The Jag - Fall 2015

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FALL 2015

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FE ATURES

A CLOSER LOOK

ALUMNI

Cynthia Callender Dungey: Building Bridges

Creative Freedom in the Classroom

Class of ‘90: Second to None


Dear Friends,

SAVE THE DATE

All Things Wellington

9th Annual Curriculum Night

21 January

Teachers and students alike embraced and encouraged her during moments of self-doubt and uncertainty. She found strength and confidence in her vast capabilities when those around her professed an unwavering belief in her potential. Wellington was a second family to her, and the deep connection she formed with the school as a teenager still resonates with her today. As Head of School and a parent of two alumni, I can say with great certainty that Cynthia’s experience at Wellington is not uncommon. Whether a student, parent, or Inspired and courageous, faculty member, Wellington students have past or present, no boundaries in the we all have a pursuit of their ambitions. powerful bond as Jaguars. With a ROBERT BRISK shared dedication to impact the world for the better, she faced, both academically our school community and socially, as a new student strengthens as alumni at Wellington, receiving an continue to travel education that stretched her across the country and further than she ever thought world for opportunities possible. in higher education What helped her face her and successful careers. fear of the unknown, Cynthia Throughout this issue recalled, was the staunch of The Jag, you will support of our school community.

This fall, I had the honor of giving the first Wellington Distinguished Alumni Award to Cynthia Callender Dungey. A member of Wellington’s inaugural graduating class in 1989 and currently Director of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Cynthia was a natural choice for this recognition; though perhaps not for the reasons you would expect. Her path to success was neither easy nor simple. Upon accepting the award at the Alumni Weekend Breakfast in September, Cynthia was quite candid about the challenges

find the many ways in which current students, empowered by innovative curriculum and self-directed learning under the guidance of expert faculty members, are already making their mark on the world before they even graduate. Inspired and courageous, Wellington students have no boundaries in the pursuit of their ambitions. The only question is where will they go next?

6:30 P.M.

Warm regards,

is published by The Wellington School for all members of its community. Please send any comments to Yvonne Johnson at communications@wellington.org. T H E JAG

Yvonne Johnson P ’25 ’27 Laura Cooke ’90 P ’21 ’21 ’24 ’27, Yvonne Johnson P ’25 ’27, Lindsey Smith P ’26, Erik Willers ‘90 C OP Y E DI T OR S : Melanie Eggleton, Caroline Haskett P ’19 ’20 ’22, Laura Cooke ‘90 P ’21 ’21 ’24 ‘27, Sally Saeger Stratton, Jeff Terwin, Erin Noviski, Jill Webb P HO T O C R E DI T S : Chris Cooke P ’27 ’24 ’21 ‘21, Laura Cooke ‘90 P ’21 ’21 ’24 ‘27, Juli O’Donovan P ‘19, Debra Gill P ‘17, Caroline Haskett P ’22 ’20 ‘19, Rob Luikart, Craig Mosier ‘01, Carolyn O’Neil P ’22 ‘20, Cindy Ray P ’25 ’22 ‘20, Chris Robbins P ’22 ‘17, Abbey Slee, Sharla Starker P ’22 ‘17, Marlo Tannous P ‘16, Mimi Taylor P ’18 ‘16, Jeff Terwin, Kelly Zavotka DE SIGN: Bluewave Creative E DI T OR :

C ON T R I BU T OR S :


TABLE OF CONTENTS

I like sharing my own experiences and struggles with young kids. I want to be a role model for others.

Ian Frim ‘19.

MADJO HYZDU ’ 16 PAGE 24

Hyzdu Can Do ON T H E C OV E R :

Alexander Khan ‘27, Paige Thompson ‘27, MadJo Hyudzu ‘16, Michael Dolciato ‘27

FEATURES

A CLOSER LOOK

Cynthia Callender Dungey: Building Bridges

Wellington Grads Have the Spirit of Adventure

Creative Freedom in the Classroom

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ATHLETICS

Imagineering a Better World

John Kruzan: Renaissance Man

Award Winners 32

ALUMNI

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Lower School Talks Numbers

The Xin Perspective 15

What Is Pos Ed? 17

Faculty News 10

Wellness at Wellington 11

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Writing is Discovery

Alumni Weekend 2015

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Deep Dive Into Marine Biology

Wellington Athletic Hall of Fame

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FE ATURE

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Cynthia Callender Dungey: Building Bridges When Cynthia Callender Dungey ’89 was called to the Lincoln Room at the Ohio Statehouse in the middle of her work day, she was uncharacteristically at a loss for words.

Fortunately, upon finding Governor John Kasich waiting for her, Dungey also found her voice and was able to engage in a deeply philosophical dialogue with the governor about the best way to help Ohioans in need of assistance find jobs and prosperity. By the end of the conversation, the accomplished lawyer and Chief of Staff of the Ohio Department of Medicaid was asked by Kasich to take on a new role as Director of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. “In leadership, I believe you have to be ready to serve,” Dungey said one bright afternoon this PICTURED fall in her office Cynthia Callender Dungey ‘89 with overlooking Robert Brisk P ‘13 ‘15 Downtown Columbus and high above the statehouse in which she first found herself entrusted with the oversight of 3,000 employees and the lives of 1.7 million Ohioans receiving aid. “I always wanted to be a social worker and save the world. If you want change, you can’t stay on the sidelines.” Dungey is as inspiring to meet as she is warm and personable. Always smiling and quick with a joke, she speaks directly but in an inviting manner that draws in everyone around her. She is thoughtful and measured but never reserved. Her passion for helping people is palpable and one can’t help but tear up at the poignant stories she tells of those in need. One such story involved an THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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“Wellington alumni have been creating a footprint around the world for the past 26 years and I am glad we are at a place where we can recognize their accomplishments with the Distinguished Alumni Award. Cynthia, a member of the first graduating class, is well-deserving of this award and is making a difference in the lives of others.” ABBEY SLEE, EVENTS, ALUMNI & FAMILY RELATIONS

internship Dungey had at Children’s Hospital during her senior year of high school at Wellington. She worked in the Family Abuse Unit of the hospital and co-authored a published article about pediatric hand injuries often indicating child abuse. After making the connection that abusive parents would often attempt to correct a behavior by harming a child’s hand, such as forcing a child’s hand on a hot stove as punishment for touching it, Dungey realized not all families were healthy and happy like her own. “There are times when I’m driven to tears by the work I do,” she said, “but I always remember that I have the opportunity to change lives.” Dungey’s own life was forever changed when she first visited Wellington’s campus as a high school sophomore from the near east side of Columbus. She can still vividly recall walking through the halls and seeing the science and computer labs, feeling immediately that the learning potential in such an environment would be limitless. When she enrolled the following year, Dungey found herself struggling not only with a challenging curriculum but also with the fact that, for the first time in her life, her classmates did not look like her. “It caused her to wonder about her identity,” former Wellington English teacher and college counselor Chris Williamson said. “Cynthia had to fit into two very disparate worlds. She told me she would change out of her uniform on her way home on the COTA bus to avoid being different at home, even as she was dealing with being different at her new school. She described Wellington, not in a disparaging way but genuinely, as La La Land for her, and for her neighbors, yet for her this unreal ideal school became part of her reality. She was determined to make it work.” Along with confronting a sense of “otherness,” Dungey faced another fear that could have crushed her. The fear of failure. She realized that despite being an honors student at her previous school, the course work at Wellington was far more advanced than she had been accustomed. “For the first time, I had to face the possibility that I wasn’t going to be at the top,” she said. “It was important for me to take personal responsibility and do what I needed to do to be successful.”

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Dungey quickly set to work, teaching herself 10th grade curriculum at night while also keeping up with her current 11th grade classes. While she did indeed do what she needed to be successful at a new school surrounded by new people, Dungey will always feel indebted to the faculty members and fellow students who embraced her and encouraged her every step toward achieving her goals. The individual attention she received from her teachers, including the creation of a Spanish class solely for Dungey, allowed her to ultimately excel academically far beyond what she could have ever imagined. She also began to think differently about the world and her place within it. Teachers like Sam Stewart inspired her to ask difficult questions and have the personal drive to find answers. When it was time to consider colleges, Williamson guided Dungey through the daunting selection process. “I remember Mr. Williamson spending a lot of time with me,” Dungey said, “telling me that I shouldn’t rule schools out simply because of cost or whether they were close to home. He opened up all my options.” She went on to earn a Bachelor of Arts in political science and sociology from DePauw University and then a juris doctorate from the Ohio Northern University College of Law. Fresh out of law school, Dungey’s dedication to public service led her to the attorney general’s office where she worked in healthcare fraud. In all of her roles throughout her career, she has found preparation and collaboration to be imperative. “I don’t think I have to be the expert,” she said. Humility aside, Dungey is an expert on the topic of Emerson, her 4-year old son. Board books and Legos are in ready supply in her office as he is always welcome to visit, and Dungey, often required to work long hours, tries to make the most of their time together. Never missing any of Emerson’s activities is important to her, as is making treats for his class, explained this self-proclaimed Pinterest queen. “As a parent, I try to give him every opportunity to learn. I allow him to explore.” Married to husband Richard, Dungey truly feels she wouldn’t be able to succeed without his support. She also looks to hobbies and interests like reading, traveling, and photography to help unwind from the pressures of her job. Dungey holds close to her heart the words of former Ohio Attorney General Betty Montgomery, a mentor and close friend, to make sure that she always takes care of herself. Now, as Dungey continues to strive toward her professional goals of bringing stability to families and creating pathways for them to succeed, she is reflective of the impact Wellington had on her. During her acceptance speech as the first recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award in September, Dungey expressed her gratitude for her alma mater. “I would like to thank Wellington. For if it was not for you, your vision, and the open arms I received, I’m not so sure I’d be where I am today. The path I am on today…you were my bridge, my village, and you continue to be that for me today. And as I carry on the torch, know that you live with me every single day in my heart.”


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PICTURED 1: Former Headmaster David Blanchard handing Dungey her diploma in 1989 2: Cynthia, Emerson, and Richard Dungey 3: Cynthia Callender’s senior picture

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A CLOSER LOOK

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Wellington Grads Have the Spirit of Adventure What do author John Steinbeck, scientist Linus Pauling, and diplomat Henry Kissinger all have in common other than winning a Nobel Peace Prize? They were also Fulbright Scholars. What do Alexander Jusdanis ‘10, Taiyo ScanlonKimura ‘11, Abigail Kaplan ‘11, and Becky Shin ’11 all have in common besides graduating from 6

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The Wellington School? They, too, were recently named Fulbright Scholars and may now join the ranks of other illustrious alumni in the program. A prestigious academic honor, the Fulbright Scholar Program was established in 1946 and sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

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Named after distinguished Senator J. William Fulbright for his esteemed contribution to foreign diplomacy, the program’s mission is to provide U.S. and foreign participants meaningful exchanges in the sciences, business, academia, public service, government, and the arts in order to promote greater understanding between the peoples of the world. “I absolutely believe that my time at Wellington helped me to be the well-rounded, articulate, creative, ambitious candidate that the Fulbright committee was looking for,” Kaplan said.

PICTURED 1: Becky Shin ‘11 at Ewha University 2: Taiyo Scanlon-Kimura ‘11 3: Alexander Jusdanis ‘10 in Fes, Morocco 4: Shin ‘11 with host family at Lotte World in Seoul, South Korea


A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE Fulbright alumni have achieved distinction in government, science, the arts, business, philanthropy, education, and athletics.

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After graduating from Denison University with a B.A. in French Language and Literature, she was awarded an English Teaching Assistantship to work with high school students in Vénissieux, France for seven months. While Kaplan’s main goal is to encourage students to speak as much English as possible, she also plans to incorporate American culture into her lessons. “The hope is that outside the classroom grantees will act as cultural ambassadors, interacting and assimilating with their community, so in my free time I plan to do some volunteer work, possibly with young people with disabilities.” For Scanlon-Kimura, a graduate of Oberlin College with a double major in politics and East Asian studies, his family’s heritage fueled a desire to spend time living in Japan. He received a research grant to study regional food systems as drivers of local economies and intends “to analyze the

effectiveness of public policies designed to foster sustainable rural communities.” He considers his classes at Wellington to have been excellent preparation for academic success at Oberlin, thus paving the way for his scholar award. “The analytical and writing skills I gained as a high school student, particularly from my chemistry, English, history, and music theory classes, put me in a position to comfortably handle my first-year course load.” Brown University graduate Jusdanis received a Student Researcher grant, as well as the Critical Enhancement Award which provided Arabic language training in Fez before his research began, to study the tourism industry in the seaside town of Essaouira, Morocco. Jusdanis will research “how foreign tourists and Moroccans navigate various social, cultural, and economic differences in the interactions that occur as a result of travel.”

More than 7,000 miles away from Columbus, Ohio, Shin is currently teaching English in Cheonan, South Korea. It was her involvement in the Claremont Colleges Asian American Advisory Board, as a student at Scripps College in Southern California, that fostered a deeper awareness of her own Asian American identity while also coming to understand the passions and struggles of others like her. Now teachers themselves, Kaplan and Shin consider themselves indebted to the foreign language faculty at Wellington. Former Spanish teacher and current Head of Middle School Erin Noviski piqued Shin’s interest in language, while French teacher Maria Baker was inspirational in Kaplan’s desire to become a language teacher. Current upper school teachers Sara Brdar P ’02 ’03 and Erin Cornett ’96 were also influential in developing their students’ critical-thinking skills when considering geopolitics. “I have always had a love for people and a spirit of adventure,” Shin said. “The more I learned about the Fulbright program, the more I was drawn to it. I loved the idea of not only being an overseas English teacher but also, and more importantly, an American cultural ambassador. I am grateful that Wellington allowed, even encouraged, us to pursue our curiosities and passions and to show us just how far our arms can reach.”

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FULBRIGHT ALUMNI

FROM 13 COUNTRIES HAVE BEEN AWARDED THE NOBEL PRIZE

29 FULBRIGHT ALUMNI

ARE MACARTHUR FOUNDATION FELLOWS

82

FULBRIGHT ALUMNI

HAVE RECEIVED PULITZER PRIZES

31

FULBRIGHT ALUMNI

HAVE SERVED AS HEADS OF STATE OR GOVERNMENT

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WHERE IN THE WORLD

ARE WELLINGTON ALUMNI 8

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WORLD ALUMNI BY NUMBERS

UNITED STATES AK – 1 AL – 1 AZ – 4 CA – 30 CO – 15 CT – 9 DC – 6

FL – 26 GA – 10 IA – 2 ID – 1 IL – 29 IN – 10 KY – 3 LA – 2

MA – 11 MD – 8 ME – 3 MI – 9 MN – 4 MO – 4 MS – 1 MT – 1

NC – 19 NH – 1 NJ – 6 NM – 2 NY – 34 OH – 596 PA – 14 SC – 11

TN – 5 TX – 14 UT – 2 VA – 11 WA – 8

AUSTRIA – 2 CANADA – 1 FRANCE – 1 GERMANY – 5 CHINA – 2 JAPAN – 4 LONDON – 2 MEXICO – 1

MOROCCO – 1 POLAND – 1 SCOTLAND – 1 SOUTH KOREA – 1 SPAIN – 4 SWITZERLAND – 1 VIETNAM – 1

*If you are not included here, please email alumni@wellington.org with your address. THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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A CLOSER LOOK

MUSE Led by Head of School Robert Brisk P ‘13 ‘15 and Director of Technology John Kruzan, MUSE is Measuring and Understanding Student Engagement. Students were queried for feedback about their classroom experience, including: room, space, furniture, class subject, pedagogy, teachers, and students. A DotPlot tool, in which students marked their level of engagement in a particular class, was designed to measure students’ sense of engagement for each of their classes. Objectives 1. To understand the student perspective on what factors lead to engagement. 2. To use engagement information to improve classrooms and teaching practice. Questions 1. What would be the impact of changing the teacher’s orientation in the classroom? 2. What other variables could make a significant difference? Partnering with nine other independent schools, Wellington will be able to use the data collected to further innovate the learning experience for all students.

FACULTY NEWS

Robert Brisk P ’13 ’15 John Kruzan Erica Foster Head of School Robert Brisk P ’13 ’15, Director of Technology John Kruzan, and Lower School Teacher Erica Foster presented at the Independent Schools Association of the Central States (ISACS) conference in November. Brisk and Kruzan shared their research for measuring student engagement in the classroom using data analysis, as well as their conclusions about how pedagogy, room, space, furniture, teachers, and students impact engagement. Foster discussed the Growth Mindset Classroom, in the most highly-attended session of the conference, using Dr. Carol Dweck’s ground-breaking work on improving student motivation to transform the learning environment for students.

Michelle Neely Middle and Upper School Math Teacher Michelle Neely competed in the Deer Creek Fall Challenge Triathlon in September. The event, Neely’s first triathlon, included a 1/2 mile swim, 12 mile bike ride, and 3.1 mile run. She finished 4th in her age group and is already planning to compete in a Half Ironman.

PICTURED Audrey Arman ‘21

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Kelly Zavotka Upper School English Teacher Kelly Zavotka has become a College Bound Mentor through Franklin County Children Services. The program matches local teens receiving services from the county with a positive role model to provide additional support for children hoping to attend college one day.

Rachel Althof P ‘29 Upper School Teaching and Learning Dean Rachel Althof P ’29 recently had her article “Reflections on the Socratic Method” published in the journal Visual Inquiry: Learning & Teaching Art. Based on her dissertation research conducted at Wellington for Columbia University, Althof’s work provides a detailed analysis of the historical text Alcibiades and finds contemporary relevance for adolescent students.

Sandra Foreman Lower School Substitute Teacher Sandra Foreman helped celebrate Brutus the Buckeye’s 50th birthday this year. She has the great distinction of being the first female to the don the mascot’s costume.


COMMITTEE MEMBERS Kelsey Carpenter, Lower School Learning Guide Craig Jones, Middle and Upper School Guidance Counselor Kenan LeParc, Middle School Teacher Sharon Nye, Benefits Specialist Lindsey Smith P ’26, Athletic Director Zach Thompson, Sports Performance Coach

WELLINGTON HEALTH AND WELLNESS COMMITTEE MISSION STATEMENT PHYSICAL: Encouraging healthy lifestyle habits and physical activity. SOCIAL: Cultivating healthy relationships with faculty, staff, and student body. EMOTIONAL: Recognizing and managing feelings. INTELLECTUAL: Acquiring new knowledge through engaging mental activities.

Vital Signs

WELLNESS AT WELLINGTON Top companies and organizations around the world have committed to developing programs that provide employees with healthier and less stressful work environments that achieve an increased level of happiness and productivity. The Wellington School has established a Health and Wellness committee dedicated to helping employees achieve their individual goals for optimal personal well-being. Each month, a Health and Wellness newsletter is distributed to faculty and staff with tips related to food and nutrition, fitness, and mental prosperity. Yoga and pilates classes, as well as workshops on health-related topics, all focus on stress management and successful work-life balance. “Overall health and wellness is essential to living a fulfilling life,” Benefits Specialist Sharon Nye said. “The Health and Wellness committee is focused on educating, practicing, and encouraging health and wellness at Wellington.”

OF AMERICANS

78%

OF AMERICANS

28%

WORK IN JOBS THAT REQUIRE LITTLE OR NO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

DESCRIBE THEIR JOB AS STRESSFUL

IN SICK LEAVE AT COMPANIES WITH HEALTH & WELLNESS INITIATIVES

80%

REDUCTION

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FE ATURE

John Kruzan: Renaissance Man It should not come as a surprise for anyone who knows Wellington Director of Technology John Kruzan that he is an educator ever ready to investigate and innovate the status quo. A self-taught woodworker and leather maker, he is always looking for a new test of his capabilities. From making his own craftsman 12

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style furniture and cabinetry to wiring the electric in his home or playing the trumpet, any skill he has acquired has been through his own tenacity and genuine love of learning. That, and he has always been a good mimic, he will tell you. Always up for a new challenge, Kruzan was first introduced to The Wellington

School by a fellow graduate student at The Ohio State University 26 years ago. Working in experimental nuclear physics at the time, Kruzan was intrigued by the prospect of teaching a summer school physics class. He had always enjoyed teaching, having started in his undergrad days at University of Dayton where

he was a teaching assistant in the physics department. At the time, Kruzan thought he would become a college professor. Former Wellington Head of School David Blanchard, a chemist himself, had other plans for the talented young scientist and offered him a full-time position. Now, nearly three decades later, Kruzan has taught chemistry, computer science, calculus, and physics to hundreds of Wellington students. Advanced physics was always a favorite class of his. “I always like talking quantum mechanics


with someone for the first time because it sounds so bizarre,” he said. “Yet that’s how the world works.” It was Kruzan’s deep affinity for physics that led him to question the syllabus for Advanced Placement Physics nine years ago. The course was inherently problematic for him in that it only covered material through 1887. Amazed that the traditional curriculum did not include 20th century advances such as Einstein’s Theory of Relativity or nuclear, atomic, and quantum physics, Kruzan set about re-designing a more inclusive course that would expand students’ comprehension of the subject. “Before, AP Physics was about solving problems, being reactive. Now the course allows for the class to talk and think like actual physicists.” By thinking “Beyond AP,” Kruzan led an evolution of the entire Wellington science program. Now students benefit from a spiraling curriculum in which a foundation of all the sciences is laid out in the first two years of upper school, allowing for more in-depth study of subjects of their choosing in later years. By senior year, many students participate in field research at major universities to further explore their individual interests.

Kruzan’s next great challenge involved developing an effective tool for measuring and understanding student engagement, or MUSE (see page 10), with Head of School Robert Brisk P ’13 ’15. The idea began with Brisk posing the question of how to best ensure that all students were fully engaged, in his words “challenged and loving it.” So Kruzan went to work designing software that would allow students to submit ‘dot plots’ for each of their classes onto the engagement grid with the ability to then aggregate and analyze the data. “DotPlots allow us to differentiate between mid-level and high-level engagement,” he explained. “It will give teachers insight as to what things they can do to improve in the classroom.” Kruzan has also created a PeerView app with Assistant Head of School Jeff Terwin, who describes it as playing “a huge part in academic technology development as a means to improve teaching.” Beyond Wellington, Kruzan takes every opportunity to golf because it is a sport that exercises his mind just as much as his body. “Every single time you go out, it’s a whole new day,” he said. “No matter how well you shot the day before, your habits can always come

back. You have to concentrate. It’s mentally competitive, but also a great time to spend with friends. You can’t beat it.” The classroom provides Kruzan with a similar sense of fulfillment. He is excited to teach the digital game design course because it incorporates so many different elements of art, design, and math. The coding required in game design is another act of creation not unlike the woodworking he enjoys in his spare time. The same creativity used in designing a table or chair can also be applied to physics. “In physics, you have to think beyond current understanding,” said Kruzan, who readily embraces failure as his greatest learning experience, “and that requires creativity. In high school you try to make science accessible and help students see the impact they can have if they continue moving forward. “Students will sometimes say they can’t do something because they aren’t as smart as the teacher. That’s not true. I always tell them not to confuse experience with intellect. The greatest contributions in the field of physics have been from people in their 20s, not the older generations. What science needs is outside the box thinking and young people contribute that.”

PICTURED Left: John Kruzan 1: Kruzan woodworking in his home workshop. 2: Kruzan teaches digital game design.

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FE ATURE

“I don’t know of any other school like Wellington. The benefits of being a student here are enormous.” Matthew Xin ’16 AT THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY’S LOVETT-RACKE LABORATORY

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The Xin Perspective When Wellington senior Matthew Xin was in middle school he went on a field trip to Nationwide Children’s Hospital that ignited his curiosity about medicine. It was a moment he will always remember as it has guided his choices of advanced study through high school. Now in his final year at Wellington, Xin is already contributing to the field of science as a research assistant at Lovett-Racke Laboratory, Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity at The Ohio State University. Xin’s work involves the molecular analysis of genes uniquely expressed by encephalitogenic t-cells. “Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, primary in the brain and spinal cord, and mediated by certain immune cells,” Xin said. “However, as the cause of multiple sclerosis is currently unknown, one of the first steps is identifying a pathway to stop its development. “Currently, it is thought that t-cells in the immune system are heavily involved in causing the development and progression of the disease. There are certain genes that are expressed at different levels when comparing an encephalitogenic t-cell (one that causes disease) and a healthy t-cell. These differentially expressed genes in the encephalitogenic t-cells are potentially responsible for the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, so current research involves characterizing the role of these select genes. The goal is to determine whether the absence of these genes in the cell causes a change in the disease state – whether changes in the expression of these genes can stop the disease from developing. This research is unique because no one has ever done it before. I often get to see the people we can

help. I know what the disease does and also what life can be like without it.” Xin’s commitment to helping others drives his pursuit of academic excellence. A voracious learner, this Wellington lifer always comes to class prepared to work hard and be challenged. Math teacher Michelle Neely was impressed with Xin’s ability to appreciate an intriguing problem as well as possess the thought necessary to solving it. “He simply loves learning and intellectual conversation,” Neely said. “He finds you in the hallway, in the commons or in the dining room with good questions and sincere interest in knowing all that he can learn from you. In so many ways, Matthew is more like a graduate student than a senior in high school.” Indeed, Xin’s relentless pursuit of knowledge and mastery have served him well in all his endeavors. A competitive swimmer, he fits in practice around an already full schedule of classes and afternoons spent in the lab at OSU. Having gone to districts with the Wellington swim team, Xin takes athletics just as seriously as academics. “Exercise always puts me in a better mood,” he said. “It makes potentially stressful things less impactful.” Music is another way for Xin to unwind, having played the piano for 11 years now. He also enjoys playing golf and tennis with friends, reading books, and watching movies. Perhaps the activity most important to him outside of school is his volunteer work. He teaches technology and ESL classes to senior citizens in National Church Residences facilities and was named National Volunteer of the Year in 2014 by the organization. “Matthew exhibits such commitment and maturity,” NCR service coordinator Marilyn Cross said. “He is a busy high school student,

and yet he shares his time and truly makes a very big difference in the lives of those he teaches… and the United States has five more citizens, thanks to him.” Xin is also a member of LASER (Latino & Latin American Space for Enrichment and Research), a program at OSU aimed at promoting diversity and inclusion. Originally designed for undergrad students to work with underfunded schools in Ohio, Wellington students wanted to help as well. Xin tutors and mentors high school students, working with them on time management and study tips. “These students have given me a new perspective on a different kind of life,” Xin said. “They have a lot to handle. I feel like I learned more from them than they have from me.” Mary Potter P ’01 ’04, Wellington middle school language arts teacher, remembered Xin’s early propensity for intellectual conversation with classmates and teachers alike, as well as his drive to make the seemingly impossible possible. When faced with a challenge, she recalled, Xin always answered with a resounding “I can do that!” and then made good on his word. The value of great teaching is not lost on this future medical student. Always quick to express gratitude for the support he has received from Wellington faculty, Xin feels deeply connected to the school and appreciates the many opportunities afforded to him in a community focused on following individual interests. He is also confident that the strong friendships he has made here will last a lifetime. “I don’t know of any other school like Wellington,” he said. “The benefits of being a student here are enormous.”

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A CLOSER LOOK

CREATIVE FREEDOM IN THE CLASSROOM Ask a Google employee about Genuis Hour and he or she will likely tell you it is their most productive time of day. A company-wide initiative focused on providing a happier, more creative, and productive work environment, employees are able to spend up to 20% of their time dedicated to projects they’re interested in and passionate about. Lower school teachers Gina Spicer P ’24 ’26 and Debra Parkes P ’26 ’28 have introduced a similar concept to Wellington students. Piloting a new class called iTime, Spicer and Parkes guided 4th graders on a journey following their passions and developing individual thinking. Soon all lower school students will participate. Students were encouraged to choose a topic that resonated with them

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and were then asked to research and design a project that would later be presented to teachers and classmates. The variety of chosen subjects reflects the vast interests of young minds given creative freedom. Robotic arms for painting, oceanography photography, DNA, and hoverchair technology were just a sampling of the self-directed projects students selected. “We want to make sure students are contributing to their communities,” Parkes said. “Our goal is to help students become ethical citizens with empathy as well as good communication and collaboration skills so they may fully contribute to the community and to the world.” During the process of discovery, research, and implementation, students have a sense

PICTURED Sam Breyfogle ‘24 designed a robotic arm

of control, competence, and purpose; all qualities likely to motivate and promote student independent learning and increased engagement. The skills they develop through iTime are also congruous with the work they will one day do in middle and upper school with their independent science research or comparable field of study. “iTime mirrors the underlying philosophies and mission of The Wellington School,” Spicer said. “It provides students the freedom to learn and grow at their own pace in a safe and encouraging learning environment. As we continue to explore pedagogy and gather data on what motivates students, it will be fascinating to see what they choose and how motivated they will be to work on their chosen project. The sky’s the limit.”


What Is Pos Ed? by Laura Cooke ‘90 P ‘21 ‘21 ‘24 ‘27

Wellington has always been a school focused on developing the whole child. A school where developing character is as important as academic success.

I know this because I attended The Wellington School from the day it opened. Back then, the saying was “no put downs” when teaching middle school children how to get along. Today, teachers use different words but with the same concept. For example, lower school shares a wise word of the month about character and both lower and middle school use experts like Jim Bisenius to supplement teaching. When I first picked up Martin Seligman’s book “Flourish,” there was an immediate connection to what happens at Wellington. Dr. Seligman founded positive psychology in 1998 to focus on the 80% of the population that was not being served by the field of psychology. These individuals were not experiencing ailments but, according to Dr. Seligman, they also were not flourishing. He challenged the field of psychology to increase its focus on what makes life worth living. The Wellington administrative team read “Flourish” in February of last year and spent time discussing how Wellington helps students develop a sense of well-being. We were excited about PICTURED the Geelong school, Left: Laura Cooke, Erin Noviski, and featured in the their cohorts from the book for founding Institute of Positive Education. Positive Education. Head of School Rob Brisk and I joined the Institute for Positive Psychology and attended the 4th World Congress on Positive Psychology in June 2015. As I began to research the field in the United States, it became very clear there weren’t any schools in our country that had implemented the practice like Geelong. The only way to truly learn about Seligman’s approach was to visit the school where he spent six months working with faculty to develop Positive Education. Head of Middle School Erin Noviski and I began our adventure on September 18 when we travelled 33 hours to Melbourne, Australia. When we landed on September 20, we had a flat white (the best coffee in the world) and drove to the koala sanctuary on what felt like the wrong side of the road. We saw kangaroos, dingos, kookaburras, wallabies, and wombats. We also got to pet a Koala which was amazing! THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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PICTURED Left: Dining Hall at Geelong Grammar School 1: Jirrahlinga Koala Wildlife Sanctuary 2: Erin Noviski and Laura Cooke on Great Ocean Road 3: Institute for Positive Psychology 4: Geelong, Victoria

The next morning we headed out to begin our boarding experience at The Geelong School. Geelong was founded in 1855 and is one of the largest boarding schools in all of Australia with about 1500 students and 450 staff. Prince Charles attended Geelong along with many other dignitaries. When we arrived, Erin and I headed straight to class at the Institute for Positive Education. As we received our notebooks and nametags, we quickly learned we were the only attendees from the United States. The only other non-Australian attendees were two people from Taiwan and a few from New Zealand. As we later learned, Positive Education has been spreading quite fast across Australia in public, private, and Catholic schools. In fact, many of the people attending the course had titles such as Director, PosEd or PosEd Coordinator. But, the United States has shown little interest. Wellington is on the cutting edge of this exciting field. Geelong started the Positive Education program in 2008. They were looking to build a new gym and a donor prospect challenged the administration to think bigger about a true wellness program. Suicide rates across the world among teens are astronomical and we all know of a teen who has struggled with drugs, alcohol, stress, body image, selfharm, anxiety, and depression. These issues compelled the donor to challenge Geelong to think more broadly. Geelong Grammar School invited Martin Seligman and several members of his team from the University of Pennsylvania to spend time at the school and work with administrators to develop a program. Geelong Grammar School defines Positive Education as bringing together the science of Positive Psychology with best practice teaching and learning to encourage and support schools and individuals within their communities to flourish.” In 2008, Dr. Seligman and Dr. Karen Reivich, along with a team of experts trained

100 staff for nine days in Positive Psychology. In 2009, the school piloted a 7th grade and a 10th grade program, each of which had very favorable results, including improved academic results. Many more staff were trained in 2009. Today, all of the Geelong faculty and staff receive intensive training. As Stephen Meek, Principal Geelong Grammar School, wrote in the introduction to the “Positive Education” textbook, “Great schools get even better because they have a vision and are prepared to take risks. They see society’s problems and they take the lead by doing something about them.” Further reinforcement that Positive Education helps prepare students for life comes from a study published in 2011 by Durlak and Suldo which found that student well-being has profound benefits for student engagement, commitment, concentration, motivation, and overall learning. The training was broken into 10 units including Positive Emotions (positivity), Positive Engagement (flow), Positive Relationships (active constructive responding), Positive Purpose (making a difference), Positive Accomplishment (mindsets), Character Strengths, and Positive Health (resilience). The schedule consisted of lecture and time for self-reflection and discussion in smaller groups. All of the lessons were based on research from many world renowned psychologists including Carol Dweck, Barbara Fredrickson, Sonja Lyubomirsky, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Felicia Huppert and many more. Throughout the training, there were many mindfulness lessons, such as meditation. I learned more in four days than I have learned in many years combined. The lessons were fruitful for both my personal growth and in thinking about how Wellington could implement a positive education curriculum. Geelong’s entire school community has embraced positive education. Students experience at least one hour of direct THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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positive education learning each week; teachers receive continual reinforcement in staff meetings and trainings; parents take either a six week course or a more intensive one week course. It is embedded in all of the community. It is a way of life at Geelong Grammar School. The experience of residing in an Australian boarding school is one I will never forget. We ate our meals in a dining hall that reminded me of Harry Potter. The school food was refined, including salmon and lamb rump. Although they speak English in Australia, I had to raise my hand on multiple occasions

to ask them to define the word they were saying – “kindy” is kindergarten, “runners” are jogging pants, “trackies” are running shoes, and “tuck” is food. As Wellington looks to formalize a wellness program of our own as part of the recently adopted Strategic Plan, I am excited we have the knowledge and experience from the world’s founders of Pos Ed. And, I am grateful for the personal life-changing experience to learn about this exciting topic.

“Great schools get even better because they have a vision and are prepared to take risks. They see society’s problems and they take the lead by doing something about them.” ~ Stephen Meek, Principal Geelong Grammar School

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THE WELLBEING CLUB

Imagineering a Better World

Over the summer, as part of Wellington’s focus on well-being, Laura Cooke ’90 P ’21 ’21 ’21 ‘27 and Doug Smith worked to create a pilot course for upper school students. The Well-Being Club: The Science and Skill of Well-Being is a course designed and co-taught by Cooke, Director of Projects and Upper School Teacher and Doug Smith, author of “Happiness: The Art of Living with Peace, Confidence and Joy.” Smith is also a very accomplished business man having served as the Chairman and CEO of Best Brands and Kraft Foods Canada among other roles in his career before graciously donating his time to work with Wellington students. The purpose of the course is to increase the understanding and practice of the skills that lead to a joyful, meaningful, fulfilling life. Fourteen juniors and seniors meet bi-weekly over lunch to discuss readings, research, and experience related to the skills of happiness. Smith has outlined 13 skills in his book, which are very similar to the teachings at the Institute for Positive Psychology in Australia. The skills are as follows:

PICTURED ABOVE Doug Smith, former CEO Best Brands and Kraft Foods Canada and author of “Happiness: The Art of Living with Peace, Confidence and Joy”

PAST

PRESENT

FUTURE (“FOFO”)

1. Forgiveness 3. Doing now what I am doing now

10. Faith

2. Gratitude

4. Honoring mind/body/ spirit

11. Optimism

5. Being altruistic

12. Flexibility

6. Thinking with abundance 13. Openness 7. Mastering our stories 8. Finding meaning/purpose 9. Cherishing relationships

Students were given a survey before starting the class that measured their happiness and a survey will be given at the completion of the class to determine changes.

The current world population of 7.3 billion is expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030, 9.7 billion in 2050 and 11.2 billion in 2100, according to a new United Nations report, “World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.” “Understanding the demographic changes that are likely to unfold over the coming years, as well as the challenges and opportunities that they present for achieving sustainable development, is key to the design and implementation of the new development agenda,” said Wu Hongbo, UN Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs. Wellington middle schoolers will be doing their part to tackle the myriad of challenges we face in the world today and expect to encounter in the future with the guidance of student engagement grant recipient Berc Backhurst. After learning about the United Nations Global Goals for Sustainable Development, which cover issues such as poverty, hunger, health/well-being, inequalities, and sustainable communities, 6th graders further researched the topics to create sculptures that expressed, and also taught, the Global Goals. They also worked with LifeCare Alliance, the non-profit organization that runs Meals On Wheels, AniWheels, a senior dining center, and a senior wellness center. Each student received a profile of a volunteer, a senior citizen, or family member of someone receiving Meals on Wheels. “The class then conducted

PICTURED Rhea Singh ‘22, Macy Croft ‘22

individual mock interviews with each other from the perspective of the stakeholder or beneficiary profile,” social studies teacher Berc Backhurst said. “This allowed students to gain deeper empathy of, and understanding for the variety of people impacted by LifeCare Alliance. The students then identified the needs of these senior citizens, their family members, their pets, and the organizations’ volunteers. In order to systematically deconstruct and discuss the results from the mock interviews, students utilized Harvard University’s Project Zero ‘thinking routines’ in small group discussions.” Eighth graders have also been discussing the Global Goals and the iLab design team worked together to create an interactive installation that communicates the UN Global Goals to the Wellington community. In their Explorers of the World class, 5th graders will research topics based on their own interests related to the UN Global Goals and search for solutions to these real world problems. Students will also have the opportunity to work with and learn more about the Sinkam Charles Foundation, a health clinic in Cameroon founded by the father of Wellington parent Dr. Patrick NanaSinkam P ’23. Backhurst is excited to see where the student engagement initiative will lead. “This will provide middle schoolers the opportunity to design solutions that will have a direct global impact.” THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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PICTURED: 1: Aidan Guiou ‘21, Lu Godfrey ‘21 at the National Museum of The American Indian in Washington, D.C. 2: Chandler James ‘16, Henry Gottschlich ‘18, J.T. Seitz ‘17, Will Taylor ‘16, Matthew Croft ‘17 in Yukatan 3: Upper school strings students

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4: Katie Humphrys ’22, Leroy Dannemiller ’22, Madeline Paull ’22 5: Eighth graders in Toronto

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6: Matthew Dittrick ’24, Alexis Kennedy ’24, Sanjan Shanker ’24 7: Seventh graders in the Governor’s Palace Ballroom in Colonial Williamsburg 8: River Kaser ’27, Ryder Horan ’27 9: Abigail Noritz ’23

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10: Upper school students in Yukatan 11: Jaedyn Gaines ’19 12: Julia Doran ’16, Anchi Hall ‘26, Ellegra Brown ‘26 13: Alexandria Parsons ’20 at the Thanksgiving Assembly 14: Angelina Zhu ’30, Zahara Rich ’30, Oliver Alonso-Taub ’30 15: Ashley Schaffer ‘21, Reagan Kadlic ‘21, Elowen Conley ‘21, Trinity Scott ‘21 at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

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FE ATURE

Hyzdu Can Do Each year, approximately 30,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported. However many more suffer due to the difficulty in diagnosing the condition. Wellington senior MadJo Hyzdu struggled for years with increasingly debilitating symptoms before learning the reason why. “I had migraines, arthritis, and chronic inflammation,” she said. “I struggled with anxiety because stress would cause my pain to flare up. But my teachers were very understanding. There’s no question I couldn’t have gotten through this without the amazing support of my parents and teachers.” 24

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The level of empathy and understanding that Hyzdu encountered during her own battle with Lyme disease has generously been paid forward, with her work as a research assistant at the Barbara Gracious Laboratory in the Center for Innovation in Pediatric Practice at Nationwide Children’s Hospital where she is focused on holistic treatments to benefit children with asthma. Hyzdu credits Wellington’s Independent Science Research program, in which students spend their senior year conducting a deep exploration of a topic of their choosing, for helping her discover a passion

for research and the opportunity to combine it with her interest in nutrition. The upper school science curriculum has further augmented Hyzdu’s pursuit of a career in medicine one day. “My favorite class right now is immunology and infectious diseases,” she said. “I love the material because it applies to my research at Children’s. This is a college class that I get to take in high school. When I talk to med students about my classes at Wellington, they’re always shocked that we’re learning the same things.” Likewise, Hyzdu has gained incomparable professional experience outside of the classroom. Having worked with patients, collected data, and contributed to the writing of

a proposal to the FDA to seek permission for a new clinical trial, she has accomplished more than most high schoolers could ever imagine. “I once doubted being able to get through med school,” she shared. “But now, after my internship, I feel like I can handle just about anything. After presenting my research at Children’s to a room full of grad students and doctors, I feel confident talking to anyone.” It is also Hyzdu’s relentless work ethic that drives her to excel in spite of any medical setbacks she may be experiencing. Her ISR mentor and Wellington Research Coordinator Dr. Brandon Sullivan finds Hyzdu a joy to work with. “She tackles projects intensely with detail, pride, and compassion; yet carries herself


through the day with a refreshing grace and kindness,” he said. “She is a pleasure to talk to and is inspiring to stand back and watch.” Mentorship is clearly important to Hyzdu who has coached little league football and volunteers at The Ronald McDonald House. “I like sharing my own experiences and struggles with young kids. I want to be a role model for others.” Having played little league football herself for many years, as well as basketball and lacrosse, Hyzdu also enjoys singing in her church choir and looks forward to continuing her involvement in theatre in college. She is a natural role model for all young people in that she has never let anything, including her medical condition, stand in the way of leading the kind of life that others find uplifting. “MadJo is someone who cares about social issues and her community because she has a deep and abiding sense of what is actually just and right in this world,” said math teacher and advisor Mark Nandor P ’15 ’19. “She has worked incredibly hard, and at the same time has a natural talent for mathematics; I couldn’t have asked for a student more pleasant and inquisitive. I think her greatest accomplishment as a student at Wellington was her positive attitude no matter what.”

PICTURED Left: Sarah Kaldelli ‘27, MadJo Hyzdu ‘16, Michael Dolciato ‘27 Above: Hyzdu presents her FDA proposal at Nationwide Children’s Hospital

LOWER SCHOOL TALKS NUMBERS Math education is undergoing an important transformation as number sense, the understanding of patterns and relationships of numbers within the context of different operations, is proving to lead to greater understanding than mere rote memorization. Four years ago, Head of Lower School Jill Webb began researching and consulting with top professors in math education to determine what role math facts play on the continuum of comprehension. When Stanford University’s Jo Boaler emerged as a top thought leader in mathematics education, Webb worked with her to develop an implementation plan at Wellington. “The goal was to create rich and regular opportunities for students to wrestle with difficult problems to find meaning, patterns, and strategies for workable solutions,” Webb said. In addition to the Everyday Math curriculum that lower school students continue to learn, they now have number talks in class that open the door to flexible thinking and treat math as an inquiry subject as opposed to memorization. During the talks, students all consider one problem and discuss aloud various relationships the numbers have to each

other as the teacher records on chart paper or a smart board, their thinking, allowing everyone in the class to find visual evidence of critical patterns. Lower school teacher Erica Foster is excited by the results. “We have found that student engagement is up,” she said. “I see children who have never liked sharing take the lead in a discussion. Talking through the problems in front of the class helps students uncover their own mistakes which then makes them feel like they’ve truly accomplished something great.” Number talks at Wellington begin informally as early as kindergarten when students first learn that a number is a symbol representing a quantity. From there, children can begin to understand relationships like addition and subtraction. The concepts will continue to strengthen students’ connection to math as they later move on to advanced courses in middle and upper school. “Our program engages students in mathematical thinking and frees them from the idea that math has no meaning,” Foster said. “Curiosity promotes their desire to know math more; creativity is a good thing.”

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A CLOSER LOOK

Writing Is Discovery “We write to discover what we think.” Joan Didion’s words hang on the door of upper school English teacher Catherine Dison’s classroom for every student to see as they enter. The quote is a powerful reminder to young writers that the act of writing is more than the mere completion of a perfunctory assignment. For Wellington students, writing is discovery; discovery about themselves and others. Their guides on the journey are teachers dedicated to helping students master the craft of understanding and effectively conveying that understanding to each other, all leading to a strong writing community at Wellington. “The heart of our writing program is the life of each student,” middle school language arts teacher Marianne Crowley said, “as well as a glimpse into the experiences of their peers.” Crowley and Dison have collaborated on re-envisioning the writing program at Wellington in an effort to make a more seamless transition from the 8th grade into 9th, improving success not just in future English courses but all classes. Effective communication is not just a requisite for English class alone.

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Eighth graders at Wellington are given opportunities to write fiction and poetry, but there is emphasis on essay writing in an effort to help them appreciate that form as a practical real-life skill. Providing support in other classes like social studies, writing a powerful essay can sometimes appeal to students who may not feel particularly creative. For Josh Wooddell ’20, it was challenging to find thesis statements in what he was reading as well as coming up with one of his own. “Now I understand what a thesis looks like and apply it to other classes,” he said. “I never feel stressed when I’m assigned a paper in other subjects.” Another important component to the writing program involves peer review and revision. Many times, it is easier to recognize in other pieces what needs to be done, which then leads to improvement in the student’s own writing. “Before I thought revision meant I did something wrong,” Kate Hans ’20 said, “but now I see it as a positive. I’ve come to realize that my writing will never be perfect, but I can see my growth as a writer over time.” With the focus always on progress, these young writers take ownership of their


PICTURED Veronica Poster ‘19 shares her writing with middle school students

thoughts and opinions by setting goals for themselves and, through thoughtful reflection, learn from their successes as well as failures. While Wooddell wouldn’t consider himself a writer, and Hans readily admits to enjoying it in her spare time, both students found the class liberating in different ways. Hans found that she didn’t have to switch off her creativity when writing an essay. Wooddell was surprised to realize that good writing was good writing, be it fiction, personal narrative, poetry, or essay. All 9th graders at Wellington take both English and writing classes in which the creative process lends itself to drafting non-fiction. By continuing to develop skills learned in middle school while also learning how to write research papers, students often find the creative process to be good fodder for the non-fiction writing. Dison believes that through writing poetry, students find connections where they may not have otherwise. Open workshop days in which students spend their time self-directed empowers freshmen to respect the method behind quality writing and often are driven to revise their work even more than originally assigned. “Even students who don’t consider themselves to be strong writers say they love this process,” said Dison, who writes and reads alongside her students. “I want students to become more confident and independent. All students should know they have a voice.” A reflective writing assignment in which 9th graders were asked to write a narrative essay, story, and poem, as well as create

a work of art related to a topic of their choosing, allowed students to view their subject from many different angles and reach a level of greater understanding. The skills they develop in their English classes provide Wellington students a tremendous advantage during their college application process in which compelling communication, be it in an essay or an admissions interview, enables them to truly stand out from other candidates. Mentorship is another important component in the program. Upper school class projects serve as a teaching tool for younger students when 7th and 8th graders take on the roles of audience members for the 9th graders to share their presentations. Freshmen are often revision buddies for 8th graders as well. The exchange of questions and ideas back and forth between students in various stages of development in their writing allows for improvement for both. Alfonso Botta-Lopez ’19 and Aquila Simmons ’19, both talented writers, saw their technique improve through the middle to upper school transition and agreed they felt more than prepared for any new challenges they would encounter as they delved into the upper school curriculum. They also have a deep appreciation for the outlet that writing provides for their many thoughts and feelings about life. “There’s a lot going on in my head and this helps me get it out,” Simmons said. Crowley and Dison are pleased with the positive student feedback they have received and see it reflected in the work. “We believe that everyone can learn to write well,” Crowley said. “Our program teaches students how to be true scholars.”

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FE ATURE

WELLINGTON “ALL SHOOK UP” Inspired by and featuring the songs of Elvis Presley, the upper school musical “All Shook Up” was a delightful farce in which the audience couldn’t help falling in love.

Set in 1955, the residents of a small town became all shook up when a guitar-playing roustabout rode into their lives on a motorcycle. When the mysterious stranger’s hip-swiveling and lip-curling magnetism threatened the mayor’s recently declared public decency act, the townspeople were thrown into an identity crisis of Shakespearian proportions as they learned the secret to life included leather jackets, blue suede shoes, and a cool attitude.

PICTURED Above: Keilah Causey ‘16 and ensemble 1: Ana Dorenbusch ’19, Ryan Wise ’18, Christina Armeni ’18, Serino Nakayama ’18 2: Lucie Kirk ’16, Ryan Wise ’18, Christina Armeni ’18, Ben Sierzputowski ’19 3: Andrew Davis ’19, Miranda Johnson ’17 4: Ryan Wise ’18, Christina Armeni ’18

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5: Ellora Majumder ’17, Andrew Davis ’19, Miranda Johnson ’17 6: Keilah Causey ’16, Ian Woods ’17

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7: Nathan Hay ’19, Ellora Majumder ’17, Sarah Abdelbaki ’18, Milan Parikh ’19, Ryan Wise ’18, Keilah Causey ’16, Ian Woods ’17, Sarah Schmitz ’16, Andrew Davis ’19 8: Sarah Abdelbaki ’18, Serino Nakayama ’18, Lucie Kirk ’16, Ana Dorenbusch ’19, Christina Armeni ’18, Ben Sierzputowski ’19, Milan Parikh ’19, Becky Carr ’18

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A CLOSER LOOK

Deep Dive Into Marine Biology “We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea, whether it is to sail or to watch we are going back from whence we came.” ~ John F. Kennedy

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Marine biology students gained crucial field experience this fall when they traveled to Belize and came face to face with sting rays, turtles, and sharks. With a dive hut just steps away from their sleeping quarters, upper schoolers became certified open water divers to further their study of aquatic ecosystems off the eastern coast of Central America. The trip was led by Assistant Head of School and Head of Upper School Jeff Terwin, a marine biologist himself, and gave students the rare opportunity to have a completely authentic experience as scientists studying the Caribbean. Surrounded by sharks during most of their dives, students also explored the Hol Chan Marine Reserve, a protected marine sanctuary known for massive numbers and diversity of fish, along with walls of coral, stingrays, and turtles. It was an environment filled with awe and wonder at every turn. “Is there anything more soothing than watching a sea turtle cruise effortlessly along the reef?” Terwin asked. “We also saw quite a few green moray eels during our dives. Very cool and just a little bit creepy.” Any challenges or fears these students may have had when they first took the plunge into the entirely new world of the sea paled in comparison to the lessons they learned about biodiversity and their own intrinsic place in the world. They returned from whence they came.

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ATHLETICS

AWARD WINNERS 1

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WELLINGTON SCHOOL PRIDE 1: GIRLS VARSITY SOCCER Emma Ruck ‘17 All District Team, Golden Boot Award Winner 8-8-2 2: BOYS VARSITY SOCCER Connor Weber ‘17 2nd Team All-State, Offensive MVP 10-4-4 3: BOYS JV SOCCER Adam Sorrels ‘19 JV Jag Award Winner 0-10-1 4: GIRLS VARSITY TENNIS Nia Gill ‘17 District Qualifier 7-6

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5: GIRLS JV TENNIS Lucie Kirk ‘16 JV Jag Award 7-6 6: GIRLS VARSITY GOLF Regan Price ‘16 R.O.A.R. Award Winner 6th place team finish sectional tournament 7: BOYS VARSITY GOLF Chris Doody ‘16 School Record Holder, R.O.A.R. Award Winner Sectional Team Champions, District Team Runner-Up

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8: BOYS JV GOLF Matt Strasser ‘17 JV Jag Award Winner

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9: GIRLS MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCCER Eli Burkhardt ‘20 Coaches Award Winner 5-7-1 10: GIRLS MIDDLE SCHOOL TENNIS Alexis Burkhalter ‘22 No. 2 singles, 8-1 individual record 10-7 11: MIDDLE SCHOOL GOLF Aidan Schumer ‘20 3rd place individual finisher in Central Ohio Middle School Tournament 4th place team finish at Central Ohio Middle School Tournament 12: BOYS 7/8 SOCCER Josh Wooddell ‘20 Coaches Award Winner 11-7

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ATHLETICS

THE VEGAS SISTERS

NEVER GIVE UP When Isabella ’19 and Olivia ’22 Vegas aren’t excelling at Latin and French or writing and math at Wellington, they dominate the tennis courts around Columbus. These sisters are a double threat as standout players on their respective teams. “The Vegas girls are an incredible picture of hard work on and off the court and how all programs benefit from the pipeline,” Coach David Drees said. “While they are small in stature, both possess drive and determination that benefit them on the court far beyond sheer skill.” Having played the sport for several years now, Isabella and Olivia tried several different activities before finding a perfect fit in tennis for their personalities. “I like that it’s both mental and physical,” Isabella said. “It’s not just about sheer strength. You have to outsmart your opponents.” For Olivia, tennis provides an outlet for a frustrating day. “It’s a great sport when you’re angry and can the hit the ball hard. I like playing better when I’m mad, so I can benefit.” During the course of the season, the girls’ strengths, both in body and mind, were apparent. At sectionals, Isabella was down and, according to Coach Drees, on the brink 34

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of succumbing to a formidable foe, when she was able to dig deep and gut out point after point. “I played the 4th seeded girl and won the third set tie break,” Isabella recalled. “I often struggle with the mental game, but I was really proud of myself for pulling off that match.” Olivia also had a hard season in which her resiliency was tested. She played a much higher level opponent early in the season and lost by a wide margin. But when the girls middle school tennis coach Savan asked her to play the same opponent in a rematch, Olivia did not hesitate. Both girls like the feeling of supporting the team through their individual efforts. Olivia was a member of the White team that finished with 8 wins and 3 losses. She played number one singles and finished with 4 wins and 6 losses overall. Isabella helped the girls upper school team finish the season 7-6. The love and comradery the girls have for their fellow players seems a natural extension of their closeness as sisters. They like to spend time together baking whenever they can, and both share a love for singing and foreign languages. The sisters also share an interest in pursuing careers in medicine. Undoubtedly, their formidable work ethic will

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serve them well in any pursuit they follow. “You can coach form and strategy,” Coach Drees said. “It’s much harder to coach determination and a will to win. These girls’ contribution to the tennis program will have far reaching effects. They set the bar for what off-season work looks like, what freshman influence and contribution can and should be, as well as how to never give up.”

PICTURED ABOVE Isabella Vegas ‘19 PICTURED BELOW Isabella ‘19 and Olivia ‘22 Vegas

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First Time Soccer Player Displays Promise and Potential

When 8th grader Noah Jones-Beyene’s friends on the middle school soccer team told him he was fast enough to join them, he decided it might be fun to try despite having never played. He was right about the fun but didn’t anticipate becoming the break out star of the team. “I had always played basketball,” he said. “It was a little awkward in the beginning learning all the rules for soccer, but the team and the coach were really supportive.” Similar to his experience taking Latin for the first time last year and picking it up quickly in a class where he felt supported by his peers and his teacher, Jones-Beyene lost little time becoming the best possible player he could be. He remembered the significance of the first goal he scored. It was at a game against Columbus Academy and ended PICTURED Left: Noah Jonesup being the gameBeyene ‘20 winning goal for Wellington. The team ended the season with an 11-9 record with Jones-Beyene the high scorer. He considered the game against Groveport Madison in the semi-finals to be one of his favorite moments of the season. Wellington was losing 2-0 but ended up winning with a few well-aimed penalty kicks. “It felt good,” he said. “I definitely want to play soccer in high school.” Assistant Athletic Director Phil Gross was impressed with Jones-Beyene’s excellence on the field. “He is a remarkable young athlete, who worked really hard throughout the season to become a better soccer player. He has a very bright future ahead of him.” The Middle School Boys Blue soccer team ended their season with a record of 11 wins and 7 losses. They claimed victory over Groveport in a similar fashion to the middle school girls, by way of PK shootout. They dropped their final game of the season to tournament champion, Worthington Christian.

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ATHLETICS

Achieving Goals a Priority for Soccer Team

The girls varsity soccer team had an outstanding season with a record of 8-8-2, the best in five years. “The program has made tremendous strides this year,” Athletic Director Lindsey Smith P ’26 said. “Just three short years ago we hardly had enough girls to carry a team and this year we had 22 girls on our roster. The leadership and commitment of the current junior class has really helped drive this program forward.” Captains Maddie McClinchie ’17, Emma Ruck ’17, and Abbey Mayne ’16 were natural

PICTURED Above: Taylor Adams ‘17 Right: Lauren Kannally ‘19

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leaders and role models for the entire team. “We get along really well,” Ruck said. “As a team, we had a lot of dinners and sleepovers, so we developed strong bonds to take out on the field with us.” It was that sense of comradery and closeness that saw the team to a strong performance even in the trickiest of games, including a harrowing tie with Bexley after coming back from being down. Advancing to districts, the team defeated Marion Pleasant in the first round of the tournament by a margin of 3-0. They lost their second round game to Fairbanks, bringing their season to an end. The team had four players pick up AllDistrict Honors. Emma Ruck was selected to the First Team, Jakaysha Williams and Annie Taylor were named Second Team, and Abbey Mayne was named Third Team and played in the Senior All-Star game.

“These girls were passionate about the game of soccer, their teammates, and creating a fun, inclusive, and competitive environment,” Smith said. “They demonstrated resiliency through a rebuilding phase and are reaping the reward of their efforts. This season they captured eight victories and a first round tournament victory. With 10 returning starters, the future looks very bright!”


Sara recently signed a book contract with the University of California Press for a critical edition of the novel. In addition, she has been awarded a Special Projects Grant ($10,000) from The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution that will allow her to focus on her research in the next academic year.

Alumni News THE CLASS OF

1989

Cynthia Callender Dungey returned to Wellington in May to hear research presented by Alex Tobin ’15 (center). Cynthia was joined by John Kulewicz P ‘12, Caiti Olberding ‘15, Dan Dodd (former state representative and Executive Director of the Ohio Association of Independent Schools), and Robert Brisk P ’13 ’15. THE CLASS OF

1990

David Efland is currently the Planning and Community Development Director for the City of Delaware. He was recently featured in the Columbus Business First “People to Know” section. David was interviewed about what his agency is doing to ease the regulatory burden on local businesses, what changes he sees for businesses happening in government over the next five years, and how business activity relates to his agency.

THE CLASS OF

1991

THE CLASSES OF

1991 & 1993

THE CLASS OF

1996

Nick and Tommy Gallo, owners of Gallo’s Food Group, plan to open a new Powell location by the end of February 2016. A menu expansion has led to increases in sales at the Olentangy and Upper Arlington locations. Gallo’s Kitchen & Bar was recently named one of Columbus’ best 15 restaurants. THE CLASS OF

Becca Blackwell was awarded the Doris Duke Impact Award in 2015 in theatre. The Doris Duke Performing Artist Awards is a ten-year program undertaken by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, in partnership with Creative Capital, to empower, invest in, and celebrate artists by offering flexible, multi-year funding as a response to financial challenges unique to the performing arts and to each grantee. Launched in 2011, the awards program supports individual artists in contemporary dance, theatre, jazz and related interdisciplinary work.

1994

Sara Schwebel is currently working on a project with the Channel Islands National Park. The project will link the National Park Service with children’s literature through a multimedia website and cuttingedge interdisciplinary research centered on the popular book “Island of the Blue Dolphins,” which has taught generations of schoolchildren California history and the mythic trope of the “vanishing American Indian.”

Elizabeth Blount McCormick was chosen as the 2015 Progressive Entrepreneur winner at the Smart Women Breakfast in October. Elizabeth was also named as a 2016 Women WELDing the Way calendar honoree. Each year, Women for Economic and Leadership Development (WELD), names a diverse group of 12 women in the central Ohio community who are high-impact leaders within their organizations and support the leadership and development of other women. According to WELD’s announcement, these women also are chosen for their reputation for giving back to the community in time, talent or resources, and for supporting the growth of other women-owned businesses. Continued on next page THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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ALUMNI THE CLASS OF

THE CLASS OF

1997

2002 & 2004

Mikaela Howie spent four months monitoring seabird populations on the remote island of Aiktak in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Mikaela, along with one additional field biologist, lived by themselves in extreme isolation from the outside world while conducting this research. The name Aiktak comes from the Unangan word Aikhag, which means, “going on a voyage.” View her story about a voyage of personal discovery in one of the most remote corners of the globe at https://vimeo. com/126965030.

Jim Wallingford and his family were featured in a news article in Muskogee, Oklahoma in May 2015 when they found a huge fish in their front yard following heavy rain that caused both the pond and the stream in their back yard to flood.

THE CLASS OF

1999

Marissa Geier got married in August in beautiful Sonoma County, California. It was a festive weekend – with so many friends and loved ones, food and drink, gorgeous scenery, and lots of dancing. Maria Bain Ferraro ’99 stood by Marissa’s side on her special day. THE CLASS OF

2001

Ryan Martin was named as the Assistant Coach of FC Cincinnati, a new professional soccer team set to debut in 2016 as a part of the United Soccer League (USL).

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Ned Young married Meghan Gouldin (now Meghan Gouldin Young) in Richmond, VA, on April 18. He said, “I have definitely out kicked my coverage.” Other Jags there included his best men, Mac Young ’12 and Jim Wallingford ’01, Groomsman Ryan Martin ’01 as well as Jud Johnston ’01 and Jordan Kilbury ’01. Since undergrad, Ned has been working at mostly midsized, high-growth companies with brief stints at Bain & Co. and at Harvard Business School for his MBA. Currently, he is at Zipcar and happy to grab a beer with anyone else in Beantown!

James and Duncan Forbes are business partners at North Country Charcuterie, a family owned company that includes their mother Jane Forbes P ’02 ’04. North Country Charcuterie handmakes cured meats in Columbus, OH. They use heritage breed pork from nearby farms, cure everything at The Commissary, an inspected, certified commercial kitchen and source 99% of our ingredients from Ohio makers including craft beer, cheese, wine, spices, and homegrown herbs.

Ciara McDermott married Thomas Happel Scurry of Columbia, SC on August 15, 2015 in Charleston, SC. They went on a honeymoon trip to Portugal and reside in Charleston where Ciara is an ICU nurse and FNP Student and Thomas is an Attorney at McAgnus, Goudelock, and Courie. Jessica Lane Witzky welcomed her baby girl, Finnley Ann, into the world on Sunday, August 16 at 3:36 a.m. She weighed 7 lb. 14 oz. and was 20 inches long. THE CLASS OF

THE CLASS OF

2003

2006

Ashwin Lakhi was married in May 2015.

David Lesgold recently found a home for his Artisanmeat business, Salumi Couture, at the Columbus Food Hub in Summer 2015. After much research and experimenting, David has been able to create his own unique line of salumes and whole muscle cuts using heritage pork and high quality fresh spices. He was recently featured in The Columbus Dispatch.

J.J. Bain joined the Wellington team as the Data, Gift Processing, and Research Officer in August. He recently finished his second year as the Wellington boys varsity soccer coach as well.


THE CLASS OF

THE CLASS OF

Kevin Herring II has chosen to wear number 30 during his last year of college basketball at Drew University in honor of Anthony Jackson ’09. He is wearing the jersey as a “personal tribute and effort to raise awareness.”

Peter Campbell is a 2014 graduate of Boston University’s Questrom School of Business and former member of the Boston University men’s varsity swim team. After a year of teaching English in Hanoi, Vietnam, Peter Campbell traveled to Bangladesh via Burma. He is currently completing a public relations internship with the JAAGO Foundation in Dhaka, Bangladesh. JAAGO works to improve the lives of slum children for the long-term through education. His July 24 post is a rundown of Peter’s favorite haunts in Hanoi. Check out petersbigadventure.com.

2007

Jeff and Katherine Swanson were married on the two-year anniversary of the first time they said they loved each other, May 16, 2015. For the proposal, Jeff made a city-wide scavenger hunt for Katherine leaving clues at favorite hangouts and sentimental places leading up to the last clue where he proposed on the Kemah Boardwalk. Katherine and Jeff honeymooned in the Dominican Republic and are loving newlywed life in their new house. Katherine teaches English at a local high school while Jeff makes really cool spreadsheets as a chemical engineer for an industrial gases company.

2010

Alexander Jusdanis was awarded a Fulbright scholarship to do independent research in Morocco for a year this past spring.

Gus Murphy graduated from Lawrence University on Sunday, June 14, 2015, with a bachelor of music in trombone performance. He received cum laude honors for his academic record.

THE CLASS OF

2011

Abigail Kaplan is a French major with double minors in computer science and studio art at Denison University. She was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assitantship in France. Dara Love is in graduate school at Indiana U. Kelley School of business majoring in Accounting. She recently accepted a full time position with Deloitte in Los Angeles, CA where she will work in their audit department.

Jon Miller graduated in June from Dartmouth College with a Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences with honors. Jon began medical school in August at Wright State. Taiyo Scanlon-Kimurau graduated this year from Oberlin College with a double major in politics and East Asian studies. He was awarded a 10-month Fulbright research grant that has sent him to Japan to “study regional food systems as drivers of local economies.”

DOUG CARPER REMEMBERED Doug Carper ’03 passed away unexpectedly on Saturday, November 14, 2015. He was known to many for his high character, strong work ethic, and his selfless attitude. A service was held in Kilbourne with full military honors conducted by the Delaware County Veterans Association, along with a celebration of life gathering in his memory. “Even though he was only with us for two years, he immediately became a part of the Wellington family,” upper school English teacher Chris Robbins said. “He made lifetime friendships – both in the hallways and on the basketball court – and he worked diligently to take advantage of the educational opportunities at Wellington. He was a sweet young man who always seemed to have a smile on his face.”

BRETT CANDELA REMEMBERED Brett Richard Candela ‘02 passed away suddenly of an unexpected illness, on Saturday, January 2, 2016 at Riverside Hospital with his loving family and friends by his side. He was born August 1, 1983 in Columbus, Ohio to Dr. Richard and Sandy Candela. During his time at Wellington he excelled at sports, made everyone laugh, and formed friendships that lasted throughout his life. Sue Bonvallet, Candela’s former Latin teacher, said “I remember most vividly his ready smile and high energy.” THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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ALUMNI

Alumni Weekend 2015 A weekend celebrating the classes of 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010

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Alumni Weekend over the last few years has transformed into a special time full of remembrance and celebration for alumni and others in the Wellington community. This year, the festivities included a tour of the building, Founders Day, and the annual Alumni Weekend breakfast. To kick off the weekend, Sara Brdar P ’02 ’03, upper school history teacher, showed a handful of alumni and alumni parents around Wellington. They had the opportunity to see where lower and upper school students now come to learn and make memories each day, while walking down the middle school hallways that once were the home of their beloved classes. Although the outward appearance has changed, the heart of the Wellington community will always be the same. Many alumni and their families joined the annual Founders Day celebration on Friday evening. Fun for the whole family was had with bouncy houses, carnival games, homecoming soccer games, and food trucks. Two of the Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees, Bice Garcia Dolciato ’96 and Craig Mosier ’01 had the opportunity to introduce this year’s Homecoming Court. In only its second year, the Alumni Weekend breakfast at Heritage Country Club was attended by over 60 alumni, alumni parents, coaches, current students and parents, along with current and past faculty and staff. Hugs were exchanged and memories were shared as guests reconnected with old friends. Attendees enjoyed a delicious breakfast with one another before the morning festivities began.


This year, nominees were inducted into the Wellington Athletic Hall of Fame and the first Distinguished Alumni Award was presented. Bice Garcia Dolciato ’96, Craig Mosier ’01, and Ian Wagner ’11 were the three newest inductees into the Athletic Hall of Fame, bringing the total to over 40 individuals. During the breakfast, each inductee shared about their time playing or coaching at Wellington and how it has impacted their lives. Rebecca Spears Hinze ’96, Chris King ’10, and Tom Haddow were instrumental in inducting these individuals into the Wellington Athletic Hall of Fame and shared their fond memories of these three alumni. Along with the athletic awards, the first Distinguished Alumni Award was presented to Cynthia Callender Dungey ’89, a member of Wellington’s first graduating class. The purpose of the Distinguished Alumni Award is to recognize a graduate of The Wellington School for notable, significant achievement reflective of the mission of the school. Rob Brisk P ’13 ’15, Head of School, thanked Sue Bonvallet, former Latin Teacher, and the Alumni Parent Advisory Committee for recognizing the varied accomplishments of Wellington alumni and advocating that it

was time to shine a light on those who are using their talents to impact the lives of Above: Sara Brdar P ’02 ’03, Karen King P ’10 ’14, Chris others by creating King ’10, Aaron Frim P ’19 this award. After thanking these key individuals, he went on to speak about his interactions with Dungey over the last year and how she was welldeserving of this accomplishment. After receiving the award, Dungey shared with the audience about how her experience at Wellington was influential in her life and encouraged the path she chose for her life. Read more about Dungey and her time at Wellington on page 3 of this issue. Members of the Wellington community joined together over the course of two days to reminisce how Wellington has made a lifelong impact on their lives and celebrate alumni accomplishments. The weekend was a true celebration. Mark your calendar for Alumni Weekend 2016 scheduled for September 23-24.

PICTURED Left: Robert Brisk P ‘13 ‘15, Bice Garcia Dolciato ‘96, Cynthia Callender Dungey ‘89, Craig Mosier ‘01

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

Alumni Weekend 2016 FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 3 & 24

A weekend celebrating the classes of 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006, and 2011. Details to follow.

Alumni Flag Football Game Rain could not put a damper on this long standing Wellington tradition. Alumni from various years came out for an intense game of flag football on Friday, November 27. After four years of being the flag football champions, the “old” school fell to the “new” school. This will be the first year the “new” school will have their name engraved on the John Yakscoe trophy.

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ALUMNI

Senior Alumni Breakfast On the second day of school, alumni joined current seniors to share their advice on how to make the most out of senior year. Alumni raved about the guidance they received from the College Counseling staff

and urged students to take advantage of the resources Wellington provides. They encouraged the seniors to visit schools and look at all of their options. Thank you to J.J. Bain ’06, Anthony Davis ’14, Colleen Durfee

’10, Chris Noble ’10, Kim Roseler ’12, Shabach Tyus ’14, Courtney Wayman ’12, and Tanner Zaas ’11 for joining us. PICTURED ABOVE Seniors chat with Tanner Zaas ‘11

ALUMNI CELEBRATE CLASS REUNIONS Close to 20 people from the class of 2010 joined together for good food, drinks, and lots of fun for their 5 year reunion on Saturday, November 28. The class met at Hofbrauhaus, in downtown Columbus, to reminisce about their time at Wellington and to share of all their adventures since graduating from Wellington. Thank you to Colleen Durfee ’10 and Jacob Robinson ’10 for planning and coordinating such a special event.

PICTURED Above: Class of 2010 reunited at Hofbrahaus in November. Left: Nolan Frausto ‘05, Nathan Dickstein ‘05, J.J. Klabunde ‘05, Nick Ward ‘05, Joey Ross ‘05, Colin Peters ‘05

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Members of the class of 2005 from all over the country met for drinks and food at Gordon Biersch Brewery in downtown Columbus on Saturday, November 28. The evening was full of laughter, conversation, and memories of Wellington as well as updates about what everyone is doing today. Thank you to Joey Ross ’05 for helping to make this evening a huge success.


WELLINGTON ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME The Wellington Athletic Hall of Fame was established in the spring of 1997 as a way to honor those Wellington athletes who, through exceptional performance combined with outstanding sportsmanship and integrity, demonstrated an unparalleled level of achievement. It also recognizes the true “pioneers” of Wellington athletics – those early athletes who began the Varsity programs and set the standard of excellence for future athletes to follow. Its members represent the very “best of the best.”

Bice Garcia Dolciato ‘96

Craig Mosier ‘01 – Coach

Ian Wagner ‘11

VARSITY LETTERS

TEAM ACHIEVEMENTS

VARSITY LETTERS

Lacrosse 1994, 1995, 1996 Soccer 1994, 1995, 1996

District Champions District Runner-Ups State Championship Top 5 State Championship Runner-Up State Championship 2011

Tennis 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011

AWARDS AND HONORS

MVP Lacrosse 1996 High School National Lacrosse Team Player 1996 Bice Dolciato went on to play lacrosse and soccer at Gannon University, Division II, for one year and lettered her freshman year in lacrosse. She then played lacrosse at The Ohio State University and represented the Midwest on the Women’s Collegiate National Team. Since Dolciato finished playing lacrosse and soccer, she has had a very admirable coaching career. One of her greatest accomplishments is leading the Wellington girls lacrosse team to their firstever state championship in 2000.

Craig Mosier began coaching at Wellington as the assistant golf coach in 2006. Throughout his coaching career the team has had 24 tournament wins and 9 All Ohio selections. His current record is 1212-530. Mosier also serves as the President of the Central District Golf Coaches Association (CDGCA) and has been named the CDGCA Coach of the Year three times. Mosier has helped many Wellington students recognize and achieve their full potential.

AWARDS AND HONORS

MVP 2008 Coaches Award 2009, 2010 Roar Award 2011 Wellington Athlete Award 2011 All-State Boys 1st Team 2008, 2009, 2011 State Qualifier 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 Ian Wagner went on to play tennis at Emory University, where he was a four year starter in singles and doubles. He was a part of the 2012 NCAA championship team and in 2013 was a NCAA Double National Champion. He has received many awards during his time there including University Athletic Association All Academic Honors and Intercollegiate Tennis Association All Academic Scholars and was also named captain in 2014. THE WELLINGTON SCHOOL

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Class of ‘90 2nd to None by Erik Willers ’90

PICTURED TOP: Larry Forlenza, Laura (Wilkins) Cooke, Rylie McHam, Erik Willers, Ridgely (Wise) Quigley, Shyam Rajadhyaksha 1: Jeffrey Wilkins ‘94, Laura (Wilkins) Cooke ‘90, Molly (Morris) Flasche ‘90, Ridgely (Wise) Quigley ‘90, Erik Willers ‘90, David Kaucheck ‘89, Larry Forlenza ‘90, Emily (Bay) Hurst ‘92 2: Hudson Willers, Erik Willers ‘90, Patricia Willers, Rebekah Forlenza, Christian Forlenza, Mira Forlenza, Larry Forlenza ‘90

It was slightly surreal, wandering the halls of Wellington, having conversations with the same individuals as over 25 years ago. Memories, partial and incomplete, flickered through my awareness while I observed and listened to names I have not heard since I stepped from those walls in 1990. I wondered several times what it is like now for those names appearing on the lockers throughout the school, some of them my friend’s children – did they have the same type of family bond that I had with my classmates. Will they remember Wellington in the same positive way? It is funny how our memories work. I remember so many of the good times. These were monumental events in the emotional growth of my character, beginning the turn from immature boy to adult. I do not remember many of the bad times, which I know I had, but cannot pinpoint. I feel like I am such a different person – the sharp edges having been worn down over time from rubbing on other sharp objects. I am softer now, more agreeable, but not with the same fervor youth afforded to me. My wife and child have only come to know the tree which is planted in our yard while they have lived here. Swaying in the heavy winds, and maybe a limb or two broken, falling to the ground, but they love this tree which provides shade, protection, familiarity. This visit allowed my family to see the roots of that tree – where it sources nutrients – why it has continued to grow, the reason for its strength.

These travels to our past, in particular ones with such relevance, make us wonder about the trails we have forged. For me, I do not wonder if I should have established another path, but rather I question if I have seen and experienced enough on the path I walk. While visiting Wellington this fall, this path led me to a clearing, where I sat over a football game and experienced a great dinner (physically feeling happiness, non-judgmental excitement) happy for others more than for myself. I am so appreciative to Ridgely and Laura for organizing and hosting this gathering, and for all who were able to attend. I renewed bonds which never went away, only sat silently in the background overshadowed by louder more pressing needs. I miss the unions which were not there, but not forgotten.

ATTENDEES FOR THE WEEKEND:

Ridgely Wise Quigley Larry Forlenza Erik Willers Molly Morris Shyam Rajadhyaksha Rylie McHam Laura Wilkins Cooke FRIENDS FROM OTHER CLASSES WHO ATTENDED:

Emily Bay Hurst ‘92 David Kaucheck ‘89 Rob Mason ‘89 Jeffrey Wilkins ‘94

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PRESORTED FIRST CLASS US POSTAGE PAID COLUMBUS, OH PERMIT #3374

3650 Reed Road Columbus, OH 43220 614.457.7883 www.wellington.org

The Wellington School is an independent, coeducational, preschool through grade 12, college preparatory day school dedicated to preparing citizens who achieve, lead, and find fulfillment in a global community.

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