Page 1

JULY 2016

Secrets to Aging Well at Every Age

BREWS AND FOODS July 2016

p14

SASOL

ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY p48

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

1


Rehabilitation Hospital

of Jennings

DIAgNOSeS THAT we TReAT

• Brain Injury

• Hip Fractures

• Strokes

• Osteoarthritis/DJD

• Amputations

• Neurological Disorders

• Burns

• Spinal Cord Injury

• Major Multiple Trauma

• Congenital Deformities

• Rheumatoid Arthritis

• Systemic Vasculidities

• Joint Replacements

Others who can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation are postoperative patients, accident victims and cancer patients. 24 Hour Nursing Care • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy • Nutritional Counseling and Monitoring Case Management Call for a free assessment today. One Hospital Drive, Ste. 101 • Jennings, LA 70546 • Phone: (337) 821-5353 • Fax: (337) 821-5355 or 5366 jenningsrehab@yahoo.com • www.jenningsrehab.com 2 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


THE CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER DIVISION P.O. Box 1727, Lake Charles, LA 70602 | 337-491-1307 • June 2016

ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT e are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality W Report for the reporting/monitoring period from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. This report is designed to inform

industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas Our water system is required to test a minimum of 80 bacteriological production, mining, or farming. samples per month in accordance with the Total Coliform Rule. • Pesticides and Herbicides – may come from a variety of Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria residential uses. may be present. During the monitoring period covered by this • Organic Chemical Contaminants – Including synthetic and report, we had no noted violations of drinking water regulations. volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial In addition, the State of Louisiana also performs routine chemical processes and petroleum production, and can also come from analysis for regulated contaminants. Chemical sampling for gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. regulated contaminants may not be required on an annual basis. • Radioactive Contaminants – can be naturally-occurring or be The results furnished for testing are from the most recent sampling the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. of our source water performed January – December 2015. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration water containing beta particle and photon radioactivity in excess regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting must provide the same protection for public health. cancer. PROTECT OUR RESOURCES, USE WATER WISELY !!! Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons A Source Water Assessment was performed on our water who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV / AIDS or supply in April 2003. The program other immune system disorders, some emphasizes pollution prevention to elderly and infants can be particularly ensure safe drinking water, focusing GOT A QUESTION? at risk from infections. These people on the protection of the water sources. NEED SOME ANSWERS should seek advice about drinking Personnel with the State of Louisiana The numbers below are provided if you have water from their health care providers. performed this assessment. The source water assessment consists of three steps: questions or problems with your water service. EPA / CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by 1) Delineation or outline of the source Cryptosporidium and other microbial Billing/New Service 491-1307 water protection areas – in our case a contaminants are available from the Safe one mile radius around each well field; 2) Meter Problems 491-1522 Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). Inventory of significant potential sources Main Breaks 491-1487 of contamination within these areas; and If present, elevated levels of lead can Rusty Water/Odor 491-1554 3) Analysis of the system’s susceptibility to cause serious health problems, especially Distribution Department 491-1494 contamination from the potential sources for pregnant women and young children. identified. This plan is now available in Production/Plant Info 491-1479 Lead in drinking water is primarily from our office. According to the Source Water materials and components associated 24 Hour Number 491-1483 Assessment Plan, our water system had a with service lines and home plumbing. For Plant Tours 491-1487 susceptibility rating of ‘MEDIUM”. If you The City Water Division seeks to provide would like to review the plan, please feel high quality drinking water, but cannot free to contact our office. Information control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. can be obtained by contacting Russell Buckels, Water Division When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can Superintendent at 491-1479. minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public you are concerned about lead in your drinking water, information Health, routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water. on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps to minimize Results of sampling by the State and contracted laboratories are exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at shown in the tables below. Drinking water, including bottled water, http://www.epa.gov.safewater/lead. may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

you about the quality of your water and the services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water and its’ compliance with government standards. In this report you will find information such as the quality of the local drinking water; likely sources of drinking water contamination; and information about your local services. The City of Lake Charles is going through some exciting times and unprecedented growth. The Water Division is dedicated to meeting that growth and continues to plan for the future needs of the water system and our customers. You can learn more about the Water Division and its’ facilities and services by visiting the City web site at www.cityoflakecharles.com. Under the Public Works department listing, click on the water tab. If you have any questions about this report, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please contact Russell Buckels at 337-491-1479. *All information in this report has been collected and reported to you in accordance with water quality standards established by the USEPA. We are pleased to report our drinking water meets all Federal and State regulatory requirements. CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER SOURCES The City of Lake Charles obtains water from wells that are drilled in the 500-foot and 700-foot sands of the Chicot Aquifer. Groundwater or well water is found in saturated zones beneath the land’s surface. It fills the pores and fractures in underground material such as sand, gravel, or other rock. If the water can be removed from this material in useful amounts, these areas are called aquifers. At the present time the City of Lake Charles has 17 wells that provide a clean, sufficient water supply for all of our customers. HEALTH INFORMATION The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals, and in some cases radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in untreated source water include: • Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. • Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff,

TEST RESULTS In the tables below are shown results of sampling on our source and treated water. The last chemical sampling of our source water was performed in Jan. – Dec. of 2015. This sampling was performed by a private laboratory certified by the State of Louisiana. Chemical sampling may not be required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided refers back to the most recent chemical sampling results. You will note that all of these contaminants were not detected or were well below the MCL. Terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with are furnished with the following definitions: Not-Detected (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety Action Level - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. (ppm) = parts per million (ppb) = parts per billion (ppt) or (nanograms/l) = parts per trillion (ppq) or (picograms/l) =parts per quadrillion Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – measure of radioactivity in water In the table below, we have shown the deficiencies that were identified during our latest survey done by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. These are deficiencies we are currently working to resolve. DATE IDENTIFIED 05/29/2014

FACILITY

CATEGORY CODE

ACTIVITY NAME

Barium

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

3/23/2015

0.49

0.21-0.49

ppm

2

TYPICAL SOURCE Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

8/10/2015

0.26

0.18-0.26

ppm

4

4

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth. Discharge form fertilizer and aluminum factories

Nitrate - Nitrite

8/10/2015

0.026

0.026

ppm

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits

Date

90th Percentile

Range

Unit

AL

Sites Over AL

Typical Source

Copper, Free

2011-2013

0.2

0.1-0.3

ppm

1.3

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives

Lead

2011-2013

2

1-7

ppb

15

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

Microbiological

Result

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

Coliform (TCR)

In the month of April, 1.19% of samples returned as positive

Systems that collect 40 or more samples per month – No more than 5% positive

0

Naturally present in the environment

July 2016

TTHM TTHM

Chlorine

Fluoride

Lead and Copper

TTHM

CONTAMINANT

MCL MCLG 2

TTHM

COMMENTS

Below, are listed the regulated contaminants that were detected during sampling. While these contaminants were detected, you will note that all were BELOW their maximum contaminant level. Required sampling was performed at sites within the distribution system, and at each of our well sites. All sampling was performed either by the State of Louisiana or by private laboratories certified by the State of Louisiana. REGULATED CONTAMINANT

SAMPLE POINT

209 Helen Street 2437 Ory Road 4260 Indigo Pl. 4908 Desoto St. 209 Helen Street 2437 Ory Road 4260 Indigo Pl. 4908 Desoto St.

LAC 51:XII.344 - LSPC Protection of Water Supply Containment Practices`

DUE DATE

GWR-App Corrective 09/30/2015 Action Plan

CC17

Distribution

DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

HIGHEST LRAA

PERIOD

DATE June 2015

RANGE

UNIT

MCL

MCLG

2015

3

1.3-4.8

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2015

8

0-7.6

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2015

3

0-5.7

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2015

4

2.1-6.3

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2015

16

10.7-19.8 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2015

32

15.9-34.1 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2015

19

15.2-19.4 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2015

23

16.3.25.9 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

RESULT

UNIT

RANGE MRDL MRDLG

1.91

ppm

0.5-3.3

4

4

TYPICAL SOURCE

TYPICAL SOURCE Water additive used to control microbes

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

Chlorine

3/23/2015

255

22.8-255

ppm

Iron

7/27/2015

1.9

0.21-1.9

ppm

0.3

Manganese

3/23/2015

0.45

0.22-0.45

ppm

0.05

PH

9/21/2015

7.8

7.1-7.8

SU

8.5

Sulphate

7/27/2015

4.5

2.6-4.5

ppm

250

SECONDARY CONTAMINANT

SMCL 250

THE FOLLOWING ARE DETECTS FROM UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING REQUIRED TO BE PERFORMED ON FINISHED WATER AT ENTRY POINTS TO OUR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. A TOTAL OF 21 CONTAMINANTS WERE MONITORED. CONTAMINANTS NOT LISTED WERE EITHER NOT DETECTED OR BELOW THE MINIMUM DETECTION LIMIT. CONTAMINANT

SAMPLE DATE

RESULT

UNITS

Molybdenum

10/08/2015

0.37

ppb

Chromium

5/01/2015

0.83

ppb

Stronium

10/08/2015

230

ppb

Chromium 6

10/08/2015

0.18

Chlorate

10/08/2015

30.0

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

PQL

MDL

DF

EPA METHOD

1.0

0.33

1

200.8

0.20

0.067

1

200.8

3.0

1.0

10

200.8

ppb

0.030

.010

1

218.7

ppb

20.0

10.0

4

300.1

www.thriveswla.com

3


Contents 8 In This Issue

14

Wining & Dining 6 Cinemark’s New Movie Bistro 8 Yes Me Cookie Places & Faces

12

Altitude Trampoline Park 14 Rikenjacks Brewing Company

56 Regular Features 10 First Person with Suzy Heck 17 Who’s News 46 The New Family Tree 55 Business Buzz 62 Happenings 66 Solutions for Life 67 McNeese Corral

Mind & Body

18

18 – 35 Cover Story & Special Section:

Secrets

to Aging Well at Every Age

36 Partnering for Free Smoking Treatment 58 Dodging the ZIKA Virus

Be sure to pick up our Special Issue spotlighting local businesses this month!

Home & Family 42 Travel the World from Your Living Room 34 Don’t Allow In-laws to Interfere with Your Marriage Money & Career 48 SASOL Releases Economic Impact Study 50 Be Smart When Managing Your Money 54 Cotten Logistics Style & Beauty 56 Retro West Fashion Boutique 58 Fighting Wrinkles with Retin-A 60 Fashion Rules to Break DON’T JUST LIVE, THRIVE!

Thrive is designed for people focused on living a happy, healthy life, one that is balanced, full of energy and contentment. Thrive readers want to make the most of every day and be successful in all areas of their lives – family, health, home and career. 4 www.thriveswla.com

Editors and Publishers

Kristy Armand Christine Fisher

Advertising Sales ads@thriveswla.com 337.310.2099

Creative Director

Barbara VanGossen

Submissions edit@thriveswla.com

Managing Editor

Angie Kay Dilmore

Business Manager

Katie McDaniel Stevenson

Assistant Designers

Shonda Manuel Kris Roy Mandy Gilmore

Submitted articles and photos are welcome. Thrive assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and does not guarantee any submissions.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


All our wonderful dogs are available for adoption through 4Paws Society. Call 287-3552 for more information and to learn about other programs that are available.

SO DOGGONE CUTE!

All of these precious pups are looking for loving homes.

Charlie Sparrow

Rumi

Bambi

Puppies are worth celebrating! These two adorable maltese-chi mixes are both male and are 8 weeks old this month.

Precious in Pearls! Bambi is a sweet, 5 year old chiweenie. She is house-trained and would do amazing in an adult household.

Let Us Help You QUIT. FOR LIFE.

Black, white and cute all over! This fuzzy 10 week old wirehaired chihuahua is full of personality. Charlie would do best in a home with older, responsible kids because of his size.

The new Smoking Treatment Center (STC) at Imperial Health is Southwest Louisiana’s pioneer nicotine addiction treatment center. Our goal is to free you from the nicotine dependence cycle and improve your health. Under the medical direction of Dr. Steve Springer, the STC combines the knowledge of our experienced, trained staff with the newest interventions and medications available. The STC utilizes a proven, evidence-based, SPONSORED BY: patient-centered approach tailored to each HealthWe meet with person’s Imperial specific needs. you and assess your personal goals, work schedule, medical history, and many other factors. We help YOU based on YOUR needs.

Sm king Treatment Center

Call us today at 312-8690.

Sm king Treatment Center SPONSORED BY:

Imperial Health YOUR TREATMENT MAY BE COVERED BY THE SMOKING CESSATION TRUST. ASK US FOR DETAILS! July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

(337) 312-8690 www.SmokingTreatmentCenter.com 501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr., Lake Charles

www.thriveswla.com

5


Wining & Dining Cinemark’s New Movie Bistro by Mitch Thomas

Cinemark creates a fresh spin on dinner and a movie with its new Movie Bistro, a dine-in theater with recliner seating and an expanded menu of dinner options, which opened in June. The company premiered its first Movie Bistro in 2013 in Edinburg, Texas, and picked Lake Charles to continue its expansion into the dine-in movie experience. A night at the Movie Bistro is intended to be a more up-scale experience than typical theaters, according to Cinemark Marketing Manager Jennifer Wood. “This is like flying in first class,” Wood said. “You’re seeing your movie in first class.” Along with typical theater staples like popcorn and candy, the Movie Bistro has a dining menu with options ranging from burgers and sandwiches to salads and appetizers: meals which moviegoers can enjoy while watching their movie in the theater itself. Movie Bistro also offers Starbucks coffee and Blue Bell ice cream. Ordering takes place upon arrival, and patrons then proceed to their theater while their dinner is being prepared. Servers bring food to the patron’s seat in the theater. It is best to place orders 30 minutes before the previews for food to be delivered to seats.

6 www.thriveswla.com

If the food is not expected to be served before the previews begin, patrons will receive a beeper that will let them know they can pick their dinners up at the counter in the front. The Movie Bistro also serves draft beer, wine and frozen drinks from their bar seven days a week, beginning at noon on Sundays. Drinks are served in plastic cups that can also be taken into the theater, and a wristband will allow servers to keep track of orders. Inside the theater, moviegoers sit in Luxury Loungers. These recliners have controls to adjust the chair’s height as well as a swinging table. Seats are arranged in pairs, with an adjustable arm rest between the pair for couples seating. The theater has a total of 605 seats, nearly half the number of the previous theater’s total seating, according to Wood. What the Movie Bistro lacks in extra seating is made up with larger reclining chairs and more arm and leg room, all without an increase in ticket price. Tickets can be ordered at the two box offices in the front of the theater, as well as from three kiosks inside the lobby for moviegoers using credit cards. When tickets are purchased, patrons will also chose their seats in the theater, so that servers will know to which seat to deliver. Tickets may also be purchased and seating arrangements made online in advance, as well. Like other theaters, the Cinemark Movie Bistro will host alternative content, such as live broadcasts of sporting events and concerts, and theaters may be rented for large parties, conferences, or satellite-hosted meetings. “There are a lot of options to come here, sit back and enjoy with a beer and a burger,” Wood said.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


TICKET PRICES General Admission: ………… $8 Weekend: ………………… $8.25 Matinee: …………………… $6.25 Child: (age 1-11): ………… $6.25 Senior: (62+): ……………… $6.25 Student (with valid ID): …… $6.50 Early Bird: ………………… $5.50 (First matinee before 1 p.m.) Discount Tuesday: …………… $5 (no opening day, holidays) Senior Day (62+ Mondays): … $5.50

Real 3D Experience: Normal Ticket + $3

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

7


Wining & Dining

Cookies with a Cause

You may not know Karen Derenbecker Davis by name, but if you get out and about town, for example to festivals and the Tuesday afternoon Cash and Carry Farmers’ Market, you’ve likely seen this civic-minded Lake Charles transplant. She’s the vendor selling the tempting giant cookies in irresistible varieties like The Original (her secret recipe cookie dough filled with premium white, semi-sweet, and milk chocolate chips),

8 www.thriveswla.com

Snickerdoodle (with an unexpected twist, and trust me, you’ll love it), Coffee and Cream Cheese (a crowd favorite), and the Stuffed Enuffs, filled with whole brownies, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, Oreos, Almond Joys, and more. Davis started her Yes Me Cookie business last January. Unlike most entrepreneurs, her business objective is not to make a personal profit. She calls Yes Me Cookie a “social enterprise,” defined as a business whose primary purpose is to benefit the community. Davis sells her cookies for $4.00 each. (Considering their humongous size, this is a reasonable price.) A dollar from every cookie Davis sells goes to charity. She also sells cookie trays for corporate meetings or parties and donates $5.00 from every tray sold to charity. Since January, she has chosen a different non-profit group each month and has donated to organizations such as Abraham’s Tent, St. Nicholas Center for Children, the Arts and Humanities Council, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). To date, Davis has donated approximately $2500.00 to local charities.

Driven to Donate Davis lives by the motto, “You Get, You Give.” This New Orleans native first started baking cookies as a fundraiser for the ballet school her daughters Thrive Magazine for Better Living

by Angie Kay Dilmore

attended in the early 2000s. “People couldn’t get enough of them,” she says. In 2012, she read Blake Mycoskie’s (founder of Tom’s Shoes) book “Start Something that Matters.” For every pair of shoes Mycoskie sells, he donates a pair of shoes to a needy child in an underprivileged country. His book and his philosophy resonated with Davis. “I thought what he does is wonderful,” says Davis. “I wanted to wake up every day and do more than just make money. I wanted to make a difference.” After being displaced from New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the Davis family moved around a bit -- Madison, Wis., San Antonio, and Austin, Tx. But she was homesick. “Louisiana never left me,” she says. In November 2014, Davis moved to Lake Charles with her husband, who works for Saltgrass Steak House at the Golden Nugget. She fell in love with southwest Louisiana immediately. After she settled into her new home, she sought an outlet to serve the lake area community. “I looked in my own backyard and saw there are people in need. I believe God has given us gifts that we’re to use. We all have our talents to tap into to benefit the community. There are so many organizations out there who are working hard to help others. I July 2016


knew I couldn’t be everywhere, so I decided to help organizations financially by selling my cookies. I knew I had a good product.”

Compassion from the Kitchen Davis creates her own recipes, saying she has a “feel for ingredients.” Interestingly, she prefers cooking over baking, saying “Cooking is creative; baking is a science.” But the baking is for a good cause. She makes approximately 5-6 dozen cookies a day; some days up to 10 dozen. Currently she does it on her own, (with a hand-held mixer!) but she is looking into soliciting some help from volunteer organizations. Her cookie making technique for the thick chewy confections is a guarded secret, so only she and her husband can make the dough and form them into balls. But they could use some help with the baking, events, and deliveries. Davis hopes her own example will inspire other small business owners to start a social enterprise, and give back with every sale. “It can be done,” she says. Through the summer months, Davis plans to collect money and purchase needed items for charities that benefit children. Because of the heat and the fact that chocolate melts, she can’t sell her cookies at outdoor festivals through the summer. They can be purchased at Cotton’s Downtown, LeBleu’s Landing, 171 Junction Roadhouse (who sponsored a cookie tray raffle to help the autism group), and the Tuesday afternoon Cash and Carry Farmer’s Market. She also hopes to sell them in Golden Nugget’s Employee Dining Room (thousands of employees) soon. Davis recently had a conversation with Lake Charles Mayor Randy Roach. She says he likened the community to a patchwork quilt made of tiny fabric squares, each unique. Every individual is part of a larger whole. Davis concurs and asks, “What does your block represent?”

Mix It Up!

Happy Hour: Tues–Fri, 4–6

at Walnut Grove

res ta u ra n tca l l a . co m July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

9


Places & Faces

S

uzy Heck opened Heckhaven Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in 1986 on a five-acre plot of land south of Lake Charles. She operates the facility with little assistance and cares for hundreds of animals every day. In an average year, approximately 1,000 injured or abandoned animals are brought to her doorstep by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Calcasieu Parish Animal Control, the Police Department, or average citizens who may find these helpless animals. Her goal is always the same; to rehabilitate and return the animal it to its natural habitat. Sometimes an animal cannot be fully rehabbed. These animals often become permanent residents at the Center. Heck, age 68, says she currently cares for approximately 100 permanent residents. But don’t call them pets. “They’re wild animals!” she says. Thrive interviewed Heck at her wildlife center, encountered numerous animals in various stages of transition, and marveled that one woman can do so much work.

first person with

10 www.thriveswla.com

Suzy Heck

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

by Angie Kay Dilmore photos by Shonda Manuel

July 2016


I understand part of your job as a wildlife rehabber is to educate the public on issues regarding wild animals. How do you accomplish this? I take some of my permanent residents to schools and various festivals and talk about ecology and conservation. Many people think that animals need humans. But the opposite is true. We humans need animals in order to exist. Without bees and bats to pollinate the plants, we would have no food crops. Without raptors, snakes, and mammals like raccoons and opossums, we would be overrun with mice and rats which can carry deadly diseases. Without vultures to clean up carrion, the human population around the world would be sickened with plague-carrying bacteria and viruses. But we are killing these animals by destroying and polluting their habitats, and our non-concern with the trash we produce. I often take my raptors to public events – hawks and owls. Many people have not seen these animals up close and they are a favorite of all ages. I have a beautiful golden eagle named Calcasieu (SieuSieu for short) but I have not been able to interest anyone in helping me obtain an eagle permit, even though it requires no cost, commitment, or obligation. Without a permit, Heckhaven cannot use the eagle for educational programs. What do you most want the public to know about wildlife rehabilitation? In most states, including Louisiana, it is unlawful to keep any wild-born animal. Wildlife rehabbers work under very strict rules and are required to have state permits for mammals and state and federal permits to handle most birds. Penalties for keeping wildlife

July 2016

without a permit range from a misdemeanor to a felony conviction, with fines and even prison. Someone may find a baby wild animal in spring and want to keep it. Normally, when that sweet, playful, cute little wild baby is a few months old, the instinct to be wild kicks in. By fall, if not sooner, the animal will start tearing up the house - chewing wires, wood trim, couches, and destroying anything and everything. And they will start biting and scratching. Finding a rehabber when an animal is first found is the best chance for that wild baby to be raised correctly so that it can be returned to the wild and live the life it was born to. You encourage the public to bring injured or abandoned animals to Heckhaven, but are there circumstances when this is not appropriate? Yes. One of my greatest challenges is to encourage people to leave animals alone or return an animal to where it was found. Most baby animals are left on their own by their mothers when she needs to find food. In the case of deer and rabbits, they are more protected from predators when mom is not around. Most baby mammals do not have a scent predators can smell until they are old enough to start eating on their own. And most are marked or colored to blend in with their surroundings. Unless the finder knows that the mother has been killed or the baby is injured or in danger, it is best to leave it alone. The mother is usually close by and is waiting until the human moves on so she can go get her baby. Usually a rehabber can raise a baby to release back into the wild, but we cannot teach them what their mother can, for example where to

find food and shelter, what predators are in the area, and where to run and hide. With uninjured baby squirrels and birds, it’s best to put the animal in a box or basket and tie or nail the container as high as possible to the trunk of a nearby tree. It does not have to be up in the branches or even in the nest tree. A wild animal’s maternal instinct is extremely strong. She will come retrieve the baby or may decide to raise it there once she deems it is safe. How is Heckhaven funded? Most think that because we work under state and federal permits, we are paid by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. Rehabbers are not paid by any government agency. We are totally self supporting and rely on donations and out of pocket contributions. How can the public support Heckhaven Wildlife Rehabilitation Center? I always welcome donations of feed, materials such as cage wire, lumber, fencing, roofing, kennels and pens, and of course, money. Heckhaven is a non-profit 501(c)3 State and Federal Corporation, so donations are tax-deductible. Heckhaven has no paid staff, including me, so all donations go to the care of the animals. You have made helping animals your life’s mission. What do you find most rewarding about what you do? I have the upmost respect for all animals and believe every animal has a purpose. I often think that maybe that one animal that I can save and send back to do what it was born to do, just might be the one needed to save the world. For more information visit heckhaven.com, or call 337-477-6129.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

11


Places & Faces

photo by Lisa Addison

Reach New Heights

at Altitude Trampoline Park by Lisa Addison

Altitude, a new indoor trampoline park in Lake Charles, is the place to be whether you’re a kid or just a kid at heart. From trampoline dodgeball to basketball, trapeze swings and more, Altitude has what you need for an active fun experience. The facility provides areas for toddlers and younger kids, as well as more high energy areas for tweens, teens and adults. Having a stressful day? Head to Altitude and bounce the tension away. On a recent afternoon, a teenage boy got his moves down by practicing the same routine again and again -- bounce up and down, do a flip, spring up against the wall, grin like a maniac…repeat! Altitude offers so many activities to choose from, you might feel overwhelmed at first, but don’t worry. There’s a check-in area as you walk in the door and helpful employees at every turn. Regarding safety, spotters monitor every trampoline area to keep things moving and to help anyone who might need assistance. The design of this super cool trampoline park (the 14th indoor trampoline park of the Altitude family) is practical as well as pleasing to the eye. There are multiple stations with trampolines, seating areas for spectators, plenty of employees to answer questions and a nice concessions area. At Altitude Trampoline Park, kids of all ages as well as adults laugh, tumble, jump, and bounce their way to a fun-filled afternoon. The excitement is contagious!

photo by Shonda Manuel

photo by Shonda Manuel 12 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


IndustryInsider

Straight Answers to Your Questions on Industry and the Environment

Q:

How did Southwest Louisiana become home to so many industrial plants?

A:

Because of our access to raw materials, abundant water supply for the manufacturing process, rail lines, a skilled workforce and our port, we were a natural choice for petrochemicals.

Back in the early 1900s, area leaders took note of the Union Sulphur Company, the largest sulfur mine in the world at the time, and the flourishing oil fields nearby. These leaders took the steps necessary to expand the Port of Lake Charles into a deep-sea channel, and Southwest Louisiana began attracting industrial business in the 1930s. In the early 40s, we were primed and ready to produce fuel and supplies for World War II. Following the war, industrial areas were created by government to encourage additional industry growth. Today, Southwest Louisiana is home to more than 25 industrial plants. Thousands of local residents over the years have built the industrial complex we have today. We salute our retirees who have been part of the economic engine fueling this corner of Louisiana.

LAIA

Nancy Tower retiree from local industry

Lake Area Industry Alliance

Visit www.laia.com to learn more and submit your question about local industry and the environment. July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

13


Places & Faces

RIKENJAKS BREWING COMPANY NOSTALGIA WITH A NEW TWIST by Braylin Jenkins, photography by Shonda Manuel

In Southwest Louisiana, we love to eat! In this city with an emerging promising outlook, Lake Charles’ most important pastime requires adequate eateries to match. Enter the return of Rikenjaks Brewing Company, where they focus on great beer, delicious food, diverse musical talent, and a unique atmosphere. Jay Ecker, co-owner/founder of this popular establishment likened Rikenjaks and its clientele to a family crawfish boil; from grandma to the kids to the pets . . . everyone is welcome. Still in the throes of a wildly successful soft launch, Ecker and his “family of 75”, as he refers to his staff, continue to determine what customers want. Some have commented the new location feels a lot like Austin, with a large open-air patio, covered outdoor bar, entertaining game area, and an intimate indoor bar and dining area. Though somewhat limited, their menu offers numerous tempting dishes that don’t disappoint; from classic appetizers like Spinach Dip, Pork Eggrolls and Fried Mushrooms or Pickles, to the creative grand slams such as Alligator Boulette, Boudin or Beer Brat, and the already popular Lazy Pistolletes (seafood fondue over fresh pistolletes with green onions.) Several salads may spark your interest. Try Ahi Tuna or Grilled Shrimp Salad or the Asian Salad. The Jockamo is all the rage right

14 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

now, with softshell Maryland crab, avocado, tomato, onion and chives over spring mix. Hot off the grill, Ecker offers Angus Ribeye, Beer Brined Pork Chop, Ahi Tuna Steak and Shrimp or Fish Tacos. Specialty items include The Fontina Turner (toasted Panini bread with fontina, pepper jack, and cheddar cheeses served with homemade tomato basil soup), Chicken Fried Chicken, Fried Catfish and Blackened Shrimp or Chicken Pasta. Burger options cross all borders with the American Classic, the Californian, the Brewpub (beer brined onion rings, angus patty, pepper jack cheese and smoky barbecue sauce), the Chuck Vegas (fried egg, 100% angus patty, fried pickles, cheddar cheese & chipotle mayo) and the Hardhead (marinated mushrooms, swiss cheese, applewood smoked bacon, lettuce,

July 2016


tomato, pickles, onions and mayo & mustard). Are you hungry yet? “With such an overwhelming response from the clientele and to keep up with the demand in our small kitchen, the menu will most likely stay small,” says Ecker. Rikenjaks drink offerings include everything from craft beers to a continually evolving cocktail menu. Their two homebrews have earned notoriety of their own. Old Hardhead (a dark Scottish ale), and Contraband Brown Ale are Rikenjak’s signature beers. Currently, they brew their beers at Bayou Teche Brewery in Arnaudville, Louisiana. Demand for these homebrews has been so high, they have at times run out, awaiting the next delivery. In early 2017, Rikenjaks brewery should be

July 2016

up and running and they’ll brew onsite at the Ryan Street location. In addition to their signature beers, many other beers are available on tap or in bottles. Music is a key component at Rikenjaks. Listen to happy hour/ singer-songwriter acoustic acts on the outdoor stage. Featured indoors, look for small eclectic and varied acts featuring classic rock, blues, and Americana. With their vast mix of clientele, there’s something for everyone. Located at 3716 Ryan Street, Rikenjaks Brewing Company is open daily, 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m. Visit www.rikenjaks.com or their Facebook page for the most up to date information and offerings.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

15


Places & Faces

'

m

Know Your food.

Know Your Farmer.

Fresh, nutritious, delicious locally grown fruits and vegetables and sound advice from people who really know good food!

Supporting local farmer’s markets strengthens our SWLA community.

Local markets are great places to purchase fresh, healthy food directly from the farmer or grower. Farmer’s markets can be a fun way to get your kids involved in healthy eating habits. All fruits and vegetables at these markets are picked in season at their peak of flavor and nutrition. Other fresh local food such as rice, honey, meats, eggs and more can be purchased at the markets. With markets across our region growing, it’s a perfect time to check out some of our local markets and meet your farmer!

l SWLA Farmer’s market schedule l Tuesdays

saturdays

Historic Cash and Carry Building

Welsh Farmers Market – Welsh

Charles Town Farmers Market- Lake Charles

Empire of the Seed - Lake Charles

201 South Elms Street, Welsh, LA 70548

1001 Ryan Street, Lake Charles LA 70605

801 Enterprise Blvd, Lake Charles, LA 70601

Seasonal- Opens in May

Historic City Hall

4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

4:00 pm- 6:00 pm

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

wednesdays

Coushatta Farmers Market- Elton

Oberlin Farmers Market – Oberlin

thursdays

Charlestown Market - Lake Charles

Hwy 190, Elton, LA 70532

228 West 6th Avenue, Oberlin, LA 70655

1001 Central Pkwy, Lake Charles, LA 70605

Koasati Plaza in Downtown Elton

9:00 am-1:00 pm

University Park Community Center

1st Saturday of the month

Seasonal – Opens in May

7:30 am-12:00 pm

4:00 pm -6:00 pm Main Street Farmers Market-Jennings

fridays

everyday

Oakdale Farmers Market - Oakdale

DeRidder Farmers Market-DeRidder

715 US 165, Oakdale, LA 71463

100 North Washington Avenue

Seasonal: Open most Fridays

DeRidder, LA 70634

Check facebook for dates

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Main Street, Jennings, LA Seasonal: May – November 7:00 am – 10:00 AM

7:30 am- 2:00 pm

r

Find more information about these markets on Facebook! Market list a courtesy of

16 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


Movers and Shakers in Southwest News? You tell us! Send press releases to Louisiana... Who’s edit@thriveswla.com with the subject line “Who’s News.”

JD Bank Promotes Robert Williamson JD Bank has promoted Robert Williamson to Sr. Vice President/Jeff Davis Market President. Williamson, who has served as the Vice President Commercial Lender of the McNeese Robert Williamson branch office in Lake Charles, will now supervise the JD Bank locations in Jennings, Lake Arthur, Welsh and Iowa and will also continue his commercial lending responsibilities. Williamson has over 16 years of experience in banking. He will be located at the JD Bank JenningsMain St. branch office.

JD Bank Announces New VP/Branch Manager JD Bank has announced the hiring of Dawn Primeaux as Vice President and Branch Manager of the McNeese Branch Office in Lake Charles. Primeaux has Dawn Primeaux over eight years of banking experience and is well known in Lake Charles financial services.

Miller Relocating to McNeese Branch Julie Miller is relocating to the JD Bank McNeese branch office in Lake Charles, where she will serve as Vice President Commercial Lender. Miller has held a similar position at the JD Bank Kirby St. Julie Miller branch office for several years, and her experience in a variety of banking positions will be another resource for the McNeese branch. Miller has worked for JD Bank since 2012.

Physiatrist Alyson Jones, MD, joins Memorial Medical Group Memorial Medical Group welcomes physiatrist Alyson Jones to its staff. She will see patients at Orthopaedic Specialists located on the third Dr. Alyson Jones floor of 1717 Oak Park Boulevard in Lake Charles. Dr. Jones specializes in inpatient care in the rehabilitation setting to a multitude of diagnosis including stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and orthopedic diagnosis. She is a member of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. For more information, call (337) 494-4900.

Police Juror Selected for National Ocean Committee Calcasieu Parish Police Juror for District 6, Dennis Scott, has been selected to serve on the White House National Ocean Council Governance Coordinating Committee Dennis Scott (GCC). The GCC consists of representatives from across the United States who bring their experience on state, local, and tribal policy to then coordinate inter-jurisdictional policy. These are specifically related to ensuring that the Ocean, the Great Lakes, and the Nation’s Coasts are healthy and resilient, safe and productive, and understood and treasured.

Burks Joins Dermatology Associates

Jamie Burks

July 2016

Dermatology Associates welcomes Jamie Burks, family nurse practitioner. Burks will assist the physicians in seeing patients and coordinating treatment plans under their direction. Burks,

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

a DeRidder native and graduate of University of Louisiana at Monroe, received her masters of science in nursing from McNeese State University. She is board certified as a family nurse practitioner from the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. For more information, call (337) 433-7272.

Dr. Cormier Marks Milestone Michael Cormier, MD, board certified dermatologist, marks 30 years of service in July at Dermatology Associates in Lake Charles as well as 39 years with Moss Memorial Health Clinic. Dr. Michael Cormier “Dr. Cormier has a palpable passion for dermatology and an obvious, heartfelt commitment to caring for the people of Southwest Louisiana. Having observed his practice from across the hall for almost three years, he has been both an influence and an inspiration to me as a young physician in this community,” said Lee Miller, MD, fellow physician at Dermatology Associates. “I consider it an honor and privilege to work beside him every day.” “We are proud to honor Dr. Cormier for his 39 years of dedication at our Moss Memorial Health Clinic,” said Larry Graham, president and CEO of Lake Charles Memorial Health System. “Dr. Cormier’s selfless commitment to underserved populations of Southwest Louisiana is a model we should all work to exemplify. Our patients and our community have benefitted from his compassionate professionalism and he is well-respected among physicians of every specialty.” Dr. Cormier is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology. He received his undergraduate degree from McNeese State University and his medical degree from LSU Medical Center in New Orleans. He completed his internship at Moss Memorial Medical Clinic (formerly Moss Regional Hospital) before serving as a general medical officer at Fort Polk. He completed his family practice residency at Moss Memorial Medical Clinic and his dermatology residency at LSU Medical Center in New Orleans. He served as chief resident from 1985 – 1986.

www.thriveswla.com

17


Secrets

Mind & Body

to Aging Well at Every Age

AGING . . . the process gets a bad rap in our society. Backs ache, hair grays, eyesight blurs. No one wants to admit it, yet every one of us begins to age from the day we were born. In many ways, that’s good news!

In this issue of Thrive, we will focus on the secrets to aging well at every age. Life can be fun, no matter the decade. We’re sharing positive tips for both women and men to maintain a healthy body, a fresh face, and a youthful mindset.

18 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


10

Things things

1 2 3 4 5 6

that Get Better with Age

GOLDA MEIR SAID, “OLD AGE IS LIKE A PLANE FLYING THROUGH A STORM. ONCE YOU’RE ABOARD, THERE’S NOTHING YOU CAN DO.” FOR SOME THAT MAY BE TRUE, BUT MANY THINGS GET BETTER WITH AGE. WE GET SMARTER, WE MELLOW, WE CHOOSE TO BE HAPPY. BELOW IS A LIST OF TEN CHARACTERISTICS THAT INDEED IMPROVE WITH EACH PASSING DECADE.

WISDOM: Look how smart you’ve become over the years. The experience you’ve gained in your work, your social life, your relationships add layers of wisdom. You don’t make the same mistakes. You understand the consequences of snap decisions and thoughtless actions. Wisdom tells you every decision affects the rest of your life. Less need for do-overs. KNOWLEDGE: While your experiences bring wisdom, knowledge

is gained through your desire for life-long learning. New knowledge, new challenges keep you mentally young and vibrant. Pursue that dream you tucked away for someday. Learn anything at your own pace through thousands of online classes. Many are free—Harvard included. Teach a class yourself for Leisure Learning or Udemy, the world’s online learning marketplace—for pay!

PATIENCE: You may wonder why you’re more patient than you were five or ten years ago. Somewhere along the way you probably learned that patience is power, as well as a virtue. According to humorist Arnold Glasow, “The key to everything is patience. You get the chicken by hatching the egg, not by smashing it open.” SENSE OF HUMOR: As you age, your sense of humor comes

more naturally. You learn to relax and not take yourself or your problems so seriously. You laugh at yourself readily and with ease. Over time, you’ve discovered life has a way of working itself out, enabling you to find joy in most any circumstance.

FRIENDSHIPS: You haven’t let friendships go unnourished, have you? New and old relationships are important for a number of reasons, but one is because of a shared point of reference. Each friendship represents treasured moments you don’t share with anyone else in the world. COMMUNICATION: You may have noticed that with each

passing year, communication resembles an obstacle course. It’s something you have to work at and will test your mental grit, but that keeps you on your toes. Think before you speak, and consider the other person’s feelings and point of view. You can’t take back something once it’s said. No one can actually disregard that last statement the witness made. Not even good friends.

July 2016

by Jessica Ferguson

7 8 9 10

SPONTANEITY: A spontaneous weekend trip makes the work

week tolerable so catch a flight or hire an Uber. For your own good! Hop up on that karaoke stage and have a blast—the kids will never know! It has been said that our spontaneity reveals meaningful insight into ourselves.

SELF-AWARENESS: You may wear a superman tee, but to

be your best, take care of your body and your mind. You’re on the right track. Your doctor-dentist-optometrist appointments are documented on your calendar right next to your fun-runs and trips to the gym. Changing your attitude about exercise and diet is key. John F Kennedy stated “physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.”

SELF-CONFIDENCE: You’ve reached an age where you no longer worry how others evaluate you. You have something to contribute to the world, whether it’s a letter to the editor or crazy laughter in your favorite coffee house. Seize the moment! Spring out of bed, look in the mirror and shout “a new beginning.” Then live it!

SENSE OF STYLE: The mind and body changes daily. There’s no

getting around it. So might your sense of style. One day you may feel like a gypsy—free and unencumbered by fashion—while the next day you leave your house dressed for tea. You understand who you are and if you don’t, it’s never too late to learn. Sweats or Chanel, it’s your decision.

Aging is akin to the domino effect—a cascading series of events we have little control over, but studies show that we have never been happier or lived longer. Certainly all of us are fallible, but the more we love ourselves and our fellow man—and take care of both—we can only get better with age.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

19


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

of Play. Importance It’s Not Just for Kids. The

by Trish Trejo

Playtime is imperative for children to grow and develop. They use their imaginations and any supplies available to create worlds all their own. Adults can learn from children’s examples to seek recreation and leisure activities that will keep them youthful throughout their days. During adult years, much of a person’s time is spent earning a living and perhaps keeping a family happy, healthy, and strong. But what keeps “grown-ups” mentally, emotionally, and physically resilient? One clue can be found in the way the brain works. During an adult’s working years, the left brain is usually carrying most of the load. This is where a logical answer for a problem at work is found and where a menu is planned that will feed the family without breaking the budget. The checkbook is balanced here; sales pitches and speeches are written. For a person to have a balanced life, the right brain needs a chance to work, as well. Everyone needs time to be creative, to be musical, to visualize, and to use imagination. Creative hobbies are one solution. This may

Have a hobby.

be sewing, woodworking, cooking, or collecting coins. Each of these activities has logical components, but they also engage the creative side of the brain. The best part of a hobby is that it is fun, and no one is judging whether it is done correctly. If it stops being fun, a new hobby is always an option.

20 www.thriveswla.com

Get creative.

When adults move into their senior years, they may have to make special efforts to engage both sides of their brains. The left side will crave the logic and reasoning that once came as part of the daily routine. Puzzles and logic games will fill this void. In 2013, Time magazine reported thinking games and activities slowed cognitive loss better than most drugs available at the time. Creative activities are still important in order to balance left brain, right brain functions. The new craze of adult coloring books is one example of Stay active. an easy activity that will engage the imagination. Coloring detailed designs also exercises hand-eye coordination. Storytelling is another pastime for seniors that can slow memory loss with the added benefit of preserving the past for new generations. Balancing brain activity is part of the formula for remaining young. Physical

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

activity must be considered, as well. Two challenges during working years that make a person feel old and worn out are work-related stress and, in some cases, a sedentary lifestyle. Senior adults may also battle stress and inactivity. The most recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys found that more than two thirds of U.S. adults are overweight or obese. Healthy eating and exercise are the obvious prescriptions for a weight issue, and according to the Mayo Clinic, exercise also elevates a person’s mood. Adults should strive to exercise daily, whether at a gym, a walking track, or the garden. Leave your car at the far end of a parking lot to increase the number of steps you take each day. It all counts! Other suggestions include participation in organized sports, hiking, and dancing. When it comes to recreation, both mental and physical, growing older doesn’t require growing up. All adults can continue to play in many ways that will benefit their overall health.

July 2016


Saving Your Hide

by Austin Price

Tips to Protect the Body’s Largest Organ: Your Skin

It’s easy to become complacent about your skin; easier still to ignore the effects it has on your health. After all, skin is selfrepairing, right? We’ve all accidentally burned our hand on an open flame or fallen asleep outside on a bright summer day only to wake up later and find ourselves as red as a lobster. We take it for granted that we’ll be good as new in just a day or two. The reality, though, is that skin damage can lead to major complications in your health and appearance years, even decades, from now. The summer sun may be lovely and welcome on those days when the rains in Southwest Louisiana finally decide to let up, but it’s also the element with the most long term consequences for your body. This doesn’t mean you should hide inside and never go outdoors again. Sunlight is essential to your body’s production of Vitamin D, a vitamin especially valuable to your mental health. Dr. Jeffery Spiegel, a facial plastic surgeon from Boston, MA, recommends you be judicious in paying attention to your exposure. “Too much exposure can lead to skin cancer and damage collagen.” You don’t need to be concerned about every little sunburn, but any that blister deserve your immediate attention. Spiegel recommends you use mineral based sunscreens, checking for zinc or magnesium in the list of ingredients, but settle on chemical-based alternatives if you have no other options. Some sunscreen is always better than none. When dealing with dry skin – particularly troublesome for anybody regularly exposed to high winds while hiking, motorcycling or otherwise – focus on moisturizers that both penetrate and protect. Check to see if your products contain peptides, retinoids or alpha hydroxy acids, all of which have demonstrated a powerful ability to counteract skin damage and aging. Finally, when dealing with your face, make sure not to use soap-based cleansers. Use instead a gentle, foaming facial wash. Too often soaps and harder washes can lead to acne and scarring. July 2016

Do keep in mind that the kind of skin care you’ll specifically require will depend on your own particular circumstances; some people have more sensitive systems and may react negatively to products others might use without worry. For instance, products with too great a percentage of alpha hydroxy acids can cause burning and redness. There is no one-size fits-all product or approach for maintaining your skin. Before seriously changing your regimen of skin care products, Dr. Spiegel recommends scheduling regular check-ups with a dermatologist and a plastic surgeon the same way you would visit a dentist or eye doctor. While “plastic surgeon” has a bit of a negative conotation, Dr. Spiegel assures it’s about much more than Botox and vanity. “Plastic surgeons offer great insight on top of your dermatologist’s, since they have a different kind of expertise. They know if the problems you’re seeing could be deeper. It could be a problem with bone under skin or muscle under skin.”

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

We created our clinic with our patients in mind. From a convenient location, a spa-like atmosphere, and extended hours, our focus is you.

Dr. Laurie Baynard Dr. Joseph Kulaga 5656 Nelson Road, Suite D2 Lake Charles, Louisiana 70605 (337) 240-6619 www.lakecharleschiro.com www.thriveswla.com

21


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

Massaaaaaage Your Way to

Better Health by Frank DiCesare

MASSAGE THERAPY OFTEN CONJURES IMAGES OF WOMEN LYING PRONE ON A PADDED TABLE, AS NIMBLE FINGERS WORK OUT THEIR BACK AND SHOULDER MUSCLES TO RELIEVE THEM OF THE DAY’S STRESS. ADD A ROW OR TWO OF SCENTED CANDLES, PUMP IN A LITTLE NEW-AGE MUSIC, AND COMPLETE PICTURE OF MASSAGE THERAPY WILL COME TO LIFE. RIGHT?

WRONG. While some of this imagery is true, it is also quite limiting. Indeed, massage therapy is a great way to relieve stress. But massage therapy also has many other health benefits (even without the candles and music) and is sought by nearly as many men as women. In fact, a 2015 survey from the American Massage Therapy Association stated that 16 percent of men and 19 percent of women reported getting a massage over a 12-month period between 2014 and 2015. According to the Mayo Clinic’s website, studies have shown massage therapy to be an effective treatment for not only reducing stress, muscular pain and tension, but also for anxiety, digestive disorders, fibromyalgia, headaches, stress-induced insomnia, myofascial pain syndrome, soft tissue injuries and strains, sports injuries and temporomandibular joint pain. In addition, the clinic’s website states that some people seek massage therapy “because it often produces feelings of caring, comfort and connection.” Many forms of massage therapy are practiced throughout the United States. The five most common types are Swedish massage, deeptissue massage, sports massage, trigger point message and hot stone massage. Swedish and sports massages are similar in their applications. With their trained fingers, massage therapists use deep circular movements, kneading and long strokes to relax and invigorate their clients. Swedish massages are also known to aid in clearing nasal and chest congestion. Sports massages are often performed on athletes who want to prevent or treat injuries. Deep-tissue massages involve slower and more forceful strokes, which target muscles and 22 www.thriveswla.com

connective tissue. They also eliminate chronic knots or muscular “adhesions.” Clients who request deep-tissue massages often do so to seek relief from pain caused by muscle injuries. Trigger point massages target tight muscle fibers that form after an injury or overuse that causes pain in other locations in the body. Clients who request trigger point massages are often asked to breathe deeply during treatment and to identify the precise location of the pain. Trigger point massage clients often experience a significant reduction in pain after their first treatment. Hot stone massages incorporate smooth river rocks (often composed of basalt) that are heated in sanitized water to about 125 degrees Fahrenheit. The stones are then placed on key body points for about 90 minutes. Hot stone massages are known to alleviate pain, especially in clients suffering from fibromyalgia, arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. They also increase joint flexibility and blood circulation. Because the hot stones aid in relaxing muscles, clients often combine hot stone massages with other forms of massage therapy. In the Lake Area, Scarborough’s Salon & Day Spa and Dermatologix offer customers many different forms of massage therapy priced from about $50 to $200. Scarborough’s massages are range from 25- to 100-minute sessions and are offered for individuals and couples. Prices range from $45 to $280, depending Thrive Magazine for Better Living

on the massage and duration requested. Scarborough’s massages include tension relief, relaxation and hot stone. The spa also offers maternity massages. Dermatologix’s massages for individuals range from 30 to 80 minutes and are priced from $50 to $115. Couples massages are offered in 50and 80-minute sessions and range from $140 to $210. Dermatologix offers Swedish, deep-tissue and prenatal massages. So if you’re in pain or just need an effective way to reduce the stress in your life, consider a massage this summer. You’ll be amazed at how a 30- or 80-minute session will alleviate your pain, calm your mind and have you feeling your best.

July 2016


Home for a Lifetime: 10Ways

by Trish Trejo

Your Home Can Grow Old Gracefully with You

Remaining happy and healthy at home is the goal of many senior adults. The National Aging in Place Council is leading the charge to educate and support this growing trend among retired adults. Here are ten of their most important tips for preparing a home to age with the homeowner: During Construction – When building a “forever” home, some modifications to typical plans can make aging in place simpler. 1. Consider doorways that will accommodate a wheelchair or walker through the major pathways of the home (kitchen, master bedroom and master bath). The American Disabilities Act lists the width of the average adult wheelchair to be 26 inches. 2. In the master bath, build a step-in or roll-in shower. Add a seat for a spa-like design and an adjustable shower head for use standing or sitting. 3. Plan the master suite or bedroom on the ground floor or save room for an elevator, to be added later.

When Remodeling – Some changes can be made to an existing home to make it more accessible for adults with limited mobility. 4. Replace smaller light switches with rocker switches that are easier to operate by aging hands. 5. Install grab bars or handrails in the master bath, making sure to secure them to the structure of the home for maximum security. 6. In a multi-story or elevated home, consider a power lift to help an adult to the entrance or an upper floor. 7. Add ramps to an entrance with stairs.

For Safety’s Sake – Many senior injuries happen in their own homes. Making the home safer can allow residents to live longer and healthier lives. 8. Just as in homes with small children, homes with older adults should lower the temperature of water heaters to 120 degrees or cooler. For increased safety, a Temperature Activated Flow Reducer can be installed that will stop the flow of water if the temperature is over 119 degrees. 9. Eliminate or secure throw and area rugs as well as any trip hazards to prevent an adult slipping or tripping. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that one in three American senior adults suffers injury each year from falling. Over 2 million are treated at an emergency room for their injuries. 10. Furniture used by seniors should be checked regularly for proper support and ease of use.

Your Kid. Your Choice.

Make the right one.

Your young athlete is one-of-a-kind. And you should know, you’re their biggest fan, behind them all the way. So when they have a sports injury, don’t stay on the sidelines. Take an active role in getting them back in the game and choose the region’s most experienced orthopaedic and sports medicine team: Center for Orthopaedics.

www.centerforortho.com Lake Charles • Sulphur • DeRidder

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Team Physicians: McNEESE ATHLETICS & 14 AREA HIGH SCHOOLS

www.thriveswla.com

23


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

Diabetic Retinopathy:

The Cost of DIABETES

on Your Eyes

Together, we lost 349 pounds! — Matthew, Theresa and Diane Weight Loss Surgery Successes

When you choose weight loss surgery at Lake Area Medical Center, we’re here to support you throughout your journey. In addition to skilled medical care and ongoing guidance from the staff, you have the support of people experiencing the same things you are. “It’s like gaining a second family,” Theresa says. For more information on surgical weight loss options, visit LakeAreaMC.com/WeightLoss.

M

4200 Nelson Road • Lake Charles, LA • LakeAreaMC.com Individual results may vary. Consult your physician about the benefits and risks of weight loss surgery. 91270_LAMC_Bariatric_Group_8x4_875c.indd 1

24 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

6/10/16 5:03 PM

July 2016


Think of the last ten people you saw during your morning commute. Chances are, one of them is among the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes today. As the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, diabetes—while manageable—can run rampant in your body and kick-start a series of serious health issues, and your eyes are not immune. Between 2005 and 2008, nearly 30% of adults aged 40 years or older living with diabetes suffered from diabetic retinopathy, which causes damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. “Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss for adults living with diabetes,” said Dr. William B. Hart of Hart Eye Center, a leading ophthalmologist in the Lake Area. “In a patient with chronically elevated blood sugar levels, we may see damage to the blood vessels in the retina.” The retina translates light into signals through the optic nerve to the brain, but diabetic retinopathy can cause the retina’s blood vessels to leak fluid, which creates distorted vision. In cases where diabetic retinopathy is in its most advanced stage, the body generates abnormal blood vessels on the retina, and these new blood vessels may cause retinal scarring. “Since diabetic retinopathy may have no symptoms in its early stages, the disease can progress without notice until one day the patient experiences a change in vision,” Dr. Hart explained.

There are four main stages through which the disease can take shape: 1. MILD NONPROLIFERATIVE RETINOPATHY The retina’s tiny blood vessels can have balloonlike swelling—similar to a miniature aneurysm— and can leak fluid into the retina. 2. MODERATE NONPROLIFERATIVE RETINOPATHY. Blood vessels in the eye work to nourish the retina and deliver blood, but as diabetic retinopathy progresses, these blood vessels can continue to swell and restrict the retina’s access to nutrients and blood. 3. SEVERE NONPROLIFERATIVE RETINOPATHY When blood vessels no longer can transport blood, the retina is programmed to create new blood vessels to make up for the loss.

“People with the three types of diabetes— type 1, type 2 and gestational—are at risk for diabetic retinopathy,” Dr. Hart stated. “The longer a patient has diabetes, the greater the risk is for the disease and for other medical problems to develop. Diabetic retinopathy is detected during a comprehensive dilated eye exam, which allows the doctor to monitor changes in blood vessels or any leakage in the eye.” Early detection and treatment can reduce the risk of severe vision changes or blindness. Diabetic patients should schedule a complete eye exam each year. Hart Eye Center offers free cataract screenings twice a month. To reserve a seat or for more information, contact Hart Eye Center at 337-439-4014 or visit www.HartEyeCenter.com.

4. PROLIFERATIVE DIABETIC RETINOPATHY. The new blood vessels, which are easier to break and leak than normal ones, continue to grow on the retina and into the vitreous gel that fills the eye. If scar tissue accompanies this growth, the patient can experience a retinal detachment.

As a child, you saw the world clearly. Now, your eyesight is weakened by cataracts. Colors aren’t as bright. Your grandchildren’s faces are blurred.

see like you used to FREE Cataract/Lasik Screening Saturday, July 9 Call 439 - 4014

.COM July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

25


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

DENTAL

IMPLANTS Four Things You Should Know A smile is one of the strongest forms of communication; it can signal confidence, offer affection and spread positivity, so it’s not surprising that the lack of a smile can do the exact opposite. “If you have damaged or missing teeth, dental implants may be the right fit for you and can help revive confidence in your smile,” said Dr. Tim Robinson, a dentist at Robinson Dental Group Family Dentistry. “Dental implants offer many benefits that affect your physical as well as emotional health.” Dental implants offer a stable, more long-term solution. Thanks to medical advances, dental implants are built to last, and with good home care and regular dental maintenance visits, their longevity can be extended. Some dentists utilize a digital CT Scanner to ensure the implant is as customized to your needs as possible. Unlike conventional dentures, there is less worry about your snap-in dentures falling out when laughing, eating or talking. A dental implant is composed of three parts—an anchoring root, an abutment and a crown. The anchoring root is secured directly to the jawbone to serve as a solid base for the final crown, and the anchor is given time to fuse naturally with the bone. After an abutment is placed into the anchor, impressions of the bite are made so that a crown can be custom fabricated. Finally, the crown is fitted as the new tooth.

Get your smile summer ready! NEW PATIENTS

FREE EXAM +X-RAYS New-Patient Complete Mouth

$201 VALUE Code: 0330, 0274, 0150

Does not include cleaning.

Offer good through 12/31/2016

ROBINSON DENTAL GROUP FAMILY DENTISTRY 26 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

MOSS BLUFF | LAKE CHARLES

337-429-5057 | 337-474-3636 ROBINSONDENTALGROUP.NET

Tim Robinson, DDS • Jonathon Rusnak, DDS Steven Park, DDS • Rolando Tapia, DDS July 2016


Dental implants don’t harm existing teeth. Since dental implants are secured to the jawbone in the place of missing teeth, your surrounding teeth typically aren’t negatively impacted by the implants. Fitting a bridge typically requires grinding away healthy neighboring teeth in order to create the support system needed for the bridge. Also, if the gap from a missing tooth is left for an extended period of time, other teeth may begin to shift to make up for the empty space. Dental implants help protect your overall oral health. If you’ve lost one or more teeth because of an injury or disease, one of the worst things you can do is leave empty spaces in your mouth. Your healthy jawbone can begin to deteriorate when there is nothing in it to support. “Dental implants fuse naturally with the jawbone,” Dr. Robinson said. “Preserving your jawbone’s health is important, and dental implants can help prevent further bone loss.” You may not even notice the difference between a dental implant and your natural teeth. Dental implants are designed and built to be the next best thing to your real teeth. “Unlike a bridge or dentures, dental implants typically don’t come with difficulty in pronouncing everyday words or eating certain foods,” Dr. Robinson said. Dental implants can give you a stronger and more stable bite, and unlike other options, dental implants are self-supporting and usually don’t put stress on the surrounding teeth. If you are in good health, have healthy gums and adequate bone to support the implant, you are probably a good candidate for a dental implant. Your dentist will conduct a thorough dental examination to determine if you are a good candidate. For more information on dental implants, call Robinson Dental Group Family Dentistry at 337-474-3636 in Lake Charles or 337-429-5057 in Moss Bluff or visit www.robinsondentalgroup.net.

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

27


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

Get

great hair

Ah childhood, when hair care meant nothing more than a quick scrub with a palm full of No More Tears, and a bad hair day was usually a product of discovering scissors while mom was on the phone. But somewhere around our tweens, most of us became hyper-aware of our hair’s texture, cowlicks, and color, which, for many, meant embarking on a lifelong battle to get hair to lay flat, puff up, curl, straighten, or any number of tricks that our hair, inevitably, seems unwilling to perform. And what’s more, as we age, it seems that new hair problems arise. Those oily locks from middle school are replaced by sundamaged strands in adulthood, and many of us find an inverse relationship between the number of birthday candles on our cakes and the number of hairs on our head. Here are a few solutions to common hair conundrums no matter what the age.

at Any Age

OBLITERATE OIL

Many teens find themselves cursed with an overabundance of sebum, an oily substance secreted by pores at the onset of puberty. Unfortunately all that oil can often make hair look a bit limp and heavy. The best solution is to use a clarifying shampoo to remove dead skin cells that could be causing the scalp to over-produce oil. However, studies have shown that overdoing it on the shampoo could send the scalp into overdrive, producing more sebum to make up for the oil being stripped by shampoo. One solution could be to shampoo every other day, applying conditioner as needed to the ends of hair, and use dry shampoo and baby powder to soak up oil on the days in between.

by Emily Alford

GUARD AGAINST UV RAYS

As we age (and experiment with hair color) our cell production slows and sun damage starts to take its toll, which usually means that hair doesn’t have the same bounce and shine as it once did, says Amanda Pugh, senior stylist at Signatures Salon in Lake Charles. “Most people remember to put sunscreen on their bodies but don’t think to take care of their hair and scalp as well,” Pugh says. “The sun can alter the color and integrity of our hair and burn our scalps. So, it’s a good idea to use a product that has UV protection, like Bb Hairdresser’s Invisible Oil Primer.”

WHAT TO DO WHEN HAIR STARTS THINNING

Thinning hair isn’t just a problem for men. At the onset of middle age, all those flat irons, blow dryers, and teasing combs catch up with many women, leaving hair thinner than it was in the past. And while it’s helpful to rejuvenate hair with conditioner and treatments, diet is just as important. Hair follicles need to be nourished with proteins and omega-3 fatty acids. People who go on extreme, restrictive diets or primarily eat foods lacking in healthy fats, like those found in avocado and salmon, often find their hair much thinner than they’d like. If you’ve been rocking the same style since your teens but are starting to notice some thin patches, it may be time for a change. “Aging hair changes texture and begins to thin,” Pugh says. “To accommodate those changes, you may need to adjust your haircut and style to improve manageability and create fullness.”

Of course, most people have more to worry about than a perfect head of hair, but there are a few things that should cause concern. Dry, scaly patches on the scalp that don’t go away or sudden, rapid hair loss are cause for concern at any age and should be checked out by a doctor. However, if the problem is more superficial, like loss of bounce or shine, consult a hairstylist. They deal with hair of all types and textures, so they can usually recommend a few new products for cultivating lush locks. 28 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR TEAM For Putting Patients & Safety First!

Thanks to you, West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital earned the nation’s top distinction for patient safety with an “A” grade from the Hospital Safety Score. The “A” recognizes our high standards in patient safety. This honor belongs to every one of our 762 team members, Board of Commissioners and Medical Staff Members, who strive to ALWAYS provide an exceptional patient experience focused on safety.

The Hospital Safety Score is an elite designation from the Leapfrog Group, an independent nonprofit that sets the highest national standards for patient safety, quality and transparency in health care. To view results, please visit www.hospitalsafetyscore.org.

701 Cypress Street, Sulphur

wcch.com

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

29


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

It’s Never Too Late

passion. to Follow Your

by Lisa Addison

30 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


.

Growing older doesn’t mean people have to give up on their dreams or that they can’t set new goals. In fact, many seniors are chasing new dreams and changing careers in their late 40’s, 50’s, and 60’s. According to a 2015 New Careers for Older Workers study, conducted by the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER), 82 percent of survey participants who made a career change after the age of 45 were successful in their transition. What’s more, these individuals reported that they were happier in their new positions, with many earning more than they did previously after the switch. The reasons for changing careers midlife vary from person to person. What they all have in common is they are willing to branch out and try new things. Davenna Greathouse Trahan is an example. She launched a photography career as a side business at age 50 while still holding on to her day job. She never looked back and today her photography business is thriving. Although Trahan recalls having a camera in her hand since childhood and took photos for her high school’s yearbook, many years passed before she began to consider photography as something she could turn into a business and a lifestyle. “My husband Robert was the one who started me on this path to my own business, by purchasing my first digital camera, a whole two megapixel camera,” Trahan says. “I swore I would never give up film but that quickly changed.” After their daughter graduated from high school, Trahan became more involved with photography. “Funny what you can accomplish when you have some time back on your hands,” she says. “My nieces and nephews were my practice models. That quickly turned into friends calling and wanting to hire me. So, at the age of 50 I started my own little photography business! I started taking classes, learning about digital photography and

July 2016

the editing programs, and joined Professional Photographers of America, bought professional gear, and changed my business name to DavennaLea Photography.” Although Trahan started out taking photos of babies, families, and seniors, she soon began doing wedding photography and was hooked. “I love, love, love weddings. I just love everything about them: the details, the dress, the stress, the unknown factors, the emotions, the love.” Her business is going better than she could have ever imagined and Trahan says it’s actually a lot more than a business. “I can now truly say that photography is my passion. I’m extremely fortunate to be able to do what I love every day!” Some celebrities are getting in on what’s become a national trend of sorts - changing careers in midlife. An actress for many years and the wife of actor Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson has forged a new career as a singer at age 59. She co-wrote every song on her second album, Rita Wilson. As she shared in a recent Parade magazine article, “If you feel frightened to do something, it’s probably a signal that you should do it. Especially creative endeavors: They make you the most vulnerable, and nobody likes the feeling of vulnerability. But if you go there, it’s the most satisfying.” For the older set who are interested in starting new careers but unsure of how to get started, Donna Satterthwaite, director of Senior Service America, which helps older adults rejoin the workforce, says, “A great thing to do to jump start things is to find an organization where you can volunteer so you’re meeting people and getting out.” Wilson has some great advice too for seniors contemplating a new career path: “I believe it’s never too late to have a new dream. It’s just a matter of finding the courage.”

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

31


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

BEING A

baby boomer Doesn’t Have to be a PAIN

by Kristy Armand

THE GENERATION OF PEACE AND LOVE HAS EVOLVED INTO THE GENERATION OF ACHES AND PAINS. Baby Boomers — people born between the years 1946 and 1964 — are getting older. Approximately 10,000 Americans turn 60 each day. The significance of this number is that within 20 years one in five Americans will be older than 65. As a group, Baby Boomers are living nearly twice as long as previous generations, and for the most part, are remaining much more active. And while this on-the-go population segment may not want to slow down, a wide range of aches and pains is starting to cramp their style. In a recent study, more than two out of three boomers said they suffer from muscle and joint pain at least once a week. However, this generation is less resigned to simply accept injury and pain as an inevitable part of aging, and, according to William Lowry

Jr., MD, rehabilitation physician specialist with Center for Orthopaedics, they don’t have to. “I often see older adults who want to keep doing all the things they did when they were younger, but find themselves struggling due to chronic pain. Fortunately, we have many more options to offer people who want to maintain an active lifestyle as they age.” Dr. Lowry says the original source of pain is typically just the natural wear and tear that occurs to joints over time. “As you get older, your joints start to show the signs of years of use, just like anything else, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to stop using them.” He explains that Boomers often unknowingly make their problem worse by cutting back on their activities when they experience joint pain. “Their knee or back hurts after physical activity, so they stop doing

INTRODUCING

A NEW STANDARD OF CLEAN

RYTECH OF SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA O

E

E

20 *

%

*

IA

%

C

20

9M9SPE

O

V SA

$

-R

V SA

2 L*

CARPET

AIR DUCT

TILE/GROUT

We use the highest quality, most advanced equipment providing maximum cleaning capability without distressing your carpet or leaving residue behind.

We offer air duct cleaning services that will remove airborne contaminants and improve your indoor air quality. Free in-home estimate.

Our process can be used on a variety of tile, including ceramic and porcelain, and is ideal for kitchen and bathroom floors, showers, countertops, and entranceways. Free in-home estimate.

*Offer includes two 12’x12’ rooms

*If booked at time of estimate

*If booked at time of estimate

377-477-8400 32 www.thriveswla.com

that activity. This results in a loss of muscle strength, decreased range of motion, reduced circulation to the area, and stiffness. So the next time they need to exert that part of their body, they experience more pain and stiffness due to inactivity. Pretty soon, that knee or back is painful any time they move. It’s a vicious cycle that can quickly lead to an extreme reduction in activity and chronic pain.” The good news is that Baby Boomers do not have to live with the pain. “There is so much we can do to provide pain relief. “Many baby boomers are reluctant to seek help because they feel surgery or joint replacement is their only option. But that is definitely not the case. We have an arsenal of non-surgical interventions that can often eliminate – or at least delay – the need for surgery for joint pain,” says Dr. Lowry. He says the first step is a comprehensive physical exam to assess functional status, which helps identify the source and cause of the pain. “With older adults, it is very common for the muscles that stabilize and support the joint to be weak. This can lead to instability around the joint, which can worsen arthritis and pain. If we can correct that with a program of physical therapy and strength training, that patient can not only be pain-free, but also be able to return to a more active lifestyle.” Other non-surgical treatment options may include over-the-counter or prescription medications, injections, heat and cold therapies, electrotherapies, massage, bracing, rehabilitation programs, nutritional recommendations and therapeutic exercise. “The treatment is determined based on each individual’s unique situation – their pain level and functional capacity. When it comes to pain management in these cases, there is no ‘one-sizefits-all approach,” says Dr. Lowry. And that’s something free-spirited Baby Boomers can certainly appreciate. For more information about joint and back pain treatment, call Center for Orthopaedics at (337) 721-7236 or visit www.centerforortho.com.

rytechofswla.com Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

33


Mind & Body | Secrets to Aging Well

Aging and

Vision Care by Kristy Armand

Remember when you could sit down to read a newspaper without reaching for your glasses? You may never have those young eyes again, but that doesn’t mean you’re doomed to a life of poor vision. In fact, many older people have good eyesight into their 80’s and beyond. “Growing older does not always mean poor vision. But age does bring with it changes that can weaken your eyes,” explains Virgil Murray, IV, MD, ophthalmologist with The Eye Clinic. “Regular, routine eye care is the best way to make sure these changes don’t result in permanent vision loss.” According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, one in three Americans will suffer from a sight-related disease by age 65. Here are brief descriptions of the most common of these diseases, and information from The Eye Clinic physicians regarding prevention and treatment:

34 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


Cataracts. A cataract is a gradual clouding of your eye’s lens, marked by blurred vision, impaired night vision, and halos around lights. A cataract may need no treatment at all if the vision is only a little blurry. A change in eyeglass prescription may improve vision for a while. Cataracts are most common in people over 60, and the risks are higher for people with diabetes and those who take corticosteroids. Excess exposure to the sun and cigarette smoke are also risk factors. There are no medications, eye drops, exercises or glasses that will cause cataracts to disappear once they have formed. Surgery is the only way to remove a cataract. During the procedure the clouded lens is replaced with a new lens implant to restore clear vision. Glaucoma. This disease is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. It occurs when the optic nerve is damaged when fluids that normally flow in and out of the eye drain improperly, causing increased pressure. Early treatment can stop its progression, but unfortunately, most people don’t notice any symptoms until permanent damage has occurred. That’s why regular trips to your eye doctor are crucial, especially if someone in your immediate family has the disease, if you have diabetes or are over age 60. African Americans are also at increased risk. It can also develop at a much earlier age, so have your eyes tested every one to two years starting around age 40.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

This disease of the retina is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65. It results when the macula, the part of the retina responsible for sharp vision, begins to deteriorate. Macular degeneration comes in two forms, dry and wet. The dry form, in which the retina has simply worn thin with age, is untreatable, but it is usually slow to progress and rarely causes severe vision loss. Some research suggests that vitamins and minerals may slow its development. The wet form of the disease occurs when abnormal blood vessels form beneath the retina. It poses a much more serious threat to your eyesight, but laser surgery can help some patients avoid further vision loss. To get the earliest possible treatment, see an eye doctor promptly if your vision becomes fuzzy or blurry, if straight lines look wavy, or if blank or dark spots show up in the center of your vision.

Diabetic Retinopathy. Diabetes can damage

the blood vessels that feed the retina, putting people with the disease at high risk for blindness. Retinal damage is particularly common in people who have had diabetes for at least 10 years, and it’s nearly universal in those who have had the disorder for 30 years or more. Diabetic retinopathy causes blurred or fluctuating vision, and it can worsen rapidly. When caught in time, the disease can be treated with laser surgery. If you have diabetes, annual checkups with an eye doctor are absolutely essential. Carefully controlling both your blood sugar and your blood pressure will also go a long way toward preventing vision loss.

Dry Eye Syndrome. This condition is usually caused by a problem with the quality of the tear film that lubricates the eyes. Many find relief simply from using artificial tears on a regular basis. Preservative-free tears are recommended because they are the most soothing and have fewer additives that could potentially irritate. Avoid products that whiten the eyes – they don’t have adequate lubricating qualities and often make the problem worse. Closing the opening of the tear drain in the eyelid with special inserts called punctal plugs is another option. Older adults often take medications for other health conditions and some of these may affect vision with side effects such as blurred vision, dry eyes, and light sensitivity. Most effects are temporary and will stop when you quit taking the medicine, but Dr. Murray says it’s important to keep your eye doctor up to date on all the drugs and supplements that you’re using. “When it comes to your vision, as with most things in life, prevention is far better than cure. Just as you have regular exams to monitor and manage other aspects of your health, it’s also important to get your eyes checked regularly, and to realize that an eye exam is not just a check for a new prescription. It’s a vital check on the overall health of your eyes that can help ensure a lifetime of good vision.”

Call The Eye Clinic nearest you to schedule an eye exam, or 800-826-5223.

Meet the Newest Member of our Physician Staff,

Andres Guillermo, MD, Family Medicine Physician

Family Medicine Specialist Dr. Andres Guillermo has joined the Imperial Health physician team, and will begin seeing patients August 1. Dr. Guillermo has over nine years of experience in his field, the last six of which were in private practice at the Guillermo Family Medical Clinic in DeRidder. His new office is located at 333 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive, Suite 110, in Lake Charles. Originally from Thibodaux, Louisiana, Dr. Guillermo received his undergraduate degree in Pre-med/Biology from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, and earned his Medical Degree from the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine in Saint Maarten. Dr. Guillermo completed his Family Practice Residency Program at the LSUHSC School of Medicine Family Medicine Residency Program in Lake Charles. Dr. Guillermo is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Guillermo, call (337)-419-1958.

www.imperialhealth.com

333 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr. | Suite 110 • Lake Charles July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

35


Mind & Body

Imperial Health and Smoking Cessation Trust Partner to Offer Free Smoking Treatment The Smoking Cessation Trust, now in the fourth year of its 10-year program, has announced a partnership with Imperial Health to offer free smoking cessation products and services to those who smoke in Southwest Louisiana. The new Smoking Treatment Center was founded by and is under the medical direction of family medicine physician Dr. Steve Springer. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking is the leading preventable cause of death and disease. The Smoking Treatment Center utilizes an evidence-based, patient-centered approach tailored to each individual’s specific needs, with the ultimate goal to free smokers from the nicotine dependence cycle and improve their overall health. “Our services combine the knowledge of experienced, trained staff with the newest interventions and medications available,” says Dr. Springer. “We assess each person’s personal goals, work schedule, medical history, and many other factors, and then customize their treatment to meet their needs.” With the adult smoking rate in Calcasieu Parish at nearly a quarter of the population, and even higher rates in surrounding parishes, Dr. Springer says this program will help those who qualify take advantage of the free resources available through the Smoking Cessation Trust. “Our partnership with the Trust will help us to treat a wider group of smokers in this region than has ever been treated in the past.” In addition to those who qualify for services through the Trust, Dr. Springer says they will also accept private pay, insurance and workplace wellness coverage. “We want to help as many people as we possibly can. Our treatment approach is proven and we are very excited to help more people begin the journey to a lifestyle free from tobacco. We also want people to understand that they do not have to be an established Imperial Health patient to be treated. We want to work with individual patients and doctors to give every patient the best chance for success.”

The benefits of quitting smoking are substantial and immediate, and include: • 2 0 minutes after quitting smoking, your heart rate begins to drop. • 1 2 hours after quitting, the level of carbon monoxide in your blood drops. • Within three months, lung function begins to improve. • A  fter one year of quitting, the added risk of heart disease is half that of a current smoker. • W  ithin five years of quitting, the risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder is cut in half. In fact, one in three cancer deaths in the U.S. would not happen if no one smoked.

36 www.thriveswla.com

Louisiana presently ranks 46 out of 50 states for tobacco use, according to the 2015 America’s Health Rankings® Report from the United Health Foundation with nearly a quarter of the state’s residents smoking. The Trust, which has members in every parish of the state, is working towards its goal of helping 210,000 Louisianans become smoke-free by 2022. To date, the Trust has more than 54,000 applicants who have made the commitment to quit smoking. The office is now open on the 4th floor of the main Imperial Health office complex at 501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive in Lake Charles. Anyone interested should call (337) 312-8690 for additional information. A new website will soon be launched at www.SmokingTreatmentCenter.com.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


Get wet. Dive in.

SUMMER CONCERT SERIES THURSDAYS • POOLSIDE • DOORS OPEN AT 7PM JULY 7

Chris Young

JULY 14

Wayne Toups & Travis Matte & the Kingpins

JULY 21

The Fray

JULY 28

American Authors & Sister Hazel

Advance purchase and VIP Party Package pricing available. Tickets may be purchased at the L’Auberge Box Office, ticketmaster.com or by calling 800.745.3000. Use your mychoice® card for discounted tickets, when purchased at the Box Office.

/LAubergeLC

@LAubergeLC

@LAubergeLC

Must be 21 or older to enter casino and pool party. Terms subject to change. Not intended for excluded patrons. ©2016 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved

GAMBLING PROBLEM? PLEASE CALL 800.522.4700. July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

37


Mind & Body

DODGING

THE ZIKA VIRUS ON YOUR SUMMER VACATION by Terry Gardner

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) activated an Emergency Operations Center for the Zika virus in January 2016. Why the sudden fuss over a virus first discovered in Africa in 1947? Zika cases had seemed relatively innocuous with flu-like symptoms over the years. But in 2015, it rapidly spread in several Latin American countries, and doctors began connecting the dots between pregnant women infected with Zika and babies born with microcephaly or abnormally small heads. In April, the CDC announced the Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and other severe fetal brain defects. The CDC is also investigating links between Zika and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a neurological disorder. More than 690 travel-related cases have been reported in the U.S., including 206 pregnant women.

HOW DO PEOPLE GET ZIKA? Most catch Zika from the bite of an infected Aedes species (aegyptae or albopictus) mosquito that primarily bites in the daytime. Zika can also be passed sexually in semen. It is unknown whether Zika can be transmitted via vaginal fluid. TRAVEL TIPS FOR PREGNANT WOMEN OR COUPLES STARTING A FAMILY

The CDC advises pregnant women not to travel to countries where Zika is spreading, such as Mexico, South America, the Caribbean and Puerto Rico. If you have already booked your trip, see if you can cancel and get a refund due to your pregnancy and the destination’s Zika threat. If you do risk going, “Practice meticulous prevention,” says Dr. Amesh Adalja of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) for Health Security. If pregnant and your partner has visited an affected area, doctors recommend using a condom or abstinence. If a couple trying to get pregnant visits an affected area, Dr. Adalja says to “abstain from trying to conceive for 8 weeks” after the trip.

38 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


HOW TO AVOID MOSQUITO BITES In our May issue, Thrive provided tips for mosquito-proofing your backyard and cautioned that water is a breeding ground. Tropical and travel medicine nurse Dyan Summers says, “Mosquitoes can breed in an upside down bottle cap with water.” Summers treated the first traveler diagnosed with Zika in New York in December 2013. Here are tips to avoid getting bitten. 1. Check the CDC’s Zika travel page before going. 2. Use Environmental Protection Agency-registered insect repellents that contain DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535. 3. Read directions and apply insect repellent correctly. Use extra precaution with children. Don’t apply repellent on a baby younger than two months—use mosquito netting. 4. Apply repellent to all exposed skin. Apply sunscreen before repellent, not on top of it. “In practice, keep it in your head that you want the mosquito to land on the repellent, not your sunscreen. It often takes 10-15 minutes for sunscreen to dry,” says Nurse Summers. She recommends an insect repellent with 20% to 35% DEET. More than 35% DEET can irritate skin.

Email or Text Notification when your RX is ready!

ThriftyWay

5. Minimize exposed skin and wear light-colored long sleeved shirts and pants. 6. Wear clothing treated with permethrin, a chemical used as an insecticide. Insect Shield is a permethrin fabric treatment that protects through 70 machine washings. ExOfficio pioneered Insect Shield for consumers in 2004. Its BugsAway line has garments for coverage head to toe.

PHARMACY #2

Friendly service from your home town pharmacy.

7. Treat your own clothes, shoes, etc. with a permethrin spray.

• Citywide Delivery Service • Drive-Thru Pick-Up Window • E-Mail and Call in RX Service

8. Wear mosquito net clothing. 9. Sleep under mosquito nets with windows and doors closed or securely screened. 10. Avoid standing water where mosquito eggs could hatch. 11. If you get a Zika infection, Summers says to protect others by using mosquito repellent to avoid getting bitten and having that mosquito pass on Zika when it bites someone else. Visit the CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov/zika for additional info about Zika.

601 S. Pine Street • DeRidder, LA 70634 • (337) 463-7442 www.thriftyway.com • thriftyway2@thriftyway.com July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

39


Mind & Body

TeleStroke Technology Provides Fast Response to Stroke Symptoms During a stroke, every minute matters. “The saying, ‘Time is brain’ is true,” said Timothy Quattrone, MD, chief medical officer of emergency medicine and hospital medicine with West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital. A diagnostic program available at West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital, known as TeleStroke, allows WCCH physicians to consult in real-time with expert neurologists in another location, on the diagnosis of a potential stroke patient. A stroke occurs when either a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is blocked, known as an ischemic stroke, or when a weakened blood vessel ruptures and spills blood into the brain, known as a hemorrhagic stroke. When a stroke happens, brain cells are deprived of blood and the oxygen within the blood, and they begin to die. Ischemic strokes are the most common, accounting for 87 percent of all stroke occurrences. It’s the result of an obstruction within a blood vessel supplying blood to the brain. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of adult disability. To benefit patients at WCCH, the TeleStroke program is available, bringing expert care to the West Calcasieu community. It is done in support with a certified Stroke Center of Excellence, Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Lafayette. WCCH is equipped with special video technology that allows the physician and the patient to consult

40 www.thriveswla.com

with a neurologist, a physician specializing in the brain, spinal cord and nerves, from Our Lady of Lourdes. This real-time video conferencing allows both physicians to share information and expertise, while interacting with the patient. “This allows the neurologist to examine the patient as if he or she were in the same room,” said Dr. Quattrone. “Because time is crucial, a swift and accurate response is critical to the patient’s outcome,” said Dr. Quattrone. “There is a term known as the golden hour. It refers to the small window that we have from the first onset of symptoms to getting treatment. If a patient can be diagnosed and receive treatment within that time frame, their outcome is much better. This time frame includes having the symptoms recognized by a family member or friend, getting to the hospital, and receiving a diagnosis.” TeleStroke at WCCH is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “Because time is critical, it’s important for the public to know the signs of a stroke,” explained Dr. Quattrone. These include: • sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body • sudden severe headache • sudden trouble understanding or speaking • sudden vision problems • sudden trouble with coordination or walking

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

by Christine Fisher photo by Shonda Manuel

If any of these symptoms are recognized, it’s important to call 911 to get to the nearest healthcare facility immediately. Once an ischemic stroke is diagnosed, a life-saving medicine called tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, can be administered. It’s the only FDA approved treatment for ischemic strokes. It works by dissolving the clot and improving blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived. “The medication works best if delivered within that ‘golden hour’. It can work up to three hours after diagnosis, but the sooner it’s given, the better the outcome,” explained Dr. Quattrone. “The medication buys us time and begins working to eliminate the blockage. We can then further monitor the patient to determine what, if any, additional treatment is necessary.” “Having access to TeleStroke allows us to provide fast, accurate treatment for patients who might be having a stroke,” Dr. Quattrone said. Nationwide, the program has proven useful by improving patient outcomes, decreasing patient disability related to stroke, and reducing cost, while keeping patients close to their home, in their community hospital.

July 2016


Lake Charles Memorial Hospital Opens New Medical Intensive Care Unit Lake Charles Memorial Hospital recently hosted an open house for its new state-of-the-art Medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Located on the 9th floor of the hospital, this modern 15,102 sq. ft. facility boasts 16 patient rooms, the latest in ICU technology, and added comfort and amenities for family members. Denise Collett, RN, is thrilled to open the new facility and offer their services to the Southwest Louisiana community. She says one of the best features of this unit is the extra large patient rooms. “The size of the rooms (double the average ICU room) enables our nurses to better deliver quality patient care.” Other unique features include a dedicated physical therapist, room-ready dialysis capability, and increased ability for nurses to observe patients and monitors through large corner windows. “It draws the nurse closer to the bedside,” says Collett.

photos by Shonda Manuel

get focused on

Summer Fun Optics Unlimited at The Eye Clinic has the styles kids want, and the quality parents are looking for in children’s eyewear. Beat the back-to-school rush and schedule your child’s eye exam this summer at one of The Eye Clinic’s five convenient locations. We’re making it easy with these special offers:

routine eye exams 65 Kid’s eyewear packages $ starting at just 49

$

for kids

This offer is available on routine vision exams* for school-aged children at all locations of The Eye Clinic through August 31, 2016. *Contact lens exams and fittings require additional fees.

Lake Charles • DeRidder • Sulphur • Jennings • Moss Bluff | (800) 826-5223 • www.theeyeclinic.net July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

41


Home & Family

Travel the World

from Your Living Room by Sylvia Ney

Far off places, daring adventures, and new favorite destinations wait to be discovered this summer. Unfortunately, not everyone’s budget or time off allows them to experience firsthand their dream vacations. Instead of going bankrupt, using all of your vacation time at once, or endless hours on a plane or in a car solely to satisfy the family’s desire to travel, try a “staycation.” No matter your age, or number of people participating, armchair traveling can be an easy fun way to tour the world from your family room. Here are some suggestions to get you started. Choose your destination(s). Gather the family to decide where everyone wants to “go.” Prepare your “passport. “ Each member participating should create a small book out of white paper or cardstock that is approximately 5 inches by 3and ½ inches. On the first page put a small picture with your name, age and birth date. The rest of the pages are for a sticker or stamp symbolizing each place you “travel” on your tour. “Take off”. The internet and local library are great places to research your destinations. Learn about the history, culture, and languages of the places you are visiting. Take turns 42 www.thriveswla.com

trying to pronounce words and learn phrases you would need to know while there. For example, how do you order dinner or ask for directions in those countries? Get hands-on with local experiences. The old adage “When in Rome…” is the rule here. The best way to experience a society or culture is to do as they do. For each country you visit, make crafts, projects, or create symbols pertinent to that culture. Use clay to model their architecture, draw and color the country flag, order a bouquet of national flowers, listen to regional music, learn local dance styles, and cook cuisine integral to that area of the world. Document your adventures. You may not actually go to far-off lands, but you can still capture memories by photographing your experiences. Use a program like Photoshop to insert backgrounds of the actual locations, or simply print the pictures and buy related papers and stickers to create your own albums. Not everyone can manage world travel at each vacation time. Try a staycation and invite friends or family members to participate. The process may turn out to be some of your best memories.

NOT SURE WHERE TO LOOK FOR INSPIRATION TO COMPLETE THE ABOVE ACTIVITIES? TRY ONE OF THESE RESOURCES: TIME for Kids: Around the World. This educational supplement to TIME for Kids magazine explores the lives of children in different cultures around the world. Purchase a subscription at www.timeforkids.com or look for back issues at your public library. Families of the World video series. This award-winning documentary series chronicles the daily lives of children and their families in almost 30 countries. Choose from titles like Families of Afghanistan, Families of Russia, Families of Kenya, or watch short clips at www. familiesoftheworld.com. The Kids’ Multicultural Cookbook by Deanna F. Cook. Explore dozens of ethnic dishes from various regions throughout the world. Theme party ideas and local games, customs and traditions provide everything you need to immerse your family in the culture of each dish you prepare. Little Passports. This subscription-based global adventure lets kids follow Sam and Sofia’s travels around the world with monthly packages received in the postal mail and online containing fun and engaging activities: www.littlepassports.com.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


We’re the Perfect Fit

for Any Real Estate Need

Whether you are buying or selling property, there are questions around every corner. CENTURY 21 Bessette Realty, Inc., and our staff of experienced agents have the answers. We’ve won numerous awards for superior service, sales excellence and community involvement.

Bessette Realty, Inc.

That’s what we’ve built our reputation on for over 20 years, and we’re ready to go to work for you.

3025 Lake Street, Lake Charles | 474-2185 July 2016

century21-bessette.com Each office independently owned and operated.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

43


Home & Family

Don’t Allow InLaws to Interfere with Your Marriage by Sylvia Ney

44 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


NOW LEASING NEW LUXURY APARTMENT HOMES

Whether it’s choosing where you’ll live, how you’ll spend the holidays, or how to raise your kids, getting along with in-laws can be a challenge. Some people adore their in-laws while others can barely tolerate their spouses’ parents and siblings. Some studies suggest the relationship you have with your in-laws can predict the success of your marriage. Below are some steps to ensure a healthy, hopefully happy, relationship for everyone involved. COMMUNICATE Opinions vary and sometimes become a source of tension either because the in-laws are too much in your business, or because they don’t participate in your life at all. Instead of keeping your feelings bottled up, or fighting continually, try talking calmly and honestly with your inlaws about any disagreements or desires you have. If this doesn’t work, be honest with your spouse and ask them to intercede. When a couple presents a united front, the chances of long term turmoil decrease drastically.

Voted

Best Apartments in SWLA by the readers of The Lagniappe 2013, 2014 & 2015

• • • • • •

1,2,& 3 Bedroom Luxury Apartment Homes Granite Countertops & Custom Cabinetry 40” flat Screen TV Included in Every Home Up to 10 Ft. & Tray Ceilings Available Enclosed Garages Available Washer & Dryer Included

FACE TIME The more time you spend with someone, the more you get to know them, and usually the better able you are to get along. Learning more about each other helps you to understand and respect each other’s strengths, even if you don’t agree on lifestyles and choices. STRENGTHEN YOUR CONFIDENCE AND EMOTIONS Others often pick up on our “vibes”. If we respect ourselves and approach each gathering as a happy or positive situation, chances are those emotions will transfer to others who may not feel the same at first. Conversely, a lack of confidence and negative emotions are extremely infectious. Take time to put yourself in the right frame of mind before greeting your relatives.

1330 WEST MCNEESE ST 337-478-8449 • WESTMAPTS.COM

COMPROMISE FOR YOUR CHILDREN Not every battle is worth fighting and children can frequently be a source of contention with in-laws. Whether it’s the clothes they wear, the toys they play with, or the food they are given, kids quickly recognize any source of controversy. Realize that most people really do want what is best for children. Ask yourself if those disagreements are worth risking the child’s relationship, as well. Unless there is a greater chance for the child to be harmed by not standing your ground, a good general rule is “while at your house, they follow your rules.” You’ll notice these guidelines are about directing your own behavior, not your in-laws, because you can only control yourself. As long as your ultimate goal is to preserve your sanity and personal integrity, you can handle any other difficulties that may arise. Decide along with your spouse on a plan of action and your marriage will remain a success regardless of how your in-laws behave.

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

45


Home & Family

One-year-old Solana Needs a Loving Forever Family after Surviving the Unthinkable

Solana, a precious 22-month-old baby girl who survived unthinkable physical abuse, now looks for a loving family to adopt her. Despite suffering a severe brain injury caused by the abuse, which has left her unable to talk or walk, Solana is a happy baby who connects and communicates in her own ways. “Weekly therapy is helping her reach her full potential,” says Solana’s adoption worker, Lazetter West with the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services, who has made it her mission to find a safe, loving, forever home for this sweet girl. West says the state of Louisiana can financially help a family interested in adopting Solana, “We would definitely have resources to assist you with therapies for Solana, teaching you how to do physical, occupational therapy, and other things that you can do at home to help her become as independent as she can.” “Solana would do best in a home that has someone who is nurturing, caring; who would be able to develop a bond with her. She needs someone who will be able to love her and commit to helping her become an independent individual so that Solana can become the best Solana that she can be,” said West. “She’s a happy baby. She smiles a lot and likes bright colors,” said West. “She loves to be hugged and talked to. Solana has so much love to give and is ready to be adopted into a home that can give it back in return.” Solana is legally free to be adopted today. To make an inquiry about her adoption, or to learn more about adopting through foster care, call the Department of Children and Family Services at 337-491-2470.

46 www.thriveswla.com

Each day, an abused or neglected child is removed from an unsafe home and placed in Louisiana’s foster care system. They remain in the system until their home environment is safe—but for many, that never happens. Of the 4,000 children currently cycling in state foster care, about 350 are ready to be adopted today. More than 60 of them are in Southwest Louisiana, right here in our community.

KPLC reporter Britney Glaser, in partnership with the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), highlights children who are legally ready to be adopted. Thrive is supporting The New Family Tree by featuring this month’s story.

QUICK FACTS ON ADOPTING A FOSTER CHILD

• Minimum age is 21. • Single people can adopt. • Many of the children in state custody are considered “special needs,” which is defined as the following: older child, race/ ethnic background, sibling group, medical conditions, and/or physical/mental/emotional handicaps. • Children in foster care are there as a result of abuse, neglect or abandonment. • The certification process typically takes 90 days to complete. Once matched with a child, the process to legally adopt a child takes about one year.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


The Secret To Raising Happy Children –

Show, Don’t Tell

Do this. Be here. Listen to me. Any good parent wants to raise happy, well-adjusted children, but the way they go about often undermines that goal. “As a rabbi, I’ve watched a lot of parents over the years,” says Rabbi Roger Herst, author of A Simple Formula for Raising Happy Children. “Many of them don’t seem to be achieving what they want for their children. They try hard, they mean well, yet they still miss the mark.” But it doesn’t have to be that way, he says. “For one thing, parents who think they are being good parents by barking orders are kidding themselves,” Herst says. “Kids don’t listen, they imitate. Think of how instruction is done in the animal world. Animals show their offspring about life skills, they don’t tell them.” Herst says a few other techniques parents can use on the way to raising happy children include: Give children decision-making opportunities whenever possible. Never make a decision for children that they reasonably can make for themselves. “Parents who make decisions unilaterally rob children of the opportunity to practice the art of making good choices,” Herst says.

Let children make mistakes. This might seem counterintuitive in terms of happiness. Most people, after all, don’t feel happy when they make a mistake. But when you allow children to make mistakes they learn that their actions have consequences, so over the long haul they become more confident in their decision-making abilities.

enjoy repeating pleasant, gratifying and successful experiences, while avoiding unpleasant ones. So parents should take steps to make sure special experiences for a child are pleasant and rewarding. Herst says it’s important that parents start early in taking steps to raise happy children who will grow into happy adults.

Delegate responsibility to children. Put them in charge of household chores and let them take responsibility for their actions. By assigning a responsible job to a child, the parent is saying that the child will perform in a mature way, Herst says. Provide children with pleasant experiences. Too often, parents have a set of convictions about what a child should do, not what the child might want to do and enjoy. But children, like adults,

2016 Keynote Speaker The extraordinary performing artist!

Phylicia Rashad! THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016 LAKE CHARLES CIVIC CENTER

8:00AM - 4:00PM Door Prize Extravaganza! Vendor Marketplace Now Open!

www.womenscommissionswla.com (Registration Opening Soon!) July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

47


Money & Career

Sasol Releases Economic Impact Study

SASOL ETHANE CRACKER & DERIVATIVES PROJECT

ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY

“ The benefit-cost ratio for the state could reach nearly 2 to1 th

Southwest Louisiana and the state will see an outstanding ret

Supporting High School Athletics 8.9 Billion ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY in Southwest Louisiana CAPITAL INVESTMENT

Sasol has already hired about 350 of the during the construction period, of which more The economic benefits of Sasol’s ethane investment in Sasol’s project. Jim RichardP SASOL ETHANE CRACKER & Dr. DERIVATIVES more than 500 full-time jobs it expects to than $110 million has already been paid. Sasol is cracker and derivatives project, now under add for the operationalIMPACT phase of the project. also projected to spend more than $3.5 billion construction in Westlake, Calcasieu Parish, are ECONOMIC STUDY The average salary for these jobs is $80,000. in Louisiana during the construction already being felt across the region& and the state, directly PROJECT SASOL ETHANE CRACKER DERIVATIVES $ Additionally, economic activity generated by according to a study commissioned by Sasol and period. To date, $2.5 billion has been committed * project would sustain nearly direct could reach ne conducted by economist Dr. Jim Richardson. Jobs to Louisiana contractors and businesses. More The benefit-cost ratio for1,900 the state “the indirect jobsLouisiana in the area over than 3,500 construction workers are currently on and and revenues being generated by the project’s Southwest andthe the30-year state will see an out the ethane cracker facility operational period. These jobsproject. are in addition to site, and peak construction is expected to reach to build construction are projected to grow over the investment in Sasol’s The benefit-cost ratio for created the state could reach nearlyon site toin 2017. through 2050. the approximately 450 full-time positions that 5,000 workers next few years, and benefits by project Southwest Louisiana the three state will see an“The outstanding return on their support Sasol’s existing operations. $ economic impacts we projected years operations will sustain and for at least decades. $ * was able8.9 to tellBillion ago duringDr. theJim front-end engineering and “The benefit-cost ratio for the state could Richardson, Economist investment in Sasol’s project. projected direct“In this study, Dr. Richardson CAPITAL INVESTMEN this project is not just creating long-term that we reach nearly 2 to 1 through 2050,” Dr. Richardson design phase are coming to life nowinvestment inusLA to build the ethane cracker facility benefits over the next three decades,” said are two years into construction,” Mike Thomas, said. “Southwest Louisiana and the state will see $ $ * vice president of Sasol U.S. Operations, BB George Swift, SWLA Economic Development senior an outstanding return on their investment in $.5 committed to3.5 LA contractors projected direct Alliance president and CEO, in an American Press said. “Sasol and the state entered into a Sasol’s project.” SASOL ETHANE CRACKER & DERIVATIVES PROJECT CAPITAL INVESTMENT $ $ investment in LA 318 M build the ethane cracker facility 100 M letter late last month. “Southwest Louisiana partnership to bring this project to Louisiana and The study projects Sasol’stocapital ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY and the state are already receiving a significant $2.5 B inare community proud to be deliveringto onLouisiana the local jobs expenditures will generate a total of $270 million we committed to LA contr vendors infrastructure $ $ $ 3.5 Bgovernments positive return on Sasol’s investment.” and revenues we promised.” in revenues for state and local 318 M 100 M improvements

2 1

3.5 B

2

8.9 Billion

to Louisiana in community infrastructure nearly 2 tovendors 1 through 2050. “ The benefit-cost ratio for the state could reach improvements

projected direct investment in LA

Louisiana and the state will see an outstanding return on their 2Southwest .5 B Dr. Jim Richardson, Economist EMPLOYMENT $ EMPLOYMENT $ $4 M 318 M CRACKER & DERIVATIVES PROJECT 100 M SASOL ETHANE in community to Louisiana in community initiatives vendors IMPACT STUDY 5,000 infrastructure ECONOMIC $ 5,000 500+ * 8.9 Billion 500+ improvements at peak $ spent to date full-time at PROJECT peak SASOL ETHANE CRACKER & DERIVATIVES construction full-time CAPITAL INVESTMENT jobs in 2017 construction to build the ethane cracker facility ECONOMIC by 2019 benefit-cost IMPACT ratio for theSTUDY state could reach nearly 2 to 1 through 2050. jobs “ The $

committed to LA contractors in Sasol’s project. investment

EMPLOYMENT

2017 Southwest Louisiana and the state will see anin outstanding return on their $ 3.5 B investment in Sasol’s project. Dr. Jim Richardson, Economist 5,000 “ The benefit-cost ratio for the state could reach nearly 2 to 1 through 2050. projected direct 500+ at peak Southwest Louisiana and the state will see an outstanding returninvestment on their in LAaverage full-time construction jobs * Dr. Jim Richardson, Economist investment in Sasol’s project.$8.9 Billion salary in 2017

by 2019

CAPITAL INVESTMENT $ 3,500+ 100 M to build the ethane cracker facility $ in community * construction 8.9 Billion infrastructure $ CAPITAL INVESTMENT improvements workers 3.5 Bbuild the ethane cracker projectedto direct about facility now investment in LA 350 $ 5 on-site $ 2. B 3.5 B

3,500+

construction workers now $ 100 M on-site in community

infrastructure improvements

projected direct $ in LA 318investment M

to Louisiana vendors

100 M

$

318 M

$

to Louisiana in community vendors infrastructure improvements CONSTRUCTION

5,000

at peak construction in 2017 & indirect jobs direct at peak atconstruction peak construction in 2017 in 2017 with personal earnings

10,000

5,000

3,500+ $546+ million

construction workers now 3,500+ construction on-site workers now on-site

48 www.thriveswla.comCONSTRUCTION

by 2019

318 M

$

to Louisiana vendors

committed to LA contractors construction

in 2017

$4 M

in community initiatives

81%

Louisiana residents

$ spent $4 M to date

500+ full-time jobs by 2019

CONSTRUCTION

in community initiatives

EMPLOYMENT

OPERATIONS$ spent to date

500+ EMPLOYMENT 3,500+ full-time

average 10,000 1,900

construction nearly jobs salary workers direct & indirect jobs $over by 2019 80k full-time nowthe 30-year operational period average jobs on-site salary with personal earnings $ by 2019 80k about

500+ 350

hired about to date

350

hired to date

about

350

community 350 ininitiatives

$546+ million Louisiana residents continued

10,000

81%

Louisiana

residents direct & indirect jobs Magazine Better Living at OPERATIONS peakThrive construction infor 2017 with personal earnings

$ spent to date

to date CONSTRUCTION

10,000

direct & indirect jobs at peak construction in 2017 average salary with personal earnings $

d the

80k OPERATIONS

$546+ million

nearly 1,90

about

350

direct & indirect jobs hired to date at peak construction in 2017 with personal earnings $104 million CONSTRUCTION81%

hired to date

about $4 M hired

EMPLOYMENT

hiredto LA contractors committed to date 5,000 $ at peak 2.5 B

3,500+

construction $ 5 2 . B workers committed to LA contractors $ now 80k on-site

direct & indirect jo 81%

Louisiana the 30-year operatio residents with personal ea OPERATIONS

$104 milli

nearly 1,900

direct & indirect jobs over the 30-year operational period with personal earnings

July 2016


270 million

in in taxes taxes for for state state & & local local governments by TAXES governments by 2019 2019 Tax revenues generated by $8.9 billion* capital investment TAXES

TAXES State

State $ Tax revenues generated by $8.9 billion* capital investment $

147 million 147270 million million

110 110 million million

Tax revenues generated by $8.9 billion* capital investment $ $ $ in taxes for state & local $$ governments by 2019

270 270 million million

inintaxes &local local taxes for for state state & governments by2019 2019 governments by

State

147 million

$

TAXES State State TAXES 147million million 147

paid paid by by project project to to date date

Local Local

122 122 million million

$ $

110 million State Local Local State Local LIVE $ $ 122 million 60 million $50 million 110 million million 110 60 million 50 million Local Local paid by by project paid project $$ 122 to date date Local 122million million State capital to erated by $8.9 billion* investment $

paid by project $ $$ to date$

$ $

WORK

GROW BANK

60 million 50 million erated by $8.9 billion* capital investment State Local $

$

State

Local

60 million $50 million 60 million 50 million Tax revenues generated during operations $

$

$

Tax Tax revenues revenues generated generated during during operations operations

270 270 million million in taxes for state local 7.5& million 6.2 million ingovernments taxes for state & local $ by 2019 7.5 million 6.2 million annually annually to local $ 7.5 million governments 2019 7.5 million 6.2 million toby the state 7.5 million governments annually annually to local $$

Tax revenues generated during operations

Tax revenues generated during operations $ $

$

$

6.2 This is your home, where you’ve built 6.2 million million

$ $

$

$

annually to the state

annually to local governments

a wonderful life. Shouldn’t your money annually annually to local annually annually to local governments have a local home too? to the state governments $ governments Sasol has paid Sasol hasto paidthe state 110 million $ has paid Sasol paid a nethas total of aSasol net total of 110bymillion Local Lakeside is local and proud of it. Personal paid project a net total of a net total of Local $project $Sasol has paid Sasol has paid $ paidtoby $ $ 10.4 million 8.8 million 122 million date $ million 8.8 attention and strong relationships set us a netmillion total of a10.4 net total of 122 million to date tolocal local governments thestate state to governments $ totothe $

to the state

on on

State State 60 60 million million

$ $

TAXESfrom 10.4 million 8.8 million from --2016 2015 2016 from2015 2015 2016 from 2015 - -2016 to the state to local governments Tax revenues generated by $8.9 billion* capital investment Local from - 2016 from 2015 - 2016 Local $ 2015 million $

Sasol has has paid paid Sasol a net net total total of of 50 a 50 million

million 10.4 10.4270million million

$ $

$

in taxes for state & local governments by 2019

apart from bigger, non-local banks.

Sasol paid Sasol has has paid We’re fully invested in helping you achieve a net total of a net total of your financial goals. We offer flexibility,

8.8 quick decisions and a depth of community 8.8 million million

$ $

banking experience and resources to to to the the state state to local local governments governments only a-truly local bank can deliver. ues generated during from 2015 -- 2016 from 110 million from operations 2015 2016 Local from 2015 2015 - 2016 2016 ues generated during operations paid bythat project *Report was conducted prior to Sasol’s announcement the project cost could increase from *Report conducted prior Sasol’s announcement that the project cost could increase from *Report waswas conducted prior totoSasol’s State announcement that the project cost could increase from billion to up to $11 billion. $ $8.9$8.9 billion to up to $11 billion. 147 million $

Learn more at www.sasolnorthamerica.com

$8.9 billion to $11 billion. Learn more to atup www.sasolnorthamerica.com

State $ 60 million Learn more at www.sasolnorthamerica.com

illion illion

ally ally state state

122 million

$

to date

Local $ 50 million

6.2 6.2 million million

$$

that

Experience it for yourself.

annually annually to to local local $ governments $ governments 7.5 million 6.2 million

Tax revenues generated during operations

annually

Join the Migration to Lakeside.

annually to local

to the state governments *Report *Report was was conducted conducted prior prior to to Sasol’s Sasol’s announcement announcement that that the the project project cost cost could could increase increase from from $8.9 billion to up to $11 billion. $8.9 billion to up to $11 billion.

Sasol has paid Sasol has paid has paid Sasol s paid Sasol as paid a net total of a net total of has paid $ $ a net total of tal of Learn more at www.sasolnorthamerica.com 10.4 million 8.8 Learn a net total of million otal ofmore at www.sasolnorthamerica.com to the state to local governments

million million

state state 5 5 -- 2016 2016

8.8 8.8 million to local governments

The Way Banking Should Be

$ from$2015 - 2016million from 2015 - 2016

Lake Charles

to local governments from from 2015 2015 -- 2016 2016

Lake Charles

Westlake

(337) 474-3766 (337) 502-4314

(337) 502-4144

4735 Nelson Road

*Report was conducted prior to Sasol’s announcement that the project cost could increase from $8.9 billion to up to $11 billion.

2132 Oak Park Blvd.

2203 Sampson Street

LakesideBanking.com

Learn more at www.sasolnorthamerica.com July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

49


Money & Career

Be

When

Managing Your Money

Money mistakes are made all the time – at the grocery store, the bank, in the housing market, the stock market . . . you get the idea. Some blunders result from a lack of knowledge; others result from human error and our tendency to work against our own best interests. The biggest snafus often involve those practices that seem harmless but end up negatively impacting your overall financial health.

Here are just a few of the many money pitfalls to avoid: Squandering an Inheritance – According to a 2013 CNN report, the average inheritance in the United States is 177,000. That sounds like a lot of money and it’s tempting to go on a luxury vacation, pay off your mortgage, or splurge on a big-ticket item. That’s usually not the best idea, according to Denise Rau, Certified Financial Planner and president of Rau Financial Group. “If you hold onto an inheritance and invest the money wisely, you can create income for years to come.”

Investing Too Conservatively – Investors often choose ultra-safe investment options in order to preserve their principal. While certainly there is a place for conservative investment options, Rau says increasing the risk within a range you are comfortable with can help you accelerate your profit. Not Regularly Increasing 401(k) Contributions – If your employer offers a 401(k) plan, take advantage of it, especially if the company has a matching program. When you get a raise, increase the amount you contribute to the plan. People also often make the mistake of cashing out their 401(k) plan when they leave a job. This, too, is a bad idea. “If you’re under age 59 ½, you’ll incur a 10% early-withdrawal penalty and get taxed on the sum,” says Rau. “You also lose the earnings that money might have generated.”

Carrying Too Much Debt – According to a 2015 study on nerdwallet.com, the average American household has $130,922 in debt – of which $15,762 is credit card debt. While a mortgage, student loans, and auto loans may help strengthen your credit rating, credit card debt can be particularly devastating. “It makes no sense to carry credit card debt at a 15% or higher interest rate when you have money in a simple savings account earning less than 1% interest,” says Rau. “Pay it off as quickly as possible. You reduce interest costs fastest by paying off the card with the highest interest rate first. But when cash is tight, many people find it easier to begin with the card with the lowest balance, which eliminates that minimum payment, then add that payment to your next card, and so on.”

Buying an Item solely because it’s “On Sale” – Often, it is our psyche and emotions that lead us to make unwise money decisions. Advertisers understand this. Just because an item is marked down doesn’t necessarily make it a good deal or even dictate that your need the item. Before you pull out your wallet to buy that next “bargain,” decide if the item is truly something you need or want, and do some research to see if you can get a better deal elsewhere. Keeping Up with the Joneses – Everyone is entitled to their own lifestyle. There is no rule that says you must have what everyone else seems to have. Trying to own the latest, greatest, and most expensive only increases your risk for unnecessary debt. “For optimal financial health, live within your means, and think about what matters most to you and your family, and your future security when making decisions about your finances,” Rau says. For more information on investing, call Rau Financial Group at (337) 480-3835.

50 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


Okay, we admit it. We know very little about turning grapes into wine. However, if you happen to be a Louisiana business owner in need of an experienced workers’ comp provider, LCI is an excellent choice. For over 25 years, we’ve worked to provide expert guidance, personalized service, and custom programs to clients from virtually every industry in the state. So put our team to work for your company, and we promise that we’ll always be sure to leave our shoes on.

:: lciwc.com :: 985-612-1230

Put us to work for you.

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

51


Money & Career

Seek Purpose When Choosing a Profession by Felicite Toney

In 2015, Millennials made up more than 53 million workers, surpassing both Baby Boomers and Generation Xers. By 2025, they will make up over 75% of the global workforce. Collectively, these 18-36 year olds are changing the definition of the word “career.� They crave not merely a job, but meaning and purpose in their employment. They tend to bounce from job to job in search of the right career path. Studies show that Millennials will remain at one job for about three years, which has given them the reputation of lacking employer loyalty. The reality is that Millennials are searching for jobs that provide them with personal fulfillment. Whatever job they perform, they need to understand the impact it makes in their community and beyond.

52 www.thriveswla.com

Otherwise, Millennials continue to job hunt. But why is it important for Millennials to find this meaningful work? Millennials want to be a part of something bigger than themselves. When searching for the right position, Millennials seek companies with relatable mission statements and common goals. They want their interests to be reflected in their work and be able to identify with what they do. They want to know they are contributing to the company and their ideas are being heard. They want to bring about positive changes in the world and leave a lasting impact. Without meaning or purpose in a career, Millennials will choose another option without hesitation.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


How do Millennials Find Purpose in the Workplace? Millennials need workplace support. They thrive on collaboration with mentors. A study by Deloitte reports “Loyalty to an employer is driven by understanding and support of Millennials’ career and life ambitions, as well as providing opportunities to progress and become leaders. Having a mentor is incredibly powerful in this regard.” Mentors can provide workplace guidance, professional advice, and most importantly, remind Millennials of their greater purpose in the workplace. The study reports that 6 in 10 Milllennials are currently benefiting from mentorship. Millennials value constructive feedback. A 2011 report from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) found “One of the strongest millennial traits is that they welcome and expect detailed, regular feedback and praise for a job well done – 51% of those questioned said feedback should be given very frequently or continually on the job and only 1% said feedback was not important to them.” Feedback brings focus to their skills and purpose in the workplace by either correcting mistakes or praising accomplishments. Lastly, Millennials desire careers that provide professional development. Though mentors and regular feedback can aid in professional development, Millennials are interested in attending conferences, webinars, and workplace collaboration. A PwC survey reports that 35% of Millennials “were attracted to employers who offer excellent training and development programs.” Millennials are now the most educated generation and want to continue learning throughout their careers. In the career world, Millennials search for purpose and they won’t settle for less. They want a meaningful career that aligns with their personal values, provides them with the tools they need to develop professionally, and appreciates their time, skills, and effort. This generation looks for more than just a paycheck—they want a job that provides personal career satisfaction.

It’s your turn! Advance to CSE! COLLECT $200 & DRIVE when you BUY or REFINANCE a new or used vehicle with CSE!

Apply online at csefcu.org or call

337.477.2000, opt. 4 for rates & qualifications.

Minimum loan amount financed is $10,000 or greater to qualify for $200 incentive offer. Incentive offer will be deposited into member’s share account after loan is fully funded. Any existing CSE FCU loans are not eligible for refinance. Qualifying CSE FCU loan criteria applies for all loans. Other restrictions may apply. Offer cannot be combined with any other offer. CSE reserves the right to discontinue this promotion without notice. Membership & Eligibility Required. Federally Insured by NCUA. Offer expires July 31, 2016.

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

53


Money & Career

Breaks Ground on OneLodge North Lake

Workforce Housing Complex

Cotton Logistics celebrated a groundbreaking ceremony with the community last month at its OneLodge North Lake development located at 516 Prater Road, at the intersection of Old Spanish Trail and Prater Road, Sulphur, LA 70669. Special guests in attendance included elected officials, members of the Chamber of Commerce and representatives from the McNeese State University Foundation, who accepted a donation from the Cotton Foundation in honor of David Conner and his many contributions to the Southwest Louisiana area and McNeese State University. The OneLodge North Lake project represents a unique housing solution and is a culmination of two years of planning to create a facility which will

54 www.thriveswla.com

serve as an anchor for temporary workforces. A study completed in 2015 commissioned by SWLA Economic Development Alliance and administered by CSRS, predicted the need for 20,000 temporary workers to support local industrial expansion projects. Recognizing the need to address the significant shortage of lodging for these workers migrating into the region, Cotton Logistics established a task force to design a campus that would promote a positive community atmosphere within close proximity to the industrial sites. Cotton Logistics is an experienced and trusted developer for lodge communities in the energy sector. Given their extensive history in creating, developing and managing multiple campuses in the United States, Cotton Logistics was able to custom design and tailor fit the OneLodge North Lake campus for the Southwest Louisiana region. Designed with an overall bed count of 2,500 upon completion, construction of OneLodge North Lake will begin immediately and Phase 1 is predicted to be open for occupancy by Fall 2016. This top quality development is centered on social responsibility and safety for the community and its patrons. OneLodge North Lake will be an all-inclusive type campus, to include dining and

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

recreational facilities. The experienced staff of Cotton Logistics will provide daily housekeeping, grounds and facility maintenance and overall management of day-to-day operations. Amenities onsite will include a fitness center, business center, billiards, lounge areas, laundry facilities, cable and wireless internet, allowing guests a variety of options to recharge at the end of a long work shift. To complete the experience, guests of the lodge will receive three meals per day, including box lunches, prepared by quality chefs of Cotton Culinary, Inc, an individually operated food service company affiliated with Cotton Logistics. Cotton Logistics’ foremost priority is the safety and security of our guests and staff, which is evident in the planning, construction and daily operation of each OneLodge campus. OneLodge North Lake will feature perimeter fencing, lighted parking, and a gated entrance. A credentialed safety manager and 24-hour onsite security team will work to ensure the well-being of all patrons on property. Further, the lodge is strategically positioned within close proximity to multiple industrial sites, reducing the drive time for our clients’ workforces in the area.

July 2016


All you need to know to stay in the know! 28 Years and Counting: CPSB Financial Reporting Recognized for Excellence

Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana CVB Earns 2016 Trip Advisor Award

The Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting has been awarded to Calcasieu Parish School Board for its comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR) by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA). The Certificate of Achievement, awarded to CPSB for the 28th consecutive year, is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting, and its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by a government and its management.

The Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau, responsible for the promotion of tourism in Calcasieu Parish, has received a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence. Now in its sixth year, the achievement celebrates hospitality businesses that have earned great traveler reviews on TripAdvisor over the past year. Certificate of Excellence recipients include accommodations, eateries and attractions located all over the world that have continually delivered a quality customer experience. The Certificate of Excellence accounts for the quality, quantity and recency of reviews submitted by travelers on TripAdvisor over a 12-month period. To qualify, a business must maintain an overall TripAdvisor bubble rating of at least four out of five, have a minimum number of reviews and must have been listed on TripAdvisor for at least 12 months.

Entergy Louisiana to Provide 75 Megawatts of Power to Two Chemical Plants Entergy Louisiana, LLC has entered into two agreements to supply power to LACC, LLC and Lotte Chemical Louisiana LLC facilities in southwest Louisiana. Under the contract, Entergy Louisiana could supply up to 30 megawatts of power monthly to LACC’s ethylene cracker facility, as well as 45 megawatts of power to Lotte’s mono-ethylene glycol (MEG) plant. Both chemical plants will be located on the same piece of property in Lake Charles.

Lake Charles Memorial Cancer Center Earns National Accreditation The Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) has granted Three-Year Accreditation with Commendation to the cancer program at Lake Charles Memorial Health System. To earn voluntary CoC accreditation, a cancer program must meet or exceed 34 CoC quality care standards, be evaluated every three years through a survey process, and maintain levels of excellence in the delivery of comprehensive patient-centered care. Three-Year Accreditation with Commendation is only awarded to a facility that exceeds standard requirements at the time of its triennial survey. The CoC Accreditation Program provides the framework for Memorial’s Cancer Center to improve its quality of patient care through various cancerrelated programs that focus on the full spectrum of cancer care including prevention, early diagnosis, cancer staging, optimal treatment, rehabilitation, life-long followup for recurrent disease, and end-oflife care. For more information, visit www.lcmh.com/ cancer.

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

55


Style & Beauty

Retro West Fashion Boutique

by Angie Kay Dilmore

T

aylor Brown has always had a passion for fashion and retail. She worked in a western store in her hometown, West Monroe, when she was in high school. Six years ago, she moved to Lake Charles to attend McNeese State University and participate on their rodeo team (she’s a barrel racer). During college and postgraduation, she worked for Baskin’s (now Boot Barn). “I love dressing people,” says this young enthusiastic entrepreneur. 56 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


At McNeese, Brown majored in agricultural business. She graduated in 2013, married her rodeo rider husband Rance, and settled onto a six acre farm in Grand Lake with several horses and three dogs. In 2015, Brown started an online retail clothing business she called Highway Hippy Company. When an opportunity to open a storefront in Lake Charles came along, she took a chance and opened Retro West Fashion Boutique at the corner of Ryan and College Sts. She carries a unique inventory of women’s casual wear, shoes, and jewelry she describes as “southern chic with a western 70s flair.” In a room connected but separate from her boutique, Brown also opened a makeup studio featuring Mary Kay Cosmetics. No surprise, she calls it The Pink Studio. She and fellow consultants sell cosmetics, do facials, makeup application, skin care instruction, and cater to bridal parties. Brown says she’s been surprised by the attention her little shop has attracted so far, despite the fact there is still no sign out front. She’s done no advertising other than social media and word of mouth. “New people are stopping by every day.”

Let

Beautiful Skin Shine all Summer Long Rejuvenating treatments and products from the Aesthetic Center can help restore and protect healthier, younger looking skin. We offer: • Cosmetic Injections: - Botox - Juvederm - Voluma - Belotero - Sculptra - Kybella

• • • • • • •

Chemical Peels Microdermabrasion Targeted Skin Care Treatments Eyelid Surgery Latisse for Eyelash Growth PCA Home Care Products Jane Iredale Mineral Make-up

Call 310-1070 for more information or to schedule your appointment. Treatments are provided under the medical direction of facial cosmetic specialist, Mark Crawford, MD.

facehealth.net • 310-1070 • 1717 Oak Park Blvd. July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

57


Style & Beauty

by Emily Alford

Most people are only familiar with Retin-A for teenagers, since dermatologists commonly prescribe the topical cream to treat acne. But even those of us who have moved beyond the days of excess oil and pimple woes can benefit from Retin-A. Recent studies have shown that it fights wrinkles just as well as it eliminates acne.

Generically known as tretinoin or retinoic acid, Retin-A is derived from vitamin A. It’s typically sold in cream form and fights acne by reducing the amount of dead skin cells that clog pores and produce pimples. Most dermatologists agree that retinoids are the most effective means of treating acne.

58 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


Doctors have discovered the same solution for curing acne can also reverse sun damage, eliminate dark spots and tighten up wrinkles. All skin cells have retinoid receptors that control skin function and cell production. As we age, those receptors break down, leaving skin more susceptible to dark spots and damage. Retinoid cream reduces the appearance of damage the same way it reduces acne: by causing skin cells to turn over more quickly, thus reducing flaws. Over time, sun exposure also causes our skin to lose collagen, which is the substance that makes young skin supple. Retin-A can prevent this breakdown by boosting collagen and preventing future loss, which both repairs damage and stops new loss from occurring.

Many drugstore face creams claim to contain retinoids, but just because a cream boasts a vitamin infusion (and often includes a hefty price tag to match) doesn’t mean it actually does anything. Over-the-counter creams are often so diluted that they don’t do much, so the best bet is to see a dermatologist with specific skin concerns to discuss the proper use and dosage of the treatment.

Unfortunately, Retin-A is not without side effects, the most common being dryness and peeling of the affected area. Start small, applying just a pea-sized amount about 30 minutes after washing the face with a gentle cleanser, such as Cetaphil. After the cream dries, use a moisturizer and eye cream. And remember to use retinoids at night, since they shouldn’t be worn under makeup. At first, it’s best to use Retin-A just a few times a week, but as the skin adjusts, most users can slowly work their way up to making it a part of their every day skincare routine. Even though it’s got some drawbacks (those first few weeks of flaky skin can be killer), everyone from celebrities to journalists to doctors swear by Retin-A for both its acne fighting and skin saving properties. So if you’re not feeling your dark spots or sun damage, retinoids could be the simple solution you’ve been looking for.

Sources: nymag.com/thecut/2015/01/does-this-vitamin-really-banish-yourpimples.html www.nytimes.com/2006/11/30/fashion/30skin.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0012511/ www.thedermreview.com/tretinoin-cream/

July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

59


Style & Beauty

5

FASHION RULES TO BREAK!

1

Never Mix Navy and Black

2

One Pattern Per Outfit, Please

3 60 www.thriveswla.com

Fashion should really be simple: wear what makes you feel good. However, it seems like set-in-stone fashion rules are everywhere: from beauty magazines to fashion blogs to well meaning but old school friends and family members. For instance, many of us grew up watching the calendar come spring, terrified to pull out our white dresses until Easter Sunday. But things seem to be changing in the fashion world, and many of the “rules” most people grew up with are quickly becoming obsolete. Here are a few outdated fashion mandates. The fashion industry seems to be designed to make us question ourselves, constantly asking, “Is this out of style?” But the truth is, fashion is supposed to be fun. Don’t box yourself in worrying about rules. If you feel good, you probably look great!

Blues and blacks are actually a fast way to look super professional around the office, according to Lauren Monroe, owner of Mimosa Boutique. “I love black with navy,” Monroe says. “It looks so classic and sophisticated. A black pencil skirt with a pretty navy blouse makes a woman look put together.”

Looking too “busy” used to be a cardinal sin back in the days of sensible pantsuits. But lately, fashion has loosened up, and mixing patterns is not only acceptable; it’s downright trendy! In Prada’s 2016 runway show, the brand mixed bold striped jackets with smaller striped skirts, and the show even paired florals with herringbone. The key is to mix patterns that feel right to you; confidence will make them match.

Put Whites Away After Labor Day Got some summer whites you love? No need to hide them away for fall. “White jeans with a chunky sweater and an ankle boot is a great look for fall and winter,” Monroe says. And a white lace summer dress can look tough but chic with a pair of black tights and cropped moto jacket in the cooler months.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

4

Bra Straps are Embarrassing

5

Keep Socks Neutral

Bras don’t have to be scandalous. The popularity of sheer tops and linens this summer will probably leave many women grappling with the question, “What do I wear under this?” Luckily most department stores and lingerie shops now sell bralettes, which combine the coverage of a cropped tank top with the support of a bra. Bralettes are usually just as pretty as the top itself, with lace details, intricate straps, and fun colors. With so many options, you can go sheer and still stay modest.

Fashion rules don’t only affect women. Most men have grown up hearing that socks should be the same color as pants, but lately, men have gotten a bit more latitude to express themselves. “The rule used to be that your dress socks had to match your dress pants, but that is not the case anymore,” Monroe says. “Men have started to have a little fun accessorizing with printed socks!”

July 2016


12 40% 121 Billion BY THE NUMBERS $ $ 68% 57% 68% 40% 57% 1:3 121 Billion 40% 68% n $ 57% 68% 8% 121 Billion 79% 40% 4% $ 20% 79% 20% 1:3 4% 79% 57% 20% 68% 1:3 1:30,0001:3 1:30,000 80% 4% 79% % 68% 20% 1:30,000 80% 79%76minutes 40% 75% 121 Billion 1:3121 Billi 75 76minutes $ 79% 4% $ % 80% 1:30,000 75 76minutes 20% 57% 6 19minutes 19minutes 79% 19minutes 20% 75% 00 76minutes 1:30,000 80% 3.5mm 68% 3.5mm 68% 57% 75% 40% 121 Billion 3.5mm 19minutes 4% 1:3 $ 75% utes 1:30,000 76minute utes 3.5mm 19minute 75% 76minutes 79% 80% 4% 20% 2 68% m 19minutes 3.5mm 1:3 1:30,000 80% 1:30 3.5mm NO WAY!

Millennials who use anti-aging skin care products daily

NO WAY!

Global estimated worth of the 2016 skin care market in US Dollars

NO WAY!

TOSS THAT TUBE AFTER 3 MONTHS!

NO WAY!

Gen-Xers who use anti-aging skin care products daily

Number of dermatologists per 30,000 people in the U.S.

NO WAY!

TOSS THAT TUBE AFTER 3 MONTHS!

Percent of mascara tubes plagued by staph bacteria

Amount of time it takes to “get ready” on a Monday morning

TOSS THAT TUBE AFTER 3 MONTHS!

TOSS THAT TUBE AFTER 3 MONTHS!

The beauty routine on a Friday?

Percent of men age 18 and older who DO NOT use skin care products

TOSS THAT TUBE AFTER 3 MONTHS! NO WAY!

Percent of women who suffer hair loss

Number of women who refuse to leave the house without make up on

Average nail growth per month

Sources: http://www.statista.com/statistics/254612/global-skincare-market-size/ https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-consumers-shopanti-aging-skin-care-market-trends-michelle-skelly http://stylecaster.com/beauty/surprising-statisticsbeauty-industry/

July 2016

Percent of women world-wide who think they are beautiful

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Percent of women who agree every woman has something beautiful about her, yet TOSS THAT TUBE AFTER 3 MONTHS! NO WAY! cannot see their own beauty

www.thriveswla.com

61


Mark Your Calendar! LOCAL LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ANNOUNCED FOR JULY L’AUBERGE

GOLDEN NUGGET

Jack Daniels Bar & Grill July 1 The Second City Improv All Stars, Tugboats July 2 DJ Cage July 3 Chester & Jairus Daigle, Kris Harper & Matt Moss July 5 DJ Verrett July 6 Brian Moore July 7 Paws the Cat July 8 LA Yard Dogs July 9 DJ San-D July 10 Chester & Jairus Daigle Kory Fontenot July 12 DJ Verrett July 13 Josh Taylor July 14 DJ Crush July 15 The Kadillacs July 16 DJ Cage July 17 Chester & Jairus Daigle, Brittany Pfantz July 19 DJ Verrett July 20 Street Side Jazz Trio July 21 Paws the Cat July 22 Rusty Metoyer July 23 DJ San-D July 24 Chestser & Jairus Daigle, Charlie Wayne July 26 DJ Verrett July 27 Kris Harper & Matt Moss July 28 DJ Crush July 29 Larry Tillery (The Kinds of Mojo) July 30 DJ Cage July 31 Chester & Jairus Daigle, Michael Krajicek

Grand Event Center July 1 America July 3 Aaron Lewis July 8 Kansas July 9 Gordie Brown July 10-14 Gordie Brown July 15 LeAnn Rimes July 16 Dick Fox’s Golden Boys Feat. Frankie Avalon, Fabian & Bobby Rydell July 22 Legacy Fighting Championship 58 July 23 Jack Ingram July 29 Jana Kramer July 30 Jerry Jeff Walker

Ember Grille & Wine Bar July 4 Kenneth Espree July 5 Kevin Lambert July 6 Chester Daigle July 7-9 Kevin Lambert July 11 Stacy Bearden July 12 Chip Radford July 13 Chester Daigle July 14-16 Katie Whitney & Chip Radford July 18 Stacy Bearden July 19 Kay Miller July 20 Chester Daigle July 21-23 Julie Williams July 25 Kenneth Espree July 26 Kevin Lambert July 27 Chester Daigle July 28-30 Kay Miller & Aaron Home

62 www.thriveswla.com

The Country Club at Golden Nugget July 16 Stacy Bearden H2O Pool + Bar Saturdays in July Sundays in July

DJ Jose Mata DJ Jose Mata

Rush Lounge July 1 The FUSE July 17 July 2 The FUSE July 18 July 3 The FUSE July 19 July 4 The FUSE July 20 July 5 The Anteeks July 21 July 6 Rapture July 22 July 7 Rapture July 23 July 8 Rapture July 24 July 9 Rapture July 25 July 10 Chinatown July 26 July 11 Chinatown July 27 July 12 Chinatown July 28 July 13 First Class July 29 July 14 First Class July 30 July 15 Tricky Dickies July 31 July 16 Tricky Dickies

High Rollers High Rollers High Rollers QRISIS QRISIS QRISIS QRISIS ENCORE ENCORE ENCORE Electric Circus Electric Circus Play It 4Ward Play It 4Ward Electric Circus

Blue Martini July 21 July 1 ENCORE, DJ Jose Mata July 22 July 2 ENCORE, LA ROXX, DJ Jose Mata July 23 July 6 The Slags July 24 July 7 GoGo Dolls, DJ Jose Mata July 27 July 8 GoGo Dolls, DJ Jose Mata July 28 July 9 GoGo Dolls, DJ Jose Mata July 10 John Guidroz, DJ Jose Mata July 29 July 13 Atomic July 14 Swagger, DJ Jose Mata July 30 July 15 Swagger, DJ Jose Mata July 16 Swagger, DJ Jose Mata July 31 July 17 Angel Garcia, DJ Jose Mata July 20 ENCORE Thrive Magazine for Better Living

AfterParty, DJ Jose Mata AfterParty, DJ Jose Mata AfterParty, DJ Jose Mata Dead or Alive, DJ Jose Mata Atomic On the Dancefloor, DJ Jose Mata On the Dancefloor, DJ Jose Mata On the Dancefloor, DJ Jose Mata Kris Harper, DJ Jose Mata

July 2016


ISLE OF CAPRI July 1 July 2 July 6 July 7 July 8 July 9 July 13 July 14 July 15 July 16 July 20 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 27 July 28 July 29 July 30

The American Kids David Joel Karaoke DJ Swiger The Coleman Brothers Herbie Stutes and The Grand Shin Karaoke DJ Love Bug & DJ Coolia The Katelyn Johnson Band Joe Harmon and the Harmonics Karaoke Tomplay Will Wesley and The Juke Box Band The Kadillacs Karaoke The Bernie Allen Band David St. Romain The Doghill Stompers

BURTON COLISEUM

Fashion Week Lake Charles Presents Summer Resort Prêt-àPortea Fashion Show Fashion Week Lake Charles presents the Summer Resort Prêt-à-Portea fashion show, August 6, at the Lake Charles Country Club. Doors will open at 5:30pm with the show beginning at 7:30pm. The Summer Resort will feature next season’s swimwear and summer lines from trendy swimwear designers and boutiques, inspired by the themes and colors of the fashion world. Ticket prices start at $25. For more information, visit www.fashionweeklc.com.

LIVE SWLA LOCAL MUSIC RESTAURANTS ARTISTS Extensive crab dish tasting with complementary Louisiana craft beer samples

First 200 tickets are

$30 $35

Special Musical Performances to Close Out the 2016 Summer Reading Program The Calcasieu Parish Public Library is closing out the 2016 Summer Reading Program with special musical performances by four time Parent’s Choice Award winners, Fox and Branch. Dave Fox and Will Branch strive to create a communal atmosphere of fun and high spirits wherever they play. A Fox and Branch show is as much a celebration of being together as it is a musical performance. Audience members are invited to sing along, to dance, and to come onstage to try their hand at the washboard and other musical instruments when they visit the following branches: Sulphur Regional Library – July 11 at 10:00 a.m. Fontenot Memorial Library – July 11 at 2:00 p.m. Starks Library – 113 S. Hwy. 109 – July 11 at 5:00 p.m. Central Library – 301 W. Claude St. – July 12 at 10:00 a.m. Carnegie Memorial Library – July 12 at 2:00 p.m. Westlake Library – July 12 at 5:00 p.m. Moss Bluff Library – July 13 at 10:00 a.m. DeQuincy Library – July 13 at 5:00 p.m. Epps Memorial Library – July 14 at 10:00 a.m. Iowa Library – July 14 at 1:00 p.m. Hayes Library – July 14 at 4:00 p.m. All library programs are free and open to the public. For more information, contact your local library branch.

July 2016

Remaining Tickets are

Purchase Tickets at

artsandhumanitiesswla.org 337 439-ARTS LIMITED TICKET SALES. TAXES AND FEES MAY APPLY. MUST BE 21 TO ENTER.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

63


Court Appointed Special Advocates to Hold Volunteer Training

Salty Catch Fishing Rodeo Returns to Golden Nugget

The 13th Annual La Cuisine de la Louisiane is Scheduled

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), a division of Family & Youth Counseling Agency Inc. (Family & Youth) will host volunteer training beginning July 9, 9am-4pm at Family & Youth in Lake Charles. Training will continue on July 16th, 23rd, and 30th from 9am-4pm. Volunteers must attend all four training days. For more information, call (337) 436-9533.

The 2016 Salty Catch Fishing Rodeo partners with Golden Nugget Lake Charles to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital with an event held at Golden Nugget Beach July 21-24. The tournament features six divisions: Offshore, Inshore, Spearfishing, Youth, Guide and Calcutta, with cash prizes worth over five hundred dollars for participants of every age. The weekend long event will launch on July 21, with the Captain’s Kick-off Party at 6pm, with live music by the Kadillacs, followed by the Miss Salty Catch Bikini Contest. Fishing will begin on July 22, at 12:01am and end the next day, July 23 at 7pm. Weigh-In Day begins on July 24, at 8am. Scales will be open from 8am-2 pm. For tickets or more information, visit www.saltycatch.com.

The 13th Annual La Cuisine de la Louisiane will be held at Paragon Casino Resort in Marksville on July 24 from 5:30-8:30pm. Over 30 restaurants throughout Louisiana participate in this culinary feast. Tickets are $35 each and can be purchased at Acadian Village Monday through Saturday from 10am-4pm. For more information, visit www. acadianvillage.org.

Christmas in July Artisan’s Fair Scheduled The 6th Annual “Christmas in July-Artisan’s Fair” will be held July 8 & 9 at Immaculate Conception Church Hall & Classrooms in Sulphur. Over 30 Vendors will be offering one-of-a-kind items such as Pottery, Wreaths, Hand-spun Yarn, Quilted items, Jewelry and much more. Free Admission. For more information, email gdaruss@msn.com.

Black Heritage Gallery Features New Exhibit Lake Charles Black Heritage Art Gallery is hosting a new exhibit. The exhibit titled “Collection No. 1” will feature art by Kamea Joy Comeaux. The exhibition will hang in the gallery through July 25.

The Eye Clinic in Sulphur is moving – but you won’t have to look very far to find us! We’re relocating in August to our new office just around the corner:

720 Cypress Street across from West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital The Eye Clinic has provided comprehensive eye care for the entire family in Sulphur for over 25 years, and our new office will feature more exam rooms, a larger waiting area, expanded Optics Unlimited eyewear, a full-service contact lens department and additional parking.

BETTER VISION IS MOVING UP THE ROAD! 64 www.thriveswla.com

(337) 625- 8948 | theeyeclinic.net

720 Cypress St.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016


July 2016

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

65


!

Solutions for Life

from Solutions Counseling & EAP by Keri Forbess-McCorquodale, MS, LPC, LMFT, CEAP

Letting Go of BadVacations Ahh…summertime. The time of lazy evenings, a slower pace, rest and relaxation. Right? Not for most of you. For many of you, the pace is just as frenetic as it was during the other parts of the year. (Whose bright idea was summer league sports, anyway?!) Can we at least agree that it might be a good time to take a vacation? Most of us will do just that during the summer. It’s always interesting for me this time of year. I have couples and families come in and tell me their vacation was wonderful and they feel closer than ever. I have others come in and tell me they were doing much better before going on vacation together. I’d like to give you some food for thought about this year’s vacation to help ensure you come back in tact! How Long? Many people make the mistake of painstakingly using their vacation time one Friday or Monday at a time. I would like to encourage you to consider taking a full one or two weeks off. A series of “long weekends” will not give you the rest, relaxation and rejuvenation that vacations are supposed to help with. Think about it: most of us take a couple of days to unwind. Then we start “winding up” again one or two days before returning to our real lives. If you never take a full week off, you never reach the real “vacation sweet spot.” I have taken a couple of lengthier vacations over the years. Leaving the office knowing I wouldn’t be back for two or more weeks allowed me to truly let go of work (although, I will confess it was crazy trying to get everything done before leaving!).

66 www.thriveswla.com

Stay or Go? “Staycations” have become more popular over the last several years. For some people, it is a financial decision. For others, they don’t enjoy all that encompasses a trip somewhere. I have a friend who told me, “I never get to enjoy my house. Weekends are spent doing chores and getting ready for the next week.” That makes sense to me. My only request is that if you choose to stay home, don’t spend all your time doing projects around the house. Get out, enjoy our wonderful community, be a “tourist” in your hometown! Others of you won’t feel like you’ve had a vacation if you don’t go somewhere. I understand that too. Just be smart about where you choose to go, and how “long” of a place it is. Meaning, how long can you be in that place and feel like you’ve truly gotten the flavor without everyone becoming bored. Some places are three day places, and others are much longer. Do some research. And if you choose a three day place, still take the full week off and enjoy a little staycation! So Happy Together? Don’t plan on spending every waking moment with your spouse/family on vacation. The people that come back feeling like things are worse typically do just that. There they were: packed into a hotel room, sharing a tiny bathroom, big and little people talking over each other as they tried to make decisions on the day’s activities while what the little people were supposed to be doing was quietly getting dressed - it’s too intense. Everyone needs a little solitude. Arrange for everyone to have some “down time” every day, and adults need to switch off getting to leave the room for an hour or two.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

To Plan or Not To Plan? The answer is: yes. Yes, you need to plan. Do some research and find out top things to do in your destination. What is important to you? Museums, restaurants, activities? Focus on those things. Don’t try to do it all, but make sure you have a couple of “must do’s” in mind. And yes, you need not to plan. If you plan the schedule too tightly, something is going to happen to kink it up. The activity will be closed unexpectedly. The restaurant at which you’ve had reservations for months will be out of their signature dish. The weather will be uncooperative. Be flexible. Decide to have a good time even if what you are doing was not on your agenda for the day. If everyone is tired and cranky, don’t drag them to do the day’s activities anyway. As with most things in life, a plan is good. A rigid plan is not. I hope you all plan to take a vacation of some sort within the next six months. Get out of your routine. See and experience something new. Clear your mind so you can solve that nagging issue you’ve been needing to deal with. All I ask is that this time, you make it a good vacation. No more bad vacations!

July 2016


McNeese Engineering Team Win National Award McNeese State University’s engineering team took home the Spirit of Competition Award at the 29th Annual American Society of Civil Engineering National Concrete Canoe Competition at the University of Texas at Tyler.

L to R: Ronish Lamsal, Jordan Saltzman, Sadie Johnson, Lee Butler, Abigail Soileau, Matt Mixon, Jennifer Myers (external adviser), Dimitrios Dermisis (faculty adviser) and Drewe Burns; and kneeling from left: Kelli Van Norman, Chani Correa, Taylor Watts, Valentina Aristizábal and Tuan Le.

McNeese MBA Program Goes Online McNeese State University’s Master of Business Administration degree program will be available completely online beginning in August. Students now have the choice of getting their MBA degree either by taking all the required courses online or the traditional face-to-face classes. Both programs are nationally accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International. This program, depending on a student’s course work and scheduling, can be completed within four semesters. Non-business majors will be required to take additional foundation courses that can extend the degree plan to six semesters. The MBA program is now accepting applications and classes begin Aug. 22. In order to be admitted to the MBA program, an applicant must be admitted to the Doré School of Graduate Studies. For more information on graduate admission requirements, visit www.mcneese.edu/mba.

July 2016

McNeese LSBDC Reaccredited and Wins State Award The Louisiana Small Business Development Center (LSBDC) has received reaccreditation for a five-year period by America’s Small Business Development Centers nationwide network. The LSBDC network has seven centers, including the LSBDC at McNeese State University.

U.S. Small Business Administration District Director Mike Ricks presents the 2016 SBDC Service Excellence and Innovation Center award to the LSBDC at McNeese State University Director Donna Little and Business Consultant Susan Thibodeaux.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

67


ebratin l e C

wo Deca T g

s of Do’s! de

Follow us on facebook, twitter and instagram as we celebrate our 20 year birthday! Hint: be watching for the RV.

20

Voted BEST SALON in SWLA!

478.4433 www.signaturessalon.biz 68 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2016

Thrive July 2016 Issue  

July 2016 Issue of Thrive Magazine

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you