Philip K. Dick

How to use the listings This section lists the major downtown cinemas, including both mainstream movie theatres and our pick of the city’s arthouse and indie cinemas, and other film venues. Listings are chosen entirely at the editors’ discretion, and Time Out São Paulo does not accept compensation of any kind in exchange for listing events or venues.

Film

Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil Built in 1901 and restored in 1927 as the first Banco do Brasil in São Paulo, this imposing former bank in the middle of the old city is now a cultural centre, with a café, art exhibitions, theatre and educational programmes. The CCBB cinema programme often includes engrossing retrospectives of internationally renowned directors. Rua Álvares Penteado 112, Centro (3113 3651/bb.com.br/cultura). Metrô 1 or 3, Sé or São Bento. 1 screen, 70 seats. Tickets R$4; R$2 reductions.

Consolação & Higienópolis Espaço Itaú de Cinema Augusta This cinema, which until recently was known as Espaço Unibanco, is divided into two spaces on either side of Rua Augusta. Visit the small bookstore located on the odd numbered side of the street, which holds many cultural works and has a good café. Rua Augusta 1470 and 1475, Consolação (3288 6780/itaucinemas.com. br). Metrô 2, Consolação. 5 screens, 51263 seats. Tickets R$14-$22; R$7-$11 reductions; R$10-$20.

Lapa, Perdizes & Barra Funda Espaço Itaú de Cinema Pompéia This cinema is known for having been the first to show movies in 3D Imax in Brazil, and still has the city’s largest screen. Screen 10 is VIP with bigger reclineable chairs. Rua Turiassu 2100, 3rd floor, Bourbon Pompéia Shopping (3673 3949/www.itaucinemas.com.br). Metrô 3, Barra Funda. 11 screens, 60-327 seats. Tickets R$16-$24; R$8$12 reductions. IMAX tickets R$25-$37; R$12.50-$18.50 reductions. 3D films R$26-$28; R$13-$14 reductions.

Vila Madalena & Pinheiros Cine-Clube Socioambiental Crisantempo Every Thursday at 8pm, this theatre/cinema combo shows national and international documentaries about social and environmental issues. It’s located in a two-storey house, which includes a dance studio. Rua Fidalga 521, Vila Madalena (3814 2850/

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Centro, Luz & Bom Retiro

Although he published 44 novels, Philip K. Dick is better known for his short stories, which became the basis for such highly-regarded science fiction films as Blade Runner (1982) and Total Recall (1990). Besides screening the movies that made him famous, the Mostra Philip K. Dick also explores the author’s impact through a series of talks with writers, critics and designers. Mostra Philip K. Dick is at the MIS, 29 Nov-10 Dec. Tickets R$3-$6. See listings. cineclubesocioambiental.org.br). Metrô 1, Vila Madalena. 1 screen, 100 seats. FREE

Jardins Playarte Bristol Located on the top floors of Shopping Center 3, Playarte Bristol has large screening rooms (more long than wide), and is a good option for passing a couple hours while waiting for traffic on Avenida Paulista to let up. Screens mainstream films. Shopping Center 3, Avenida Paulista 2064, Consolação (3289 0509/playartepictures. com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. 7 screens, 115-444 seats. Tickets R$19-$23; R$9,50-$11.50 reductions. Cine Livraria Cultura This cinema may have just a few screens, but the ample space and interesting programming, packed with independent films, more than compensates. It also also has the advantage of location – next door to the excellent bookshop Livraria Cultura. Avenida Paulista 2073, Conjunto Nacional, Consolação (3285 3696/cinelivrariacultura.com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. 2 screens, 100-300 seats. Tickets R$14-$20; R$7-$10 reductions. CineSESC This charming cinema on Rua Augusta has a bar at the back, separated by a glass screen, where you can enjoy a drink as you watch a film. One of the most popular cinemas for

film buffs, it screens art-house movies and hosts a number of annual film festivals. Rua Augusta 2075, Consolação (3087 0500/sescsp.org.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Tickets R$6-$12. Cinemark Iguatemi With comfortable armchairs and good quality image and sound projection, this cinema, on the top floor of Shopping Iguatemi, has sceenings of mostly mainstream films. Avenida Brigadeiro Faria Lima 2232, Iguatemi Shopping, Jardim Paulistano (3815 8713/cinemark.com.br). 6 screens, 129-266 seats. Tickets R$6-$28; R$3$14 reductions; 3D films R$28-$31; R$14-$15,50 reductions. Museu da Imagem e do Som This cinema is located inside the MIS – the Museum of Image and Sound. Housing an impressive archive of films, videos, photos and musical compositions, this venue also hosts innovative temporary exhibitions and concerts. Avenida Europa 158, Jardim Europa (2117 4777/mis-sp.org.br). 2 screens, 66-177 seats. Tickets R$ 4; R$2 reductions. Reserva Cultural This pleasant spot has a small café and a restaurant-bar with large windows through which you can watch the comings and goings along the city’s main avenue. Avenida Paulista 900, Bela Vista (3287 3529/reservacultural. com.br). Metrô 2, Brigadeiro or TrianonMasp. 4 screens, 110-190 seats. Tickets R$17-$24; R$8.50-$12 reductions.

Itaim Bibi & Vila Olímpia Cinépolis JK Opened in 2012 in the swish JK Iguatemi shopping mall, this cinema is all about luxury – of its eight screening rooms, six are VIP. The other two aren’t too shabby, either: one uses Imax technology and the other, with 4D capacity, can use up to 20 special effects to enhance the viewing experience. It doesn’t come cheap though –­ tickets are are much as R$68. Avenida Juscelino Kubitschek 2041, 4th floor, Vila Olímpia (3152 6605/jk.cinepolis.com.br). 8 screens, 67-382 seats. Tickets R$34$68; R$17-$34 reductions. Kinoplex Itaim Housed in the Brascan complex, this cinema is located near a food court with a great variety of restaurants as well as a number of bars for longer nights out. Screens have comfortable armchairs with adjustable head and armrests. Screens mainstream films. Rua Joaquim Floriano 466, Itaim Bibi (3131 2004/kinoplex.com.br). 6 screens, 155-312 seats. Tickets R$10$26; R$5-$13 reductions; 3D films R$28$31; R$14-$15,50 reductions. Kinoplex Vila Olímpia Considered one of the best in town, this cinema, inside Shopping Vila Olímpia, screens mainstream movies and is spotlessly clean, with comfortable screening rooms and friendly staff. Rua Olimpíadas 360, Vila Olímpia (3131 2006/kinoplex.com. br). 7 screens, 98-189 seats. Tickets R$22-$53; R$11-$26.50 reductions.

Liberdade, Bela Vista & Vila Mariana Centro Cultural São Paulo – Sala Lima Barreto This intimate cinema is part of a large building that also houses theatre, music and dance programmes, and art exhibitions. The Centro Cultural was one of the city’s first multidisciplinary cultural centres, and its library, the second largest in the city, has excellent art and Braille sections. The cinema has a second screen with an additional 100 seats as of January 2013. Screenings are at a token cost (R$1). Rua Vergueiro 1000, Paraíso (3397 4054/centrocultural.sp.gov.br). Metrô 1, Vergueiro. 1 screen, 100 seats. FREE

Brooklin, Morumbi & Berrini Cinemark Cidade Jardim Has gigantic screens, digital sound and projection, and love seats. Also includes two screens in the Cinemark Premier style, reclineable leather armchairs with foot rests, a lounge area, wine list, and special popcorn seasoned with flavoured oils – all with a high price tag. Avenida Magalhães de Castro 12000, Cidade Jardim (3552 1800/cinemark.com.br). 7 screens, 72-274 seats. Tickets R$22$53; R$11-$26,50 reductions; 3D films R$28-$57; R$14-$.28,50 reductions. Cinemark Market Place Located inside Market Place shopping centre, this cinema only screens mainstream films. Avenida Doutor Chucri Zaidan 920, Morumbi (3048 7400/cinemark.com.br). 8 screens, 145-397 seats. Tickets R$6$32; R$3-$16 reductions.

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Gay & Lesbian Listings

Bars

Dance off Boogie night

‘Bar da Lôca’ The always-crowded ‘bar on the corner’ is actually the neighbourhood bakery-cum-watering hole officially named Bar Tom Zé. Its proximity to nearby club A Lôca turned it into the club’s unofficial waiting room. The crowd is mixed, and it’s often standing-room only. Rua Frei Caneca 106, Consolação (3256 1946). Open 7pm-midnight Mon-Sun. Prices 600ml beer R$6; caipirinha R$8. Vermont República This traditional boteco is a long-time gay institution. At night, it’s mostly the laydeez soaking up the pheromone-charged atmosphere. Pop ditties spew from the speakers until a live band covers cheesy, emotive hits from MPB muses like Ana Carolina and Simone. Avenida Doutor Vieira de Carvalho 10, República (3222 5848/ vermontrepublica.com.br). Metrô 3, República. Open 6am-1am Mon-Thu; 6am-2am Fri-Sun. Prices 600ml beer R$6; caipirinha R$12; cover R$3-$4.

Our listings are chosen entirely at the editors’ discretion, and Time Out doesn’t accept compensation of any kind for publishing details of events or venues. Times, prices and other details can change at short notice, so it’s best to check before heading out.

Clubs A Lôca If the image of Alice in Wonderland’s Queen of Hearts as the club’s logo doesn’t say it all, then the names of the parties – Tapa na Pantera (Brazilian slang for getting high) and Loucuras – Portuguese for madness – say the rest. Things can get crazy in this cavernous space where techno and pop music keeps the frisky twinks and trannies dancing. Rua Frei Caneca 916, Consolação (3159 8889/aloca. com.br). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open midnight-7am Thu-Sat; 8pm-6am Sun. Admission R$25. ABC Bailão This is a favourite with the over-50s crowd and its admirers. The music ranges from romantic ballads and pop to sertanejo (Brazilian country music) and axé (Bahian music). Rua Marquês de Itu 182, República (3361 7964/abcbailao. com.br). Metrô 3, República. Open 9pm3am Thu; 11pm-5am Fri, Sat; 9pm-3am Sun. Admission R$15-$20. Blue Space The tea dance at this spot culminates with the funniest drag shows in town – and some of the hottest go-go boys. Most of the stage productions, which have inspired a cult following on YouTube, are so elaborate they could teach Cher a thing or two about costume changes. The crowd is mixed: postadolescents share space with muscle marys. Rua Brigadeiro Galvão 723, Barra Funda (3666 1616/bluespace.com. br). Metrô 3, Marechal Deodoro. Open 11pm-6am Fri, Sat; 7am-1pm Sun. Admission R$20-$28. Bubu Lounge On Fridays, this club can get crowded and it can get hot, in every way imaginable. Get there early to avoid the queue, but once inside, be ready for some action, with hip beats in the entrance lounge, house and electronic on the dancefloor, and shake-your-booty songs upstairs. Bubu Lounge, Rua dos Pinheiros 791, Pinheiros (3081 9659/bubulounge.

Rodrigo Barreto/PRESS IMAGE

How to use the listings This section contains our pick of the city’s GLS (gay, lesbian and sympathisers) clubs and bars. We also include a selection of gay or gay-friendly cafés and restaurants, plus gyms, saunas and other suggestions. Recommended listings are marked with a , lesbian or lesbian-friendly listings with a , and venues aimed specifically at men are marked with a .

An exaggerated name is only fitting for an over-thetop monthly party held at a gay megaclub. The fourth installment of Veeem Dançar (‘Cooome Dance’) at Bubu Lounge aims for excess with an upmarket disco-erathemed night, combining everyone’s favourite 1970s dance club tracks – spun by resident DJs Jumba and Mauro Borges – with a Katy Perry drag performance. Admission R$40-$60. 14 December. See listings. com.br). Open 11.30pm-late Wed-Sat: 7pm-late Sun. Admission R$10-$60. Cantho Dance Club Cantho is a sleeper hit with a smokin’, democratic crowd representing all the flavours: twinks, bears, muscle-heads, preppy boys and trannies. One of the best kept secrets in town is their monthly after-hours party when the DJ whips up deep tribal house right from the start on Sunday mornings. The area is a little sketchy, but there’s a police post right across the street. Largo do Arouche 32, Centro (3362 1530/ cantho.com.br). Metrô 3, República. Open 11pm-7am Fri-Sun. Admission R$25-$35. Danger Head downtown and prepare yourself for a hardcore experience. There’s a live, 20-minute sex show at 2am in which three couples of varying sexuality do the do. They switch places on stage, giving everyone an excellent view. The crowd is a tad rough’n’tumble, but if you go to the dark room or have a couple of extra sips, you may not even notice. Rua Rego Freitas 470, Centro (3211 0371/dangerdanceclub. blogspot.com). Metrô 3, República. Open 11pm-6am. Admission R$18. Flex In the war for the hottest shirtless boys in town, Flex is fighting with the big guns: a huge dancefloor, a booming

sound system, go-go dancers to spice it all up and an open-air space for dancing and chilling out. Despite all its efforts, however, the club hasn’t managed to lure all the pretty boys away from The Week. Still, the crowd is young and fun. Avenida Marquês de São Vicente 1767, Barra Funda (3612 4402/flexclub.com.br) Open midnight8am Sat. Admission R$25-$45. The L Club In this girls’ club, you get all sorts: from Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi types to everything in between. On Friday’s, there’s live MPB in the outside lounge area, but the main dance floor rocks with tribal house. Rua Luís Murat 370, Vila Madalena (2604 3393/thelclub. com.br). Open 11pm-6am Fridays only. Admission R$15-$20. The Week This party is what every other club (gay or straight) is trying to copy. It’s the city’s main gay party and a national brand, with summer-season clones in Rio and Florianópolis, and an average of 2,000 muscle boys, straight couples, celebrities and hipsters crowding the dancefloors. It’s already gone international, with parties popping up in Barcelona, London and Mexico City. Rua Guaicurus 324, Lapa (3868 9944/ theweek.com.br). Open midnight-8am Sat. Admission R$60-$80.

Out & about CAFÉ Frey Café & Coisinhas This

lively café-cum-bar, recently relocated to a larger space with an outdoor terrace, draws in passers-by for espressos during the day, while couples or groups of friends come by at night. The tasty mojito is a good way to get in the mood. Rua Frei Caneca 703, Consolação (3539 0858/ freycafe.com.br). Open 4pm-midnight Tue, Wed; 4pm-1am Thu-Sun. Prices 600ml beer R$6.60; caipirinha R$15. GYM Academia Gaviões This threelevel, 24-hour fitness center serves as a pre-clubbing must for the muscle marys. The monthly fee includes weight training, aerobics classes and karate lessons. Rua 13 de Maio 812, Bela Vista (3285 3269/ academiagavioes.com.br). Open 24hrs daily. Other locations throughout the city. Admission R$190 monthly. GYM Commando Fitness The convenient location and the cheap membership fee make this small, no-frills gym a favourite among the gay men who live around Frei Caneca. Rua Augusta 810, Consolação (9442 8697). Open 6am-1am Mon-Thu; 6am-midnight Fri; 10am-6pm Sat; noon-3pm Sun. RESTAURANT Bella Paulista Casa de Pães Brightly lit and always crowded, this bakery-cum-restaurant is a gay institution. From early evening to the wee hours of the morning, party-goers and TV stars hob-nob and flirt over tasty sandwiches, pastas and pastries. The service, however, can be patchy. Rua Haddock Lobo 354, Consolação (3214 3347/bellapaulista.com). Metrô 2, Consolação. Open 24 hours daily.

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Music & Nightlife Wonder and Confusion

It’s easy to start feeling jaded by the huge names that keep coming to town on the tour circuit, but it might be worth stopping to ask yourself this time: would you like to see Stevie Wonder live? Think carefully: an international superstar known for his funky singles, soulful R&B and chart-blasting pop, he’s one of the most prominent US songwriters of the 20th century, with ‘the definitive voice of soul rapture’, according to the NME. ‘Pure joy’. Having slowed down considerably from his nearly annual releases of decades past, since the late-1980s Wonder has only issued the albums A Time to Love (2005), Conversation Peace (1995) and the Jungle Fever soundtrack (1991). Having created a pattern of surefooted success that started with a burst of hits in the late-1960s – like the classic ‘My Cherie Amour’ and the upbeat ‘Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours’, which gave him the first of many Grammy nominations – he would eventually win an astounding 22, including a Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996 – Wonder no longer needs to try too hard to impress. Though still performing, he has been making only about a dozen live appearances each year. But even at 63, the man who signed with Detroit’s influential Motown label at the tender age of 11 is still more than capable of engaging large audiences with his soaring and inventive vocal lines, his honest, emotive harmonica solos, and even some solid rock riffing, of the kind he made famous with the twitchy Hohner Clavinet C keyboard’s main hook in 1972’s ‘Superstition’. Along with his widely recognisable smile and ever-present dark sunglasses (he has been blind from birth), expect a canter through Wonder’s vast catalogue, from 1977’s jumping ‘Sir Duke’, and his mid-’80s adult contemporary blockbusters ‘I Just

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The thematic hodgepodge of the Banco do Brasil Circuito Festival is saved by headliner Stevie Wonder, says CM Gorey

Wonder never ceases Ever since he was 11 years-old, the singer and songwriter has been cranking out the hits

Called to Say I Love You’ and ‘PartTime Lover’, which will admittedly make for an odd soundtrack to the Banco do Brasil Circuito Festival’s edgy pretences and its day-long skateboarding competition, of

for advertisers and hopeful teen girls on holiday, Mraz’s blue-eyed soul is all about teaching life lessons through schmaltz-laden positivity, with bouts of thoroughly unnecessary scat thrown in. This

Even at 63, Wonder is still more than capable of engaging large audiences with his soaring and inventive vocal lines which this show forms a part. Positioned to warm up Wonder’s crowd is another Grammy winning American: the fedora aficionado and coffee-shop open-mic-nightstyled acoustic guitar threat, Jason Mraz. Best known for tracks like ‘I’m Yours,’ and ‘I Won’t Give Up’, which sound tailor-made

is the tamest kind of pop possible: you’ll find more musical risks on the soundtrack of the next animated Disney movie. Though the festival continues on into the late hours, with the ‘Electrônico’ stage hosting Brazil’s own Mario Fischetti and the British house music DJ Mync, get there in

good time for one of the afternoon’s highlights: the São Paulo singer and rapper Criolo, at 4.30pm, who is still riding out the fame of his breakthrough second album, 2011’s Nó na Orelha, with his particular brand of samba-driven hip hop. His spot, which wouldn’t be complete without the melancholy anthem ‘Não Existe Amor em SP’ (‘There’s No Such Thing as Love in SP’), should help focus the crowd toward a grooving raison d’être in the programme of otherwise confusingly disparate events. Stevie Wonder plays the Banco do Brasil Circuito Festival at Campo de Marte, Avenida Santos Dumont 2241, Santana (hotsite.ingresso.com. br) at 10.15pm on 14 December. The one-day festival is from 2.30pm. Tickets R$120-$240.

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Live preview Sandy Leah

For some musicians, there’s nothing a PR, however canny, can ever do to change their public image. Luckily, for the duration of her 23-year career, Sandy Leah Lima hasn’t really had to try. The vocalist, who came of age in the spotlight during the 1990s as half of the huge Brazilian pop star duo Sandy e Junior, simply allowed her solo career to develop in a natural and unpretentious way, no outlandish Miley Cyrus overhaul necessary. After parting musical ways with her brother in 2007, Sandy’s first solo effort, 2010’s Manuscrito (Manuscript) traded the romantic singles and ballads

that were the hallmark of the later releases of her previous project for a more introspective, delicate and acoustically-flavoured light rock sound on singles such as ‘Pés Cansados’ (‘Tired Feet’) and ‘Quem Eu Sou’ (‘Who I Am’). This year’s album, Sim, shifts gears, with strains of late-Beatles song construction and early 1970s chord structures on songs like ‘Escolho Você’ (‘I Choose You’) and ‘Ningúem é Perfeito’ (‘Nobody’s Perfect’), while other tracks like ‘Saudade’ (‘Longing’) show Sandy’s vocal range over complex piano work. And though most of the record is held back by an overly conservative approach to production, an exception to that cautious style comes in the unexpectedly moving title track: its powerful and inventive

string and drum lines add an effective counterpoint to Sandy’s lofty singing, providing the record with a surprise stratospheric lift. Charged emotional potency isn’t Sandy’s bread-and-butter, though, so cuteness will have to cut it at her upcoming show. Because even after a heavily mocked 2011 Devassa beer campaign half-heartedly tried to paint Brazil’s sweetheart in a sexy light, the woman named after the good girl lead from the 1978 film Grease continues to satisfy her long-time fans with her unshakeable sweetness. CM Gorey Sandy Leah plays at HSBC Brasil, Rua Bragança Paulista 1281, Santo Amaro (5646 2120/hsbcbrasil. com.br) at 10pm on 23 November. Tickets R$40-$180.

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Brazil’s girl-next-door comes to SP in support of a solid new record

Aw, shucks Sandy just can’t help it

Album review

Wenu Wenu (Ribbon Music)

The dance album of 2013 – according to its admittedly slightly biased producer Kieran Hebden – isn’t Jon Hopkins’ Immunity or Disclosure’s Settle. It’s a collection of Middle Eastern folk pop by a 47-year-old Syrian who sings in Arabic and Kurdish and made his name on the local wedding circuit. Omar Souleyman started performing back in 1994, electrifying and accelerating traditional Syrian dabke music (dabke being the arm-linking, leg-swinging line-dance that forms at celebrations from

Lebanon to Iraq). Joined two years later by Korg synthesizer whiz and producer Rizan Sa’id, he became something of a musical legend locally, dominating the lines of tape stalls that blare out their wares like rival sound systems. That was how Seattle-based global obscurities label Sublime Frequencies came across him, and via their rough-and-ready compilations his synth-and-saz (long-necked lute) sound found Western ears. Now he’s big with the indie crowd, with a remix credit for Björk (who dubbed him ‘Syrian techno’ – needless to say, it stuck) and festival slots from Primevera to Pitchfork (when he can

perceive that ‘Khattaba’ is about a marriage proposal in which the bride’s family demand a kilo’s worth of gold earrings and a Mercedes taxi. Then there are the questions, not all of them petty, about packaging and perception: the debates about exoticism, authenticity and ‘Eastmeets-West’ fetishism; about whether Souleyman is kitsch, and the extent to which that might be calculated. But Wenu Wenu genuinely is a contender for the dance album of the year because, apart from anything else, it’s massive fun to dance to. With an in-your-face urgency that’s impossible to resist, its opening synth stabs deliver you straight into the middle of the party, like a taxi arriving at its destination: the dancefloor. And this party’s been going since 1994, so we’re already running late. Bella Todd

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Special of the day Syrian vocalist Souleyman during a placid moment

get the right visa). There’s both a fervent heat and a remote cool to his live presence: a moustachioed gent in tunic, kaffiyeh, leather jacket and aviator shades, he has his lyrics (often romantic melodramas) whispered sternly into his ear mid-performance by a suited poet with the discreet gravity of a political aide. If you count the bootleg cassettes recorded at weddings, Souleyman has some 500 records to his name, but Wenu Wenu, produced by Hebden (aka electronic adventurer Four Tet) is his first studio album. It’s addictive stuff: a pumping, high-BPM, hardedged, microtonal folk-rave that makes a virtue of incessance over variety, while picking out individual instruments with exciting clarity. Souleyman’s rasping voice is framed and deepened by reverb. Sa’id (at the risk of sounding dangerously orientalist) is more snake charmer than keyboard player, drawing out endlessly twisting and wriggling synth lines that strike out from the melody with a life of their own. Of course, what Wenu Wenu doesn’t have is the visual drama and intrigue of the live shows. Neither do we don’t buy the line regularly tripped out by Souleyman himself that the general meaning of his songs transcends language barriers: you really do need more than your common humanity to

Music & Nightlife

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Omar Souleyman

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Nightclubs Spiritual sax Ravi Coltrane How to use the listings This section consists of our pick of the city’s clubs. A marks our favourites spots. Our listings are chosen entirely at the editors’ discretion, and Time Out doesn’t accept compensation of any kind for publishing details of events or venues. Times, prices and other details can change at short notice, so it’s best to check before heading out.

Indie & rock

Eclectic Bar Secreto More of a club than a bar, this candle-lit room is decked out with a piano, leather couches, chandeliers, and a soundtrack that’s mainly rock, MPB and electronic. The exclusive club (you can’t call – contact is only via email) caters to fashionistas and hipsters. Rua Álvaro Anes 9, Pinheiros (sitedobar.com). Open 10pm5am Tue-Sat. Prices small bottle beer R$12; caipirinha R$22; cover R$80. Caos In a compact little space on Baixo Augusta, Caos crams in more of everything than most bars. More fun-loving customers, bumping elbows at the bar or packed tight on the dance floor. More eclectic DJ sets. And more – well, tat, with walls and shelves The post-bop US saxophonist and son of the legendary brimming with film posters, telephones jazz great John Coltrane, Ravi Coltrane arrives with his and door knobs – all for sale during the day, too. Rua Augusta 584, Consolação highly-regarded quartet for a pair of shows promoting (2365 1260/caos584.com.br). Open his most recent record, 2012’s Spirit Fiction. Mixing 7pm-2am Tue-Fri; 9pm-2am Sat; 7pm2am Sun. Prices chope R$6; caipirinha abrasive and dissonant blasts alongside lingering and R$15.90; cover R$20-$40. layered horn lines, Coltrane’s tunes make for engaging, Casa 92 Dance under the stars in the summer heat at this 1950s houseadventurous creations that should appeal to jazz turned-club, or sit by a real log fire enthusiasts and hardline avant-garde fans alike. Ravi when the nights turn cold. The action is out the back, where media types and Coltrane plays 26 and 27 November at 9pm at SESC rich kids flit up and down the steps Belenzinho, Rua Padre Adelino 1000, Belém (2076 between two tree-covered courtyards, each with its own bar and dancefloor. 9700/sescsp.org.br). Tickets R$8-$40. DJs spin everything from electro rock and ’80s disco to house. Rua Cristóvão Gonçalves 92, Pinheiros (3032 0371/ casa92.blogspot.com). Open 10.30pmhouse and dance music keeps the energy to hip hop and jazz. Rua Augusta 246, late Tue-Sat. Prices small bottle beer levels high until long after sunrise. Rua Consolação (tapasclub.com.br). Metrô 2, R$9; caipirinhas R$15; cover R$50. Araújo 232, República (3231 3101/ Consolação. Open 9pm-5am Tue-Sat; Lions This downtown club in a 1950s danceterialovestory.tur.br). Metrô 3, 8pm-2am Sun. Prices chope R$5.80; building has an exclusive air, with República. Open midnight-late Mon-Sat. caipirinha R$11; cover R$5-R$15. high ceilings and decor inspired by Prices cover R$60. 19th-century gentlemen’s clubs, right Serralheria Espaço Cultural down to the stuffed animal heads on Popular with an artsy, alternative Electronica the walls. But the real star of the show crowd, this no-frills venue in a small Clash Club The young, pretty crowd is the terrace, shared by smokers and warehouse in Lapa has a laid-back vibe at this swish, ultra–modern club gets non-smokers alike, from which you and super-friendly owners. Blending seriously animated to the latest electronic can gaze over at the Catedral da Sé. bar and exhibition space, you’ll find music. Rua Barra Funda 969, Barra Avenida Brigadeiro Luís Antônio 277, everything from photography to video Funda (3661 1500/clashclub.com.br). Centro (3104 7157/lionsnightclub.com. art and sculpture on display in the Metrô 3, Barra Funda. Open midnightbr). Open midnight-6am Tue, Thu-Sat. covered outdoor bar area, while eclectic late Tues, Fri, Sat. Prices can of beer Prices small bottle beer R$8; live music sets are hosted in the cosier R$8; cover R$50-$60. caipirinha R$18; cover R$30indoor space. Rua Guaicurus D–Edge D–Edge is seriously $120. 857, Lapa (6794 0124/ dedicated to underground electronic Love Story Love escapeserralheria.org). Open music, with a wall that lights up with a Story isn’t about the 9pm-2am Fri; 9.30pm-2am giant equaliser, pulsing in time to the music – it’s about a Sat. Prices small bottle of relentless beats, and a beautiful terrace. decadent party that beer R$4; cover R$10. dhu t a M Alameda Olga 170, Barra Funda (3665 doesn’t get going until Tapas Another nonchalantly ng Ou ti a E e Se 9500/d-edge.com.br). Open midnightwell after 2.30am, when cool hangout on the Augusta 7am Mon, Wed-Sat. Prices can of beer party animals, off–duty strip, Tapas is a two-storey R$8; caipirinha R$12; cover R$20-$80. hookers, tourists, clubbers bar with DJs and live bands Disco This club is a favourite with the and whoever else is still awake packing out the dark dancefloor city’s beautiful and rich, although it’s in the edgy downtown party zone lets upstairs with a healthy mix of ages quite small and often beyond crowded. loose until the early hours. A mix of and musical styles, from dub and R&B PRESS IMAGE

Music & Nightlife

The highlight of the space – a creation of the architect Isay Weinfeld – is the glittering mirrored entrance corridor. Rua Professor Atílio Innocenti 160, Itaim Bibi (3078 0404/clubdisco.com.br). Open 11pm-late Wed, Fri, Sat. Prices cover R$50-$100.

IN THE AREA

Inferno Club It’s not just the music, but the leopard-print walls and abundance of neon signs, that scream rock’n’roll at Inferno. Live gigs and DJs get rockers of all ages going on the large dancefloor, although other genres get the occasional look-in on the programme, too. Rua Augusta 501, Consolação (3120 4140/ infernoclub.com.br). Open 11pm-6am; Thu-Sun. Prices small bottle of beer R$8; caipirinha R$15; cover R$10-$30. Funhouse Funhouse is a unique mix of house party, bar and mini-club. Behind the curtain, you’ll find a little black box of a dancefloor where they might be blaring electro dance music, pop anthems, hard rock, or funk carioca. Rua Bela Cintra 567, Consolação (3854 6522/funhouse.com.br). Open 10pm-late Thu-Sat. Prices small bottle of beer R$6; caipirinha R$15; cover R$10-$50.

Music venues Classical Sala São Paulo One of the most celebrated concert halls in Latin America, Sala São Paulo was constructed in a Louis XVI-style 1938 train station and redesigned as a cultural centre and concert hall. Praça Júlio Prestes 16, Luz (3367 9500/ salasaopaulo.art.br). Open box office 10am-6pm Mon-Fri or before concert; 10am-4.30pm Sat on performance days; 2hrs before concert Sun. Prices R$20-$110. .

Jazz All of Jazz One of the city’s oldest jazz clubs, All of Jazz pays homage to the genre’s past but still manages to leave room for new groups and budding artists from Mondays to Thursdays – a contrast from its more experienced performers at the weekend. Rua João Cachoeira 1366, Itaim Bibi (3849 1345/ allofjazz.com.br). Open 8pm-late MonFri; 9pm-late Sat and holidays. Prices small bottle of beer R$9; caipirinha R$17; cover R$15-$35. Bourbon Street Music Club This New Orleans-style bar is big with upmarket paulistanos, who come to hear live jazz and blues. They host shows every night of the week. Rua dos Chanés 127, Moema (5095 6100/ bourbonstreet.com.br). Open 8pm MonTue; 9pm Wed-Sat; 8pm Sun. Shows 11pm Tue-Thu; midnight Fri, Sat; 11pm Sun. Prices chope R$7.90-$9.50; caipirinha R$17. Jazz B This space features a small but crowded grandstand on one side of the stageless performance area,

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and on the other, a crowd that remains standing while nursing drinks. Their schedule usually runs Monday through Saturday nights, with a preference for hosting combos doing jazz standards and Brazilian classics.. Rua General Jardim 43, República (3257 4290/jazzb. net). Open 8pm-2am Mon-Sat. Metrô 3, Anhangabaú. Prices cover R$25-$35; chope R$6-$10; caipirinha R$14. Jazz nos Fundos Dark, spartan and unpretentious, this bar is basically a hole-in-the-wall in the back of parking lot, but the music is excellent. The dimlylit, rustic space provides a perfect setting for combos playing everything from old standards to Afro-Cuban styles. Rua João Moura 1076, Pinheiros (3083 5975/ jazznosfundos.net). Open 8pm-2.30am Tue-Sat; shows 10pm, 1am. Metrô 2, Sumaré. Prices cover R$13-$19; small bottle beer R$4.50; caipirinha R$11. Madeleine Musicians like playing this swish restaurant/bar, as it’s a pleasant space, with lots of wood, a high ceiling and a mezzanine. Rua Aspicuelta 201, Vila Madalena (2936 0616/madeleine. com.br). Open 7pm-last client Tue-Sat. Shows 9.30pm. Prices cover R$17-$26 (minimum spend R$50 on Sat.); chope R$8.60; caipirinha R$16.90.

happening Bixiga section of Bela Vista, this house is a hot spot for rock lovers. The bar, small dancefloor – where the live shows take place – and relaxing lounge give it a homely feel. Rua Treze de Maio 112, Bela Vista (3237 1247/ cafeaurora.com.br). Open 8.30pm-late Tue-Sun Prices R$25-$40. Cine Joia This former cinema close to the Praça da Sé is the newest jewel in the crown of São Paulo’s alternative music scene. Lovingly restored, it opened its doors in 2011, revealing to the world a diamond-shaped bar, elegantly sloping parquet floors (promoting good views, even from the back) and a top-notch video-mapping system. Praça Carlos Gomes, 82, Liberdade (3231 3705/ cinejoia.tv). Open 9pm-late, days vary – check website Metrô 1 Liberdade. Prices small bottle beer R$8; vodka with cranberry juice, R$16. Inferno Club It’s not just the music, but the leopard-print walls and abundance of neon signs, that scream rock’n’roll at Inferno. Live gigs and DJs get rockers of all ages going on the large dancefloor, although other genres get the occasional look-in on the programme, too. Rua Augusta 501, Consolação (3120 4140/ infernoclub.com.br). Open 11pm-6am; Thu-Sun. Prices small bottle of beer R$8; caipirinha R$15; cover R$10-$30.

MPB

Rock & indie Beco 203 From rock to electro, go nuts with the fantastic Brazilian and international – mainly rock – bands that take the stage at the paulistano branch of the Porto Alegre nightspot. Indie kids, hipsters and rockers mix on the crowded dance floor, while the upstairs mezzanine provides a calmer view of the stage. While bands are the main draw here, Beco also hosts regular parties, like Indierokkers on Saturdays and the all-you-can-drink-for-R$50 party Fuck Rehab! on Wednesday nights. Smokers might consider quitting for the night, since the indoor smoking area is claustrophobically small. Rua Augusta 609, Consolação (2339 0351/ beco203.com.br). Open midnight-late Wed-Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$10; caipirinha R$14; cover R$20-$40. Café Aurora Located in the always-

Samba Bar Brahma Bar Brahma is one the São Paulo institutions still standing downtown. Go for its line-up of live samba, MPB, choro and jazz. Avenida São João 677, República (3333 3030/ barbrahmasp.com). Metrô 3, República. Open 11am-late daily. Shows 10.30pm weekdays; 2pm & 9pm Sat; 1.30pm Sun. Prices chope R$5.10-$5.90; caipirinha R$16.50-$19.20; cover R$10-$68. Ó do Borogodó This compact space is the best samba venue in town if you love to dance, drink and sing along from Monday through Saturday. On Mondays, Gafieira Nacional come highly recommended for their musical aplomb, and Wednesdays are rammed for Dona Inah and her group. Rua Horácio Lane 21, Pinheiros (3814 4087). Open 9pm-3am Mon-Fri; 1pm-3am Sat; 7pmmidnight Sun. Prices cover R$15-$20; chope R$5-$6; caipirinha R$7.50-$9.50. Pau Brasil Bar Walk into the body heat of this packed little hole-in-thewall bar, named after the pau-Brasil (Brazilwood) tree out front, and you may feel like you’ve discovered São Paulo’s most authentic Brazilian boteco. This hidden gem in Pinheiros offers an excellent roda de samba (samba circle), with Tuesday’s roda featuring exclusively São Paulo samba. Rua Inácio Pereira da Rocha 54, Vila Madalena (3816 1494). Metrô 2, Vila Madalena. Open 10pm-late Wed-Sun. Prices small bottle beer R$4.50-$6.50; caipirinha R$10; cover R$7-$10. Vila do Samba This no-frills joint specialises in live ‘roots’ samba, played in a ring in the middle of a big,yard. The audience knows its music and comes ready to dance. Saturday has feijoada; Sundays churrasco. Rua João Rudge 340, Casa Verde (3858 6641/ viladosamba.com.br). Open TueThu 8pm-2.30am; Fri 9pm-4am; Sat 1-11.30pm; Sun 2-11pm. Prices 600ml beer R$5.50; caipirinha R$10.

Music & Nightlife

Bar do Cidão This spot has live samba and chorinho, which brings the diehards out all week long. Rua Deputado Lacerda Franco 293, Pinheiros (3813 3111/ cidaobar.com.br). Open 7pm-late MonSat. Prices 600ml beer R$5.50-$6.50; caipirinha R$11; cover R$8. Grazie a Dio! This medium-sized, unpretentious, and charming place is one of the best live venues in São Paulo to hear great musicians play samba, samba rock and MPB. Get close, dance, and smell the sweat – or sit out back and have dinner. There’s live music TuesdaySunday nights, but Friday nights with the excellent samba rock combo Clube de Balanço, are recommended. On Sundays, Marquinho Dikuã, one of São Paulo’s leading sambistas, puts on a fiery show with the Sambasonics. Rua Girassol 67, Vila Madalena (3031 6568/grazieadio. com.br). Open 8pm-late Tue-Sun; shows 10pm Tue, Wed; 11pm Thu-Sun. Prices cover R$15-$25; small bottle beer R$4.40; caipirinha R$10.40.

November 2013  timeout.com/sao-paulo 53 760 MUSIC_bia_11nov.indd 53

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Football & World Cup 2014 Shifting allegiances Portugal. Thiago Alcântara, son of Brazilian player Mazinho, also opted to play for Spain, despite the fact that his brother, Rafael Alcântara, still wears the canary yellow shirt for the under-20 national side. But are these changes legal? FIFA stipulates that when a player has more than one nationality he may choose his prefered team, so long as he hasn’t previously played for another national team during another official match. Since Costa had only been on the field for friendlies, the choice was up to him. The decision inevitably led to controversy, but Costa – who had never played for any Brazilian clubs and had moved to Spain when he was 19 years old – retains the right. It was there that he developed and improved his game, so he felt compelled to choose between the country he was born in and the one that had given him everything. Felipão isn’t happy with Costa’s decision, claiming he’s turning his back on the chance of a lifetime. It must have slipped the coach’s mind that when he managed Portugal between 2003 and 2008, he had no issue with putting Brazilian Deco on the squad. In Costa’s defence, he quite rightly wasn’t sure that he’d find a place on the already star-studded Brazilian roster. For fans, the question remains as to who stands to gain from Costa’s Spanish conversion. Either way, here’s hoping that the Sergipe state native, rather than the World Cup’s hosts, will end up on the losing side.

17 November Brasileirão: Corinthians vs. Vasco The traditional Rio-based club comes to São Paulo facing a serious risk of being relegated, while the current Club World Cup champions have slipped back into mid-table anonymity. 5pm, Pacaembu. 24 November Brasileirão: São Paulo vs. Botafogo Tricolor head coach Muricy Ramalho leads his resurgent squad into a showdown with one of the highest ranking teams in the championship, who are fighting to seal their place in the Libertadores Cup. 5pm, Morumbi. 24 November Brasileirão: Santos vs. Fluminense Flu still hold out hope for the return of their main star,

forward Fred, who has been sidelined since September due to a thigh injury. 5pm, Vila Belmiro. 1 December Brasileirão: Corinthians vs. Internacional Corinthians’s much-maligned striker Pato will go up against his original team once again, but it remains to be seen whether he will see some time on the pitch or have to watch the game from the bench. 5pm, Pacaembu. 1 December Brasileirão: Santos vs. Atlético Paranaense A Santos victory could bring the Paranaenese team’s dream of playing in their fourth Libertadores Cup to an end. 5pm, Vila Belmiro. 8 December Brasileirão: São Paulo vs. Coritiba In the context of national

tournaments, the last game for São Paulo in the Campeonato Brasileiro may also be the final farewell for goalkeeper, team captain and idol, Rogério Ceni. There’s speculation that he’ll retire at the end of this season. 5pm, Morumbi.

Ricardo Ordonez/reuters

For Brazilian players, the idea of donning a canary-yellow national strip, taking the field for their country and becoming a star striker is the stuff of dreams. Being among those chosen for the national squad is just about the highest honour a footballer can receive. This is especially true here, given that the Brazilian team have won more titles

than any other in the world. Surely playing for the side would seem like the natural choice for any player. But not always. Diego Costa, the 25-year-old, Brazilian-born, recently naturalised Spaniard and striker for Atlético Madrid, has hit the headlines for renouncing Brazil, choosing instead to play for the Fúria (Fury), as the Spanish national team is known. Despite having played for Brazil back in March in two friendly matches – against Italy and Russia – Costa wasn’t picked for the side during the FIFA Confederations Cup and subsequently began to show interest in joining his new home’s national team; the Royal Spanish Football Federation even petitioned FIFA for his membership. Aware of his indecision, the Brazilian coach Felipão opted to play him for the Brazilian team’s recent friendlies against Chile and Honduras. But despite his inclusion, Costa announced his exit plans. Odd as it might seem, it’s not the first time that a national switch has happened. The forward nicknamed Mazzola, who was a champion alongside Pelé, Garrincha and company during the 1958 World Cup, played again in 1962 for Italy under his birth name, Altafini. At that time, the Brazilian team refused players who played for foreign clubs. Altafini responded to the snub by saying, ‘I didn’t leave Brazil, Brazil left me.’ Likewise, Brazilian players Deco, Liedson and Pepe, all became expats and went on to play for

Team player Diego Costa points out the newest member of the Spanish side

A Brazilian-born player is the subject of a crossborder controversy. Cecília Gianesi reports If you ask most Brazilian boys what they want to be when they grow up, the response will almost always be the same: a football player.

Football listings How to use the listings This section consists of our pick of the matches of São Paulo’s major teams this month. Times, prices and other details can change at short notice, so it’s always best to check before heading out to a match. Tickets can be purchased online at ingressofacil.com.br and futebolcard.com.br.

Football stadiums Pacaembu Praça Charles Miller, Pacaembu (3664 4650). Metrô 2, Clinicas. Tickets R$30-$120. Morumbi Praça Roberto Gomes Pedrosa 1 (3749 8000). Tickets R$30-$120. No credit cards. Vila Belmiro Rua Princesa Isabel, no number, Santos (13 3257 4000). Tickets R$20-$60.

54 timeout.com/sao-paulo  November 2013 790 FOOTBALL_11Nov_bia.indd 54

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Resources Fire and medical emergencies 193 Military Police 190 DEATUR (Specialised tourist police) Rua da Consolação 247, Centro (3151 4167/3259 2202.

HEALTH For emergency medical needs, head to one of the public hospitals such as the immense Hospital das Clínicas (Avenida Doutor Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar 255, Pinheiros, 2661 0000, hcnet. usp.br), though be prepared to wait. Of the private hospitals, Hospital Nove de Julho (Rua Peixoto Gomide 625, Bela Vista, 3147 9999, hospital9dejulho.com.br) is close to Avenida Paulista and accepts walk-ins. For a complete list of hospitals in São Paulo, visit saude.sp.gov.br.

LEGAL ASSISTANCE Large general practices with Englishspeaking lawyers include Suchodolski Advogados Associados (24th Floor, Rua Augusta 1819, 3372 1300, suchodolski.com.br) and Ary Oswaldo Mattos Filho (Alameda Joaquim Eugênio de Lima 447, 3147 7600, mattosfilho.com.br).

SP Essentials

MONEY The Brazilian currency is the real (plural reais). Banks and ATMs are easy to find throughout the city, though not all will accept foreign ATM cards – travellers tend to have the most success with CitiBank, HSBC and Banco do Brasil. Banks open from 10am-4pm Mon-Fri. Some ATMs can be accessed after 4pm, though for security reasons, most will only dispense R$300 after 10pm.

Lost & stolen cards

American Express 0800 721 1188 Diners Club 4001 4444/0800 728 4444 Mastercard 0800 891 3294 Visa 0800 891 3680

SAFETY & SECURITY It’s customary for Brazilians to carry identification, often required to access office buildings. For security reasons, it’s best not to carry an original passport around, but it’s easy enough to get a copy of a passport certified at the offices of a notary public (cartório). As in any large metropolis, crime is a serious issue in São Paulo. Be careful with personal belongings, especially at night and in the city centre. Avoid wearing valuable- looking jewellery, and take the measure of your surroundings before pulling out an expensive camera, laptop or mobile phone. Most places in São Paulo are safe to walk in during the day, but at night it’s best to avoid dark streets where there are few people. High-risk areas for crime and pick-pocketing include Praça da Sé, Praça da República, and around Estação

da Luz. Do not argue with muggers – just hand over your possessions calmly., and try not to look at them too directly. Chances are they will be carrying a weapon.

instant São Paulo

INST

@timeoutsp

TELEPHONES DiaLling & codes

Brazil’s international country code is 55. All cities have a two-digit city code followed by an eight-digit telephone number. Mobiles in São Paulo have nine digits (always commencing with a 9), except those operated by Nextel. The city code for São Paulo is 11, though you don’t need to include 11 when making a local call from within São Paulo.

Mobile phones

European phones and US GSM phones usually work, though you may need to call the mobile operator first to remove international restrictions. Some Brazilian operators reportedly permit foreigners to register a pre-paid local SIM card using a passport number, but in practice, most insist on a valid CPF (Brazilian social security number).

TOURIST INFORMATION São Paulo’s official English-language tourism site, run by SPTuris, is cityofsaopaulo.com. There are several tourist information offices. The most centrally located ones are at Avenida São João 473 and Avenida Paulista 1853.

TRANSPORT PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Rafa Deda (@rafa_deda)

EMERGENCIES

Submit your Instagram pics of the city for a chance to see them featured on this page. This month’s ’gram from Rafael Palomares (@rafa_deda) was snapped by the CPTM train line connecting Brás and Mooca. Tag your photos with #timeoutsp and we’ll pick the best photo each month. tickets can be bought at booths labelled bilheteria. With some exceptions, the metrô operates from 4.30am to midnight (0800 7707722, metro.sp.gov.br).

your licence was issued. Avis 3259 6868/avis.com Budget 3587 7165/budget.com Hertz 3258 9384/hertz.com Localiza 5533 3535/localiza.com Movida 3075 8686/movida.com.br

São Paulo’s public transport system is extensive. The metrô is clean and safe, though it doesn’t serve many neighbourhoods. But where the metrô doesn’t go, a bus usually does. The transport authority, SPTrans (sptrans. com.br), has a journey planner that uses Google Maps.

CPTM The Companhia Paulista de Trens Metropolitanos (0800 055 0121, cptm. sp.gov.br) is essentially an extension of the metrô that serves farther-flung suburban destinations, as well as parts of the city that the metrô does not reach.

CYCLING

Fares & tickets If you plan to make a few journeys on public transport, it’s well worth getting a Bilhete Único (free at metrô stations, but with a R$20 initial minimum credit). The card allows for free or low-cost transfers between buses, the metrô and CPTM trains. One bus ride is R$3, or for R$4.65 you can take one metrô/CPTM ride and up to three bus rides in a period of three hours.

Taxis Taxis can be hailed on the street, though the safest way is to call for one, find one at a ponto de táxi (taxi rank), or download one of the handy new smartphone apps such as Easy Taxi App, or SaferTaxi. Taxis use electronic meters, and fares start at R$4.10. Most taxis don’t accept cards, so make sure to have cash to hand. Central Táxi 3035 0404 Delta Rádio Táxi 5072 4499

WALKING

City buses São Paulo is served by a large network of buses regulated by SPTrans. A 24-hour hotline (dial 156) provides information on buses routes, or use Google Maps to plot your journey. You can pay on board with cash (R$3), or use a Bilhete Único. Metrô There are five metrô lines, each identified by a colour and a number. Maps are few and far between at metrô stations, so ask for one when you buy a ticket. A ride to any destination costs R$3 and

DRIVING

Driving in São Paulo is not for the faint of heart – drivers can be assertive and traffic and parking can be a nightmare, especially during peak hours. Ethanol is just as common in Brazil as traditional fuels, so make sure you know which fuel your car runs on. (Most new cars run with both ethanol and petrol.) Car rental companies will happily hand you a set of keys as long as you have a driver’s licence, credit card, and a passport corresponding to the country in which

There are still relatively few ciclovias (bicycle paths) in São Paulo, but there are some located in Parque do Ibirapuera, Cidade Universitária and along the Rio Pinheiros. There are also ciclofaixas (closedoff roads) on Sundays and holidays from 7am-4pm (ciclofaixa.com.br).

Though São Paulo is a car-oriented city, it is possible to explore many areas on foot. The best neighbourhoods for walking in are the historic Centro (which is less safe at night), Vila Madalena and Jardins. When crossing, watch out for speeding traffic – cars rarely slow for pedestrians.

MOBILITY ISSUES

São Paulo is not the most accommodating city for visitors with disabilities. Private tour agency Go in São Paulo (3289 3814, goinsaopaulo. com.br) provides tourist services and assistance for people with limited mobility, while the non-profit agency Instituto Mara Gabrilli (img.org. br) also provides information for the disabled on accessibility in public places.

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