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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL YOUR ONLY SOURCE FOR REGIONAL BUSINESS NEWS | westfaironline.com

October 21, 2013 | VOL. 49, No. 42

TIES THAT BIND

FCBJ this week

PaGE 6

RENDERING UNTO HARTFORD Questions for Kevin B. Sullivan, commissioner of Connecticut’s Department of Revenue Services … 11 CROWD-SOURCED DECISIONS Joe Murtagh takes on predictive thinking … 15

Nancy Gault, William Gault, Jim Donaher and Ginger Donaher of Gault Energy & Stone.

Babe Rizzuto of Conair.

Jerry Nielsen, Sandy Nielsen Baumann, Karen Kuehler and Tami Whittier of Nielsen’s Florist.

Angela Rountos, Christopher Rountos, James Rountos and Shannon Rountos of Windmill Diner & Restaurant.

Liz Osta, Suzy Lulaj and Nagi Osta of Nagi Jewelers.

Jan Unger of Unger Enterprises.

ADVICE FOR THE THREE MAGI When bestowing gifts, it pays to know the law … 16 WINNERS CIRCLE Carissa Ganelli does the math … 17

MEDIA PARTNER Linda McMahon of World Wrestling Entertainment.

STEM sell

ZaniaC ComeS to toWn BY BILL FaLLoN bfallon@westfairinc.com

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amilla Gazal, 39, and Flavia Naslausky, 40, have much in common: Both are from Brazil; both are New York University-educated; and both are from the world of international finance. But the common element that found them recently stand-

ing amid the dust of a 2,500-square-foot construction site at 644 W. Putnam Ave in Greenwich is that both are mothers of gradeschool children — Gazal of two boys and a girl and Naslausky of two boys — and no kid of theirs is going to be deficient in the four subjects the world cares most dearly about: the STEM curriculum of science, technology, engineering and math. » STEM, page 6

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13 GREEN FLAG FOR ACA

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9

LAP OF LUXURY

Flavia Naslausky and Camilla Gazal in the future Zaniac Greenwich space on W. Putnam Avenue.

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Malloy opens legislation for public review

From left, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy; Catherine Smith, commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development; Peyman Zamani, CEO of Logicbroker; Kate Donahue, president of Hampford Research; and Steve Ford, owner of Butcher’s Best Country Market.

BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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usinesses may now have the chance get to rid of pesky state laws. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy signed an executive order Oct. 16 encouraging the public to actively engage and review all legislation more than four years old. In an address to members of the Business Council of Fairfield County at the Stamford Marriot Hotel, Malloy said he hopes to amend any laws that are now obsolete, duplicative, excessively burdensome or unnecessary. “We know a lot of regulations no longer make sense,” Malloy said. “We know that regulation is getting in the way of business.” The initiative is a part of Malloy’s efforts to streamline agency policies and procedures, officials say. In July, for the first time, all state regulations were posted online, allowing the public to view the state’s laws. Now residents will be able to provide feedback and commentary online or by email. Additionally, forums will be held across the state to instigate further discussion. Under Malloy’s order, any updates to old regulations will also need to include the authors’ clear intentions. Policy goals will need to be identified,

as well as how the regulation meets those goals. Additionally, authors must use clear language and include any of the legislation’s anticipated economic impacts, whether positive or negative.

Before 2010, the state issued support to about 119 companies per year. But with the Small Business Express loan program, hiring with STEP UP and the innovation ecosystem, some 880 small

“We know a lot of regulations no longer make sense. We know that regulation is getting in the way of business.” — Gov. Dannel P. Malloy

To a crowd of roughly 200 business leaders, Malloy touted the order as further proof of his commitment to growing the Connecticut economy. The group gathered Oct. 16 to discuss the state’s economic development initiatives. Since taking office, Connecticut has added about 1,700 jobs every month on average, he said. Through several jobs programs, the state has also significantly increased its number of loans and grants to growing companies.

2 Week of October 21, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

companies have received roughly $117 million in loans over the last two years, he said. “In doing nothing, we were doing something,” he said, noting the state’s previous hands-off approach encouraged startups to move to places like Brooklyn, said Malloy. “We said goodbye to thousands of jobs. Those days are gone.” With $350,000 in loans and grants from the Small Business Express program, Newtown business owner Steve

Ford said he was able to hire seven additional employees and quadruple his sales. Created in 2011, the Small Business Express program provides loans and grants to small businesses with fewer than 100 employees. The companies must be creating new jobs and be in fields related to either precision manufacturing, exporting, business services, green and sustainable technology, bioscience or information technology sectors. Ford said when he opened Butcher’s Best county Market four years ago, he knew there was a demand for fresh, locally sourced meat products, but he couldn’t scale his company up to meet the demand without additional help. He said his local bank was willing to help provide some loans, but it wasn’t until the state “stepped up” that his local bank stepped up, too. With the funding, he moved to a new location, expanded and hired more employees than he projected. He started with only one part-time employee. Six of the seven employees he hired were either unemployed or working part time. Now they’re each the breadwinners of their families. “I am truly grateful,” Ford said. “None of this would have happened without the assistance of the government.” The recipient of $282,000 in state support, Kate Hampford Donahue also expressed gratitude for the state’s Small Business Express program. President of Stratford-based Hampford Research Inc., Donahue said the funding allows the chemical manufacturer to hire two new engineers. The company faces stiff competition from companies in Asia that can offer lower prices. But the company stays ahead of the pack by guaranteeing its customers’ intellectual property rights are protected. Donahue said the state’s grants helped give the company the assurances it needed to pursue its hiring needs. One of the new employees had recently been laid off before joining Hampford, while the other held a position underutilizing vital skills. “This money made the difference for us to hire them and keep them in the state,” Donahue said. “We need homegrown, Connecticut talent to find high tech jobs.”


The family business, statistically speaking BY BILL FaLLoN bfallon@westfairinc.com

T

he Connecticut Business and Industry Association recently assembled a raft of family business survey findings and was expected to release them formally after press time. Peter Gioia, the CBIA’s vice president and economist, offered a preview of the findings Oct. 10 at the first FamilyOwned Business Awards in Greenwich, which the CBIA presented in conjunction with the Fairfield County Business Journal and its sister publication, WAG magazine. Gioia noted that the figures were not yet finalized. “They need one more set of eyes,” he said. Survey sponsors included First Niagara, Reid & Riege Counselors at Law and accounting, tax and advisory firm Cohn Reznick. “Through the Family Business Survey we learn more about the importance of family businesses,” Gioia said, addressing a crowd of 125 at the Arthur Murray Grande Ballroom. “But, also, we have policymakers who need to be informed.” Gioia threw a rock at the perception

of “cold-hearted corporate chieftains who have an adversarial relationship with their employees.” Rather, he said, family businesses — some 80 percent of all businesses — “tend to treat employees like family.”

Other preliminary findings of the CBIA survey included: “Skills shortage” was cited by 17 percent of respondents as their “greatest human resource challenge over the next five years,” followed in close succession

“Skills shortage” was cited by 17 percent of respondents as their “greatest human resource challenge over the next five years,” followed in close succession by developing leadership (16 percent); implementing obamacare (15 percent); and workforce shortage (14 percent). Regarding those family businesses, the 2013 family business survey data offer a portrait of resilient, long-serving business relationships among family members. Sixty-three percent of respondents have two generations working together and 12 percent have three generations. One percent have four generations involved. (One company on hand when Gioia spoke, Westport-based Gault Energy and Stone, is fifth generation.)

by developing leadership (16 percent); implementing Obamacare (15 percent); and workforce shortage (14 percent). Conflicts among family members was a low-wattage problem (6 percent). With multiple responses permitted, 68 percent of family-owned businesses are parent-child; followed in descending order by siblings (44 percent); spouses (38 percent); cousins, aunts and uncles (23 percent); and in-laws (9 percent).

yes

A THOUSAND TIMES, YES.

Succession issues met divided survey answers: 58 percent plan to pass on the business to other family members and 42 percent will look to fresh blood. As for training, the survey found 35 percent hoping for greater tech skills among their top training and development challenges in the next five years. That figure dwarfed leadership skills, which were the No. 2 concern (18 percent). The survey offers a snapshot of services as family business owners see them. Accountants are the most trusted advisers according to 44 percent of respondents, followed by their lawyers (32 percent). Bankers (5 percent) were held in the lowest esteem, trailing consultants (14 percent); wealth advisers (13 percent); and insurance brokers (9 percent). Fully 75 percent of respondents said their family-work relationships are either balanced or well balanced. Only 3 percent found the balance of work and family “very difficult.” A final question could have been germane to any enterprise: “Do you think Connecticut is friendly to your business?” The nays were 90 percent and the yeas were 10 percent.

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RAKOW FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013

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PERSPECTIVES

FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL • • • • •

A CAULDRON OF CLIMATE AND POLITICS

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he Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection recently hosted R. Andreas Kraemer, founding director of the Ecologic Institute in Berlin, Germany, to participate in DEEP’s commissioner’s lecture series in Hartford. The American political system remains unconvinced, at least universally, that manmade climate change is upon us. Skeptics should heed Kraemer, if not for the crazy weather that’s coming then for the bullets that he says will follow. He minces no words regarding climate change, saying it will have “clear physical consequences for our natural environment” and, if unchecked, will spill into the social sphere. Bad weather — droughts and floods — will garner the headlines, but Kraemer’s analysis of the region ringing the Mediterranean Sea says, “Climate change may have wider sociopolitical questions for the region.” For anyone even vaguely familiar with the historic cauldron known by the acronym MMES (Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Saharan), the prospect that things could get worse there owing to environmental stresses should be terrifying. Most of the world’s oil originates there; much of its culture was born there.

“The MMES form a region under particular threat from, among other things, changes to rainfall patterns,” Kraemer wrote in a paper titled “The Effectiveness of Policy Frameworks for Addressing Climate-Induced Risks to Human Security and Conflict.” His thoughts drive abstractions like fractions of degrees and acidifying oceans to the real world of armed revolution. “Climate change may also have wider sociopolitical consequences for the MMES region: it can undermine human security and create conflict over scarce water resources,” he says. “A new study by Ecologic Institute investigates policies that MMES countries have developed to address the physical impacts of climate change on water and examines how effective these policies are for ensuring human security and reducing conflict.” The report is based on more than 70 interviews in Ethiopia, Morocco, Israel and the Palestinian Territories, the European Union and the United Nations. It assesses “not only the effectiveness of existing measures for addressing hydroclimatic risks,” but also collects perspectives on these policies and how they should mature. In short, policy is currently a hugely mixed bag.

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Or write to: Fairfield County Business Journal 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 www.westfaironline.com

“How climate change adaptation is taken up in policy processes varies considerably across the region and is influenced by both the extent of climate change impacts and existing policy agendas,” Kraemer reports. “Climate change ranges from being viewed as marginal in comparison to existing stressors (such as the Arab-Israeli conflict for Palestinians), to being of central importance to livelihoods and national development efforts (as is the case in Ethiopia). “At the national level, there is an absence of policies that specifically address climate-related impacts on human security and conflict,” Kraemer says. “These impacts may nonetheless be addressed indirectly through other policies such as farmer insurance schemes or the integration of conflict resolution mechanisms in water management. “Expectations and demands for future policy are also to a large extent shaped by existing policy agendas: in the case of Ethiopia this is shaped by climate change adaptation; in Morocco by agricultural policy and human development; and in the Palestinian Territories by the ongoing conflict with Israel.” As the witches said in “Macbeth:” “Double, double, toil and trouble; fire burn and cauldron bubble.”

Publisher • Dee DelBello Managing Editor • Bob Rozycki Editor • Bill Fallon Administrative Manager • Alissa Frey

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Circulation and Office Manager • Sylvia Sikoutris Contracted CFO Services: Adornetto & Company L.L.C. Human Resources & Payroll Services: APS PAYROLL

Fairfield County Business Journal (USPS# 5830) is published Weekly, 52 times a year by Westfair Communications, Inc., 3 Gannett Drive, White Plains, NY 10604. Periodicals Postage rates paid at White Plains, NY 10610. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Fairfield County Business Journal: Westfair Communications, Inc., 3 Gannett Drive, White Plains, NY 10604. More than 40 percent of the Business Journal is printed on recycled newsprint. © 2013 Westfair Communications Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited

SPEAKING OF … CLIMATE “often times when you face such an overwhelming challenge as global climate change, it can be somewhat daunting – it’s kind of like trying to lose weight, which i know something about.” — Hillary Clinton

“there are plenty of problems in the world, and doubtless climate change – or whatever the currently voguish phrase for it all is – certainly is one of them. but it’s low on my list.”

— Author P. J. O’Rourke

4 Week of October 21, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

HAVE YOUR SAY We want to hear from you! Have an opinion column, letter to the editor or story idea? Send it to us! Please include your name, home or business address, email and phone number. We reserve the right to edit all submissions and publish them in print or online. EMAIL SUBMISSIONS TO BFALLON@WESTFAIRINC.COM


HCC expands ESL courses UConn Stamford scales back BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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ust as the University of Connecticut’s Stamford campus discontinues its English as a second language program, Bridgeport’s Housatonic Community College is stepping up with an expansion of its ESL, noncredit courses. For $150 dollars, students can now chose from a selection of ESL courses at HCC, ranging from early beginner to advanced English. “As a community college our main job is to serve the educational needs of the community,” said Denise Bukovan, dean of community outreach at HCC. “It happens, for a whole variety of reasons, that we live and work in an area where a third of the population is non-English speaking.” Living in a country where you don’t speak the primary language has its obvious problems, whether it’s cultural, educational or in the realm of career advancement, Bukovan said. Launched earlier this month, HCC’s four new courses begin with a basic understanding of English and move into the kind of complex skill sets needed to advance a career or pursue a degree. Each course helps students develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. About 35 students are currently enrolled, some working as far away as Greenwich. “I like everything about the class,” said Nelson Fernandez of Bridgeport. Fernandez is in HCC’s advanced level course. “I feel so comfortable and relaxed. I enjoy learning.” Bukovan said school officials decided to expand its noncredit ESL courses after launching a program to help employers teach their employees English last year. After employees spent about 80 hours of classroom time learning workrelated words in English, managers at Lex Products in Shelton said they saw a big increase in employee productivity. Employees were more confident and many expressed how much the coursework helped at home, too. “Following on an excellent experience with Lex, we decided we should be doing more to serve the English language needs of the surrounding community,” Bukovan said. “We feel like it’s kind of an obligation.” It remains to be seen why the UConn discontinued its ESL program in Stamford this spring. As of press time, UConn Spokesperson Stephanie Reitz said only that “in these days of tight budgets” pro-

grams are sometime scaled back or discontinued after evaluation. The school still operates an accredited ESL program in Storrs, however. Bukovan said running the program can be expensive, as it requires instructors and staff. But she was quick to qualify the statement, saying the school is fortunate that community members have recognized the need and are willing to pay for it. HCC’s program is funded in part by a $50,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation.

“It costs money, it does,” Bukovan said. “But people think it’s worth paying for. It’s an investment in your future. We try to offer it at a reasonable cost.” In addition to the four basic courses, the college also offers an ESL course for families, who might not otherwise go to a college campus for lessons. The school presently is arranging one-on-one programs for six families to practice every day discussions about school meetings, doctor visits and car problems.

Often non-English speaking families will use their children who know English from school as their sole interpreters, Bukovan said. It makes the parents dependent on their children for most errands. “The effect is to change the roles where the child is the head of the family for practical purposes,” Bukovan said. “The child can become the center of the family. They’re the one that interprets everything … This course is very near and dear to my heart. It’s pretty special.”

Straight up the hill and firm, Z. Yep. Got it.

Team McGladrey Golfer Zach Johnson and his caddie, Damon Green.

Power comes from being understood.SM When you trust the advice you’re getting, you know your next move is the right move. That’s what you can expect from McGladrey. That’s the power of being understood. Experience the power. Go to zachisunderstood.com or contact Tony Ceci at 203.328.7101.

© 2013 McGladrey LLP. All Rights Reserved.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013

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Family-owned, forward-thinking Work-home relations thrive; six companies stand tall

By Bill Fallon bfallon@westfairinc.com

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he full passion and scope of familyowned businesses — from restaurateurs to jewelers to auto dealers — stood to be recognized recently at the 2013 Family-Owned Business Awards, sponsored by the Connecticut Business and Industry Association (CBIA), the Business Journal and its sister publication, WAG magazine, and hosted by event co-sponsor Arthur Murray Grande Ballroom in Greenwich. The six winners from among 24 Fairfield County finalists were Conair Corp., Gault Energy & Stone, Nagi Jewelers, Nielsen’s Florist, Unger Enterprises and Windmill Diner & Restaurant. They were chosen by a panel of judges that included CBIA economist and Vice President Peter M. Gioia; Lovins Group Family Business Consulting Center principal and licensed marriage and family therapist Donald P. Opatrny; Santa Energy former CEO and Vice Chairman John S. Santa; and workplace attorney and HR counsel for CBIA Mark Soycher. (Profiles of all nominees and judges appeared in the Oct. 7 FCBJ.) An anecdote from William Gault, with his wife, Nancy, standing beside him, set the evening’s tone. “I started out helping, driving in the fields, when I was 14,” said Gault, a fourth-generation Gault family member and father to Sam Gault, the fifthgeneration president of Westport-based Gault Energy & Stone. “I think from age 5 I knew what I was going to be doing.” Asked if he had made the right choice as a small boy, the 79-year-old Gault replied, “Absolutely.” The event drew 125 to the event co-sponsor Arthur Murray Grande Ballroom in Greenwich. The keynote speaker was former U.S. Senate candidate and World Wrestling Entertainment CEO Linda McMahon. With a nod to the dysfunction in Washington, D.C., Business Journal publisher Dee DelBello introduced her by saying, “If Linda were in Washington right now, things might be different.” DelBello also noted 78 percent of jobs created in the U.S. are created by familyowned enterprises and 35 percent of the Fortune 500 companies are familyowned or family controlled. McMahon appeared a study in poise

and success, yet the backstory she shared was of bankruptcy and disappointment. “Our home was auctioned; our car was repossessed,” she said. After battling back, helping to build a 700-employee, publicly traded company — WWE — and mounting a pair of U.S. Senate bids, she said, “You build a family business with heart and mind; it’s a very special treasure.” The pride family members place in their businesses was the event undercurrent and McMahon embraced it, citing the massive banner that flies beside the Stars and Stripes at WWE headquarters in Stamford. “The WWE flag — you can’t miss it,” she said. “When you see that emblem, it’s like the McMahon family crest; it’s blood, sweat and tears.” McMahon cited a number of foibles unique to family-owned enterprises, including the personal: her husband, Vince, addressing her during a board meeting with, “So, baby …” and witnessing the warm relationship between her then 3-year-old daughter, Stephanie, and Andre the Giant, all 7’4” of him. “When he picked her up it was like something from ‘Gulliver’s Travels,’” she said. Gioia spoke to a new set of familyowned business data (see separate story, page 8) and took the assembled behind the scenes of the judging process, saying, “This was a really tough job; everybody looked great.” Soycher, another judge, said “Family ties lead to some of the greatest successes in business and to some of the greatest losses.” He has seen family businesses flaunt their ties and other family businesses hide them. One commonality, however, is the sense they are “embedded in the community,” he said. He called the nominees “a rich array of companies.” Opatrny, also a judge, concurred, saying, “Choosing the best was an impossible task, a flawed task. We live in a messy process.” Donning his counseling hat, he said it required “heroic efforts to navigate family and business responsibilities. “These are real families facing real challenges,” he said. He addressed directly the family-themed audience and said, “Without you we really don’t have a country.” Callari Auto Group joined Arthur Murray as a sponsor. Deutsch Family Wines & Spirits in White Plains, N.Y., a recognized event supporter, provided wine and Heineken USA the beer.

6 Week of October 21, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Chista Pooya and Marria Pooya

Showcase of vehicles on Lewis Street, compliments of Callari Auto Group, an event sponsor. Callari operates BMW of Darien, Volvo of Westport, Mini and Fiat of Fairfield County.

Tom Varian, Kelly Butler and Moises Guernero of Arthur Murray Grande Ballroom of Greenwich owned by Christine Georgopulo.


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Camilla Gazal and Flavia Naslausky in the future Zaniac Greenwich space on W. Putnam Avenue.

STEM — » From page 1

Zaniac — an after-school franchise with two outposts in Utah and now with one in Greenwich slated for a November grand opening — is the result. “We both have small children and we became involved with their education,” Naslausky said. “The education here is terrific, but something was missing. What was lacking, we believed, was a math curriculum that was engaging and that kids actually have fun with.” Gazal came to the same conclusion, calling the Greenwich public education “top notch,” but also saying, “More was needed in the area of mathematics. I implemented STEM studies at home and saw results. I was always a lover of numbers. Those two factors led me here.” The pop culture world of youths can be rough on the math-centric: the geek, nerd, etc. But Greenwich has embraced a more commodious relationship with numbers, according to Naslausky and Gazal. Naslausky related attending a science fair at Greenwich High School. “The kids were good looking. The guys were cool. We said, ‘Wow, this is wonderful.’” The five paid teachers at Zaniac Greenwich will be high school seniors, all the better if they play sports. “We want it

to be as good an experience for them as it is for the kids they are teaching,” said Naslausky. The women described their ideal high school teachers as “smart,” “extroverted,” “a role model for my kids” and “well-rounded.” The women hope initially to attract 100 children. Once they sign up, students are assessed and placed in groups based on levels of STEM understanding. They advance at their own pace, with “enormously active” communications with parents via assessments and notes. Curiously, perhaps, in a world of screens, “We still believe in pencil and paper,” Naslausky said. Hard-copy work will be scanned so parents can review it on their computers. Sessions are 90 minutes per week. Some students are expected to enroll in multiple 90-minute sessions. Said Gazal, “If the kids don’t ask their parents on Saturday morning, ‘Please take me to Zaniac,’ we are not doing our job right.” Zaniac Greenwich will offer four programs: Zane Math, Minecraft Exploration, LEGO Robotics and Chess Instruction. Each program is nine hours over the course of six weeks. Programs meet after school on weekdays and Saturdays and are taught in groups of no more than five children per instructor. Cost for the programs ranges from $150 to $350.

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of October 21, 2013

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a.P. Construction notches landmark ‘bettter, faSter, more CoSt effeCtive’

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tamford-based A.P. Construction Co. recently marked 20 years in business and the completion of more than $100 million of health care construction projects. A.P. Construction has worked for regional hospitals and health care facilities, including St. Vincent’s Medical Center in Bridgeport and Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. Besides hospitals, the company’s résumé includes outpatient care facilities and special-needs housing for the elderly; 15 employees are now certified health care constructors. Most recently A.P. Construction completed a 20,000-square-foot, $2.4 million renovation of Stamford Hospital’s second floor that includes upgraded rooms utilizing smart room technology, the second of its kind in the U.S., one of “numerous projects” between the hospital and the builder. St. Vincent’s Medical Center in Bridgeport hired A.P. Construction to complete a 53,000-square-foot, $18.1 million project on its operating rooms and intensive care unit, including 10 operating rooms.

Northern Westchester Hospital chose A.P. Construction for a 31,000-squarefoot, $3.3 million revamp, requiring the demolition and build-out of office space as a state-of-the-art outpatient facility. Outpatient projects for A.P. Construction include the 35,000-squarefoot, $7.9 million construction of Generations Family Health Center in Willimantic; a $4.1 million multi-phased renovation for the Westchester Medical Group in Rye, N.Y. requiring the conversion of a single-tenant office into multiple medical suites; and the $2.1 million renovation of Darien Imaging Center in Darien. A.P. Construction’s health care projects for special-needs housing for the elderly include the 64,500-square-foot, $11.6 million expansion of the Waveny Care Center in New Canaan, which includes 53 private resident rooms, an adult day care center addition and an outpatient rehabilitation gymnasium; Cedar Mountain Commons, a 78,000-squarefoot, $8.2 million, senior housing health care project in Newington; and Crescent Point, a 50,000-square-foot, $5.4 million assisted living project in Niantic.

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A new operating room at St. Vincent’s Medical Center in Bridgeport, an A.P. Construction project.

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There are 1.2 million names on www.CTBigList.com, a list of individuals, businesses and organizations who have unclaimed property held by the Office of the State Treasurer. The Office also has issued a printed publication that lists more than 54,000 new Connecticut names.

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8 Week of October 21, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Honorable Denise L. Nappier Treasurer of the State of Connecticut


Adding social oomph to luxury brands

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he Luxury Marketing Council, Connecticut-Hudson Valley Chapter gathered recently at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich for an evening panel discussion on cross-generational marketing, with a focus on social media strategies and related issues. “Our topic, ‘maintaining brand integrity through authentic, multigenerational focused strategies,’ drills to the heart of successful luxury lifestyle marketing and sets the stage for one of the important topics — social media issues and strate-

gies — that members have consistently requested that we probe,” said Kathryn Minckler, chapter co-founder. “The highest level of a luxury lifestyle brand is achieved when a brand becomes recognized as a timeless classic or right of passage, transcending different age groups and other niches. Successfully maintaining the integrity of such coveted brands is a complex and deftly creative mix of communication, art and science.” — Bill Fallon

From left, The Luxury Marketing Council, Connecticut-Hudson Valley Chapter’s Karen Hertz, business development manager; Taffy Holliday, membership coordinator; and Kathryn Minckler, co-founder.

Coal plant protest �inds New Jersey

P

rotesters pushing for the shutdown of Bridgeport’s coal plant took their fight to Newark, N.J., recently. Rallying outside the Newark headquarters of Public Service Electric & Gas Co., the company that owns and operates the Bridgeport coal plant, environmentalists from the Healthy Connecticut Alliance have continued demands to close the Bridgeport Harbor Station. The group has collected 1,000 signatures supporting the retirement of the station in favor of cleaner energy sources. The station was operating at a 3 percent capacity level in 2012, according to a previous data analysis by the Business Journal. But PSE&G representatives contend the plant is necessary as a backup power source. Based on emissions levels and demographics of the area where the plant is located, the station has ranked as the eighth worst for environmental injustices by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. However PSE&G officials contend the station in much safer today than in the past. In 2002 and 2008, PSE&G spent $150 million on emission controls for the station.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013

9/23/13 4:15 PM

9


BY MARK LUNGARIELLO

Nuclear neighbor enters political fray

mlungariello@westfairinc.com

O

n the east bank of the Hudson River, the Indian Point nuclear reactor remains of interest and concern to nearby Fairfield County residents, who could be affected by a meltdown and concomitant evacuation. The two candidates running for Westchester County, N.Y., executive are on opposite ends of the argument over whether or not to close Indian Point Energy Center in Buchanan. Democrat Noam Bramson said he is in favor of creating a plan to reduce the county’s energy consumption, develop alternative power sources and eventually close Indian Point, which has often been criticized for its location on the Hudson River, 25 miles outside of New York City and within 50 miles of the homes of 17 million people. “A nuclear power plant should never have been sited in an area that’s so densely populated and which does not have adequate escape routes,” Bramson, who is the mayor of New Rochelle, said during an Oct. 2 debate in White Plains. “But I recognize that’s not something that can be accomplished overnight and therefore we have to establish this as a longer-term objective.”

But Bramson’s opponent, incumbent Robert P. Astorino, said he wants to keep open the plant that produces about 25 percent of the electricity for New York City and Westchester. “To say, ‘Let’s close it down,’ and lose 25 percent of our region’s energy is nonsense,” he said. “I mean that cannot happen, that’s not reality. We must have clean energy and we do in nuclear power and so yes, I would support the continued operation.” Entergy Corp., which owns Indian Point, is seeking to relicense the plant’s two reactors for another 20 years amid ongoing opposition from environmental groups and politicians including Gov. Andrew Cuomo who say the plant is a health risk and a potential terrorist target. The current relicensing is the lengthiest process of its kind in U.S. history. No plant has ever closed due to an expired license. Supporters have said the region’s infrastructure couldn’t meet the area’s electricity needs if the plant were closed and emissions would increase because more fuel-burning power plants would need to make up the deficit. The Business Council of Westchester, of which Entergy is a member, released a study last year that said closing the power plant would drain $11.5 billion from the local economy, cause electric rates to jump 6.3 percent

and increase the likelihood of blackouts by 280 percent. Indian Point employs about 1,600 with about $130 million in salaries, according to the report, while a similarly sized gas plant would employ about 20 employees. The report also said closing Indian Point would mean a loss of $75 million in annual local property taxes and $2 million to local charities from the plant’s owners. That study, itself an update from a 2008 report, was in reaction to 2011 research by Synapse Energy Economics Inc., that said if Indian Point closed the infrastructure could meet the region’s energy demands and would only minimally affect energy bills, to the tune of roughly an extra $1 per month. Bramson said in an email to the Business Journal that there is no reason the plant’s closing, if done over time, should have an impact on the local economy. “In fact, if we pair the gradual decommissioning … with a strategy to build out our alternative energy infrastructure and promote smart growth and sustainable development, we can seize and opportunity to make broader investments in our county economy.” Although the federal government has the final say on the operation of any nuclear facility, Bramson said the county executive could be an advocate for resi-

dents and local business owners and act as a leader in “green” planning. As mayor of New Rochelle, Bramson oversaw the creation of GreeNR, a sustainability plan which set 43 initiatives over 20 years to increase awareness of environmental impacts, reduce energy consumption and cut costs. “I want to take the same approach countywide,” he said. The continued operation of the power plant has been a talking point in county executive races in the past. Democrats had accused Astorino of having a tightknit relationship with Entergy when he first ran for the seat in 2005 against incumbent Andy Spano and lost. In a 2009 rematch, Astorino won despite a 110,000 Democratic-to-Republican registration advantage in the county. Indian Point first went into operation in 1962. Its original reactor, Indian Point 1, is no longer use. Indian Point 2 and 3 were added in the 1970s. Indian Point 2’s permit expired in September, but the NRC extended the old permit until a decision could be made on the relicensing. Unit 3’s permit expires in December 2015. Bramson said he favors a decommissioning that would not extend operation of the reactors another 20 years, nor does he think the plant should be immediately shuttered.

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10 Week of October 21, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal


Business taxes unfriendly? Taxman disagrees BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

T

he Tax Foundation’s latest annual business tax report ranked Connecticut as having one of the 10 worst tax climates for businesses. In a report released Oct. 9, the state ranked among the bottom half of all states on its property tax (49th), corporate tax (35th), income tax (33rd) and sales tax (32nd). However the report doesn’t paint an accurate portrait, says Kevin B. Sullivan, commissioner of Connecticut’s Department of Revenue Services. Recalling common criticisms that say the Tax Foundation is “too ideological” rather than nonpartisan, Sullivan said he prefers to rely on analyses by the Council on State Taxation. According to COST, Sullivan says, the state has a relatively low tax burden on businesses. The Business Journal asked Sullivan to explain his viewpoint further.

FCBJ: ARE THE TAXES ON CONNECTICUT BUSINESSES HIGH OR LOW COMPARED TO OTHER STATES? HOW DO YOU KNOW? Kevin B. Sullivan: “The 2012 report of the governor’s business tax task force found that Connecticut’s comparative business tax burden is low to moderate — except state taxes on business-to-business services and local property taxes. This is confirmed by the single most reliable and respected, business-funded, tax think tank, the Council on State Taxation. As recently reported by COST — based on analysis performed by Ernst & Young — Connecticut ranks as the second lowest in the nation at 3.6 percent in total effective state and local business taxes, as a share of private sector gross state product; and the lowest in the nation at 30.4 percent in the overall business share of total state and local taxes. COST’s methodology is very inclusive in terms of total business taxes (and includes) property tax, sales tax, excise tax, corporate income tax, unemployment insurance tax, individual income tax on pass-through business income, all other taxes paid by businesses directly or indirectly, and license fees. The methodology used by the Tax Foundation is not only less exhaustive but actually ranks states with lower economic productivity relative to taxes higher than states, like Connecticut, with higher economic productivity relative to taxes based on a less-than-objective belief that no tax is better than any tax, no matter what the economic impact or consequences.”

WHAT ARE THE PRIMARY TAXES CONNECTICUT BUSINESSES PAY? HOW MUCH REVENUE DOES IT AMOUNT TO FOR THE STATE? KS: “Using COST’s statistics for comparability, Connecticut state business taxes for FY 2012 were: 1) Sales taxes at $1.8 billion, 2) Excise taxes at $1.2 billion, 3) Individual income tax on pass-through business income at $800 million, 4) Unemployment insurance tax at $800 million, 5) Corporate income tax at $600 million and 6) License fees and other taxes at $300 million. Connecticut local property tax paid by business for 2012: $2.1 billion.”

ABOUT 5 PERCENT OF ALL TAX REVENUE COMES FROM CORPORATE TAXES, WHEREAS 11 PERCENT CAME FROM BUSINESSES 10 YEARS AGO. WHY HAS THIS CHANGED? KS: “The major changes in Connecticut’s state business tax profile over the past 20 years or so are: 1) The shift in business organization from c-corporations that pay corporate income tax to partnerships, limited liability companies and similar non-c business organizations where individual principals and investors pay personal income tax upon net business income distribution and 2) Elimination of what were double-digit tax rates on capital gains, dividends and interest income prior to enactment of the state income tax.” TAXES ON BUSINESSES AND INDIVIDUALS ARE A BALANCING ACT. HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN IT’S THE RIGHT BALANCE? DO WE HAVE A GOOD BALANCE NOW? KS: “All taxes are about balance. For state business taxes, Connecticut is better balanced today in terms of fiscal stability, tax stability and tax burden. The exception in Connecticut is the imbalance that results from significant reliance on local property taxes.” ANYTHING ELSE WE SHOULD KNOW? KS: “America has an anti-tax popular culture that tends to exaggerate tax impact. It is also easier to fixate on taxes rather than the harder-to-solve other areas where Governor Malloy is working to make Connecticut more business friendly: energy costs, transportation and other infrastructure, housing costs, education, workforce training and state economic development policies that focus on higher value added and emerging economic sectors. Similarly, state taxes are a relatively modest factor in business decisions overall but can be important in specific cases.”

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 11


aSk andi

BY aNDI GRaY

Sales are about so much more than selling i’m almost afraid to sell more business because i don’t think i have enough resources to handle it. THOUGHTS OF THE DAY: The sales function in any company needs to do more than sell. Accurate sales planning coordinated with operations goals is essential. A good sales team sells what’s

needed, keeps the company informed and educates current and future customers about what’s coming next. Selling more this year than last year is a given for any company’s sales department. Effectively managing sales also includes hitting macro and micro targets based on continuous planning and review. A great sales department teams with their operations counterparts to regularly look at

BEWARE Outside companies are soliciting BUSINESS JOURNAL readers for plaques and other reproductions of newspaper content without our consent. If you or your firm is interested in framing an article or award from our newspaper or obtaining a reprint of a particular story Please contact

Marcia Rudy of Westfair Communications directly at (914) 694-3600 x3021.

12 Week of October 21, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

questions of quantity, dollar volume and profitability matched to present and future customer needs. Sales must know what operations can deliver, now and in the future. It needs to inform operations about potential problems selling things that operations wants to produce. Sales must take action when they see that customers are likely to want something operations isn’t yet prepared to deliver. Constant, collaborative information f low gets both parts of the company working towards the same realistic end point. That makes it easier for sales to do its job in the future. Think of the problem this way. Sales decides to sell 1,000 units. Operations can only produce 800. Two-hundred customers, or more, if there are delays in the production schedule, go away unhappy and likely to complain about the company. Those complaints floating around the marketplace make it harder for sales in the future. Alternately, operations produces 1,200 units and sales can only find buyers for 1,000. Two-hundred units go unsold. The cost of producing those excess units eats away at overall profitability. Customers may be happy that they received their orders on time, but may balk at future orders because sales prices had to go up to cover the lower profit on the previous cycle. In both instances customers suffer. Sales struggles to fill its future pipeline. It’s much better for everyone when sales builds goals in concert with production. Planning starts with one-year and five-year cycles. What does the company need to sell in the upcoming year in order to be profitable? What will the company look like in five years? What will alter regarding customer wants and needs? What modifications and transformations are anticipated in production methodology and raw materials? How will the economy and competitive threats affect both supply and demand? Once there’s agreement to one-year

and five-year objectives, a quarterly review cycle comes into play. Were sales goals met last quarter? How about profitability? Was delivery on time? What adjustments in sales would lead to a resounding “yes” to all of those questions? Having analyzed the last quarter, it’s time to look forward. Adjust targets by answering the following questions. Increase volume or decrease? Switch around what’s being sold? Got the right customers? Are customers paying in full? Is anyone asking for significant discounts, which can indicate pressure from competitive threats or selling on price instead of selling on value? Get specific. How much of what is to be sold? Delivered by when? Feed operations weekly, monthly and quarterly updates so they can plan and adjust. Constantly assess sales capacity. Can sales meet the company’s upcoming goals with some capacity to spare? Or is sales stretched and barely hitting its targets? It’s essential to know when sales is under or over resourced. Prepare for long-term success by asking sales to educate and assess the marketplace. Make sure customers know what’s being done to meet their upcoming needs. Look for “right fit” prospects to fill the pipeline. Ask for today’s order and request commitments to future plans. Looking for a good book? Try “Sales & Operations Planning: The How-To Book Handbook” by Thomas F. Wallace, Robert A. Stahl. Andi Gray is president of Strate�y Leaders Inc., strate�yleaders.com, a business consulting �irm that specializes in helping small to mid-sized, privately held businesses achieve doubled revenues and tripled pro�its in repetitive growth cycles. Interested in learning how Strate�y Leaders can help your business? Call now for a free consultation and diagnostic process, (877) 238-3535. Email questions for Andi to AskAndi@Strate�yLeaders. com. AskAndi.com contains an entire library of Ask Andi articles.


SPECIAL REPORT

LAW

Health law up and running

GoodbYe to the ‘pre-exiStinG Condition’ freeZe oUt BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

A

ccess Health CT, Connecticut’s health care exchange, is well on its way. Within the first 11 days of launching Oct. 1, nearly 2,000 applications had been processed for new health care plans. Most of the hype surrounding the launch pertains to the individual plans. For the first time, any individual, regardless of pre-existing conditions, is able to secure health insurance. But the exchange is also offering a first for small businesses. Now small business employers can offer their employees a choice among three different health insurance providers through the exchange: United Healthcare Group, HealthyCT and Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield. While one employee might like a plan from Anthem better, a coworker may prefer a Healthy CT plan.

Both can have either under the exchange and the employer will get only one bill from Access Health CT. “It’s a new option in the marketplace,” said Phil Boyle, a business liaison for Access Health CT. “We haven’t seen anything new for the last 10, 15 years. So it’s exciting to have this small employer option.” Boyle said the exchange is off to a strong start, though at this time employers might not see big cost savings with the exchange. For now, the prices are set at a standard, competitive rate. For employers in companies with fewer than 50 employees, monthly premiums range from $271 to $435. Individual policies range from $215 to $347 per month, depending on the level of coverage. Businesses with fewer than than 25 employees and an average salary of less than $50,000 may be eligible for tax subsidies to help pay for the cost. Under this scenario, both the employer and employ-

ee would receive a tax write-off for a portion of the premium. By 2015, employers with more than 50 employees will be required to offer those employees health care. But for the next couple of months, large employers can sit back and watch the political mudslinging, said Eric D. Fader, a Day Pitney counsel. “There’s a lot of political rhetoric flying around but at its core, the Affordable Care Act is intended to allow those who don’t have insurance to get insurance,” he said. “Anyone who doesn’t know what their options are should do some research.” Fader, the author of Day Pitney’s new health care blog, said employers won’t need to make changes to their plans within the next couple months. However it doesn’t hurt to poke around the exchange’s website to see what options are out there now, he said. While initial reports showed website glitches on the first day of the exchange’s

launch, Fader said he believed the website to be easy to use and understand. He did predict, however, that not many small employers would find cost savings on the exchange. He also said he supports the notion that several large employers will opt to pay the $2,000 fee per employee for not offering coverage in 2015. The penalty only applies after the first 30 employees, so a $40,000 fee will likely be cheaper than paying premiums on 50 employees’ health care plans, he said. The penalty could increase in the future, however, he said. When Fader first started to specialize in health care law 25 years ago, he said people’s eyes used to glaze over at cocktail parties when he’d mention his line of work. Today that’s not the case. Health care reform is likely the cocktail party subject of the year. “It’s an interesting time to be practicing health care law,” Fader said. “That’s for sure.”

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 13


THE LIST LAW FIRMS LAW FIRMS

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY

FAIRFIELD COUNTY NEXT LIST: OCTOBER 28 SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS

Ranked by number of attorneys practicing in the county Listed alphabetically in event of tie. Name, address, telephone number Area code: 203 (unless otherwise noted) Website

Managing partner(s) or officer(s) Email address Year firm established

Number of attorneys in county Total number in firm

1

Cohen and Wolf P.C.

2

Pullman & Comley L.L.C.

3

Finn Dixon & Herling L.L.P.*

4

Cummings & Lockwood L.L.C.*

5

Day Pitney L.L.P.

6

Ivey, Barnum & O'Mara L.L.C.*

7

Ryan Ryan Deluca L.L.P.*

8

Wiggin and Dana L.L.P.*

9

1115 Broad St., Bridgeport 06604 368-0211 • cohenandwolf.com 850 Main St., P.O. Box 7006, Bridgeport 06601 330-2000 • pullcom.com 177 Broad St., Stamford 06901 325-5000 • fdh.com 6 Landmark Square, Stamford 06901 327-1700 • cl-law.com 1 Canterbury Green, 201 Broad St., Stamford 06901 977-7300 • daypitney.com 170 Mason St., Greenwich 06830 661-6000 • ibolaw.com 707 Summer St., Stamford 06901 357-9200 • ryandelucalaw.com 2 Stamford Plaza, 281 Tresser Blvd., Stamford 06911 363-7600 • wiggin.com

Shipman & Goodwin L.L.P.* 300 Atlantic St., Stamford 06901; 289 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich 06830 324-8100 • 869-5600 • shipmangoodwin.com

10

Robinson & Cole L.L.P.*

11

Diserio Martin O'Connor & Castiglioni L.L.P.*

1055 Washington Blvd., Stamford 06901 462-7500 • rc.com

1 Atlantic St., Stamford 06901 358-0800 • dmoc.com

Levett Rockwood P.C.* 33 Riverside Ave., Westport 06880 222-0885 • levettrockwood.com

Whitman Breed Abbott & Morgan L.L.C.* 500 W. Putnam Ave., Greenwich 06830 869-3800 • wbamct.com

12

Brody Wilkinson P.C.* 2507 Post Road, Southport 06890 319-7100 • brodywilk.com

Wilson Elser 1010 Washington Blvd., Stamford 06901 388-9100 • wilsonelser.com

13

Halloran & Sage L.L.P.* 315 Post Road West, Westport 06880 • 227-2855 133 Deer Hill Ave., Danbury 06810 • 798-1000 halloran-sage.com

Withers Bergman L.L.P. 660 Steamboat Road, Greenwich 06830 302-4100 • withersworldwide.com

Zeldes, Needle & Cooper 1000 Lafayette Blvd., P.O. Box 1740, Bridgeport 06601 333-9441 • znclaw.com

14

Collins, Hannafin, Garamella, Jaber & Tuozzolo P.C.* 148 Deer Hill Ave., Danbury 06810 744-2150 • chgjtlaw.com

Gilbride, Tusa, Last & Spellane L.L.C. 31 Brookside Drive, Greenwich 06830 622-9360 • gtlslaw.com

Number of partners, associates, of counsel

Name, address, telephone number Area code: 203 (unless otherwise noted) Website

David A. Ball cw@cohenandwolf.com 1951

53 53

31 11 11

Goldman Gruder & Woods L.L.C.

James T. Shearin, chairman info@pullcom.com 1919

52 88

37 13 2

Sandak Hennessey & Greco L.L.P.*

Michael J. Herling 1987

44 44

22 18 4

15

Cacace Tusch & Santagata

Jonathan B. Mills 1909

41 66

28 11 2

16

Martin Chioffi L.L.P.*

Stanley A. Twardy Jr. 2007

40 288

19 12 9

Michael J. Jones general@ibolaw.com 1950

34 34

20 6 8

17

Murtha Cullina L.L.P.

Robert C. E. Laney info@ryandelucalaw.com 1966

33 33

11 18 4

18

Rosenblum Newfield L.L.C.*

31 150

19 11 1

Rucci Law Group L.L.C.

Scott L. Murphy 1919

29 151

16 10 3

Zeisler & Zeisler P.C.*

Steven L. Elbaum 1845

28 225

14 6 8

William A. Durkin III dmoc@dmoc.com 1983

21 21

14 5 2

Christopher M. Graham info@levettrockwood.com 1981

21 21

13 6 2

Harry E. Peden III 2000

21 21

16 3 2

Peter T. Mott 1998

20 20

13 4 3

21

20 774

7 12 1

22

William J. McGrath Jr., managing partner Stephen P. Fogerty, managing attorney, Westport fogerty@halloransage.com 1935

19 95

10 3 6

Carta, McAlister & Moore L.L.C.

David Lehn inquiries.gw@withers.us.com 1896 (U.K.) 1962 (U.S.)

19 450

12 5 2

Lev & Berlin P.C.*

Maximino Medina Jr. info@znclaw.com 1971

19 19

13 6 0

Tremont & Sheldon P.C.*

Edward J. Hannafin plathrop@chgjtlaw.com 1963

15 15

NA

23

Lax & Truax L.L.C.*

Thomas P. Spellane info@gtlslaw.com 1983

15 19

7 5 3

24

Cramer & Ahern

Robert W. Benjamin Chairman, executive committee

1934

Brian Del Gatto regional managing partner, Connecticut

info@wilsonelser.com 1978

Look for the Law Firms List with their special practices in the forthcoming Book of Business Lists. * Previous listing updated with information from firm website. NA Not available. WND Would not disclose.

14 Week of October 21, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

200 Connecticut Ave., Norwalk 06854 899-8900 • goldmangruderwoods.com 707 Summer St., Suite 300, Stamford 06901 425-4200 • shglaw.com 777 Summer St., Stamford 06901 327-2000 • lawcts.com 1 Landmark Square, Stamford 06901 973-5200 • martinchioffi.com

Willinger, Willinger & Bucci P.C.* 855 Main St., Bridgeport 06604 (888) 845-3916 • wwblaw.com 177 Broad St., Stamford 06901 653-5400 • murthalaw.com 1 Landmark Square, Fifth floor, Stamford 06901 358-9200 • rosenblumnewfield.com 19 Old Kings Highway South, Darien 06820 202-9686 • ruccilawgroup.com

10 Middle St., Bridgeport 06604 368-4234 • zeislaw.com

19

Ferguson Cohen L.L.P.* 25 Field Point Road, Greenwich 06830 661-5222 • fahwlaw.com

McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney & Carpenter L.L.P.* 30 Jelliff Lane, Southport 06890 319-4000 • mdmc-law.com

20

Berchem, Moses & Devlin P.C.* 1221 Post Road East, Westport 06880 227-9545 • bmdlaw.com

Jackson Lewis L.L.P. 1010 Washington Blvd., Seventh floor, Stamford 06901 961-0404 • jacksonlewis.com

Gager, Emerson, Rickart, Bower & Scalzo L.L.P.* 2 Stony Hill Road, Bethel 06801 207-5400 • gagerlaw.net

Brody and Associates L.L.C. 179 Post Road West, Westport 06880 965-0560 • brodyandassociates.com

1120 Boston Post Road, Darien 06820 202-3100 • cmm-law.com

200 Connecticut Ave., Norwalk 06854 838-8500 • levberlin.com 64 Lyon Terrace, Bridgeport 06604 335-5145 • tremontsheldon.com

2507 Post Road, Suite PH, Southport 06890 254-9877 • laxandtruax.com

38 Post Road West, Westport 06880 222-7000 • cramerahern.com

Managing partner(s) or officer(s) Email address Year firm established

Number of attorneys in county

Number of partners, associates, Total number of counsel in firm

Michael L. Goldman mgoldman@goldgru.com 1995

15 15

7 2 6

WND 1990

15 15

11 4 0

Michael J. Cacace mcacace@lawcts.com 1982

12 12

4 6 2

Christopher G. Martin 2000

11 11

6 5 WND

Charles J. Willinger Jr. amwillinger@wwblaw.com 1991

11 11

6 5 1

Elizabeth J. Stewart sgerard@murthalaw.com 1936

10 115

3 6 1

James Rosenblum 1992

9 9

WND

Amy Zabetakis info@ruccilawgroup.com 2011

9 10

3 1 6

Matthew Beatman, James Berman, Lawrence S. Grossman, Jed Horwitt, Coleen Hurlie-Dunn, Stephen M. Kindseth, Craig I. Lifland and James R. Miron 1968

9 9

7 2 0

John J. Ferguson jferguson@fercolaw.com 2006

8 8

WND

8 300

4 0 4

Robert L. Berchem, Marsha Belman Moses, Michael P. Devlin fdugas@bmdlaw.com 1933

7 32

6 1 0

Michael J. Soltis, Stamford managing partner Vincent A. Cino, firm-wide managing partner 1958

7 765

2 4 1

WND 1917

6 6

NA

Robert G. Brody info@brodyandassociates.com 1997

5 7

1 3 1

Mark R. Carta ingrid@cmm-law.com 2011

5 5

3 2 2

Duane L. Berlin info@levberlin.com 1979

5 5

1 2 2

Robert Sheldon, Cindy Robinson Frank Bailey, Jason Tremont and Douglas Mahoney info@tremontsheldon.com 1960

5 5

WND

Sandra P. Lax, Louise T. Truax 1998

4 4

4 0 0

Allan P. Cramer info@cramerandahern.com 1968

3 3

2 0 1

Edward B. Deutsch, managing partner Suzanne E. Baldasare, managing partner, Southport office

info@mdmc-law.com 1983


BY JoE MURTaUGH JOE MURTAGH

M

Predictive thinking, hiding in the data

ost of us, whether as voters, consumers, managers or investors believe that valuable knowledge is concentrated in very few hands. We assume that the key to solving problems or making good decisions is finding the one right person who will have the answer. In 2004, that theory got blown out of the water. James Surowiecki author of “The Wisdom of Crowds” helped change the world. He proved that expertise is overrated and the very best decisions were made through the collective intelligence of groups. Way back then he said, “The wisdom of crowds has the potential to make a profound difference in the way companies do business.” Today’s technology is making that difference and can help you know: What used car is least likely to be a lemon? What customer is least likely to pay their bills? Who is most likely to purchase your product or service? “The Wisdom of Crowds” proved that crowds make the best decisions. Now, by combining crowds of “data scientists” who use predictive analytics technology to learn from the historical data organizations already have, the best decisions are even better. These crowds of data scientists are discovering and proving the best algorithm for any given problem… from predicting the click through rate on ads to forecasting who will be admitted to the hospital within the next year. “Use your competition to crowdsource the best answers,” says Renee Boucher Ferguson in the November 2012 issue of the MIT Sloan Management Review. Even if you’re new and don’t yet have your own, the competitions actual historical data is freely available. Now a company, Cagle Inc. is using a virtual community of more than 40,000 data scientists around the world as a crowd full of wisdom. Groups of data scientists compete with each other to develop the best algorithm for a specific problem and are awarded prizes of up to $3 million if they win. It’s like a global golf match with the 40,000-plus players ranked according to how well they have done. Like the pro golf tour, there is no one winning every time, but the best solution always emerges. Allstate Insurance used Kigali Inc. to build a predictive claims model because they understood that if they hired a consulting ‘data scientist group’ and gave them the historical data that they would get an algorithm to use and be able to build a predictive model. Allstate under-

stood that when a global ‘crowd’ of data scientist are all working on the same problem and the results are being posted in real time, the competition increases and the best algorithm becomes obvious. A regional retail used-car company wanted to solve the problem of how to buy the best used cars and avoid the customer problems that come when someone gets a lemon. According to the MIT Sloan Management Review, as the data scientists went through more than 2000

previous transactions they discovered that, among other things, the color of the car was a predictor of quality. If the car had an uncommon color it was far less likely to be a lemon. The logic behind this predictive algorithm turned out to be that if someone bought an unusual color they had a tendency to take better care of it. There is logic behind the behavior of everyone and, if you can determine it, you can gain a tremendous competitive advantage.

Michael J. Cacace* Mark P. Santagata Paul T. Tusch Ronald E. Kowalski, II Jane W. Freeman Judith Ellenthal Nicholas W. Vitti, Jr. Michelle A. Malone* Frank L. Baker, III* James D. Diamond*

Of Counsel Ellery Plotkin Mark Koczarski*† *Also admitted in New York †Also admitted in Florida

Just as with Allstate Insurance and the used car company you can open yourself to the benefits of predictive analytics to develop an algorithm that is already data tested … and get the best solution for any challenge.

This column is provided by Joe Murtagh, The Dream Speaker, who is an international motivational speaker, meeting facilitator and business trainer. For questions or comments, email Joe@ TheDreamSpeaker.com, TheDreamSpeaker. com or call (800) 239-0058.

777 Summer Street Stamford CT 06901-1022 V 203 327 2000 F 203 353 3392 E cts@lawcts.com www.lawcts.com

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 15


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16 Week of October 21, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Making the most of financial gifts to grandkids

T

he bond between grandparents and grandchildren is unique. Typically free of daily responsibility for them, grandparents can focus on fun, and making financial gifts can be especially satisfying. In many cases, though, the recession has altered family dynamics. Parents may have lost their jobs. Retirement and college funds may have been raided to pay monthly bills. The generations may even have moved in together. So gifting to grandchildren can have an added dimension and it’s more important than ever to ensure that kind-hearted gestures have the intended results. At the same time, a little forethought can lower your taxes or help qualify you for Medicaid coverage of long-term care. Think through your goals. Do you want to help cover the cost of education or a first car? Do you envision annual gifts or a lump sum? Be careful not to over-extend yourself and budget for the economic downturns that can play havoc with retirement savings. Don’t forget to factor in the possibility of long-term care expense, as well. CoLD CaSH Writing a check may be easy but, tax considerations come into play if you make gifts in excess of $14,000 (as of 2013) to an individual in a single year. That maximum doubles for gifts from married couples. In addition to the annual $14,000 exclusion, there’s a $5.25 million (indexed for inflation) lifetime limit to tax-free gifting. Your grandchildren will incur no tax liability in either case — unless the money is invested and earns income. You may, however, have misgivings about how the funds might be used. A teenager’s idea of money well spent may differ sharply from yours. In that case, you could consider covering education or medical bills. If payments are made directly to the service provider, there’s no gift limit. If the child has disabilities, there’s an additional consideration, since your generosity could disqualify them for important means-tested government benefits. In that case, you’ll want to explore creating a special needs trust, a vehicle to hold funds benefiting someone with disabilities without affecting their eligibility for public programs. CoSTLY CoLLEGES The spiraling cost of higher education makes it a favorite target for doting grandparents. Investment income

generated by a 529 account is tax-free so long as the funds are used to defray college expenses. There are often state income tax breaks for contributions, as well. Some 529 accounts will enable you to pay today’s rates for tuition credits to be used at public colleges in the future. Gifting maximums apply and while such accounts can affect a child’s eligibility for means-tested public benefits, they generally won’t interfere with their eligibility for college financial assistance. If your goals are broader than funding higher education, consider establishing a custodial account. If your grandchild is under 21 (18 in some states), such an account, regulated under the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA) or Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA), will enable you to retain influence over how the assets are used until the beneficiary reaches adulthood. UTMA accounts are offered by banks and brokerage firms and can be funded with a broad range of financial assets in addition to cash. One downside is that they are often considered when calculating the need for college financial assistance. STRINGS aTTaCHED In contrast, naming yourself trustee of a gift trust places you squarely in control for as long as you wish. You determine how assets are invested, when they become available to the beneficiary and even, if you wish, how distributions can be spent. The trust can also be designed so that you assume tax liability for any income that it generates. This may reduce the overall taxes paid by you and the trust. Since there are many variations, it’s important to consult an experienced attorney who can structure the trust to comply with your specific goals. Of course, you can always leave money to the grandkids in your will, but there are definitely benefits to bestowing your financial gifts now. Beyond witnessing the smiles on their faces, you’ll be reducing your heirs’ exposure to estate taxes and spending down your assets in case you need Medicaid assistance for long-term care. All it takes is a little planning to ensure that your good intentions will have the desired effect. Bernard A. Krooks is past president of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. He is managing partner of the law �irm Littman Krooks L.L.P. (www. littmankrooks.com; (845) 896-1106 with of�ices in White Plains, Manhattan and Fishkill, N.Y.


Carissa Ganelli and the mathematics of success

By Frank Pagani

W

hen Carissa Ganelli attended Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University to obtain her MBA, she recalls encountering male prejudice regarding women’s math abilities. “None of them wanted women to be on their math teams, believing we didn’t have what it took to solve problems and win,” she said. In case any of those guys haven’t kept up with the news, please note that Ganelli went on to enjoy an accomplished career as a marketing executive in the emerging e-commerce market where she applied her analytical skills to create successful digital and mobile strategies for top brands. And more recently, in a sector still dominated by males, she founded and is CEO of LightningBuy, a Bridgeportbased startup that will dramatically simplify how e-retailers sell, and consumers purchase, products via mobile devices. It’s been nearly three years since Ganelli decided that the next chapter in her remarkable career would be as an entrepreneur. She quit her job and labored hard to develop and test the product. In February 2012, she was ready to pursue financing by pitching the business to angel investors. Amazingly, on just the third pitch, she raised the eyebrows of some investors and a conversation began about her business model. She was not prepared to hear what came next — an offer of $1 million to help launch LighningBuy. It’s a sum that exceeded what she projected to help pay start-up costs. But after careful consideration, she turned it down. “As tempting as $1 million sounded,” Ganelli recalls, “some of the things that the investors said gave me pause, especially relating to the tremen-

dous potential my product would have in a multibillion-dollar market. One of them said: ‘This can be huge, have you considered going public?’ I thought it prudent to wait and revisit financing as we were very close to getting some clients. Once that happened, the potential value of our company would be greater and would also give us leverage to secure financing at even better terms.” Ganelli notes that saying no to the angels was the most important business decision she made. A month later, the company received a $30,000 grant from the CT Center for Advanced Technology Inc., which paid for patent, trademark and other startup costs. Then, in November, Lax.com signed on as the first client. The lacrosse e-commerce retailer used LightingBuy for daily deals it ran on Facebook. “The performance was an amazing 8 to 14 percent conversion rate, which is unheard of,” Ganelli said. Other clients followed. Meanwhile, the company’s application for additional funding with the Connecticut Department of Economic Development was under review. Earlier this summer, it was approved and LightningBuy received about $300,000 in grants and loans. Today, the company, which started with just Ganelli and cofounder Jeffrey Oh, who heads business development, comprises 12 employees. Recently, it was selected as a “2013 Tech Company to Watch” that will be featured with other startups at the seventh annual Connecticut Innovation Summit, Nov. 7, in Wallingford. Ganelli was smitten early by all things digital. She served as vice president of marketing at Webloyalty, a directresponse online marketing company where she launched and ran the Official

Carissa Ganelli

NASCAR Members Club. She was also a vice president at Digitas Modem Media and a Digital Strategist working on strategies for Guinness, Newman’s Own and IBM, among others. Ganelli’s inspiration for LightningBuy sprang from her analysis of the mobile commerce market where purchases typically require consumers to have PayPal accounts and where those same purchases necessitate completing several pages and multiple clicks to facilitate the buy. Her vision for a streamlined process resulted in LightningBuy’s “Single Click Mobile Checkout” that gets e-commerce retailers selling on mobile devices without a mobile site or an app. They can sell directly from Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google Search or any ad unit with just one line of code. There’s no development work for them to do. And consumers don’t need to create an account, register in advance or download an app to purchase via credit card. Gannelli’s tech development team

initially raised objections to creating a browser-based product, but Ganelli, first and foremost a problem solver, did not take no for an answer. She attributes tenacity as key to her success, which she learned from her Sicilian ancestry. “My parents came from nothing and achieved great success,” she said. “My father put himself through medical college and became a surgeon and my mother was a teacher and then a chiropractor.” Going to Bryn Mawr College “was incredibly beneficial to my personal development. The 100 percent total woman’s environment showed me that nothing could stop me from becoming a high achiever as a woman.” Her brush with male stereotyping of women at Kellogg was amusing at best. Then, now and looking ahead, loftier goals have guided her. She points out that by 2017 mobile commerce will represent about 25 percent of a $100 billion-plus U.S. e-commerce market. Ganelli has done the math.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 17


Westport’s arts & cultural heritage – past, present, future Westport is proud of its arts and cultural heritage and that it continues to be a part of town life in the 21st century. While many newcomers may move to Westport because of its strong school system and recreational offerings, there are many who are additionally attracted by its arts and cultural offerings — and the fact that we are a community that highly values them. the Westport Country playhouse, the levitt pavilion for the performing arts, the Westport arts Center, the Westport historical Society, the Westport library and newcomer the Westport Cinema initiative have all gained widespread attention for their often ground-breaking initiatives. but so have the Westport Community theatre, beechwood arts, play With Your food, mtC mainStage, Staples players, orphenians, toquet hall, the blues, views and bbQ festival, the galleries, music and dance schools, not to mention all the individual artistic efforts. Combined they offer a quality of life in Westport that many tell me is unduplicated anywhere else. this year the town of Westport and its arts advisory Committee — an official town body — celebrate the 20th annual Westport arts awards through a series of programs around town. Since 1994 and its founding by the late burt Chernow, the committee has honored almost 50 individuals who have made significant contribution to the arts. the combined economic impact of Westport’s Cultural life on the town and the region is enormous. many who attend come from out of town and spend time shopping our stores and dining in our restaurants. the recent wave of restaurant openings in Westport has added to the culinary choices of visitors. Westport’s commitment and dedication to its arts and cultural heritage is unwavering. We can only imagine what attractive and innovative happenings are in store for the future. best wishes to the Cultural alliance of fairfield County for its help in making it happen. Gordon F. Joseloff first Selectman town of Westport

The mission of the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County is to support cultural organizations, artists and creative businesses by providing promotion, services and advocacy. For more information, visit CulturalAllianceFC.org or email infoCulturalAllianceFC.org or call 256-2329. For events lists, visit FCBuzz.org.

FCBUZZ

Arts & Culture of Fairfield County

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT:

WESTPORT PLAYHOUSE MARKS 20 YEARS OF WESTPORT ARTS AWARD WINNERS to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Westport arts awards, Westport Country playhouse presents a lobby exhibit featuring past award winners who have been associated with the historic theater, now through oct. 27. the exhibit includes photos, posters, programs, set models, videos and memorabilia of award recipients. additional items are displayed throughout the lobby and mezzanine designated with a Westport arts awards’ 20th anniversary logo. the exhibit coincides with the run of the madcap american comedy, “room Service,” about a producer and his ragtag bunch of cohorts who try to raise money for a broadway show as they scramble to evade their hotel bill, through oct. 27. for more information or tickets, visit westportplayhouse.org.

BEHIND THE SCENES TOUR OF THE LEVITT PAVILION Get a sneak peek at the future and at one of the nation’s longest-running free outdoor festivals during a guided hard-hat tour of the construction site for the new levitt pavilion for the performing arts. the tour is part of the levitt pavilion’s way of celebrating the 20th year of the Westport arts award, joining forces all month long with others in town. the tour will be led by peter Cadoux of peter Cadoux architects, Walter Cameron of verdi Construction, and levitt pavilion executive director freda Welsh. the behind-the-scenes tour includes refreshments and entertainment and is free. Space is limited to 30 people; reservations required. for reservations or more information, contact carleigh@ westportct.gov on or before oct. 23.

AWARDS CELEBRATE 20 YEARS OF ARTISTIC VIBRANCY Join the Westport arts advisory Committee (WaaC) on Sunday, oct. 27 along with the myriad arts and cultural organizations that call Westport home to celebrate the vibrancy of the arts in Westport and for a tribute to outgoing first Selectman Gordon Joseloff. there will be short performances highlighting works by award winners in music, film, theater, literature and other artistic fields over the past 20 years, including John Corigliano, ring lardner, Sinclair lewis, david Wiltse, max Shulman, igor pikayzn and others. the event will be held at the auditorium in the Westport town hall. it is free and will conclude with a reception immediately following at the Westport historical Society. for more information, visit westportartsawards.org.

‘GEMS OF WESTPORT’ ARTISTS TALK Join us thursday, oct. 24, at the Westport historical Society for a drink and some tasty bites and a chance to sit “fireside style” with some of Westport’s most wonderful artists. to help celebrate 20 years of the Westport arts awards, beechwood arts is dedicating its monthly artist talk to taking a peek into the incredibly interesting lives of visual artists who call or have called Westport home. participating artists include naiad einsel, larry Silver, leonard fisher, miggs burroughs, ed vebell, hans Wilhelm, Jak kovatch and Spencer platt. no slides, presentations or ceremony — just a rare opportunity to hear stories first-hand from these great artists, each truly a gem. Seating is limited. Call 222-1424 for reservations or visit westporthistory.org.

Visit FCBuzz.org for more information on events and how to get listed. 18 Week of October 21, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Presented by: Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County


FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL aTTaCHMENTSFILED Bolliger Mobility L.L.C., Stamford. Filed by Thomas Agnes, Robert Bolliger and Arthur Bolliger, Danbury. Property: 120 Viaduct Road, Stamford. Amount: $40,000. Filed Oct. 3. Scogno, Catherine, New Fairfield. Filed by Jeanne Moore, Danbury. Property: 2 Southview Road, New Fairfield. Amount: $63,000. Filed Oct. 2. Sing Bhagania, Surinder, Brookfield. Filed by Montana Cigarette Candy & Tobacco Inc., Milford, by Erick H. Opin, Milford. Property: 7 Spruce Drive, Brookfield. Amount: $18,000. Filed Oct. 1. Smith Brothers Woodland Management L.L.C., Brookfield. Filed by Supreme Forest Products Inc. Property: 117 Whisconier Road, Brookfield. Amount: $95,000. Filed Oct. 3.

aTTaCHMENTSRELEaSED Iemolo, Michael, Shelton. Filed by Worldwide Properties L.L.C., by Joseph Voll. Property: 2 Kneen Court, Shelton. Amount: $35,000. Filed Oct. 7.

BUILDING PERMITS

commerciaL A Pappajohn Co., Norwalk, contractor for Merritt 7 Venture L.L.C. Perform renovations at an existing commercial building, 501 Merritt 7, Fifth floor, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $46,800. Filed Oct. 1. Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Bob Rozycki c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: (914)694-3600 Fax: (914)694-3680

A Pappajohn Co., Norwalk, contractor for Merritt 7 Venture L.L.C. Perform renovations at an existing commercial building, 501 Merritt 7, Fifth floor, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $46,800. Filed Oct. 1. Bell Atlantic, East Hartford, contractor for TM Realty. Install commercial antennas on roof of a commercial building, 207 Main St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $360,000. Filed Oct. 2. Brookdale Place of Wilton L.L.C., Wilton. Perform additions and alterations at an existing commercial building, 96 Danbury Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $2,500. Filed Sept. 30. C.W. Brown Inc., contractor for Nathal 1220W L.L.C. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 12 Wilton Road, Westport. Estimated cost: $57,000. Filed Sept. 23. Connecticut Construction, contractor for Hall Investments. Perform additions and renovations at an existing commercial building, 9 Old Kings Highway South, Darien. Estimated cost: $34,000. Filed Oct. 2. Dwyer, John, contractor for Westport Post Road L.L.C. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, Granola Bar, 295 Post Road East, Westport. Estimated cost: $140,000. Filed Oct. 2. Enterprise Builders Inc., contractor for Saugatuck Congregational. Repair fire damage at an existing commercial building, 245 Post Road East, Westport. Estimated cost: $5.3 million. Filed Oct. 4. Fantastic Tile & Construction, Waterbury, contractor for Halsam Co. Repair car damage at an existing commercial building, for Starbucks, 689 E. Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $2,500. Filed Oct. 7. Greenwich Centre L.P., Old Greenwich. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, for Carrington Holding Co., 1700 E. Putnam Ave., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $36,000. Filed Oct. 7. Griffith Construction, contractor for Post Plaza L.L.C. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 1076 Post Road East, Westport. Estimated cost: $750,000. Filed Oct. 7.

Kleban Holding Company II L.L.C., Fairfield. Fit-out an existing commercial building for Snip Doggy Dog, 1125 Post Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $81,135. Filed Oct. 3.

residentiaL 132 Redding Road L.L.C., contractor for Christena and Adam Worobec. Construct a new single-family residence, 4 Jackie Lane, Westport. Estimated cost: $440,000. Filed Sept. 25. 1460 Post Road L.L.C., Fairfield. Add a two-story addition and perform interior renovations to an existing single-family residence, 1460 Post Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed Oct. 8. 58 Richland L.L.C., Greenwich. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 58 Richland Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed Oct. 7. A&G Development L.L.C., contractor for Lisa Headly. Strip and reroof an existing single-family residence, 350 Quincy St., Fairfield. Estimated cost: $4,900. Filed Oct. 9. Able Construction Inc., contractor for 14 Adams Farm L.L.C. Construct a new single-family residence, 14 Adams Farm Road, Westport. Estimated cost: $700,000. Filed Sept. 24. All in One Construction Group, contractor for Marisa and Peter Novello. Lay foundation for an accessory building at an existing single-family residence, 79 Old Road, Westport. Estimated cost: $300,000. Filed Oct. 3. All Season’s Construction, contractor for Valerie Leinfelder. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 19 Rocky Ridge Drive, Trumbull. Estimated cost: $53,300. Filed Oct. 7. Alpert, Matthew, Fairfield. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 127 Longfellow Ave., Fairfield. Estimated cost: $69,000. Filed Oct. 7. Andersen, Brad, contractor for Reynaldo Pena. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 259 Wilton Road, Westport. Estimated cost: $12,000. Filed Sept. 25.

Anspich, David, contractor for Patrick Lennon. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 53 Echo Drive North, Darien. Estimated cost: $65,000. Filed Oct. 3.

Barnyard, contractor for Gino Ciancanelli. Construct an accessory building with a nonhabitable space at a single-family residence, 36 Cotton Tail Trail, Trumbull. Estimated cost: $7,000. Filed Oct. 1.

Arango, John, contractor for Randi and Jeremy Vishno. Perform external additions at an existing single-family residence, 10 Mansfield Place, Westport. Estimated cost: $65,000. Filed Sept. 24.

Bartlett Construction & Development, contractor for Megan and Jeffrey Bryson. Lay foundation for a new single-family residence, 60 Hoydens Lane, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $440,000. Filed Oct. 2.

Associated Design & Development L.L.C., contractor for William Fink. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 297 Pemburn Drive, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $35,000. Filed Oct. 1.

Bauer Builders, contractor for Sebastion Correa. Perform additions and alterations at an existing single-family residence, 5 Stony Brook Road, Darien. Estimated cost: $160,000. Filed Oct. 1.

Astrum Solar Inc., contractor for Robert Noecker. Install solar panels at an existing single-family residence, 47 Bay Edge Court, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $18,194. Filed Oct. 1.

Benson R.B. & Co., contractor for 6 Sea Spray Road L.L.C, Raise a single-family residence above the base flood elevation, 6 Sea Spray Road, Westport. Estimated cost: $187,000. Filed Oct. 4.

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Better Built Basements L.L.C., contractor for Betsy and Joseph Morreale. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 144 Carroll Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $17,000. Filed Oct. 4.

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Astrum Solar Inc., contractor for Eileen and Bruce Seeliger. Install solar panels at an existing single-family residence, 90 Sherwood Farm Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $40,392. Filed Oct. 8. Astrum Solar Inc., contractor for Susan Smith and Harlan Bass. Install solar panels at an existing singlefamily residence, 70 Curtis Terrace North, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $25,806. Filed Oct. 3.

BG Construction Inc., New Canaan. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 600 Oenoke Ridge, Wilton. Estimated cost: $500,000. Filed Oct. 8.

Avida Construction Management, Stamford, contractor for Danie Kraus. Construct a two-car carport at an existing single-family residence, 50 Apple Valley Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $26,000. Filed Oct. 3.

Blomberg, Louise and Hendrik Olsson, Fairfield. Perform interior renovations at an existing singlefamily residence, 51 Blaine St., Fairfield. Estimated cost: $32,000. Filed Oct. 8.

B Rogers Home Restorations, contractor for Khoa Nguyen. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 12 Firehouse Road, Trumbull. Estimated cost: $18,000. Filed Oct. 1.

Braydan Construction L.L.C., Stamford, contractor for Kelley Long and William Thrush. Reroof an existing single-family residence, 32 High Point Road, Westport. Estimated cost: $125,000. Filed Oct. 7.

Babowski, Marilyn, Wilton. Perform alterations to an existing single-family residence, 10 Banks Drive, Wilton. Estimated cost: $8,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Breaz Construction L.L.C., contractor for Lianzi L.L.C. Strip and reroof an existing single-family residence, 447 Tunxis Hill Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $9,950. Filed Oct. 3.

Banks Brothers Services, Cos Cob, contractor for Angela and Gary Gilbride. Perform external renovations at an existing single-family residence, 26 Marshall St., Old Greenwich. Estimated cost: $9,500. Filed Oct. 7.

Casey Residential Roofing, contractor for Cynthia and Peter Burnim. Strip and reroof an existing single-family residence, 698 Old Post Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $16,500. Filed Oct. 4.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 19


NEWSMAKERS plus awards and events COURTNEY NELTHROPP HONORED Nearly 200 guests gathered at the Water’s Edge at Giovanni’s in Stamford Sept. 18 to honor Stamford resident COURTNEY NELTHROPP for his years of community service. As chairman of CHARTER OAK COMMUNITIES Board of Commissioners, Nelthropp has been instrumental in revitalizing the face of Stamford’s public housing greatly improved the quality of the city’s low and moderate income housing. Hosted by FAMILY CENTERS, Charter Oak Communities and STAMFORD HOSPITAL, the event raised more than $45,000 for the Truglia Thumbelina Fund. Founded by former Connecticut State Rep. CHRISTEL TRUGLIA in 1996, the Thumbelina Fund is a donor-advised fund of the Fairfield County Community Foundation that aims to meet the special needs of Stamford’s children. Whether it helped with a prom dress for an underprivileged girl or to build a playground at a public housing complex or to send promising students to a leadership conference, “THE TRUGLIA THUMBELINA FUND has added wonder, adventure and joy to childhoods throughout Stamford.” A United Way, Community Fund of Darien and New Canaan Community Foundation partner agency, Family Centers is a member of the Connecticut Council of Family Service Agencies and the Alliance for Children and Families and is accredited by the Council on Accreditation and the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

GETTING JUICED

Betsy Conti

The ASHFORTH CO., a 117-year-old Stamford, commercial real estate firm installed a plug-in electric vehicle charging station at 3001 Stamford Square, Ashforth’s 290,000-square-foot office property on Summer Street in Stamford. Darien resident MIKE MCGEE, managing director at the

Mark Namm

Stamford office of KPMG, a tenant at Ashforth’s 3001 Stamford Square building, is the first person to utilize the charging station according to the building’s vice president and property manager, DAVID MARKS. McGee recently purchased a 2013 Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid.

FLU SEASON PARDONS ASSISTANCE PROJECT RECEIVES $4K FROM BAPTISTS The PRISON MINISTRIES of THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BRIDGEPORT is the recipient of a $4,000 Matthew 25 Grant from ABCUSA (the national body of the American Baptist Churches) to fund the Bridgeport Pardons Assistance Project. The Mission of the Bridgeport Pardons Assistance Project is to combat poverty, from the first day of an ex-offender’s release from prison, through what it terms “a culture of pardons:” public service, volunteerism, goodness, dedication, forgiveness, grace, discipline, faith and family. The ministries’ objective is “to bring professionalism and respect to a process at a time when our clients’ have already been through the most difficult and dehumanizing periods of their lives.” For more information call 339-5887. The GREENWICH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE and GREENWICH HOSPITAL co-sponsored a flu clinic recently available to all town business owners and residents at the Greenwich

20 Week of October 21, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

YMCA. Pictured: MARCIA O’KANE, chamber executive director, and CHRISTINA DEVITO, a registered nurse from Greenwich Hospital.


A FRESH QUEST FOR SECURITY

PEERS CITE SHATTUCK’S LEGAL EXPERTISE

ANTONIO CALDAS has launched a new business resource, QUEST FINANCIAL SERVICES, a consulting and financial services company that “provides resources to assist businesses that are looking to move their business forward and get on track to improve their bottom line.” Caldas brings 20-plus years of domestic and international accounting, finance, business development and operations experience to his clients. The Quest team includes “Six Sigma” certified professionals, business modeling consultants, certified public accountants, certified management accountants and other business leaders. Free consultations are available. The website is quest-fs. com or call 343-2553.

After an extensive and confidential peer review by members of the CONNECTICUT BAR ASSOCIATION, MartindaleHubbell Peer Review Rating services has awarded LAURA SHATTUCK, an associate attorney with Westport-based NUSBAUM & PARRINO P.C., its highest rating for both family law and litigation. The Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Ratings reflect a combination of achieving a very high general ethical standards rating and a legal ability numerical rating. A threshold number of responses is required to achieve a rating. Shattuck received Martindale-Hubbell’s “AV Preeminent Rating,” a testament to the fact Shattuck’s peers rank her at the highest level of professional excellence. She is a member of the American, Connecticut and Fairfield County Bar associations. She is a graduate of ABA-NITA Family Law Trial Advocacy Institute, where she completed a seven-day intensive trial practice program in 2010.

DaTES OCTOBER

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NEW PIE IN TOWN NEW COO AT SACHS WALSH

New York restaurant principals, from left, MOGAN ANTHONY, JOE BUETI and ANTHONY LEGATO now have a Connecticut address. A popular Westchester County eatery, SOCIAL KITCHEN + BAR IN MT. KISCO, is reaching across the border for its new venture, Locali Pizza Bar + Kitchen at 32 Forest St., New Canaan, set to open soon. The Locali menu includes gourmet pizzas and Mediterranean small plates. Call Joe Bueti for details at (914) 864-1255

Westport-based SACHS WALSH INSURANCE announced that DAVID F. COYLE has joined the firm as chief operating officer. Walsh began his career in 1982 as a personal insurance underwriter with Aetna Life & Casualty. He held several positions of increasing responsibility in both underwriting and field management before joining Travelers in 1996. In 1998, he was appointed sales director and most recently served as business development manager for the New England Region. In 2012, he was recognized by the Professional Insurance Agents of Connecticut as its “Company Person of the Year.” Sachs Walsh Insurance has earned the prestigious “Cornerstone Agency” designation from Chubb Insurance Co. and has been recognized as an “Elite Agency” by Travelers Personal Insurance.

OCTOBER

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The WESTPORT/WESTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE will host a public open forum with regional state Reps. Gail Lavielle, R-143rd Assembly district, and Jonathan Steinberg, D-136th Assembly district, Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the Westport Country Playhouse’s Lucille Lortel Barn, 25 Powers Court, Westport. The community is invited to interact with the representatives and find out more about how Westport is being represented in Hartford. Participants are encouraged to bring questions, concerns, thoughts and ideas. Lavielle is a ranking member of the General Assembly’s commerce committee and sits on the appropriations, education, higher education and higher education consolidation committees; and is a member of the manufacturing caucus and the Long Island Sound caucus. Steinberg is vice chairman of the energy and technology committee and a member of the finance, Revenue and bonding committee, the transportation committee and the aging committee. Westport-Weston Chamber of Commerce President Lisa Parrelli Gray will moderate. To register in advance, call 227-9234 or visit westportwestonchamber.com.

This marks the sixth year for the “HOWL & PROWL” Halloween pet costume party in Greenwich that attracts hundreds of owners and their dogs for an afternoon of fun to benefit pets in need: Sunday, Oct. 27, from 1-4 p.m. Dogs in novelty outfits will be on parade at Greenwich Common Park, 290 Greenwich Ave. All proceeds from the “Howl & Prowl” Costume Party in the Park go to the AdoptA-Dog animal rescue organization. Pet Pantry Warehouse is the sponsor. Visit ppwpet.com to register a dog for the costume contest.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

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on the record Casey Roofing Company Inc., contractor for Jean Pollack. Strip and reroof an existing single-family residence, 123 Inwood Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $10,700. Filed Oct. 3. Chapman-Rizzo Residence, Westport. Reroof an existing singlefamily residence, 1 Highland Road, Westport. Estimated cost: $14,000. Filed Sept. 24. Chase, Kimberly and Brent Chase, Wilton. Perform alterations to an existing single-family residence, 41 Hulda Hill Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed Oct. 8. Code, Mary Elizabeth and David Cote, Wilton. Perform alterations to an existing single-family residence, 10 Oak Ledge Lane, Wilton. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed Oct. 8. Compass Builders L.L.C., Trumbull. Repair fire damage at an existing single-family residence, 77 Canoe Brook Road, Trumbull. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed Oct. 3.

COURT CASES

Bridgeport District Court Bridgeport Towers L.L.C., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Abraham Feller, Brooklyn, N.Y. Plaintiff’s attorney: Daniel A. Benjamin, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for its failure to repay an original loan in the amount of $1.8 million plus interest. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6038595. F.W. Webb Co., Hartford. Filed by Conair L.L.C., Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Robert D. Russo, Southport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for the installation of faulty equipment, which caused fire damage to the plaintiff’s property. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6038628. Jerusalem Foods Incorporated of Connecticut, Stratford. Filed by Brenda Pensnti, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Thomas M. Yuditski, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that she sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 9. Case no. 6038657.

Newfield Associates L.L.C., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Rose Mary Moccia, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: John M. Parese, New Haven. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that she sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6038607. Rowayton Beach Association Inc., et al., Rowayton. Filed by Adam Pemberton, West Redding. Plaintiff’s attorney: Michael J. Rosnick, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that he sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6038597. The Hills Condominium Association Inc., et al., Monroe. Filed by Josephine Guastella, Monroe. Plaintiff’s attorney: Jonathan Eamon Spodnick, Trumbull. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that she sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 7. Case no. 6038584. The J&J Corp., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Elnora Scott, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: John J. Luckhart Jr., Fairfield. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that she sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 9. Case no. 6038662. Walmart Stores Inc., Stratford. Filed by Nyisha Grissett-Newby, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Michael P. Foley Jr., Cheshire. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that she sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6038615.

Danbury District Court Aardvark Remodeling L.L.C., Danbury. Filed by Prime Insurance Co., Sandy, Utah. Plaintiff’s attorney: Howard E. Kantrovitz, Hamden. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay $7,093.19 for outstanding insurance premiums. Filed Oct. 9. Case no. 6013769. Big Y Foods Inc., New Milford. Filed by Barbara Engel, New Milford. Plaintiff’s attorney: David R. Gronbach, New Milford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that she sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 4. Case no. 6013733.

Exterior Design Landscaping L.L.C., et al., Danbury. Filed by O&G Industries Inc., Torrington. Plaintiff’s attorney: Joseph Michael Metzger, Torrington. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breachof-contract suit against the defendant for failing to make payments on a line of credit for the sum of $22,565.08 plus interest, that the plaintiff had provided the defendant. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6013747. Keith J. Manca Building Company L.L.C., Newtown. Filed by The Charter Oak Fire Insurance Co., et al., Hartford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Howard Evan Ignal, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay $11,187.45 for outstanding insurance premiums. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6013755. Make-A-Home Foundation Inc., Newtown. Filed by Devivo-Vona Industries L.L.C., Newtown. Plaintiff’s attorney: Steven M. Olivo, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay rent and other charges due under the terms of the lease agreement. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6013749. Puglia Inc., et al., Waterbury. Filed by Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Christopher G. Winans, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for failing to make payments on a term note in the original amount of $120,000 that the plaintiff had provided to the defendant. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6013753. Shop-Rite Supermarkets Inc., Brookfield. Filed by Janice Nelson, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Michael McCarroll, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries she sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6013745.

Stamford District Court AC Electrical L.L.C., et al., Milford. Filed by Summers Group Inc. d.b.a. Rexel CLS, Hartford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Charles I. Miller, West Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to make payments on a line of credit for the sum of $55,946.45 plus interest, that the plaintiff had provided the defendant. Filed Oct. 7. Case no. 6020020.

22 Week of October 21, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Exterior Design Landscaping L.L.C., et al., Danbury. Filed by L&L Evergreen Inc., South Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ronald D. Japha, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breachof-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay $12,693.56 for materials sold and delivered to the defendant. Filed Oct. 8. Case no. 6020048. Nevellier & Associates Inc., Reno, Nev. Filed by Gordon, Haskett & Co., Greenwich. Plaintiff’s attorney: David W. Rubin, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to terminate the agreement before the three-year term expired and for failing to pay $83,740 for service charges performed by the plaintiff. Filed Oct. 9. Case no. 6020079.

SUPERIOR COURT American Medical Systems Inc., et al. Filed by Albertina and Miguel Esteves, Plaintiff’s attorney: David M. Bernard, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this productliability suit against the defendant for the implant of a pelvic mesh product. The plaintiff has suffered personal damages. Filed Oct. 7. Case no. 13cv01476. Carver Foundation, Norwalk. Filed by Pamela Moultrie, Norwalk. Attorney: Self represented. Action: The plaintiff has brought this discrimination suit based on ethnicity against the defendant. Filed Oct. 1. Case no. 13cv01443. Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies Inc., Skillman, N.J. Filed by Heidi Langan, Trumbull. Plaintiff’s attorney: Mark P. Kindall, West Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this product liability suit against the defendant for using unfair and deceptive business practices arising from marketing and sale of their products as ‘Natural’ which in fact contains synthetic ingredients. Filed Oct. 7. Case no. 13cv01471.

DEEDS

COMMERCIAL 100 Northfield L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: Greenwich Business Associates Commercial L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 100 Northfield St., Greenwich. Amount: $8.3 million. Filed Oct. 2. HGMP L.L.C., Norwalk. Seller: Raymond Brown Associates L.P., Norwalk. Property: 8 Haviland St., Norwalk. Amount: $10.5 million. Filed Oct. 3.

QUIT CLAIM

RESIDENTIAL

Gorman, Blair T. and Christopher H. Gorman, Darien. Seller: First Niagara Bank N.A., New Haven. Property: 55 Crooked Trail Road, Norwalk. Amount: $750,000. Filed Oct. 4.

1032 PRE L.L.C., Westport. Seller: 1032 Post Road East L.L.C., Ridgefield. Property: 1032 Post Road East, Westport. Amount: $2.4 million. Filed Oct. 7.

GRC Construction L.L.C., Sandy Hook. Seller: Flagpole Holdings L.L.C., Newtown. Property: 27 and 31 Beechwood Drive, Newtown. Amount: $106,000. Filed Oct. 1. Hittenmark, Stacey and Jeremie Hittenmark, Monroe, 50 percent interest, and Donna R. and Francis X. Tomasko, Newtown. Seller: Donna R. and Francis X. Tomasko, Newtown. Property: 24 Northwood Road, Monroe. Amount: $125,000. Filed Oct. 7. Kniffen, Susan M., New Canaan. Seller: Heejung and David Laird, Nashville, Tenn. Property: 102 South Ave., Unit 11, New Canaan. Amount: $750,000. Filed Oct. 1. Magliari, Samuel A. Jr., Stamford. Seller: Emilia M. Magliari, Stamford. Property: 1242 Hope St., Unit 1, Stamford. Amount: $100,000. Filed Oct. 1. McAllister L.L.C., New Canaan. Seller: Peoples United Bank, Bridgeport. Property: 8 McAllister Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $231,000. Filed Oct. 1. Peattie, Andrea, Greenwich. Seller: Elia Anita Zia and Rezan C. Graf, Greenwich. Property: 1 Putnam Hill, Unit 3J, Greenwich. Amount: $311,000. Filed Oct. 3. Richardson, Mary B. and Paul C. Richardson, New Canaan. Seller: Marion S. and Harry Hazlehurst III, New Canaan. Property: Garage Unit 15, Canaan Close, New Canaan. Amount: $15,000. Filed Sept. 30.

131 Havemeyer Place L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: George W. Crossman III, Riverside. Property: 131 Havemeyer Place, Greenwich. Amount: $825,000. Filed Oct. 1. 203 McKinley Avenue L.L.C., Shelton. Seller: Maria R. and Antonio s. Leandres, Shelton. Property: 203 McKinley Ave., Bridgeport. Amount: $100,000. Filed Oct. 7. 331 Harbor Road L.L.C., Fairfield. Seller: Patricia A. Dammerman, Fairfield. Property: 331 Harbor Road, Fairfield. Amount: $2.7 million. Filed Oct. 4. 333 PRW L.L.C., Weston. Seller: 333 Post Road Associates L.L.C., White Plains, N.Y. Property: 333 Post Road West, Westport. Amount: $4 million. Filed Oct. 1. 385 Harbor Road L.L.C., Fairfield. Seller: Patricia A. Dammerman and Gregory R. Barmore, Fairfield. Property: 385 Harbor Road, Fairfield. Amount: $590,400. Filed Oct. 4. 385 Harbor Road L.L.C., Fairfield. Seller: Patricia A. Dammerman and Gregory R. Barmore, Fairfield. Property: 385 Harbor Road, Fairfield. Amount: $5.3 million. Filed Oct. 4. 4 Square L.L.C., Stamford. Seller: Osada L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 56 Manor St., Stamford. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Oct. 2. 40 Belmont Street L.L.C., Fairfield. Seller: Frank Geiger, Weston. Property: 40 Belmont St., Fairfield. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed Oct. 1.

Sound Cove Property L.L.C., Stamford. Seller: Eileen and David Hathaway, Stamford. Property: 398 Courtland Ave., Unit 16, Stamford. Amount: $83,000. Filed Oct. 2.

78 Mayo Avenue L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: Bradley Miller and Llewellyn H. Miller, Greenwich. Property: 78 Mayo Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $6.4 million. Filed Oct. 2.

Valentine, Krysta, Stamford. Seller: Donna J. Harrington, Stamford. Property: 337 Sylvan Knoll Road, Unit 337, Stamford. Amount: $192,000. Filed Oct. 3.

Abba, Fidelia M., Danbury. Seller: Anita LoPresti, New Fairfield and Frank LoPresti, Danbury. Property: 7 Padanaram Road, Unit 189, Danbury. Amount: $82,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Wang, Allen Honglian, Norwalk. Seller: Jason Kiska, Norwalk. Property: 41 Wolfpit Ave., Unit 9D, Norwalk. Amount: $80,000. Filed Oct. 1.

Agate, Michael P., Stamford. Seller: Diane M. and Stuart M. Shydlo, Stamford. Property: 2979 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Amount: $299,000. Filed Oct. 1.


on the record Alfaro, Marvin and Jose Escobar, Trumbull. Seller: Leandro N. Pereira, Fairfield. Property: 272 Birmingham St., Bridgeport. Amount: $70,000. Filed Oct. 7.

Eagam, Somaiah, et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Mendotta Heights, Minn. Property: 75 Maple Tree Ave., Unit A, Stamford, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 2.

Ali, Kurshida and Habib Ullah, Stamford. Seller: Milos Nemec, Hampton Bay, N.Y. Property: 245 Fairfield Ave., Stamford. Amount: $420,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Fernandez, Angelita and Evelyn Fernandez. Creditor: HSBC Bank USA N.A., Mount Laurel, N.J. Property: 311 E. Washington Ave., Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 1.

Pontillo, Erna E. and Paul Pontillo, et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 28 Strawberry Lane, Shelton, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 4.

Fish, Eileen and Christopher B. Fish, et al. Creditor: US Bank N.A., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 4 Fawnwood Road, Newtown, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 4.

Ramos, Vicente, et al. Creditor: American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc., West Palm Beach, Flas. Property: 161 Dunn Ave., Stamford, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 2.

Foreman, Kimberly D. and Willie J. Foreman, et al. Creditor: US Bank N.A., Owensboro, Ky. Property: 330 French St., Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 3.

Santos, Milquiadas and Pablo Santos. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Mendota Heights, Minn. Property: 25 James St., Danbury, mortgage default. Filed Sept. 30.

Heege, Elouise and Donald L. Heege. Creditor: Household Realty Corp., Elmhurst, Ill. Property: 24 Rockwell Road, Bethel, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 2.

Schmalz, Jacqueline B. and William D. Schmaltz, et al. Creditor: GMAC Mortgage L.L.C., Fort Washington, Pa. Property: 2 Mayflower Lane, Shelton, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7.

Alpert, Matthew, Monroe. Seller: Shirley B. Hartlett, Stamford. Property: 30 Chattfield St., Stamford. Amount: $200,000. Filed Oct. 1. Amrogio, Jennifer and Brendan M. Dunn, Cos Cob. Seller: Mary P.P. and James M. Lanza, Stamford. Property: 134 Knapp St., Stamford. Amount: $516,000. Filed Sept. 30. Andrews, Patricia and Rory Cummings, Stamford. Seller: Malay Dey and Rajeev Parthasarathy, Bridgeport. Property: 120 Poplar St., Bridgeport. Amount: $96,500. Filed Oct. 2. Augusto, Alan, Danbury. Seller: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., McLean, Va. Property: 2 Falmouth Court, Unit 3C, Brookfield. Amount: $125,000. Filed Oct. 1. Bartmess, Joanne C. and Bradford Bartmess, Fairfield. Seller: Mary Anne Greeley, Fairfield. Property: 19 Balmaha Close, Fairfield. Amount: $475,000. Filed Oct. 1.

FORECLOSURES Bank of America N.A. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Mendotta Heights, Minn. Property: 227 Hollister Ave., Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7. Criscuolo, Rhonda M., et al. Creditor: Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Dallas, Texas. Property: 45 Pert St., Trumbull, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 1. D’Addario, F. Francis, et al. Creditor: Benchmark Municipal Tax Services Ltd., Bridgeport. Property: 1769 to 1771 E. Main St., Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7. Di Paola, Gina, et al. Creditor: Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Frederick, Md. Property: 34 Riverford Road, Brookfield, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7. Donnachie, Anne Marie and Kyle Buonincontra, et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Fort Mill, S.C. Property: 80A River Bend Road, Stratford, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 3.

Pignataro, Melissa M. and Umberto N. Pignataro, et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Fort Mill, S.C. Property: 147 Kennedy Drive, Unit 147, Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 3.

House, Christopher J., et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 9 Nutmeg Lane, Newtown, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7.

Smith, Paul A. III. Creditor: Chase Home Finance L.L.C., Jacksonville, Fla. Property: 1032 Valley Road, Fairfield, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 1.

Kundoor, Praveen K., et al. Creditor: Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C. Lewisville, Texas. Property: 76 Cedarcrest Court, Shelton, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 4.

Torre, Jessica and Christopher Torre, et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Fort Mill, S.C. Property: 325 Lafayette St., Unit 3003, Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 3.

Lampart, Stamatina and David B. Lampart and Gregory P. Lampart. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Westerville, Ohio. Property: 20 Craig Lane, Trumbull, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 1.

Tottenham, Jeffrey and Joseph Moretti. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Westerville, Ohio. Property: 35 Barnum Terrace, Stratford, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 1.

Letersky, Darlene and Paul J. Letersky, et al. Creditor: Peoples United Bank, Bridgeport. Property: 274 to 276 Lyons Plain Road, Weston, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 1. McLaughlin, Shirley D. Creditor: GDBT 1 Trust 2011-1. Property: 1245 to 1249 Kossuth St., Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7. Messam, Maxine A. Creditor: Hudson City Savings Bank, Paramus, N.J. Property: 400 Birmingham St., Bridgeport, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7. Moen, Christine and Pieter Moen, et al. Creditor: town of Stratford. Property: 1578 Silver Lane, Stratford, tax liens. Filed Oct. 4.

Vail, Christina and Anthony Iannucci, et al. Creditor: Flagstar Bank, Troy, Mich. Property: 43 Drummers Lane, Unit 8, Bethel, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 2. Vasquez, Roni, et al. Creditor: LPP Mortgage Ltd., Zurich, Ill. Property: 3699 Broadbridge Ave, Unit 122, Stratford, mortgage default. Filed Oct. 7.

FORECLOSURES BY SALE Arconti, Richard D., Newtown. Appointed committee: Deutsche Bank National Trust, New York City. Property: 147 Boggs Hill Road, Newtown. Amount: $259,512.33. Docket no. DBD 10cv6002510S. Filed Oct. 1.

Bank of America N.A., Simi, Calif. Appointed committee: Jennifer J. Tunnard. Property: 34 Lois St., Danbury. Amount: $193,746.31. Docket no. DBD 12cv6008508S. Filed Oct. 1.

Bortolotto, Jose, Greenwich. $7,703.59, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 20 Harvey St., Greenwich. Filed Sept. 30.

Dauria, Katherine, Bridgeport. $1,891.08, in favor of Waterside Financial Inc., Cheshire, by Scarlett A. Tracey. Property: 111 Pilgrim Road, Bridgeport. Filed Oct. 3.

City of Bridgeport, Appointed committee: Susan Baran, Bridgeport. Property: 560 N. Washington Ave., Unit 7, Bridgeport. Amount: $125,000. Docket no. FBT 12cv6029931S. Filed Oct. 1.

Bradley, Deborah A., Norwalk. $26,118.14, in favor of U.S. Equities Corp., South Salem, N.Y., by Linda Strumpf, New Canaan. Property: 9 Fair St., Norwalk. Filed Oct. 1.

Defino, Douglas, Danbury. $2,841.17, in favor of Capital One Bank N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 20 Oakland Ave., Apt. 4A, Danbury. Filed Sept. 30.

OneWest Bank F.S.B., Pasadena, Calif. Appointed committee: Miriam Helene Sayegh. Property: 51 Bayview Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $272,515.76. Docket no. FST 12cv6016024S. Filed Oct. 3.

Brisseaux, Max, Bridgeport. $1,839.29, in favor of Capital One Bank N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 183 Marigold Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Oct. 1.

Defino, Julie S., Danbury. $2,370.16, in favor of Capital One Bank N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 20 Oakland Ave., Apt. 4A, Danbury. Filed Sept. 30.

Onewest Bank F.S.B., Austin, Texas. Appointed committee: Matthew D. Newman, Stratford. Property: 259 McGrath Court, Stratford. Amount: $55,000. Docket no. FBT 12cv6025110S. Filed Oct. 4.

Burdick, Allison M., Brookfield. $6,667.81, in favor of Asset Acceptance L.L.C., Warren, Mich., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 73 Laurel Hill Road, Brookfield. Filed Oct. 7.

Doherty, Kevin, New Fairfield. $2,426.68, in favor of Giordano Associates L.L.C., East Haven, by Frank J. Kolb Jr., East Haven. Property: 5 Meadow drive, New Fairfield. Filed Oct. 7.

Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Appointed committee: Osvaldo G. Machado, Newtown. Property: 9 S. Main St., Newtown. Amount: $347,537.98. Docket no. DBD 11cv6007970S. Filed Oct. 2.

Cacace, Deborah and Marco Cacace, Brookfield. $2,094.10, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 21 Meadow View Drive, Brookfield. Filed Oct. 2.

Dossantos, Arminda, Danbury. $1,260.22, in favor of Capital One Bank N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 5 Fourth St., Danbury. Filed Sept. 30.

JUDGMENTS Andiamo Italian Deli L.L.C. and Eugenio Mercuri, Norwalk. $489.66, in favor of Napoli Foods Inc., Cheshire, by Eric H. Opin, Milford. Property: 12 Reservoir Ave., Norwalk. Filed Oct. 4. Asaduzzaman, Syed, Danbury. $6,443.39, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 15 Scuppo Road, Unit 103, Danbury. Filed Sept. 30. Aviaga, Luis A., Trumbull. $26,712.01, in favor of Unifund Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio, by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 200 Sunnydale Road, Trumbull. Filed Oct. 7. Ayala, Leonila, Bridgeport. $4,139, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 474 Indian Ave., Bridgeport. Filed Oct. 1. Baines, Paul, Brookfield. $8,957.35, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 19 Meadow Brook Road, Brookfield. Filed Sept. 30. Bennett, Avis, Bridgeport. $1,058.06, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 38 Edward St., Bridgeport. Filed Oct. 1.

Carrano, Dennis P., Stratford. $3,128.11, in favor of Sikorsky Financial Credit Union Inc., Stratford, by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 1309 Huntington Road, Stratford. Filed Oct. 7. Cox, Judith, New Fairfield. $845.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 9 Wood Creek Road, New Fairfield. Filed Oct. 2. Cyr, Michelle, Brookfield. $4,003.87, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 35 Sunset Hill Road, Brookfield. Filed Sept. 30. Czudak, Theresa, New Fairfield. $781.13, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 39 Route 39, New Fairfield. Filed Oct. 2. D’Arinzo, Rhonda, Stamford. $100,854.66, in favor of The Hatch & Bailey, Norwalk, by Bruce L. Elstein, Trumbull. Property: 2020 Long Ridge Road, Stamford. Filed Oct. 3. D’Elia, Rosemary and Emilio D’Elia, Stamford. $1,224.78, in favor of New England Oil Company Inc., Greenwich, by Dina Urso, Greenwich. Property: 29 Fairway Drive, Stamford. Filed Oct. 4.

Dyke, Frank, Sandy Hook. $4,149.47, in favor of West’s Sales and Service Inc. d.b.a. West Chevrolet, Woodbury, Francis M. Donnarumma, Woodbury. Property: 56 Shepaug Road, Sandy Hook. Filed Oct. 4.

LEASES Standard Tile Distributors of New Haven Inc. d.b.a. Tile America, New Haven. Landlord: Brookfield Industrial Development Company L.L.C., Danbury. Property: 115 Federal Road, Brookfield. Term: Five years, commencing Sept. 1, 2013. Filed Sept. 30.

LIENS

FEDERAL TAX LIENSFILED Alidadi, Michael, 70 Forest St., Apt. 8E, Stamford. $64,655.22, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. B&G Marina Inc., P.O. Box 159, Rowayton. $8,428, failure to file or file correct information returns. Filed Oct. 1. Bauer, J. Scott, 19 Oak Crest, Darien. $39,318.55, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 23


on the record Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, 150 Fairfield Ave., Stamford. $8,690.79, failure to file or file correct information returns. Filed Oct. 1. Binch, Susan M. and James G. Binch, 362 Canoe Hill Road, New Canaan. $125,873.53, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 3. Cavalea, Vincent J., 1224 Foxboro Drive, Norwalk. $95,738.46, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Cavaliere, Kathleen and John Cavaliere, 64 Katherine Court, Shelton. $2,223.85, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. CBD Dental Lab Inc., 135 Bedford St., Stamford. $23,559.83, payroll taxes; quarterly tax returns; and corporation income tax return. Filed Oct. 1. Conger, Robert D., 61 Philo Curtis Roa, Sandy Hook. $30,700.08, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 23. Connell, Barry, 29 Benedict Road, Bethel. $45,304.28, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 2. Country Air Heating & Cooling, 26 Paugussett Road, Sandy Hook. $13,908.30, failure to file or file correct information returns. Filed Oct. 1. DeBello, Antonella and John DeBello, 17759 Litten Drive, Boca Raton, Fla. $102,183.16, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 2. Fusco, Michael, 55 Fieldstone Terrace, Stamford. $190,658.67, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 2. Gaylor, Richard, 126 Triangle St., Apt. A38, Danbury. $36,200.73, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30. Groth, Leslie and John Quinn, 3 Ridge Road, Newtown. $39,524.38, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Hill, Travone M., 15E. Pearl St., Danbury. $45,137.98, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30. Johnny Cakes Coffee Corner L.L.C., 10 N. Water St., Greenwich. $16,071.74, failure to file or file correct information returns and payroll taxes. Filed Sept. 30. Klein, Greg, 153 Pocono Road, Brookfield. $86,912.68, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30.

Lombardi, Richard J., 10 Federal Road, Danbury. $2,918.80, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 2. Mackell, Daniel J. Jr., 101 Lewis St., Apt. N, Greenwich. $107,252.60, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30.

Griffith, Bruce, 4801 Sawgrass Breeze Drive, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. $39,223.44, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 7. KB Shellfish Inc., 7 Edgewater Place, East Norwalk. $43,708.49, employer’s annual federal tax return. Filed Oct. 1.

Maxfield, Rosemary T. and James R. Maxfield, 101 Washington Blvd., Unit 1218, Stamford. $53,643.37, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 2.

Kirby, Stephen J. Jr., 38 Freeman Ave., Stratford. $792.23, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 7.

Mitra, Sipra and Jitendra Mitra, 28 Gregory Road, Cos Cob. $36,881.91, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30.

Morrison, James M., 56 Broad Brook Lane, Stamford. $785,361.70, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1.

New England Carting of Wilton L.L.C., P.O. Box 672, Wilton. $25,576.87, 941payroll taxes. Filed Oct. 1.

Moy, Mary A., 25 Home Place, Greenwich. $5.7 million, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30.

O’Hagan, Brian R., 80 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. $130,854.78, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Pellegrino, John F., 64 Kane Ave., Stamford. $53,870.65, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Thanasoulis, Carolyn and Costas Thanasoulis, 57 Pole Bridge Road, Sandy Hook. $33,263.85, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Troja, Terry and Douglas Rohrer, 343 Taconic Road, Greenwich. $125,605.66, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Watts, Sylvia and John Watts, 8 Tulip Tree Lane, Norwalk. $15,938.17, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. White Hills Communications Inc., 20 Rock Ridge Road, Shelton. $67,523.92, payroll taxes. Filed Oct. 1. WLM Construction L.L.C., 3 Ridgeside Road, Danbury. $16,148.81, payroll taxes. Filed Sept. 30.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSPARTIAL RELEASE Bonis, Dawn M. only, 45 Blueberry Hill, Redding. $71,040.45, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSRELEASED Dranka, Raymond, 65 High Ridge Road, Apt. 342, Stamford. $40,478.07, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 2.

Napoleone, Pietro, 16 Sheehan St., Norwalk. $3,773.29, payroll taxes. Filed Oct. 1. Porco, Michael F. Jr., P.O. Box 575, Newtown. $5,396.05, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Porco, Michael F. Jr., P.O. Box 575, Newtown. $5,391.54, tax debt on income earned. Filed Oct. 1. Versaggi, Marilen, 1465 E. Putnam Ave., Apt. 627, Old Greenwich. $221,455.40, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30.

Kaye, Jeremy E., Greenwich. Filed by Pronto Plumbing & Heating Inc., Bethel, by Mark Diot. Property: 7 Wynn Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $9,950. Filed Sept. 30. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., Norwalk. Filed by Enterprise Electrical Contractors Inc., Newtown, by David Bonadio. Property: 800 Connecticut Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $10,721.44. Filed Oct. 1. Norwalk Yacht Club, Norwalk. Filed by C&C Landscaping Services Inc., Norwalk, by John Courtney. Property: 10 Nathan Hale Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $19,531.42. Filed Oct. 1. Norwalk Yacht Club, Norwalk. Filed by Combis Building & Remodeling, Norwalk, by Lee Combis. Property: 10 Nathan Hale Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $30,600. Filed Oct. 1. Norwalk Yacht Club, Norwalk. Filed by Hatch and Baily Co., Norwalk, by Michael Defelice. Property: 10 Nathan Hale Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $27,319.81. Filed Oct. 1. Norwalk Yacht Club, Norwalk. Filed by R and R Landscape Designs L.L.C., Trumbull, Keith Romano. Property: 10 Nathan Hale Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $17,200. Filed Oct. 4. Willcon Holdings L.L.C., Greenwich. Filed by Enterprise Electrical Contractors Inc., Newtown, by David Bonadio. Property: 289 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $7,514.17. Filed Oct. 1.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSWITHDRAWAL AFTER RELEASE MECHANIC’S LIENSRELEASED Palmer, Lynda and Kenneth Palmer, 29 Tomac Ave., Old Greenwich. $89,971.03, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 30.

MECHANIC’S LIENSFILED

30 Broad Street Partners L.L.C. and Neda and Farzad Rastegar, Weston. Filed by Lorenzoni Stone Restoration Inc., Greenwich, by Kathryn Palmer. Property: 30 Broad St., Weston. Amount: $5,056.20. Filed Oct. 1.

Bayly0Gidez, Louise and Christopher Gidez, Fairfield. Filed by Lou Levy Construction, Carmel, N.Y., by Lou Levy. Property: 51 Eunice Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $24,730. Filed Oct. 3.

FC Stratford Tod L.L.C., Stratford. Filed by D Kay Electrical Contractors L.L.C., Stratford, by David Kay. Property: 1055 and 1111 Stratford Ave., Stratford. Amount: $10,100. Filed Oct. 3.

Brown, Jason, Riverside. Filed by Kramer Lane Construction L.L.C., Weston, by Zbigniew Surowiec. Property: 112 Indian Head Road, Greenwich. Amount: $125,000. Filed Oct. 4.

LIS PENDENS

Hamilton Development L.L.C., Westport. Filed by Double “D” Designs & Cosntruction L.L.C., Stamford. Property: 11 Ferry Lane West, Westport. Amount: $23,711. Filed Oct. 4.

24 Week of October 21, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

214 Greenwood L.L.C., Bethel. Filed by John Jowdy, Danbury, for Denise and George Trembly, Bethel. Property: 212 to 216 Greenwood Ave., Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $350,000, dated October 2006. Filed Oct. 3.

Adames, Gertrudy D. and Franklin R. Hernandez, et al., Danbury. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 14 Coalpit Hill Road, Unit 2, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $135,206, dated March 2009. Filed Oct. 1.

Belknap, Paula R., et al., Wilton. Filed by Dennis R. LaVette, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 779 Danbury Road, Wilton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $417,000, dated November 2006. Filed Oct. 3.

Alfalo, Deborah E., Danbury. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Green Tree Servicing L.L.C., Rapid City, S.D. Property: 35 Jefferson Ave., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $292,000, dated December 2006. Filed Oct. 1.

Bishop, Anique and Clifton Samuels, et al., Danbury. Filed by Christopher K. Leonard, Danbury, for Berkshire Hills Townhouse Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 160 Shelter Rock Road, Unit 7, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed Sept. 30.

Ali, Anwar, et al., Stamford. Filed by Timothy W. Menasco, Stamford, for Stamford WPCA, Stamford. Property: 976 E. Main St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose on a sewer-use lien. Filed Oct. 1.

Bowman, Barbara A. and Wayne R Bowman, et al., Stratford. Filed by Kyle T. Auty, Milford, for the town of Stratford. Property: 225 Topaz Place, Stratford. Action: to foreclose on a real estate lien. Filed Oct. 4.

Anderson, Nerissa and Godfrey O. Anderson, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jennifer M. Jason, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 25 Hawthorne St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $212,000, dated November 2005. Filed Oct. 3.

Braxton, Elizabeth and Julian Braxton, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Marsha S. Beckford, Bridgeport, for Benchmark Municipal Tax Services Ltd., Bridgeport. Property: 1162 Stratford Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose past due tax liens. Filed Oct. 1.

Anglin, Richard, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 469 to 471 Connecticut Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $117,000, dated May 2003. Filed Oct. 7. Artis, Terrence James, Bridgeport. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Everbank, Islandia, N.Y. Property: 159 to 161 Spring St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $223,556, dated April 2008. Filed Oct. 3. Barry, Cameron, Danbury. Filed by Robert A. Pacelli Jr., Bridgeport, for Lake Place Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 12 Boulevard, Unit 15, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed Sept. 30. Belardinelli, Karen M. and Charles A. Belardinelli, Ridgefield. Filed by Paul Lewis Otzel, Milford, for Wilmington Trust Co., Wilmington, Del. Property: 35 S. Olmstead Lane, Ridgefield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $336,000, dated January 2005. Filed Oct. 3.

Bright, Laquita and Stephen Morrison, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 47 Magnolia St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $201,600, dated August 2006. Filed Oct. 1. Brown, Dianna E. and Trevor K. Brown, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 180 Broadbridge Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $280,000, dated January 2007. Filed Oct. 3. Buezo-Cardona, Silvia and Maynor Cardona, et al., Greenwich. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 5 Green Lane, Unit A, Greenwich. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $502,400, dated March 2006. Filed Sept. 30. Buryj, Victoria J. and Bohdan Buryj, et al., Stratford. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Citimortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 42 Greenfield Ave., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $170,000, dated October 2004. Filed Oct. 7.


on the record Bussey, Victor, Shelton. Filed by Amanda Tiernan, West Warwick, R.I, for Waterfall Victoria Master Fund Ltd. Property: 160 River Road, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $421,000, dated August 2008. Filed Oct. 2.

Conway, Diane H., et al., Shelton. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Everbank, Islandia, N.Y. Property: 43 Cold Spring Circle, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $175,041, dated September 2001. Filed Oct. 7.

Cain, Anne E., et al., Newtown. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 32 Buttonshop Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $405,750, dated December 2005. Filed Oct. 3.

Cook, Loryn J., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Amanda Tiernan, West Warwick, R.I., for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 8 Chatham Terrace, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $340,000, dated January 2006. Filed Oct. 2.

Campos, Felipe, Stratford. Filed by Kyle T. Auty, Milford, for the town of Stratford. Property: Lot 6, Map 1641, Stratford. Action: to foreclose on a real estate lien. Filed Oct. 4. Carlo, Chris, et al., New Canaan. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 49 Danforth Drive, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $1.03 million, dated October 2005. Filed Oct. 3.

Cranwell, Jeffrey R., et al., Danbury. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Arrowood Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 20 E. Pembroke Road, Unit 31, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Sept. 30.

Davis, Debra A. and James Davis, Danbury. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 22 Pond Crest Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $270,418.73, dated November 2007. Filed Sept. 30. DeJesus, Julio A., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Hudson City Savings Bank, Yonkers, N.Y. Property: 2036 Seaview Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $142,000, dated September 2007. Filed Oct. 3. Dimmo-USA L.L.C., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert N. Sensale, New Haven, for Plymouth Park Tax Services L.L.C., Whippany, N.J. Property: 1003 to 1005 Howard Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose past due tax liens. Filed Oct. 3.

Fleetwood, April M. and Jon W. Fleetwood, et al., Newtown. Filed by Paul Lewis Otzel, Milford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 12 Overlook Knoll Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage, dated July 2005. Filed Oct. 3. Flores Fraser, Antonio, Danbury. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 164 S. King St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $171,002, dated November 2009. Filed Sept. 30. Freeman, Merritt, et al., Stamford. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Citifinancial Inc., Stratford. Property: 17 Chestnut St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $74,511, dated November 2006. Filed Oct. 3.

Cuarenta, Corrina, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for PHH Mortgage Corp., Mount Laurel, N.J. Property: 78 Haddon St., Unit 99, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $55,000, dated April 2003. Filed Oct. 1.

Encarnacao, Auilia and Jose Cabral and Hermano Ramos, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Amanda Tiernan, West Warwick, R.I, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 153 to 157 Whittier St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $216,000, dated July 2004. Filed Oct. 2.

Galarza, Rafael Jr., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 75 Overland Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $133,206, dated October 2010. Filed Oct. 1.

Daniele, Frank R., et al., Norwalk. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 5 Fremont Place, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $125,000, dated November 2001. Filed Oct. 2.

Esposito, Lindsey and Andrew Wilson, Monroe. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 81 Old Zoar Road, Monroe. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $299,653, dated August 2009. Filed Oct. 3.

Gehann, Daniel, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 161 Alice St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $300,000, dated April 2006. Filed Oct. 3.

Daoutis, Athanasios and Demetris Daoutis, et al., Newtown. Filed by Lucas B. Rocklin, New Haven, for Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Property: 160 S. Main St., Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $960,000, dated July 2007. Filed Oct. 7.

Feenstra, Chaja F. and Robert G. Feenstra, et al., Stratford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Everbank, Islandia, N.Y. Property: 164 Pauline St., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $338,200, dated January 2006. Filed Oct. 1.

Gil, Nancy and Cesar Juarez, et al., Stamford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 32 Woodledge Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $444,800, dated December 2005. Filed Sept. 30.

Cheatham, Cynthia, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by John J. Moranski, Fairfield, for Nob Hill Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 256 Texas Ave., Unit 20, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a lien held by the plaintiff, against real property. Filed Oct. 1.

Daoutis, Athanasios and Demetris Daoutis, et al., Trumbull. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Property: 29 Greenbrier Road, Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $340,000, dated July 2007. Filed Oct. 7.

Figlar, Beverly A. and Neil J. Figlar, et al., Fairfield. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for Ocwen Loan Servicing L.L.C., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 54 Figlar Ave., Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $348,350, dated February 2010. Filed Oct. 3.

Gillman, Donna M. and Lawrence J. Gillman, et al., Redding. Filed by Erin A. Mutty, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 24 Old Hattertown Road, Redding. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $840,000, dated August 2004. Filed Oct. 7.

Collazo, Carmen, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Amanda Tiernan, West Warwick, R.I., for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: Lot 29, Pixlee Place, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $175,500, dated August 2006. Filed Oct. 7.

Davidson, Felicia, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Connecticut Housing Financial Authority, Bridgeport. Property: 230 Pilgrim Place, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $176,739, dated December 2009. Filed Oct. 1.

Fils, Marie T. and Simon Fils, et al., Stamford. Filed by Richard Lewis, Stamford, for First County Bank, Stamford. Property: 46 Scofield Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $588,000, dated December 2005. Filed Oct. 1.

Carlo, Ingrid, et al., Stratford. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 73 Disbrow St., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $312,169, dated April 2009. Filed Oct. 1. Ceste, Mario G. Sr. and John G. O’Keefe, et al., Stratford. Filed by Kyle T. Auty, Milford, for town of Stratford. Property: 286A Agawam Drive, Stratford. Action: to foreclose on a real estate lien. Filed Oct. 4. Chase American Mortgage Company L.L.C., Stratford. Filed by Kyle T. Auty, Milford, for the town of Stratford. Property: 1563 Stratford Ave., Stratford. Action: to foreclose on a real estate lien. Filed Oct. 4.

Gonzalez, John M., et al., Norwalk. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Washington Row Preservation IV Condominium Association, Norwalk. Property: 42 S. Main St., Unit 105, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Oct. 1.

Grow Bridgeport Fund Inc., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Marsha S. Beckford, Bridgeport, for Benchmark Municipal Tax Services Ltd., Bridgeport. Property: 492 Seaview Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose past due tax liens. Filed Oct. 1.

Hunter, Paulette, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Candellight Terrace Association, Bridgeport. Property: 73 Riverview Drive, Unit 153, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed Oct. 7.

Guinta, Maryanne N., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert N. Sensale, New Haven, for Plymouth Park Tax Services L.L.C., Whippany, N.J. Property: 75 Harborview Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose past due tax liens. Filed Oct. 3.

Ines, Myriel and Allan Ines, et al., Stamford. Filed by Erin A. Mutty, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 178 Seaton Road, Unit 22A4, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $185,000, dated January 2007. Filed Sept. 30.

Gulli, Donna L. and Anthony A. Gulli, Brookfield. Filed by Erin A. Mutty, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 39 Huckleberry Hill Road, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $287,000, dated November 2006. Filed Oct. 7. Gzyms, Louise A. and Michael A. Gzyms, et al., Shelton. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 25 Brookwood Lane, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $234,202, dated August 2012. Filed Oct. 2. Hemingway, Gertrude, et al., Norwalk. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 4 Kellogg St., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $435,478.50, dated July 2004. Filed Oct. 3. Hickey, John D. Jr., et al., Newtown. Filed by John P. Fahey, Farmington, for Valley National Bank, Houston, Texas. Property: 41 Bushy Hill Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $188,000, dated December 2002. Filed Oct. 2. Hilton, Yohvanna, et al., Norwalk. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for Citimortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 19 Wilton Ave., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $398,000, dated August 2005. Filed Oct. 3. Hunte, Dawne, et al., Shelton. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 44 Applewood Drive, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $354,600, dated April 2009. Filed Oct. 3.

Jacobs, Cecelia M., et al., Stratford. Filed by Kyle T. Auty, Milford, for the town of Stratford. Property: 25 Elizabeth St., Stratford. Action: to foreclose on a real estate lien. Filed Oct. 4. James, Mecca, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Nob Hill Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 179C Louisiana Ave., Unit 360, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Oct. 1. Jenkins, Eunice, Stratford. Filed by Kyle T. Auty, Milford, for the town of Stratford. Property: 230 Larkin Court, Stratford. Action: to foreclose on a real estate lien. Filed Oct. 4. Johnson, Clifton George, et al., Stamford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 69 Forest Lawn Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $245,049, dated September 2003. Filed Oct. 3. Johnson, Marvel, et al., Shelton. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 47 Middle Ave., Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $329,289, dated August 2005. Filed Oct. 7. Jones, Terrell L., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Ocwen Loan Servicing L.L.C., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 1276 Park Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $177,600, dated December 2004. Filed Oct. 7. Jossick, Cheryl L. and James L. Jossick Jr., et al., Newtown. Filed James Trudell, Farmington, for Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Property: 40 Turkey Hill Terrace, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $144,000, dated August 1998. Filed Oct. 7.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 25


on the record Kirts, Deana L. and Daniel E. Zimmerman, et al., Newtown. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 50 Queen St., Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $380,855, dated October 2007. Filed Oct. 7. Kulish, Kathy L., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Valerie A. Finney, Farmington, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 7 Teresa Place, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $184,000, dated February 2007. Filed Oct. 1. Lampitelli, Cecelia J., et al., Redding. Filed by Sonja J. Straub, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 356 Whortleberry Road, Redding. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $249,960, dated January 2012. Larosa, Diana and Peter T. Frasca, et al., Danbury. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Lexington Mews Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 2703 Eaton Court, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Oct. 2. Lemus, Laura and Fredy Lemus, et al., Cos Cob. Filed by Karen E. McArthur, Armonk, N.Y., for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 67 Cos Cob Ave., Cos Cob. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $600,000, dated April 2005. Filed Sept. 30. Lent, Bridgit N. and Richard S. Lent, et al., Norwalk. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Prospect Garden Association Inc., Norwalk. Property: 18 Prospect Ave., Unit A1, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Oct. 1.

Lesinsky, Joseph, Stratford. Filed by Kyle T. Auty, Milford, for the town of Stratford. Property: 135 Seabreeze Drive, Stratford. Action: to foreclose on a real estate lien. Filed Oct. 4. Lewis, Marcia, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Nob Hill Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 34 Nob Hill Circle, Unit 59, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Oct. 1. Lino, Rigoberto, Bridgeport. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for PNC Bank, Pittsburgh, Pa. Property: 412 Intervale Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $237,000, dated March 2012. Filed Oct. 1. Ludwig, Susan P. and Roger W. Ludwig, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 19 Eames Blvd., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of. Filed Oct. 1. Lynch, David Nixon, executor for the estate of Gaynelle N. and Rollo M. Lynch, et al., Norwalk. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 83 Vista Road, Wilton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $62,000, dated July 1993. Filed Oct. 3. Lyons, Kirk, and Garfield Patterson, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Beechwood Square Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 200J Beechwood Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Oct. 7.

+THIS WEEK’S

ELECTRONIC RECORDS SECTION CONTAINS:

10 MORE COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS available on Westfaironline.com. 120 MORE RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS available on Westfaironline.com. 250 MORE RESIDENTIAL DEEDS available on Westfaironline.com. 50 MORE JUDGMENTS available on Westfaironline.com. 70 MORE LIS PENDENS availble on Westfaironline.com.

MoRTGaGES

commerciaL 100 Northfield L.L.C., Greenwich, by Andrew M. Bursky. Lender: Bank of America N.A., St. Louis, Mo. Property: 100 Northfield St., Greenwich. Amount: $6.5 million. Filed Oct. 2. Greenwich Putnam L.L.C., Greenwich, by Quatrella & Rizio L.L.C., Fairfield. Lender: People’s United Bank, N.A., Bridgeport. Property: 2 to 10 Greenwich Ave., and 4 to 14 W. Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $3 million. Filed Oct. 1. HGMP L.L.C., Norwalk, by Cassin & Cassin L.L.P., New York City. Lender: Walker & Dunlop L.L.C., Bethesda, Md. Property: 8 to 16 Haviland St., Norwalk. Amount: $8.1 million. Filed Oct. 3.

construction 333 PRW L.L.C., Weston, by Wofsey, Rosen, Kweskin & Kuriansky L.L.P., Stamford. Lender: First County Bank, Stamford. Property: 333 Post Road West, Westport. Amount: $4.2 million. Filed Oct. 1.

NEW BUSINESSES 155 Wayne Navcapman L.L.C. d.b.a. Golden Hill Realty, 1023 Main St., Bridgeport 06604, c/o Justin Goldberg and Ilan Tiomkin. Filed Oct. 2.

Award Properties, P.O. Box 320363, Fairfield 06825, c/o Alexander Ward. Filed Oct. 4.

GHS Girls Ice Hockey, 52 Nicholas Ave., Greenwich 06831, c/o Lisa A. Ferguson. Filed Oct. 3.

Bogeyes, 71 Newtown Road, Danbury 06810, c/o Albert Quell. Filed Oct. 2.

Green Line, 1365 E. Main St., Bridgeport 06608, c/o Mohammad Abouduhun. Filed Oct. 2.

Bridgeport Netball Club, 387 Jackson Ave., Bridgeport 06606, c/o Simone Bailey and Angella Porter. Filed Oct. 1.

Ifixitall, 13 Nicholas St., Danbury 06810, c/o Aslan Kumantas. Filed Sept. 30.

Catherine Avery Investment Management, 27 Pine St., New Canaan 06840, c/o Catherine Avery. Filed Oct. 4. Center Chimney Publishing, 16 Chestnut Hill Road, Sandy Hook 06482, c/o Kelley Tina Johnson. Filed Oct. 7. Coffee Coffee, 365 Short Hill Lane, Fairfield 06825, c/o Lori DeGroat. Filed Oct. 3. Cruz Multiservices, 13 West St., Danbury 06810, c/o Tatiana Cruz. Filed Oct. 3. Danbury Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates, 85 North St., Danbury 06810, c/o Marshall D. Kurtz D.M.D. Filed Sept. 30. Dance Corner Plus, 1 Morse Court, New Canaan 06840, c/o Sarah Duffy. Filed Oct. 1. Danis Day Care, 16 Adams Farm Road, Westport 06880, c/o Danielly Ferreira Novoli. Filed Oct. 3.

8 to the Bar, 607 Brewster St., Bridgeport 06605, c/o Kathy Monahan and James V. Bruno. Filed Oct. 2.

Dee Hair and Beauty Supplies, 1285 Park Ave., Bridgeport 06604, c/o Dedre Facey. Filed Oct. 7.

A and J Cleaning Services, 58 Linwood Ave., Fairfield 06824, c/o Jerry Numaworse. Filed Oct. 7.

Dependable Maintenance Service, 11 Vining Road, Bethel 06801, c/o Kenneth Sallusto. Filed Oct. 7.

AAJ&J Associates, 12 Lake Ave., Danbury 06810, c/o AAJ&J Associates L.L.C. Filed Sept. 30.

DJS Roofing & Siding, 1414 Huntington Road, Stratford 06614, c/o Donato Quattrucci. Filed Oct. 2.

Alumnae Association of the Stamford Hospital School of Nursing, 719 Ponus Ridge, New Canaan 06840, c/o Carole A. Manimbo. Filed Oct. 2.

Doctors Express - Bridgeport I, 161 Boston Ave., Bridgeport 06610, c/o Steven Heffer. Filed Oct. 3.

Amazing Staging, 709 Huntington Road, Stratford 06614, c/o Dawn Ruggiero. Filed Oct. 4. AP Dental Studio, 80 Douglas St., Stratford 06614, c/o Oleksandr Rudka. Filed Oct. 2. Awaken Higher Brain Living Westport, 17 Bridge Square, Westport 06880, c/o Mark Breiner. Filed Oct. 3.

26 Week of October 21, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

East Coast Events, 116 Morgan St., Apt. 234, Stamford 06905, c/o Tanya Szele. Filed Sept. 30. Fazabridge Consulting, 77 Oxford Place, Southport 06890, c/o AWS innovation and Investment L.L.C. Filed Oct. 4. Forever Hair by Sarah, 47 Stony Hill Road, Bethel 06801, c/o Sarah Bengtson. Filed Oct. 7.

Info Pro Xtreme L.L.C. d.b.a. Croix Sather Worldwide, 32 Wood Creek Road, New Fairfield 06812, c/o Croix Sather. Filed Oct. 3. Interactive Response Marketing, 929 White Plains Road, Suite 405, Trumbull 06611, c/o Michael P. Epstein. Filed Oct. 7. Jims Services, 45 Blakeman Place, Stratford 06615, c/o James S. Taber. Filed Oct. 4. Lectors Lab, 91 Lenox Ave., Stratford 06615, c/o Daniel Yatsinko. Filed Oct. 4. Market Ready, 77 Oxford Place, Southport 06890, c/o AWS Innovation and Investment L.L.C. Filed Oct. 4. Mobile Wheel Repair Specialists of the Northern Fairfield County, 94 Sand Pit Road, Danbury 06810, c/o Enio Albuquerque. Filed Oct. 3. Naughty Water Whiskey Bar and Grille, 2931 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport 06605, c/o Jerry Iannucci. Filed Oct. 3. New England Thinstones, 278 Meadow St., Fairfield 06824, c/o James Hersh. Filed Oct. 7. Northwater Deli Pluss, 41 N. Water S., Greenwich 06830, c/o Aurora A. Gonzalez. Filed Oct. 2. Pacific Dialogue, 159 Reitter St., Stratford 06615, c/o Robert J. Miko. Filed Oct. 1. Platinum Touch Transportation Corp., 3 Grange St., Greenwich 06830, c/o Diego Gallego. Filed Oct. 1. RPM Cleaning Maintenance and Landscaping, 195 Funston Ave., Bridgeport 06606, c/o Philip Murphy and Wilfred E. Murphy. Filed Oct. 3. Second Chance Voice of Hope Daycare & Pre-School Center, 175 Sixth St., Bridgeport 06604, c/o Dr. Hazel Bonaparte, et al. Filed Oct. 2.

Second Chance Voice of Hope Enterprises L.L.C., 175 Sixth St., Bridgeport 06607, c/o Dr. Hazel Bonaparte, et al. Filed Oct. 2. Sherries Specialties, 17 Tobins Court, Danbury 06810, c/o Sherrie Krupnick Associates L.L.C. Filed Oct. 3. SHIP internal Medicine Associates of Darien, 36 Old Kings Highway South, Darien 06820, c/o Stamford Health Integrated Practices. Filed Oct. 1. SND Cleaning Services L.L.C., 57 Petrie St., Bridgeport 06604, c/o Shenida Eaddy. Filed Oct. 3. SRI RX L.L.C., 140 Greenwood Ave., Bethel 06801, c/o Srikanth Popuri. Filed Oct. 4. Straight Line Builders, 201 S. Salem Road, Ridgefield 06877, c/o David Shea. Filed Oct. 7. Summerhill Kitchen & Bath, 56 Golden Hill, Trumbull 06611, c/o Stacey Hart. Filed Oct. 7. Suresound, 217 Seaver Cirlce, Bridgeport 06606, c/o Andrew J. Sorensen. Filed Oct. 7. The Bag Lady of Greenwich, 255 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich 06830, c/o Alexander Eli. Filed Sept. 30. V&N Cleaning, 319 Granfield Ave., Apt. D, Bridgeport 06610, c/o Nadiia and Volodymyr Kushnir. Filed Oct. 4. Variety Bon Jounto Haiti, 2438 Main St., Bridgeport 06606, c/o Presilius Prophete. Filed Oct. 1. Wave Baseball, 287 Delaware Drive, Stratford 06614, c/o Brian Alves. Filed Oct. 2. Well Adjusted L.L.C., 499 Federal Road, Unit 18, Brookfield 06804, c/o Debra Dlug. Filed Oct. 2. Zephyr Fluid Solutions L.L.C. d.b.a. RX Armory, 30 Pecks Lane, Newtown 06470, c/o Patrick Wind, Michael C. Malota, Kevin Houlihan and Don Whaley. Filed Oct. 4.

NEW LIQUoR LICENSES Greens Farms Spirit Shop, 1250 Post Road East, Westport 06880, c/o John A. Riley. Filed Oct. 1. Tengda Asian Bistro, 1330 Post Road, Westport 06880, c/o Dong He Zhao. Filed Oct. 1.


Business ConneCtions Issues & PolIcIes

events

Workers’ Comp Insurance Rates May Rise in 2014

CBIA’s 198th Annual Meeting & Reception

C

onnecticut’s best business gathering of the year is a spectacular combination of great networking, excellent food, and timely information and insights. Make sure you and your company participate in this annual crossroads of ideas and innovators where you will:

M

any employers in Connecticut could end up paying higher workers’ compensation insurance premiums in 2014. Pending approval of the Connecticut Insurance Department, rates for policies purchased in the normal, or voluntary, market will increase by 3.2% overall; rates for assigned risk policies will rise by 5.7%.

f Network with the people whose talent, vision and ingenuity are the reasons for Connecticut’s economic vitality. f Review the accomplishments of the state’s largest business association in 2013 and get a preview of what’s ahead in ’14.

Costs for self-insured companies will likely increase as well, since their costs generally mirror those for insured businesses. The rate changes are proposed by the National Council on Compensation Insurance Inc. (NCCI), which analyzes and recommends workers’ comp rates for insurers in more than 40 states. According to NCCI, the primary drivers of the proposed changes are:

Special Informational Program

Rates will take effect for policies as they are purchased or renewed on or after Jan. 1, 2014. Here’s how the proposed rates break down by industry: Assigned Risk Market

f Average costs for both indemnity and medical care remain high and are growing faster than wages

Voluntary Market Manufacturing

+3.7%

Manufacturing

+6.2%

f The medical cost per case for lost time claims has increased dramatically over the last eight years

Contracting

+3.5%

Contracting

+6%

Office & Clerical

+2.5%

Office & Clerical

+5%

f However, said NCCI, continuing declines in claim frequency have somewhat helped to offset rising costs.

Goods & Services +2.3%

Goods & Services +4.7%

Miscellaneous

+5.2%

Miscellaneous

+7.7%

The proposed rates are “pure premium” rates, which do not include costs associated with administration, premium taxes, and other expenses—nor do they take companies’ claims experience into consideration.

Overall

+3.2%

Overall

+5.7%

f Sustainability’s New Bottom Line— Panel discussion addressing regulatory reform and Lean practices f From Hartford to the Himalayas— Journey over 11,000 miles, and soar 13,000 feet, to see how a remarkable alliance of high school students, a world-traveling entrepreneur and Connecticut businesses brought electricity to a school high in the mountains of Nepal. Date

Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013

Time

4:30–7:30 pm

Place Marriott Hartford Downtown 200 Columbus Blvd., Hartford Cost

CBIA members only, $95

Scan to RegiSteR!

f Read more at gov.cbia.com ➤ Register at cbia.com/events

HealtHcare 2014

ACA Healthcare Reminders for Connecticut Businesses

T

he coming months will be a busy time for many Connecticut businesses with open enrollment for their employees’ health insurance plans.

It’s important to keep in mind that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) does not change the existing avenues for purchasing health insurance coverage—for example through private insurers—but adds the state-operated marketplace as another option. The ACA’s employer penalty has been delayed until 2015, so large employers (having 50 or more full-time equivalent employees) won’t face penalties

for providing coverage deemed unaffordable under ACA standards in 2014. However, it’s also important to remember that other requirements are still in place. For example, notices of state exchanges (which should have been provided to your employees by October 1), W-2 filing requirements, and new taxes have not been delayed.

number of health benefit mandates—that is, procedures and treatments the state government requires insurance plans to cover. Each of these special mandates affects the overall cost of health insurance, and when the mandates add up—Connecticut has one of the highest totals in the U.S., with more than 50—the problem gets worse.

Still a central concern for Connecticut’s employers is the escalating cost of healthcare, with recent headlines highlighting the issue.

As implementation of the Affordable Care Act continues, the state legislature must focus on policies that will reduce the cost of purchasing health insurance in Connecticut.

Contributing to the problem is Connecticut’s high

f Learn more at cbia.com/healthcare2014

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of October 21, 2013 27


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