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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL YOUR ONLY SOURCE FOR REGIONAL BUSINESS NEWS | westfaironline.com

September 23, 2013 | VOL. 49, No. 38

FALL DEFAULT RILES HIMES

FCBJ this week DOWN ON THE FARM Participation lags for farm-chef project … 5

‘A PLACE WE’VE NEVER BEEN BEFORE’

MONEY FOR STEAK HOLDERS The intersection of food and finance … 14

By JEnniFER BiSSEll jbissell@westfairinc.com

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CLASS IS IN SESSION FCBuzz trips the light fantastic … 18 CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE Newsmakers and their doings … 20

MEDIA PARTNER

An over the edge employee rappels off 101 Park Ave. in Stamford.

BUSINESS, COMMUNITY GO OVER THE EDGE By JEnniFER BiSSEll jbissell@westfairinc.com

TO CLIMB OVER THE EDGE of a high rise is usually a cry for help. But at a recent fundraiser in Stamford it was a sign of help. Nearly 20 community members rappelled off the roof of 101 Park Place at Harbor Point earlier this month to raise roughly $30,000 for the Special Olympics in Connecticut. By raising a minimum of

$1,000 each, participants were given the chance to climb down one of the tallest buildings in Stamford, standing 15 stories high. Leading the way, John Freeman, the senior vice president and general counsel of Harbor Point, was the first to go “over the edge,” as the name of the event put it. “It was really scary, but it’s for a great cause,” Freeman said. “You have to go » Business, page 7

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SPECIAL DELIVERY The Stamford Post Office’s mixed-use future.

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.S. Rep. Jim Himes, a Greenwich Democrat, spoke to the Greater Norwalk Chamber of Commerce Sept. 16 calling for Congress to reach a deal over deficit reduction strategies. At the end of September the county faces a government shutdown unless Congress agrees to a debt ceiling resolution. The Treasury Department said if no deal is reached, it won’t have enough money to pay the government’s bills by mid-October. “We’re not talking about the budget anymore,” Himes said, emphasizing the problem was larger than any single-year budget line item. “The debt ceiling does nothing to limit debt because (Congress) always raises it. “But if we get to Oct. 19 or 20, and the world believes we won’t honor our (debt) obligations, then we’re in a place we’ve never been before,” he said. Himes, speaking to a group of about » Fall, page 6

information central By Bill Fallon bfallon@westfairinc.com

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tatistics gathered The Business Council of Fairfield County say it’s time to make room for Stamford among the world’s international cities: polyglot and thrumming. For the last five years, 60 percent of births there have been to foreign-born women and fully one-third of four-year degree holders are foreign-born. » Information, page 6


Women’s work, 2013 WBDC opens doors once nailed shut By Bill Fallon bfallon@westfairinc.com

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he year 1972 hardly rings with the mustiness of olden days — two Apollo missions landed on the moon that year and San Antonio, Texas, hosted a smoky “Cheech and Chong Day.” But in that year, it was impossible for a woman in her own name to get a mortgage, a credit card or a car loan. The male-dominated power structures could even forbid a woman from retaking her maiden name after divorce. It was enough to make a person pine for 1872, 100 years earlier: “That was the year the federal government passed a law mandating equal pay for women and men doing the same work for the government,” said Fran Pastore, president and CEO of the Stamfordbased Women’s Business Development Council (WBDC). “We’re still fighting the battle.” That battle, with all its historic permutations and persecutions, eventually reveals its economic underpinnings. “If women have their own economic clout, everything is better,” Pastore said. “There is less domestic violence. There is less oppression. It does not matter if you’re from Rwanda, Costa Rica, Afghanistan or the U.S., the issues are the same. The way out is through education and empowerment and teaching women to advocate for themselves. It’s been proven over and over again.” The fight made a major leap forward in 1988 with the passage of HR 5050 — also called the Women’s Business Ownership Act — a game-changing law that for the first time opened the world of credit to independent businesswomen and that made WBDC possible. (The number was not retired; the current Congress’s HR 5050 concerns online activity.) Pastore heads a full-time team of 14 at the WBDC on Bedford Street in Stamford. It is an office with a distinctive feature: a teched-out classroom from which the council provides entrepreneurs with education, training and economic empowerment. About 15 percent of those who sign up for WBDC assistance are male. “We are the resident experts in Connecticut on the topics of small-business training and education,” Pastore said. “The WBDC is all about why a woman needs her own pocketbook.”

The organization’s mission is “dedicated to helping women achieve economic equality through entrepreneurial training, financial education and professional development.” Greenwich retailer and New Canaanbased Liz Logie women’s clothing founder Veronique Lee offered praise for her WBDC experience, saying via written testimonial: “We met with WBDC business counselors for over a year. As a result of our work with WBDC, we were able to open a retail store on Greenwich Avenue and create two new jobs. The WBDC is an invaluable resource and was instrumental in the launching of Atelier 360. We could not have done this without them.” Atelier 360 is at 113 Greenwich Ave. “We’re problem-solvers here,” said Kimberly DeSousa, senior manager of programs. The federally funded WBDC is a national Small Business Administration program. The Connecticut arm helps some 1,200 clients per year. “We’re fast,” said Pastore, who founded the WBDC 17 years ago. “Because we’re an SBA project/program, we received seed funding 17 years ago. We’re the go-to agency for the federal government for small business and we’d like to think we’re the go-to agency for the state. “A person might need to know how to register a business with the secretary of state” Pastore said. “We’re connected on the state level to the treasurer, the secretary of state, the DECD, the lieutenant governor and the governor, all of whom recognize our work is critical.” The WBDC operates with three pillars of principal: • entrepreneurial training, including one-on-one counseling and strategic planning, cash flow, marketing and sales; • financial education, including oneon-one budget coaching and help with debt, credit repair and personal finance issues; and • professional development, wherein avenues of growth and employment skill gaps are among the lesson plans. Beyond the pillars, the council identifies itself as a “thought leader” for small business, hewing to the proven path of training, education and development. “We’re leaders in the arena of adult education and training as it reflects on those three pillars,” Pastore said. She offered an example that would ring

2 Week of September 23, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Louise Lisboa, WBDC operations specialist, left, and Karen Ham, finance manager.

Fran Pastore, WBDC president and CEO

true to many, perhaps more so given the current “man cave” and “boys-and-toys” ethos in pop culture: “Give a woman whose portfolio is good a $10 loan and that woman invests in family and children,” she said. “The male maybe thinks, ‘What can I get?’” The WBDC, in Pastore’s words, is “inextricably connected to HR 5050,” the 1988 law that, among other advances for women, included the Fair Credit Act that gave them — and the WBDC — access to capital programs. HR 5050 also established the national Women’s Business Council 16-member board that, as of last September, includes Pastore. Thursday, Oct. 24, the WBDC will host its only annual fundraiser, a breakfast at the Stamford Marriott Hotel & Spa

that opens its doors at 7 a.m., and kicks off with networking at 7:30 a.m. This year marks the 12th annual business event and will recognize the passage of HR 5050 25 years ago. Mistress of ceremonies is Diana Sousa, vice president for corporate communications, Cigna Corp. State Treasurer Denise L. Nappier is guest speaker and Teresa Younger, executive director of the Connecticut Permanent Commission on the Status of Women, is panel moderator. The panelists are Sarah Fisher, CEO, Sarah Fisher Harman Racing L.L.C.; Susan Duffy, executive director, Women’s Center for Entrepreneurial leadership at Babson College; and Laurie Tucker, senior vice president for corporate marketing, FedEx Services.


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Panelists discuss careers at Westchester Country Club. Photo by Jennifer Bissell

By JEnniFER BiSSEll jbissell@westfairinc.com

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t a time when women make up the majority of the workforce, but are often absent from executive leadership meetings, the jury is still out on whether or not the glass ceiling still exists. But at a recent women’s seminar at the Westchester Country Club in Rye, N.Y., attendees agreed on one thing: strong networks matter when it comes to advancing women’s careers. “There’s been so much progress and I think we make that progress through positive example,” said Susan Fox, president of the White Plains Hospital. “You have more women in the workforce now that are willing to be mentors. That increases our ability to move forward and with more speed.” “I never had a mentor,” she added. “I had to figure it out myself.” Hosted by accounting and professional services firm Citrin Cooperman & Co. L.L.P., five women executives spoke Sept. 18 about their careers paths and the major challenges they’ve faced as leaders. Each started their careers in “pink collar” positions in education, health care and retail, but now have taken over jobs typically held by men. In addition to Fox, panelists at the event included Roberta Bernhardt, a Citrin Cooperman partner; Kimberly Cline, Long Island University president; Lori Littell-Pape, Chase Consumer and Community Banking chief control officer; and Dee DelBello, CEO of Westfair Communications, which publishes the Business Journal. The event was organized by Citrin Cooperman’s White Plains and Norwalk offices. A decades-old brotherhood of working men has provided a support net-

work and camaraderie. But a network for women is just beginning, DelBello said, saying she believes the women have shattered the glass ceiling. Only 15 percent of executive leadership positions are held by women today. But with additional mentoring and time, more women will emerge as leaders, she said. “God, I wish I was a young kid today,” DelBello said. “I think this next generation of women is absolutely incredible — the opportunities available to them, the courage and stamina of these women. I don’t think they’re going to have much trouble if they have confidence in themselves.” Both panelists and audience members said it can be difficult standing up as the only woman in the room. But by teaming up with other women and by looking for mentors in both men and women, a better path is being blazed for women in the future, they said. Institutions are starting to take work-life balances and flexible schedules more seriously, too, according to Cline. Regarding Millennials, Cline said, “The work-life balance for them is huge. It’s important for us to tell them our stories, what happened along the way, to let them understand the importance of hard work. You can leave at 5. That’s your choice. But you’re not going to become CEO.” Bernhardt candidly recounted that when she graduated with her accounting degree about 25 years ago, there were not many positions open for women. One hiring representative at one of the largest accounting firms at the time even blatantly told her that, despite her good grades, he couldn’t hire her because she was a women and a little older than the rest of her class. “‘You know I can’t hire you,’” she recalled him saying. “‘But I just had to meet you. You have a great GPA.’”

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PERSPECTIVES

By FRan PaSToRE

C

an you imagine owning and operating a successful business as a female just 25 years ago? Your balance sheet looks great and your credit is exceptional. Business is so good that you need to expand. You go to your local banker and attempt to get a business expansion loan and you are turned away. Not because you have poor credit, but because, even with your stellar financial statements and your fantastic credit, you STILL need a male relative to co-sign a loan for you. That’s right — just 25 years ago this October, women’s access to credit for commercial purposes required a male co-signer! October marks the 25th anniversary of the historic passage of H.R. 5050 — legislation that led to an explosion in women’s entrepreneurship. H.R. 5050 accomplished four important milestones: 1. initiated women business centers (WBCs) to provide small business training, education and counseling to women who want to start or grow businesses. Nine years later, in 1995, Connecticut was one of a few states in the country, which did not have a women’s business center. As an entrepreneur myself, I saw an opportunity and decided to start one and that is how the Women’s Business Development Council was born, nearly seventeen years ago. In 2010, over 120 women’s business centers helped to create 13,000 new businesses nationally; 36,578 new jobs; and supported existing businesses that contributed a collective $1.3 billion to the U.S. economy. That same year in Connecticut, WBDC assisted in the creation of nearly 120 new businesses and helped more than 140 existing businesses with operations,

FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL • • • • •

HR 5050 at 25 resulting in the creation of more than 240 new jobs. WBDC clients generated an estimated $40 million in gross revenue. 2. Established the national Women’s Business Council, a nonpartisan federal advisory council to serve as an independent source of advice and counsel on economic issues of importance to women business owners. The 16 women, including myself, that comprise NWBC, advise the president, Congress, and the U.S. Small Business Administration. 3. Required that the Census Bureau include C Corporations when counting women-owned �irms; C corporations owned by women were not included in the US Census data collection process. 4. And, yes, �inally eliminated all individual state laws that required women to have a male relative co-sign a business loan. Today, women entrepreneurs have benefited from a new procurement program put in place so that women owned companies can bid for contracts with restricted competition — opening up a public market important to their success. Access to credit is still an issue, but credit is no longer based on gender. WBDC is one of the leading WBCs in the country. And, if the new marketplaces to buy insurance succeed, women business owners will have fewer barriers to providing health insurance to their employees. The number of women-owned businesses in Connecticut increased 35 percent since 1997 and sales at those firms

SPEAKING OF … WORKING WOMEN “Being the boss anywhere is lonely. Being a female boss in a world of mostly men is especially so.” — Robert Frost

“Women who seek to be equal with men lack ambition.” — Timothy Leary

4 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

increased by nearly 67 percent, according to an analysis of U.S. Census data by American Express OPEN, titled “The 2013 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report.” Connecticut firms exceeded the national average in hiring employees (up 17 percent in the state vs. 10 percent nationally) and in sales growth (67 percent vs. 63 percent). In Connecticut, we’ve witnessed a 17.3 percent growth in jobs — or a whopping 92,000 positions — among women-led businesses, from 2007-11. Women-led businesses have had a national growth rate of 1.5 times the national rate for all businesses. It’s exciting to imagine what the next 25 years will bring, and WBDC intends to remain in the driver’s seat — educating and training women entrepreneurs throughout Connecticut and helping to continue to shape policy issues as they relate to women owned businesses nationwide. Fran Pastore is president and CEO of Women’s Business Development Council. She can be reached at (203) 353-1750.

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Or write to: Fairfield County Business Journal 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 www.westfaironline.com Publisher • Dee DelBello Managing Editor • Bob Rozycki Editor • Bill Fallon Administrative Manager • Alissa Frey

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Few join Farm-to-Chef Week By JEnniFER BiSSEll jbissell@westfairinc.com

I

t is easier for people to imagine a $5 million country manor in Fairfield County than a farm. The rubber boots on Greenwich Avenue rarely see mud. But when the dinner bell rings, officials at the Department of Agriculture want people to remember local farms exist and their products should be on your plate. Roughly 76 restaurants and other establishments across the state participated in this year’s fourth annual Farmto-Chef Week, bringing locally grown produce, meat and wine to patron’s plates. But while more farms and venues participated in this year’s event than in previous years, the rate of participation is still lower than Agriculture Department officials would like, especially in Fairfield County. Only 15 food venues in Fairfield County participated in the week and two-thirds were schools. Similarly only four Fairfield County farms participated, while there are at least 16 producers

and wholesalers in the county actively involved in the department’s general “Farm to Chef” program. “It’s really a question of people not knowing about it,” Linda Piotrowicz, program director for Farm-to-Chef Week, said. “Restaurants get bombarded with this week and that week. In Hartford, for instance, there’s both the Connecticut Food & Wine Festival and Taste of Hartford. I know they get bombarded with special events all the time. It gets lost in the shuffle.” Most of the fees collected by participating venues go toward advertising. But with a fee as low as $25 per restaurant, the advertising budget is pretty small, Piotrowicz said, especially when compared to restaurant week in places like the Hudson Valley, where participating restaurants are charged $700. Despite the relatively small size of the event, however, Piotrowicz said it still accomplishes its goals. It increases awareness among diners and residents about Connecticut-grown ingredients and it strengthens the connection between farms and restaurants.

Piotrowicz said she has heard of several instances where the week has supplied both farmers and restaurants with new regular customers. Sometimes chefs don’t realize they’re able to get Connecticut-grown meat and poultry, she said. Other times chefs are able to experiment with new menus to see if customers respond positively. “A lot of food is being grown out of the country and we don’t have much control over how it is grown,” Piotrowicz said. “If it’s local, they can ask questions, go to farm and see how it’s produced.” Pete Sepe, who owns Sepe Farm in Sandy Hook with his wife and family, said he was surprised more farms weren’t registered for the event. He has found several regular customers from participating in the week during the last three years. For 20 years his family farm has offered ground lamb and other lamb products year round. “That’s the trick of the trade,” Sepe said. “You got to try to make it easy for the chef. It takes collaboration both ways. Chefs like to know what’s out there and they’re so busy that when

Sepe Farm animals. Photo courtesy Sepe Farm.

they take the time to look at what venues there are, hopefully you’ve made it easy to find yourself.” Sepe’s lambs are free-range and are raised without being treated with hormones, additives or antibiotics. As his daughters and their families become more involved in the farm, Sepe said he’d like to see the business grow larger and more efficient, but never at the cost of sacrificing quality. The farm primarily relies on orders from local markets, chefs and private family orders. “People want to know where they can get Connecticut grown products, especially lamb,” Sepe said. “This week is one more way to promote it.”

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013

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Fall — » » From page 1

100 people at the Norwalk Double Tree by Hilton Hotel, likened the situation to people deciding whether or not to pay off their credit cards after buying a big screen TV and as much clothing as they wanted. The purchasing and budgeting decisions have already been made. Now it’s time to decide how to pay. Though Himes offered few specifics on how to reduce the debt ceiling, he said the government will need to initiate “equitable reforms” of Medicare and Social Security and raise additional revenue through eliminating tax loopholes. In light of recent discussions over military action in Syria, however, there has been less urgency to address debt

Information — » » From page 1

Eye-opening as those statistics are, they barely scratch the surface. An hour with Chris Bruhl, president and CEO of The Business Council of Fairfield County, reveals the melting pot spreads countywide, with one in five county residents foreign-born. “This was not so 15 years ago,” he said. “Stamford is now a global city.” That knowledge could prove golden for someone with an idea to reach the immigrant economy. Another data set might open another door. An introduction might lead to a business deal or a loan. The emphasis is local, but the Business Council acknowledges the huge impact of Hartford and New York City and gathers their masses of data and regulations. Business Council areas of concern fall into two broad categories: “the tangible” and “the tactical.” “Our field has been geographically defined,” Bruhl said. “We’re not trying to change Wichita.” Bruhl is in his mid-60s and he peppers his thoughts with the appropriate Buffalo Springfield quote. His confidence is backed by an undergraduate degree from Brown University, an MA in English literature from LSU and an MBA from NYU’s Stern School of Business. Tieless on a recent Friday, he exuded ease among the din of statistics that surround him and that he shares without notes. Knowledge of immigration trends spills into macro-

reduction. Himes said he does not believe it would be “the worst thing” if Congress acts too slowly and there is a government shutdown. But he warned it could be disastrous if the nation stops paying its bills or if the world thinks there’s a chance default could happen. “A government shutdown isn’t the worst thing,” Himes said. But, he added, “When you start thinking about people working in Social Security and relying on Social Security, it becomes quickly uncomfortable.” Himes said there is a “catastrophic downside” if national debt is mishandled. “Any business person knows it all starts with the premise that U.S. Treasury debt is risk free,” he said. “If we start raising questions about that, the economic

impact will potentially be dramatic.” Earlier this month House Republicans said they would agree to raise the nation’s debt limit and avoid a government shutdown only if President Obama and Democrats agree to delay Affordable Care Act regulations. Other Republicans, such as Arizona Sen. John McCain, have urged the need to sign a short-term spending bill to avoid a government shutdown and the blame that goes along with it. Himes said he believes it will be up to GOP House Speaker John Boehner “to say no to the radical elements of his party” to reach an agreement. “The faster we get to that point the faster we’ll strike a deal to get past the government shutdown,” he said.

U.S. Rep. Jim Himes speaks in Norwalk. Photo by Jennifer Bissell.

economics with the observation, “In reality, economies are large, sprawling, unpredictable.” One year ago this month, the Business Council began its Growth Advisory Services with the idea of establishing “growth-oriented relationships” for promising companies. So far, the program has helped 20 companies, including GoECart, LogicBroker, Owlstone and Q-Bank Group. The four companies on Sept. 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m., at 4 Landmark Square Conference Center in Stamford, will participate in a review the program for potential investors, members of the council’s Growth Network, board members, corporate innovation team leaders and others interested in early exposure to growing companies. “All in a day’s work” at the Business Council involves historic perspective (“autos replacing rails and now the resurgence of rail and transit hubs”); analyzing the intersection of regional Fed policy and economic policy from Hartford; plus analysis in the arenas of taxation, infrastructure, schools, health, families and even faith. “From June to December we address regional issues and trends, briefing philanthropists, chambers of commerce and religious leaders on key issues like health,” Bruhl said. “A particular point of interest is small business. Larger employers have an interest in these topics, but they have different challenges.” The first half of the year is focused more on legislation and policy. Even after 22 years on the job, Bruhl

said he “stands on the shoulders” of those who came before, notably John Mitovich, the director who preceded him and who died in 2007. “John Mitovich was here 20 years, starting in 1968 or ’69,” Bruhl said. “He stressed policy, procedure and personality. He would rather lose a board member than have a non-decision maker on the board. If he allowed that, the CEO pretty soon would delegate to the director of community affairs. Without the decision makers, the formula would not have worked. You have to involve the decision makers directly or nothing gets done. John Mitovich built that culture within a sphere of activity — and, boy, has that served us to this day.” Bruhl said that, besides Stamford where the Business Council is headquartered, the council has members from Danbury to Bridgeport to Norwalk. The council employs 12. Its annual budget is $2.1 million, with 75 percent from private funding and the remaining funding coming from the federal Small Business Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Labor and from the state Department of Energy. The Business Council also now partners with the state Department of Economic and Community Development and for small business help it works with SCORE — the Service Corps of Retired Executives. The council’s Growth Network consists of 50 executives from 31 companies who meet monthly. “For some things, we’re the only

ones gathering data and referrals, offering support and direction,” Bruhl said. “The object is not to own it all. The object is to get it all done. We think of ‘network’ as a noun — something to build, to manage. It is robust, dynamic.” The council, now headquartered at 1 Landmark Square, dates to 1890 when it was called the Stamford Board of Trade. Through much of the 20th century it was the Stamford Chamber of Commerce, which is not the same as the current chamber, dating to the 1980s and at 733 Summer St. In 1970, the Business Council was called the Southwestern Area Commerce and Industry Association, a merger of several Nixon-era business organizations. The Business Council became known as such eight years ago. The name changes were not arbitrary. Rather, they ref lected what Bruhl called, “an evolving picture of representation that is consistent across the country. We reflect larger companies and policies, which differentiates us from chambers. We see ourselves as a business organization focused on issues that affect businesses or that businesses can affect.” Bruhl directed the Westchester Arts Council until 1990 when he joined the Business Council. He cited a difference between Westchester, where a county government model offers pertinent data through its Planning Department, and town-oriented Connecticut. “Connecticut has no regional data,” he said. But that began to change 22 years ago when Bruhl came aboard.

6 Week of September 23, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal


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through a bit of terror, but it’s absolutely worthwhile.” When a handful of observers on the ground cheered and encouraged Freeman to stop mid-climb for a picture, he never lost his focus. Not for one moment did Freeman stop climbing to look around and wave. Only once his feet touched the ground again did he smile. “Fifteen stories is a lot higher than you think when you’re standing on the edge looking down,” Freeman said. “All I was thinking was, ‘I hope this rope holds my weight,’ and trying not to fall.” Freeman, often the spokesman of Harbor Point, said he’s been a longtime supporter of and volunteer for the Special Olympics. He estimated his rappel that day raised about $2,700, which is about one month’s rent at Park Place.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013

7


Business —

program is also offered in 170 schools. “It’s great to see the athletes get the opportunity to compete and express themselves,” Freeman said. “It displays a tremendous amount of courage. It’s really rewarding to be involved. I’m happy to do something like this in order to support them.” Beau Doherty, president of the Connecticut Special Olympics, said the event was a great fundraiser but also a strategic way to bring more awareness for the program. In the past, the program in southwestern Connecticut has been weaker than in other areas of the state, though that is now changing with growing programs in Greenwich, Darien and Stamford. Doherty said he’d like to see more participate, however. The event was about the fifth time Doherty said they’ve used rappelling as a fundraiser. Previously they’ve held repelling events at Mohegan Sun and in the Hartford area, in addition to Stamford. “We’ve got to get the word out,” Doherty said. “People with disabilities don’t always make the team at school … We give them a sense of pride and a social network.”

» » From page 7

Nearly 13,000 athletes of all ages participate in the Special Olympics program in Connecticut, which provides year-round sports training and competitive games for those with intellectual

“Fifteen stories is a lot higher than you think...”

disabilities. From croquet to sailing and bocce ball to softball, the league offers 27 sports to choose from and holds more than 70 sport events a year. The

BEWARE

COMING this FALL

Outside companies are soliciting BUSINESS JOURNAL readers for plaques and other reproductions of newspaper content without our consent. If you or your firm is interested in framing an article or award from our newspaper or obtaining a reprint of a particular story Please contact

Marcia Rudy of Westfair Communications directly at (914) 694-3600 x3021.

WOMEN WHO MADE THE GREATEST IMPACT IN 2013

You can be part of this celebration by nominating women from Westchester and Fairfield counties who have had an impact on business or their communities.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A NOMINATION, CONTACT HOLLY DEBARTOLO AT (914) 358-0743. Another spectacular Business Journals and Wag magazine-sponsored event.

8 Week of September 23, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal


Tax Policy in Connecticut Kevin Sullivan, Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Revenue Services has made significant changes in the Department since taking office in 2011. Co-leading the Governor’s Tax Policy Taskforce in 2012 (with DECD Commissioner Catherine Smith), Mr. Sullivan generated a thorough review and assessment of state tax policy. The taskforce was charged with identifying specific areas of business taxation to be considered in future legislation and state economic policy. The overriding goal formulated through the work of the Taskforce is ‘to make taxes more directly business fair and job friendly, without jeopardizing fiscal stability, Wednesday, October 2 retreating to policies that become 7:45-9:30am an economic race to the bottom, or shifting the burden to middle inCost: $30 member; $40 non-member come taxpayers.’ Over the next 6 years, this is Stamford Marriott Hotel & Spa what the Commissioner has proposed to accomplish in order to Register at: www.businessfairfield.com help business thrive and compete, be fair, and grow jobs and incomes. On October 2, the Commismade and planned for the state’s tax policy sioner will outline the results of the task- from corporate income tax, to business tax force and provide insights into changes credits to gift and estate taxes.

Upcoming Event for Young Professionals in Finance and Professional Services

The Young Professionals Network of The Business Council of Fairfield County, the Association for Corporate Growth, Connecticut Chapter and three industry leading companies have partnered up to bring together the next generation of movers and shakers for some table tennis to help you grow your professional network. Join us at Chelsea Piers Stamford for a fun and competitive table tennis tournament. Whether you are just starting out in your career or looking to move to the next level, it is important for you to build your connections. You might as well have some fun while you are at it! This event is for associates or vp’s working in financial and professional services firms, or young professionals in finance. The evening will feature complimentary food, refreshments and prizes.

Thursday, September 26 6:30-9:00 pm Cost: $15 per person in advance; $20 at door. Pre-registration is highly encouraged. Chelsea Piers One Blachley Road Stamford, CT 06902 Register at: http://events.mcgladrey.com/ CTEmergingProfessionalsEvent

Celebrating Healthy Workplaces: Nominations now being accepted The Healthy Workplace Employer Recognition Program has become the premiere award in Connecticut, recognizing the outstanding achievements of businesses and organizations in implementing employee health and wellness programs. Now in its sixth year, The Business Council will highlight employers’ efforts to encourage healthy behaviors, enhance productivity, and ensure healthy work environments on February 14, 2014. Nominated programs are reviewed by a committee of experienced professions in a formal process using detailed criteria and standardized application materials. There are three merit categories – platinum, gold, and silver – awarded for the activities and

outcomes achieved for each wellness program. All recognized employer programs will be profiled in a resource publication published in conjunction with the event. If your company is offering a healthy workplace program, we want to recognize you.

land, Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire are eligible to submit an application. Employers may be private and not for profit as well as local, state and federal governments.

Questions?

How to apply

Please contact Tanya Court, Director, Public Policy & Programs at 203-7050668.

Who is eligible?

The Healthy Workplace Employer Recognition program is an initiative of The Business Council of Fairfield County’s Wellness Roundtable. It is made possible by the active participation of the members of the Roundtable’s Employer Recognition Committee.

It is easy! Complete the application at www.businessfairfield.com. Submissions are due January 6, 2014. Employers in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Is-

Get recognized for your Healthy Workplace Programs www.BusinessFairfield.com

Follow us! facebook.com/ BusinessFairfield

#BCFairfieldCo

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013

9


Stamford Post Office finds a buyer

T

he Stamford U.S. Post Office at 421 Atlantic St., which remains open as a mail center, could see a deal to finalize its sale as soon as this month. The U.S. Postal Service placed the building for sale via the offices of Stamford-based Cushman & Wakefield 18 months ago. Cushman & Wakefield Director Skip Lane said Sept. 16 the deal with unnamed buyers should reach fruition Sept. 23. He said details have been worked out across the last year. Lane said the Post Office has yet to find a new home, but the prospective owners have agreed to a grace period that will see the building remain mail-centric for now. Lane said the 42,000-square-foot building suffered from too little parking, but that the developer, who plans a mixed-use project, has bought an adjacent parcel to satisfy that need. The building’s obvious beauty is more than skin deep. “It’s one of those classic civic buildings,” Lane said. “It’s built like a fortress.” — Bill Fallon

NON-PROFIT PANEL Learn what non-profits have to offer businesses, what kind of support is needed (other than cash) and case histories of effective for/non profit collaborations. • Anthony DiLauro, Human Services Council • Bridget Fox, Volunteer Center • Julia Wade, DOMUS • Tom Gabriel, United Way Greenwich • Ryan Odinak, Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County

Using cause marketing to grow business and help the community. Creating strategic for-profit/non-profit collaborations. Wednesday, September 25, 2013 8:30 -11:30 a.m. Stamford Innovation Center 175 Atlantic St – Stamford, CT 8:30 a.m.

Registration, Resource Center & Networking

9:00 a.m.

Panel Presentations Moderated by Lisa Wexler Award Winning WFAS Radio Host, Author, Lawyer

10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Speed “Dating”/Networking PLUS… Resource Center Open

www.charitymatchmaking.com 10 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

BUSINESS PANEL What businesses need and want from non-profits in order to support them and case histories of effective for/non profit collaborations. • David Martin, Solude Coffee • Liz Osta, Nagi Jewelers • Mia Schipani, RMS & Hotel Zero Degrees

RESOURCE CENTER Low/no cost support opportunities for fundraising efforts and general resource organizations.

SPEED “DATING” Facilitated introductions will allow non-profits to share their cause with multiple businesses in one session. Businesses (first name only) will learn about potential synchronistic organizations to help grow revenue. Mutually selected “matches” will lead to future “dates” to be arranged at an agreeable, convenient time.

REGISTRATION

Pre-registration and more details at www.cmsymposium.eventbrite.com $35 per non-profit organization (pre-registration required) No charge per corporate business (pre-registration required) Resource Center Open to All (no registration required)

SUPPORTERS


2013

FAMILY-OWNED

BUSINESS AWARDS SALUTING THE HARDWORKING FAMILY ENTREPRENEURS WHO HAVE BUILT SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSES IN FAIRFIELD AND WESTCHESTER COUNTIES. Now’s your chance to nominate that special family-owned business you’ve watched grow and give back to the community. A distinguished panel of judges will choose three winners: one from a business with 1 to 50 employees, another from a company with 51 to 100 employees and the third from a business with more than 101 employees. AWARDS CELEBRATION

NOMINATIONS

FAIRFIELD COUNTY

Nominations are open from now through Sept. 13. To nominate, please visit westfaironline.com for instructions and nomination forms or call Holly DeBartolo at (914) 358-0743.

OCTOBER 10 | 5:30 P.M. ARTHUR MURRAY GRANDE BALLROOM OF GREENWICH 6 LEWIS STREET, GREENWICH WESTCHESTER COUNTY

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 11


By KEnnETH a. HoRoWiTZ

The right investment plan, part 2

A

Simplified Employee Pension Individual Retirement Arrangement (SEP-IRA) or a Profit Sharing Plan (PSP): Which plan is right for your client or business? Last week compared several differences between the profit sharing and SEP plans. Part 2 hews again to the SEP vs. PSP differences and what they mean for clients and for businesses in the arenas of design, employee exclusion, loans, lastday requirement and vesting.

new comparability to create different rate groups providing there are established reasonable job classifications. Here’s an example of how a business owner with employees can find it more advantageous to establish a Profit Sharing Plan/401(k) rather than a SEP. By adding the deferrals and catch-up contributions to a new comparability PSP, the business owner increases his maximum tax-deductible contribution by 118 percent, as illustrated below.

INDIVIDUAL DESIGN SEPs do allow for integration, however, contributions are typically defined on a pro rata basis, meaning a uniform percentage of pay formula for all participants. For example, if contribution owner A is 25 percent of pay, contributions for other plan participants would also be 25 percent of pay — that can be costly. However, a PSP structure allows for use of different percentages of pay rates as long as nondiscrimination testing 401(a) (4) is satisfied. One example is using

PART-TIME & SEASONABLE EMPLOYEE EXCLUSION The eligibility rules are more liberal under SEPs. Both plans require minimum age of 21. However, required years service for SEPs can be as satisfied by working an hour, three of the prior five years, and earning a minimum annual salary of $550. This can allow many people to be included in a retirement plan that would otherwise not be the case under a profit sharing situation. Additionally, employees have immediate investing on 100 percent of

employer contributions. PSP structure on the other hand, may require a minimum 1,000 hours annually of service and one year of employment for eligibility. Employees are then vested on either a 3-year cliff or a 6-year graded gradual scale of 20 percent a year for five years of employer contributions. The nonvested amounts get refunded back to the plan and either allocated among participants based on the allocation formula under the plan, or they may be used to reduce future costs of the plan.

LAST DAY REQUIREMENT An employee may be required to be employed by the company for the last day of the year to be eligible for a contribution in a PSP, subject to nondiscrimination testing. 401(A)(4) LOANS As an IRA, SEPs do not allow for loans. Loans may be permitted under PSP plans. VESTING All employer

contributions

to

employee accounts in SEPs have immediate vesting. An employee for example gets 100 percent of the employer contribution when they leave. That can be much more costly to an owner compared with vesting in a PSP. Where here is a 6-year vesting schedule — 20 percent after year two and 20 percent for the next four years. No doubt the vesting schedule will encourage employees to stay with the company. Additionally, an employee will forfeit part of the contributions should they leave before six years. As mentioned earlier, they may be required to be employed the last day of the year to eligible for a contribution. In a SEP, an employee can qualify for and vest for the full contribution as soon as they satisfy the nominal income and hourly guidelines. Kenneth A. Horowitz is a registered representative and financial adviser of Park Avenue Securities L.L.C., doing business in Rye Brook, N.Y., as Integrated Benefit Consultants. He can be reached at (914) 288-8946.

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12 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

This space provided by Westfair Business Publications as a public service.

CALLING ALL BUSINESS OWNERS!

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LISTED ALPHABETICALLY

THE LIST

Fitness Facilities FITNESS CENTERS

FAIRFIELD COUNTY NEXT LIST: SEPTEMBER 30 SMALL BUSINESS LENDERS

locker rooms

personal trainers

a

a

a

a

a

Joe Moretti Owner 1987

40,000 Fairfield NA Greenwich

a

a

a

a

a

a

Michael Buonocore General manager, Greenwich Jason Fox General manager, Darien 1991

30,000 Darien NA Greenwich

a

a

a

a

a

a

Jo Rasmussen Owner fitnessworks93@yahoo.com 1993

NA

a

Juliet and Peter Harker julietharker@getinshapeforwomen.com 2009

NA

NA 1984

NA

The Edge Fitness Clubs 1333 E. Putnam Ave., Greenwich 06870 500 Kings Highway Cutoff, Fairfield 06825 637-3906 • 255-2582• theedgefitnessclubs.com

Equinox 72 Heights Road, Darien 06820 16 Old Track Road, Greenwich 06830 655-2300 • 863-0070 • equinox.com

Fitness Works 275 Post Road East, Westport 06880 216-0033 • fitnessworks.us

Get in Shape For Women 85 Mill Plain Road, Fairfield 06824 170 Post Road West, Westport 06880 873-0723 • 293-4445 • ggetinshapeforwomen.com

LA Fitness 52 Sixth St., Stamford 353-8810 • lafitness.com

New York Sports Clubs 6 Liberty Way, Greenwich 869-1253 • mynewyorksportsclubs.com

Norwalk YMCA 370 West Ave., Norwalk 06870 866-4425 • norwalkymca.org

Peak Physique Inc.

Patricia Jeffries General manager patricia.jeffries@town-sports.com 1974 Bob McDowell CEO bmcdowell@norwalkymca.org 1928 Owners 1993

Prime Time Fitness

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

NA

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

30,000

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

10,000

Patrick Toth 2005

NA

John DeFilippo Director of tennis john@solarisclubs.com 1972

40,000

Felicia Gaglio General manager info@sportsplexbethel.com 1980

NA

Glenn Colarossi Managing director donna@stamfordathletic.com 1993

35,000

Mark Christo mark@unitedathleticcenters.com 2009

45,000

Ed Phillipp President and CEO 1916

NA

100 Route 37, New Fairfield 06812 312-0399 • primetimefitnessnf.com

Solaris Racquet Club 23 Radio Place, Stamford 06906 359-0601 • solarisclubs.com

Sportsplex 49 Brownhouse Road, Stamford 06902 358-0066 • sportsplex-ct.com

Stamford Athletic Club 75 Third St., Stamford 06905 357-7555 • sacnews.com

1330 Honeyspot Road Extension, Stratford 06615 386-0449 • unitedathleticcenters.com

a

Dominic Novak and Dana DeRespino-Novak

50 Holly Hill Lane, Greenwich 625-9595 • peakphysique.biz

United Athletic Centers

massages

on-site café

a

nutrition/weight-loss program

on-site parking

a

tanning beds

on-site child care

30,000

23 Commerce Road, Newtown 06470 426-8591 • newfit.com

racquetball courts

group exercise classes

Penny Tavar penny@newfit.com 2007

Club NewFit

Amenities and programs offered

swimming pool

Approximate square footage of gym corporate discounts

Name, address, telephone number Area code: 203 (unless otherwise noted) Website

tennis courts

Owner/Manager Email address Year facility established

group/family

Listed alphabetically.

YMCA of Greenwich 50 E. Putnam Ave., Greenwich 06830 869-1630 • greenwichymca.org

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

a

Note: This list is a sampling of fitness clubs. To be included in future lists, email afrey@westfairinc.com. Source: Information obtained from company websites and responding companies. NA: Not available.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 13


SPECIAL REPORT

SMALL BUSINESS BANKING

Restaurant loans dodge the menu ForGet the Fries, Collateral is What Matters

By CRySTal KanG ckang@westfairinc.com

R

ave reviews and a steady business income no longer guarantee a bank loan for restaurant owners. What lenders now want to see on the table are real property assets that can be used as collateral in case a restaurant tanks. Before the recession, a restaurateur could apply for bank loans and pool financial resources from a few committed business partners. But those wishing to open small restaurants today have found it increasingly difficult to secure loans. Gerry Houlihan, a restaurant broker at Houlihan & O’Malley Real Estate Services and principal of Houlihan Business Brokers in Bronxville, N.Y., said the U.S. Small Business Administration is no longer lending to restaurant owners who don’t own the real estate where their businesses operate. It’s keeping the market “extremely soft,” he said. SBA loans had been one of the more common methods of financing a restaurant. But since the recession, eligibility rules for an SBA loan have become stricter and restaurant owners have fewer options for financing their businesses, Houlihan said. “If you were going for an SBA loan, it was based on the income of the business that was being purchased, which required showing three to five years of tax returns, positive net income, and of course the furniture, fixtures and equipment had to be in good condition,” Houlihan said. But now banks rarely give out loans to small restaurants because they usually lease space, said Leonard Carraturo, vice president relationship manager for business banking at Chase Manhattan Bank in White Plains. (Chase also maintains a robust Fairfield County presence.) John Gazzola, co-owner and partner in Butterfield 8, an American gastropub franchise, knows from experience that trying to get bank loans without real estate as collateral doesn’t “amount to much.” His company, Public House Investments, has opened Butterfield 8 restaurants in midtown Manhattan, Stamford and downtown White Plains. The company has also opened Lola’s Mexican Kitchen in

John Gazzola, co-owner and partner in Butterfield 8.

White Plains and Stamford and Mulberry Street Italian Kitchen in White Plains. Gazzola and his partners are financially sound with about 20 restaurants successfully operating in five states and the District of Columbia. When opening their Westchester eateries in 2012, they were able to finance their investment without seeking a bank lender. “Over the years, we realized how difficult it is to get a loan,” Gazzola said. “We’re pretty much self-funded. The time it takes for you to wait for bank approvals costs money. When you have to wait for a loan to come through, you’re just sitting on your property paying additional rent and utility.” Sometimes a restaurant owner can draw on an extended track record of success to obtain a bank loan. Before the credit market collapse in 2008, Houlihan said about 60 to 70 percent of the more than 100 restaurant deals he closed involved buyers securing home equity loans, while 15 to 20 percent of the purchase deals were financed by SBA-backed loans. Today, he said none of his buyers are applying for bank loans through either process because banks are not willing to lend to restaurants without collateral.

14 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

An exception to this trend is Alvin & Friends, a New Rochelle, N.Y., restaurant serving Caribbean and southernstyle food, which opened in 2010 in a 1,200-square-foot space with 50 seats at 49 Lawton St. Alvin Clayton, a majority partner in Westchester Friends Management Group, said the partners had subleased their space from Villarina’s Pasta & Fine Foods Co. to avoid being “under a gun” and “choked with a high mortgage.” The arrangement greatly reduced the cost of rent for Clayton and his investors. When Villarina’s moved out, Alvin & Friends investors pooled their resources to finance a larger space to accommodate their growing dining and private-party business. This year, the six investors, including Clayton and his wife, Gwen, bought a 5,000-square-foot space at 14 Memorial Highway. With the purchase, the business qualified for an SBA loan. “Because we’ve been open for two years, and we had been doing well, we can show the bank that in this economy, we were operating on our own without getting loans,” Clayton said. Clayton added that it made sense to buy the property instead of leasing

because the mortgage payment was equivalent to the monthly rent at the restaurant’s old location. Buying the property gives them more security and eliminates the risk of a landlord pulling the rug out from under them, he said. For other restaurant owners, two or three years of running a business doesn’t guarantee a bank loan. Chris Vegara, executive chef and partner in Saint George, a French bistro opening this month in Hastings-on-Hudson, secured a loan with Chase Manhattan Bank using another property as collateral. Front-of-the-house team member Jason Steinberg said this will be Vegara’s third restaurant, and he has built a relationship with Chase Manhattan through the years. “Chris opened his first restaurant 10 years ago, and we already knew a good person to be talking to about loans,” Steinberg said. “We didn’t have to cold call.” Even with a loan, most renovations to the former Buffet de la Gare space will be done with their own labor and paid for out of pocket. “I’ll be reupholstering the chairs,” Steinberg said. “I taught myself to do that. I’ve painted the interior walls myself.”


NEWS IN BRIEF

THE COMMUNITY’S BANK SHUTTERS

Federal bank regulators Sept. 13 closed The Community’s Bank in Bridgeport, which had operated 12 years and was the state’s only minority-owned bank. The Federal Deposit insurance Corp. (FDIC) said the bank had some $26.3 million in assets and $25.7 million in deposits as of June 30. The FDIC reported it was unable to find another bank to take over The Community’s Bank operations. The FDIC expects the failure will deplete the federal deposit insurance fund by $7.8 million. (The FDIC insures individual deposits up to $250,000.) Connecticut Banking Commissioner Howard Pitkin said the state Banking Department had tried to save the bank, but was unsuccessful and in the end acted to protect depositors. He said the bank had been under increased regulatory scrutiny since 2010 and its finances had been gathering red ink despite attempts to recapitalize. “I am shocked and saddened by

state Banking Commissioner Howard Pitkin’s announcement today regarding the closure of Bridgeport-based The Community’s Bank,” Bridgeport Mayor Bill Finch said. “The bank has provided a full range of banking services to the Bridgeport community since 2001, and has been a strong supporter and sponsor of many events in our city and the region. “The closing of this bank means our minority community, which oftentimes does not have the same access to credit as others do, is now bereft without this bank’s focus on providing access to credit or capital,” Finch said. Finch expressed bewilderment at the failure and has cast a net for answers. “It is not clear how the state could allow this to happen,” he said. “I will be writing to the Banks Committee of the Legislature urging them to investigate this loss of a source of capital to Bridgeport individuals and businesses and asking them how we can change

the laws to improve access to capital in minority communities and assure this never happens again. The state of Connecticut needs to do a better job of getting investments into small businesses like the ones served by The Community’s Bank. “I also have spoken to Commissioner Pitkin about the impact of the loss of The Community’s Bank on our city. I will be organizing a public forum with him to discuss community and minority capital needs and how the state can work together with the city to address those needs.” Finch also promised to work with the state to fill the void left by the closing. The Community’s Bank had operated two branches, one by Interstate 95 and the other by Beardlsey Park.

BRIDGEPORT LANDS $1M GRANT

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development agency recently announced $7.3 mil-

lion in funding to winners of a grant competition designed to boost job creation and the global competitiveness of minority-owned businesses nationwide. The Greater New England Minority Supplier Development Council received $1.02 million to operate the MBDA Business Center in Bridgeport, which will focus on the “American Indian and Alaskan Native business community.” The Bridgeport money will be dispensed across the next four years. Other recipients’ money will be dispersed across three years. They include Baltimore ($900,000), Houston ($900,000), the South Bronx ($1.5 million), Chicago ($900,000), San Francisco ($1.2 million) and Washington, D.C. ($900,000). “MBDA is committed to the continued success of all minority-owned firms, who strengthen the economy and create American jobs,” David A. Hinson, MBDA national director, said. “These new centers will expand the » Briefs, page 16

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 15


NEWS IN BRIEF

Briefs — » From page 15

Your local source for SBA financing. Lines of Credit | Term Loans | Commercial Mortgages

MONEY GROWS BEST IN LOCAL SOIL.®

Darien 1001 Post Road Darien, CT 06820 203.669.4122

Rowayton 138 Rowayton Ave. Rowayton, CT 06853 203.669.4122

Southport 3695 Post Road Southport, CT 06890 203.842.8900

drbank.com

number of front-line business experts we have providing resources to minority-owned businesses to help grow economies in more cities across the U.S.” The MBDA bills itself as is the only federal agency dedicated to the growth and global competitiveness of U.S. minority-owned businesses.

CAPTIVE INSURANCE IS GROWING

Connecticut is the insurance capital and captive insurers are a growing part of the business. The industry will host its second annual breakfast to discuss topics relevant to the field Oct. 2, 7 a.m.- 4 p.m., Sheraton Hotel, 700 E. Main St., Stamford. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy will deliver the keynote address at 12:15 p.m. Captive insurance has become a popular alternative to traditional insurance programs — for both property and casualty and for life and health. By forming their own insurance subsidiary, businesses are able to insure their own risks and better control costs. Topics on the docket for discussion include “The Fundamentals of Forming a Captive,” “Concepts of Risk Capital,” “Captives & The Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act,” “Corporate Governance,” and “Growth of Captives for Middle Market Business.” Call John Thomson, program manager, Connecticut Insurance Department Captive Insurance Unit, at (860) 297-3995 for more details.

MANSION A STEAL IF FIRST BID WINS

A Greenwich mansion that originally listed for $28 million hits the auction block Oct. 15-17 with $1 million the starting bid. Web-based auction.com is running the sale. The auction winner will come into possession of 160 John St., including a 14,966-square-foot house, an equestri-

16 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

an facility with two large stables for up to 30 horses, plus a practice polo field. “The lender-owned private estate may also be subdivided to create four additional estates,” according to Auction. com. The property features a stonepaved courtyard and fountain, nine bedrooms, 17 baths, a guest suite, home theater, library, exercise room, several playrooms, a heated pool, spa and a tennis court. Prospective buyers can view the property at two open houses, scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 21 and Saturday, Oct. 5, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Bidders must register at www.auction.com and provide a $25,000 deposit, plus proof of funds.

DOL LAUNCHES YOUNG-WORKER WEBSITE

A new  educational website  for working teenagers was recently launched by the state Department of labor. To educate young workers on their rights and responsibilities, members of the Connecticut young Worker Health & Safety Team launched a new website last week providing links to relevant labor laws, training programs, events, statistical data and local news. The rate of non-fatal injuries for workers between the ages of 15 to 24 is about twice as high as older workers. In 1998, the Labor Department formed the young workers team to address the health issues and promote safety standards. Now they’re bringing their cause online. “We are hopeful that this one-stop resource will be beneficial to anyone looking for information pertaining to young workers employed in Connecticut,” said  Deborah Pease, chair of the young worker team. “If we can prevent one young worker injury as a result of this website, then we feel as if our mission has been accomplished.” — Bill Fallon and Jennifer Bissell


JoE MURTaGH

Profit with multiple customer service levels

A

fter extensive research, Budget Rent-a-Car found that 5 percent of its New York customers cause half of the company’s accidents that result in damage suits. This 5 percent was made up primarily of people who are not traveling by plane. It would be foolish for Budget to continue to service this segment. These are C customers! This basic service principal is founded on the wisdom that no business can be all things to all people. Bloomingdale’s knows that even among its well-heeled customers, some are more valuable than others. They reward ‘preferred shoppers’ with Godiva chocolates, hand-written thank-you notes, and private shopping nights.

“if you craft an exceptional customer service experience for different types of people, your business will grow. it’s guaranteed to work, because people spend money on what they value” — Kelly McDonald

They know they don’t want all the business and that every customer is not equally valuable. For you and your organization to take advantage of this model, you need to divide your customers into three groups. a-customers are your best customers. While they may have greater needs, they contribute the most to your profits. B-customers either have fewer needs or less ability to pay. They make mid-range additions to your profits. C-customers can make a big impact on your bottom line and that impact may be a huge negative! If you treat B and C customers the same as your best ones, you may actually lose money on them. Bear in mind however, if you can keep costs low enough while serving them, they can be profitable. Don’t necessarily get rid of your B and C customers before considering how you may be able to reduce the costs of serving them through such tactics as membership fees or self-service. Although Macys doesn’t charge membership fees it does assign its salespeople

to give shoppers different levels of service according to the profit margins of the items they buy. In jewelry and luggage, doting salespeople provide all the help these customers need. However, in other departments, such as hosiery, customers help themselves. You can also divide your service along these lines: Better service for some customers. lower cost services for others. In the book, Crafting the Customer Experience author Kelly McDonald reminds us that, “If you craft an exceptional customer service experience for different types of people, your business will grow. It’s guaranteed to work, because people spend money on what they value. A key part of their values is how you make them feel, how you respond to their needs and wants, and how you treat them.” The leader in the mutual fund industry, Fidelity, is trying to cover every base from discount broker Charles Schwab to Wall Street’s Merrill Lynch. On the other hand, Vanguard is focusing on hitting just one target better than anyone else and that is selling mutual funds directly to investors at low fees. Which company do you think is able to stretch the fewest resources to get the best returns? To satisfy their value proposition, you will need a committed team. Define roles and accountability up front. Involve your staff in creating plans. They know the different types of people, which customers use the most service time while generating low profit and will have ideas about how to fix that. Your team also knows, which sales strategies are working and what needs are not being filled. To reach your maximum profit potential, give the market what it wants. Segment the market to target the right customer groups with the right service at the right cost. Do this, and profits will take care of themselves. Questions for discussion: Who are our A, B and C customers? Can we make each customer group profitable?

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This column is provided by Joe Murtagh, The DreamSpeaker, who is an international motivational speaker, meeting facilitator and business trainer. For questions or comments Joe@TheDreamSpeaker.com, www.TheDreamSpeaker.com or call (800) 239-0058.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 17


Why arts education matters this time of year the “Back to school” theme is all around. We know that public school students will get classes in basic academics like math and reading, but will they get a basic education in the arts? the thoughtful arts education advocacy tool, “arts education navigator,” produced by americans for the arts, offers the following reasons for supporting arts education programs. these reasons could make a strong case to anyone: 1. The arts transform the learning environment. When the arts become central to the learning environment, schools and other settings become places of discovery; school culture is changed and learning is improved. 2. The arts reach students who are not otherwise being reached. Young people who are disengaged from schools and other community institutions are at the greatest risk of failure or harm. the arts provide a reason and sometimes the only reason, for a student to engage with school or other organizations. 3. The arts reach students in ways they are not otherwise being reached. recent research into the theory of multiple intelligences illustrates that students learn in myriad ways: linguistically, logically, spatially, kinesthetically, etc. Conventional classroom practices do not engage students with different learning styles; an education rich in the arts is more likely to reach more students in more ways. 4. The arts connect students to themselves and each other. When creating art, the student draws upon his or her personal resources to generate the result. By engaging his or her whole person, the student feels invested in ways that are deeper than “knowing the answer.” experiences such as this enable young people to grow and connect with one another in new ways. 5. The arts provide new challenges for those students already considered successful. Boredom and complacency are barriers to success. For those young people who outgrow their established learning environments, the arts can offer a chance for unlimited challenge. let’s all work together to build a community of people dedicated to supporting the arts as part of a well-rounded education for all students. You can do it — one school at a time, where you live.

Ryan Odinak executive Director Cultural alliance of Fairfield County.

The mission of the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County is to support cultural organizations, artists and creative businesses by providing promotion, services and advocacy. For more information, visit CulturalAllianceFC.org or email infoCulturalAllianceFC.org or call 256-2329. For events lists, visit FCBuzz.org.

FCBUZZ

Arts & Culture of Fairfield County

CLOSER: THE GRAPHIC ART OF CHUCK CLOSE With a body of work composed almost entirely of portraits, Chuck Close has been astounding us with his artistic verisimilitude for more than four decades. his prints are adventures in problem solving: working from the particularities of each print medium, he gives his imagination free rein to reconceive their aesthetic possibilities. “any innovation that is evident in my paintings is a direct result of something that happened in the course of making a print,” the artist has said. Close announced his arrival on the contemporary art scene with large-scale, black-and-white airbrushed heads, paintings based on photographs he had transferred to canvas by means of a grid. his work was shown at the Whitney Museum of american art in 1969, followed by

solo exhibitions at the Bykert Gallery in 1970 and the los angeles County Museum of art in 1971. in 1972, he created the first print of his professional career, a mezzotint, which began a life-long engagement with the aesthetics and technology of printmaking. Working with master printers, Close alters one or several variables to create endless permutations in a wide variety of print techniques, usually recycling past portraits of himself, his family, and his friends. one of the great modern masters of printmaking, methodical yet always inventive, Close continues to follow the bold trajectory he set for himself nearly five decades ago. Visit brucemuseum.org for information about this exhibition, the illustrated catalog and public programs.

NEW DESIGN STORE INSPIRED BY ARCHITECT’S IDEALS the Glass house, in collaboration with Moss Bureau, is pleased to announce a new design store opening september 2013. the Glass house Design store offers an edited selection of books, furniture, objects and works on paper that represent the sensibility and idea that inform the Glass house, both the iconic 1949 structure and the unique synthesis of art, architecture and landscape that developed over half a century. the store will offer unique and specially sourced objects perfect for finding useful and unique gifts for any occasion such as a wedding, a birthday or your holiday shopping. the store is located at the Glass house Visitor Center in new Canaan. the design store will also have an online store presence year round. inspired by “Machine art,” a legendary exhibition organized by philip Johnson for the Museum of Modern art in 1934, the Glass house Design store celebrates the origins of Johnson’s thinking through its rigorous offering. in addition to whatever function they perform, these objects are intended as keepsakes, tokens of remembrance

of your experience at the Glass house. in this way, the ideas — and ideals — articulated by philip Johnson over many years can be enjoyed in the course of daily life long after your visit. please visit theglasshouse.org and click on the “shop” link to access the online design store. the Glass house tour season runs May to november and advance reservations are required. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit philipjohnsonglasshouse.org.

Visit FCBuzz.org for more information on events and how to get listed. 18 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Presented by: Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County


FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL aTTaCHMEnTSRElEaSED Haydusky, John, Stratford. $191,900, in favor of Alice Rolstone by C. Christian Young, Bridgeport. Property: 164 Oakland St., Stratford. Filed Sept. 9.

BUilDinG PERMiTS

commerciaL 444 Danbury Road Association, Wilton. Perform additions and alterations at an existing commercial building, 444 Danbury Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed Sept. 6. 45 Glover Partners L.L.C., Norwalk. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, Xerox, 45 Glover Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $48,000. Filed Sept. 3. 48 Westport Avenue L.L.C., Norwalk. New tenant, Euphoria Fitness Studio, 44 Westport Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $4,000. Filed Aug. 23. A Pappajohn Co., Norwalk, contractor for Wilton 64 L.L.C. Perform additions and alterations at an existing commercial building, 64 Danbury Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Sept. 6.

A.F. Conte, Norwalk, contractor for Carver Foundation. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 7 Academy St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $18,000. Filed Aug. 30. Alexander, Albert, New Canaan. Perform additions and alterations at an existing commercial building, 98 Elm St., New Canaan. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Aug. 30. Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Bob Rozycki c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: (914)694-3600 Fax: (914)694-3680

Babbidge Facilities Construction, contractor for the town of Fairfield. Lay foundation for a new commercial prefab building, 210 Old Dam Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $1.2 million. Filed Sept. 9.

John Moriarty & Associates Inc., Farmington, contractor for Merritt 7 Venture L.L.C. Fit-out an existing commercial building for Home Serve USA, 601 Merritt 7, Sixth floor, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $565,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Baybrook Remodelers Inc., West Haven, contractor for Gloria Mellinger. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 237 Taunton Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $13,000. Filed Sept. 4.

Brennan, Seamus, Stamford, contractor for Mary and Gabriel Armstrong. Perform additions and alterations at an existing single-family residence, 20 Little Fox Lane, Wilton. Estimated cost: $140,000. Filed Aug. 26.

Benco L.L.C., Torrington, contractor for Jan Han Two CT Realty L.L.C. Reroof an existing commercial building, 1882 Main St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $41,912. Filed Sept. 6.

Karp Associates Inc., New Canaan, contractor for New Canaan Community YMCA Inc. Perform interior alterations at an existing commercial building, 564 South Ave., New Canaan. Estimated cost: $100,000. Filed Aug. 30.

Baybrook Remodelers Inc., West Haven, contractor for Linda and Louis Zarrelli. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 41 Ferguson Drive, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $6,000. Filed Sept. 4.

Brinckerhoff, Laura, Norwalk. Perform external additions at an existing single-family residence, 18 Woodlawn Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $3,000. Filed Sept. 3.

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Baybrook Remodelers Inc., West Haven, contractor for Alex Orban. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 132 Southport Woods Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $19,000. Filed Sept. 5.

BLT Management L.L.C., Stamford, contractor for NJS Enterprises. Perform interior alterations at an existing commercial building, Loft Artist Association, 575 Pacific St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $50,000. Filed Sept. 6. Borghesi Building, Torrington, contractor for Liwomp Real Estate Inc. Construct a new superstructure, 46 Brookfield Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $839,000. Filed Sept. 9. C H Nickerson & Company Inc., Torrington, contractor for First Taxing District. Replace pump station and accessory equipment, 34 Grandview Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $455,900. Filed Aug. 30. Cathedral of the Holy Spirit, Bridgeport. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 729 Union Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Sept. 9. Construction Resources Inc., Farmington, contractor for the town of New Canaan. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 3 Farm Road, New Canaan. Estimated cost: $371,000. Filed Sept. 5. Crowley, Steve, Bridgeport. Perform external renovations at an existing commercial building, 3425 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $200,000. Filed Sept. 9. Ema Construction, contractor for Southport Station Office. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, Smith Hanley, 107 John St., Fairfield. Estimated cost: $63,000. Filed Sept. 3. Greenwich Acquisitions L.L.C., Norwalk. Fit-out an existing commercial building for Credit Union, 250 Westport Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Sept. 4. HPVC Direct L.L.C., Stamford. Reduce to core, 208 Harbor Drive, Buildings 208 and 232, Floors 1 - 4, Stamford. Estimated cost: $300,000. Filed Sept. 5.

21 Twin Walls Lane L.L.C., Weston. Construct a new single-family residence, 21 Twin Walls Lane, Weston. Estimated cost: $761,150. Filed Sept. 3. 323 Fairfield Avenue L.L.C., Bridgeport. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 17 Lafayette Circle, Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $1,800. Filed Sept. 5. 382 Gregory Street L.L.C., Bridgeport. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 606 to 610 Atlantic St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $3,000. Filed Sept. 6. Anthony M. Baldino Custom Homes, contractor for Carrie Frank. Perform interior renovations at an existing singlefamily residence, 201 Fairmount Terrace, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $12,000. Filed Sept. 6. Anthony O’Neill L.L.C., Wilton, contractor for Kathleen and Brian Fitzgerald. Perform additions and alterations at an existing single-family residence, 85 Hulda Hill Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $100,000. Filed Aug. 28. Avgerinos, Michael, New Canaan, contractor for Rebecca and David Brown. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 1144 Weed St., New Canaan. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Sept. 9. Ayala, Maria, Bridgeport. Perform interior renovations at an existing singlefamily residence, 407 Funston Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $12,000. Filed Sept. 4. Baptista, Luis, Stamford. Perform interior renovations at an existing singlefamily residence, 40 Rolling Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $41,275. Filed Sept. 6.

Becker, Michael, contractor for Andrea and Gregg Espach. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 44 James St., Fairfield. Estimated cost: $45,000. Filed Sept. 6. Benedetto, Leonard, Bridgeport. Perform external renovations at an existing single-family residence, 1482 Capital Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $500. Filed Sept. 9. Bennett, Tom, Wilton, contractor for Madhura Warty. Perform additions and alterations at an existing single-family residence, 80 Rivergate Drive, Wilton. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Aug. 29. Berg, Carole and Jeffrey Berg, Weston. Perform external additions at an existing single-family residence, 166 Steephill Road, Weston. Estimated cost: $120,000. Filed Sept. 5. Bhonslay, Joan E. and David Bhonslay, Weston. Repair deck at an existing single-family residence, 9 Treadwell Court, Weston. Estimated cost: $6,000. Filed Aug. 26. Bisagni, Stephen, Norwalk. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 21 Lancaster Drive, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Aug. 28. Blanche, Andrew, New Canaan, contractor for Charlotte and Dominic Howard. Perform external additions at an existing single-family residence, 145 Marvin Ridge Road, New Canaan. Estimated cost: $21,500. Filed Aug. 30. Boehle, John Douglas, Ridgefield. Construct an accessory building with a nonhabitable space at a single-family residence, 19 Deer Hill Drive, Ridgefield. Estimated cost: $60,660. Filed Sept. 4.

Buchanan Residence, Bridgeport. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 333 Vincelette St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $50,000. Filed Sept. 5. Byelas L.L.C., Westport. Reroof an existing single-family residence, 1790 Post Road East, Westport. Estimated cost: $23,000. Filed Sept. 9. Carlos, Fernando, Bridgeport. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 1825 Chopsey Hill, Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $8,000. Filed Sept. 4. Carpentry Unlimited, Stamford, contractor for Douglas Alderman. Perform additions and alterations at an existing single-family residence, 17 Tree Top Court, Stamford. Estimated cost: $285,000. Filed Sept. 6. Cenatiempo, Alfred, Norwalk. Perform external additions at an existing singlefamily residence, 66 Grandview Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed Sept. 6. Christopher Home Improvement, Norwich, contractor for Nancy and Timothy Anderson. Reroof an existing single-family residence, 148 Gallows Hill Road, Redding. Estimated cost: $8,800. Filed Aug. 29.

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Clark Construction, Ridgefield, contractor for Christine Gryson and George Fletcher. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 10 Woods Way, Unit 19D, Redding. Estimated cost: $29,369. Filed Sept. 5. Collins, Evadney, Bridgeport. Construct an accessory building with a nonhabitable space at a single-family residence, 531 Lafayette St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $9,000. Filed Sept. 9. Collins, Evadney, Bridgeport. Construct a new deck at an existing singlefamily residence, 531 Lafayette St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $5,700. Filed Sept. 9.

Visit FairfieldCountyJobs.com or call (203) 595-4262 for more information

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 19


NEWSMAKERS plus awards and events DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS AND RESTAURANT TEAM UP

ALL-STAR SALUTE IN BRIDGEPORT

STAMFORD DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS is a locally run and supported, all volunteer nonprofit founded in 2011 with a simple mission: to mobilize the community and support Stamford students with impactful scholarship awards to pursue education beyond high school. To raise funds for Stamford students to pursue education after high school, OLIO RESTAURANT is hosting a special fundraising dinner event to support Stamford Dollars for Scholars beginning at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 26. Olio Restaurant, 934 Hope St., Stamford, will donate 20 percent of all sales to Stamford Dollars for Scholars to help fund local scholarships. Call 817-0303 for details.

TWO STATES, MANY REALTORS, BIG HEARTS The WOMEN’S COUNCIL OF REALTORS DUTCHESS COUNTY CHAPTER spearheaded a “Realtor to Realtor” social event with neighboring Women’s Council chapters in New York and Connecticut at CLANCY MOVING SYSTEMS in Newtown Sept. 12. The gathering was an opportunity for the Realtors to promote their commitment of supporting the community in raising funds to be donated to the Newtown Rotary — SANDY HOOK SCHOOL FUND and to meet their colleagues in neighboring communities. Women’s Council of Realtors attending from New York were the Dutchess County, Empire Westchester and Greater Hudson Valley chapters; from Connecticut were the Greater Danbury and South Fairfield chapters. The event was made possible by the sponsorship of TOM GRIMES and Clancy Moving Systems.

Betsy Conti

Mark Namm

The BRIDGEPORT BLUEFISH held Angel Espada Day at THE BALLPARK AT HARBOR YARD on Sunday, Sept.. “ANGEL ESPADA was a cornerstone of this franchise for nine years and made a lasting impact in Bridgeport both on and off the field” said Bluefish General Manager Ken Shepard. “Angel is one of the greatest players in our history, a class individual and we are excited to retire

his jersey.” A special pre-game ceremony was held on-field recognizing Espada’s accomplishments with the Bluefish. Espada played nine years in a Bluefish uniform, encompassing 734 games. He holds franchise records in runs scored (444), hits (817), and stolen bases (173). In 1999 he batted an impressive .356.

SHEARIN TAPPED AS PULLMAN & COMLEY CHAIRMAN

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20 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

JAMES T. SHEARIN has been named chairman of PULLMAN & COMLEY L.L.C. Shearin was appointed to the position Sept. 16. He succeeds D. ROBERT MORRIS in the role. Shearin, who is known as Tim, joined Pullman & Comley in September 1988 and has served in leadership roles at the firm for the past two decades. He has served on the Executive Committee since 1998 and as chairman of the Litigation Department since 1995. He serves as vice president of the Connecticut Bar Foundation Inc. Among his bona fides, he has been appointed by the chief justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court to the Judicial Performance Evaluation Program Advisory Board; and he was also appointed by the governor to the Judicial Compensation Commission. “Tim has been a leader for many years, not just at Pullman & Comley, but in the legal community and through his work with many nonprofit organizations,” said Morris. “The firm will be in great hands under Tim’s direction.” Morris remains on the firm’s executive committee and will continue to lead the tax section of its Business Organizations and Finance Department. With nearly 90 attorneys, Pullman & Comley is one of Connecticut’s largest firms. Offices are in Bridgeport, Hartford, Stamford, Waterbury and White Plains.


KUDOS FOR STAMFORD FRANCHISE OWNER

THIRTY CANDLES FOR LAW FIRM

ASSISTING HANDS HOME CARE franchisee GARY FERONE of Stamford was honored recently by the International Franchise Association (IFA) with its annual Franchisee of the Year Award. Franchise owner-operators representing 36 franchise systems were recognized during the IFA’s 14th Annual Public Affairs Conference for their outstanding performance and the contributions they have made to enhance the growth and development of franchising. Ferone said he is flattered by the award. “We have worked very hard to get our business where it is, and we are very happy with the support we have received from the home office of Assisting Hands Home Care and the International Franchise Association during the growth process,” he said Assisting Hands Home Care of Fairfield County offers in-home, nonmedical support services that “fill the gap between living at home with dignity and the need for institutionalized medical care.”

STRATFORD APARTMENTS HIT THE MARKET

The Greenwich law firm GILBRIDE, TUSA, LAST & SPELLANE is marking its 30th anniversary. “Anniversaries present not only an opportunity to celebrate the past, but also an occasion to remember the values that sustained us through the last 30 years and will fuel our success over the next 30 and more,” said FRANK GILBRIDE, a longtime Greenwich resident and one of the firm’s founders. “Over the years, we’ve enjoyed great collegiality and are very proud to still be around,” said CHARLIE TUSA, a Brunswick graduate who grew up in Greenwich and is another of the firm’s founders. “Most firms our size don’t last anywhere near as long as we have.” JOHN TESEI, another of the firm’s senior principals and a lifelong Greenwich resident, remarked that he was delighted to join the firm shortly after its founding in 1983 and has enjoyed his long association with the firm. Besides Greenwich, the law firm has an office in New York City and it recently opened an office in New Canaan. Other offices are in West Palm Beach and Naples, Fla. The firm employs 18 attorneys in its various offices.

WEBSTER BANKER RECEIVES PATRIOT AWARD

From, left, developer NICK OWEN of Sultan Realty Management; Forest City Residential Senior Vice President ABE NAPARSTEK; Town Council Chairman JOE KUBIC; and MAYOR JOHN HARKINS at the ribbon-cutting recently for the new apartment community on Stratford Avenue at Main Street known as 1111 Stratford.

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CARRIE GREEN, vice president, SIX SIGMA BLACK BELT; JACKIE JAMSHEED, WEBSTER BANK senior vice president for enterprise risk management; and WILLIAM VERNILE, EMPLOYER SUPPORT OF THE GUARD AND RESERVE area coordinator, honored Jamsheed with the DEFENSE PATRIOT AWARD from the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve. The award is given to a supervisor and company who support their Guard and Reserve employees and their families through flexible work schedules, time off and overall support and understanding of the strains that long-term deployments can have on family members. “It is such an honor to receive this award as it is so fitting with Webster’s values,” said Jamsheed. “When we say we take responsibility for meeting our customers’ needs and respect the dignity of every individual — that includes our employees as well — because they are our family. Our hearts and our gratitude go out to all our service families. By keeping them strong, we help keep our communities and our country strong.” Jamsheed was nominated by Carrie Green, vice president, Six Sigma Black Belt, whose husband, 1SG John Green, was deployed in Afghanistan.

STRATEGY LEADERS and ALCOTTHR present “The Owners Game” Thursday, Sept. 26, at the Stamford Hilton, 1 Stamford Place, 5:30-8 p.m. The networking and informational event is free and features appetizers and refreshments. The invitation reads: “Come play the Owners Game. Fun, exciting and a superior learning opportunity. A great way to network with other business owners.”

A CONNECTICUT CAPTIVE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION (CCIA) symposium takes place Wednesday, Oct. 2, 7 a.m.-4 p.m. at The Sheraton Hotel, 700 East Main St., Stamford. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy delivers the keynote address at 12:15 p.m. This is the second annual CCIA symposium, featuring industry leaders in captive insurance, which works via businesses forming their own insurance subsidiaries, better enabling them to insure their own risks and control their costs.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

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on the record Connelly Construction L.L.C., Fairfield. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 8 Pennoyer St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed Aug. 29. Country Club Homes, Wilton, contractor for Mary and Robert Crisafulli. Perform additions and alterations at an existing single-family residence, 182 Catalpa Road, Wilton. Estimated cost: $90,000. Filed Aug. 26. Cyr, Roland, contractor for Frank Mastro. Reroof an existing single-family residence, 675 Wilcoxson Ave., Stratford. Estimated cost: $5,800. Filed Sept. 6. Dallas, Carmella and George Dallas, Stamford. Replace windows and perform interior renovations to an existing single-family residence, 56 Dagmar Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $58,000. Filed Sept. 3.

COURT CASES

Bridgeport District Court Great Northern Bonding Company Ltd., et al., Danbury. Filed by M&L Construction Inc., Trumbull. Plaintiff’s attorney: James M. Nugent, Milford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay $2.4 million for labor and materials for a certain project performed by the plaintiff. Filed Sept. 10. Case no. 6037854. Greenwich Golf Group L.L.C., et al. Filed by TD Bank N.A. Plaintiff’s attorney: Laura Gold Becker, West Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to make payments on a promissory note in the original amount of $20,000 that the plaintiff had provided the defendant. Filed Sept. 9. Case no. 6037771. Homechek Real Estate Services Inc., Danbury. Filed by Christopher Lyon, Wilton. Plaintiff’s attorney: Drummond C. Smith, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breachof-contract suit against the defendant for its failure to conduct an inspection on the premises and to inform the plaintiff of any major deficiencies in the condition of the property. Filed Sept. 4. Case no. 6037716. Ray Weiner L.L.C. d.b.a. All Phase Construction. Filed by The Chapin & Bangs Co. Plaintiff’s attorney: Brian C. Cantor, Fairfield. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to make payments on a promissory note in the original amount of $50,652.94 that the plaintiff had provided the defendant. Filed Sept. 5. Case no. 6037742.

Steiber Realty L.L.C., Bridgeport. Filed by 19th Hole Restaurant Inc., Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ernest C. LaFollette, Fairfield. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-lease suit against the defendant as the plaintiff had discovered the premises in questio n to have certain defects. Filed Sept. 4. Case no. 6037727. Stratford Hotel & Conference Center, Stratford. Filed by URS Midwest Inc. d.b.a. United Road, Romulus, Mich. Plaintiff’s attorney: Luke R. Conrad, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this property damages suit against the defendant due to part of a building, which collapsed an d damaged a car carrier. Filed Sept. 9. Case no. 6037762.

Danbury District Court Danbury Kitchen Warehouse L.L.C., Danbury. Filed by Indoamerican Business Inc., New York City. Plaintiff’s attorney: Robert F. Ludgin, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay $5,904.92 for materials sold and delivered to the defendant. Filed Sept. 12. Case no. 6013527. National Guitar Summer Workshop Inc., et al., Litchfield. Filed by Bank of America N.A., Kansas City, Mo. Plaintiff’s attorney: Paul A. De Genaro, Stamford. Action: Action: the plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for its failure to make payments on a promissory note for $50,000. Filed Sept. 10. Case no. 6013492. OLM L.L.C., Trumbull. Filed by Hartford Casualty Insurance Co., New York City. Plaintiff’s attorney: Mark A. Sank, Stamford. Action: the plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for its failure to pay the premiums due on a workers’ compensation insurance policy. The amount of $38,491.68 is due the plaintiff. Filed Sept. 11. Case no. 6013521. The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company L.L.C., Newtown. Filed by Tiffany Lowe, Sandy Hook. Plaintiff’s attorney: Eric M. Gross, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that the plaintiff had sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Sept. 5. Case no. 6013463.

Stamford District Court Alaimo, Peter d.b.a. East Coast Power Equipment, Norwalk. Filed by KPM Exceptional Equipment & Service Inc., Kenvil, N.J. Plaintiff’s attorney: Edward J. Jacobs, new Haven. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay $6,137.59 for materials sold and delivered to the defendant. Filed Sept. 10. Case no. 6019753. Beiersdorf Inc., Norwalk. Filed by Jacklyn Jimenez. Plaintiff’s attorney: James K. Smith, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for injuries that the plaintiff had sustained due to the alleged negligence of the defendant. Filed Sept. 12. Case no. 6019783. CRG Carting L.L.C., et al., West Greenwich. Filed by Connecticut Community Bank N.A., Greenwich. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Alena C. Gfeller and Stella Szantova Giordano, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breachof-contract suit against the defendant for failing to make payments on a term note in the original amount of $900,000 that the plaintiff had provided. Filed Sept. 13. Case no. 6019788. Gunga Duleep d.b.a. Gunga Limited Corp., Norwalk. Filed by Yankee Gas Services Co., Berlin. Plaintiff’s attorney: James M. Trudell, Torrington. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for its failure to pay for utility services in the amount of $14,207.14. Filed Sept. 11. Case no. 6019779. Learning Care Group Inc., Novi, Mich. Filed by David Armetta, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Joseph M. Pastore III and Christopher Geotes, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this defamation suit against the defendant as an internal investigation put a strain on the business relationships and the reputation of the plaintiff due to a conflict of interest. Filed Sept. 10. Case no. 6019759. Learning Care Group Inc., Novi, Mich. Filed by Carlene Armetta, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Joseph M. Pastore III and Christopher Geotes, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this defamation suit against the defendant as an internal investigation put a strain on the business relationships and the reputation of the plaintiff due to a conflict of interest. Filed Sept. 10. Case no. 6019760.

Workshop Arts Inc., et al., Litchfield. Filed by Bank of America N.A., Kansas City, Mo. Plaintiff’s attorney: Paul A. DeGenaro, Stamford. Action: Action: the plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for its failure to make payments on a promissory note for $100,000. Filed Sept. 10. Case no. 6013493.

22 Week of September 23, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

RJRO Inc., et al., Atlanta, Ga. Filed by The Lawyers Group Advertising Inc., Darien. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ross M. Chintz, Darien. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay $23,629.10 for advertising services performed for the defendant. Filed Sept. 11. Case no. 6019772.

Clean Country Cars Inc., et al., Hartford. Filed by Jeanette Llaurador-Perez and Grisel Esmurria, Hartford. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Aida N. Arus and Daniel S. Blinn, Rocky Hill. Action: The plaintiff has brought this truth-in-lending suit against the defendant for violation of title and damages for breach of warranty. Filed Sept. 11. Case no. 13cv1333.

The Wine Connection, et al., Pound Ridge, N.Y. Filed by Jerry Straus, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Steven J. Curley, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for its failure to comply with certain conditions of a purchasing agreement. Filed Sept. 12. Case no. 6019786.

Freundt & Associates Insurance Services Inc., Irvine, Calif. Filed by PHL Variable Insurance Co. Plaintiff’s attorney: Eric L. Sussman, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for its failure to refund a portion of premiums paid after the policies were rescinded. Filed Sept. 6. Case no. 13cv1314.

Waterbury Properties No. 2 L.L.C., et al., Waterbury. Filed by Yankee Gas Services Co., Berlin. Plaintiff’s attorney: James M. Trudell, Torrington. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for its failure to pay for utility services in the amount of $39,905.81. Filed Sept. 11. Case no. 6019780.

Midland Funding L.L.C. Filed by Solomon Daniel, New Brittain. Plaintiff’s attorney: Daniel S. Blinn, Rocky Hill. Action: The plaintiff has brought this violation-of-the-fair-debt collections act against the defendant for failing to file a settlement action in a timely manner. Filed Sept. 11. Case no. 13cv1336.

White Birch Capital Partners L.L.C., Stamford. Filed by The Connecticut Light & Power Co., Berlin. Plaintiff’s attorney: Dianne M. Quigley, Bloomfield. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for its failure to pay for utility services in the amount of $12,856.86. Filed Sept. 11. Case no. 6019774. White, John A. d.b.a. Jaw Vinyl Liner Replacement, Columbia. Filed by Michael Grant, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Jonathan M. Shapiro, Middletown. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for substandard construction services that were performed by the defendant. Filed Sept. 9. Case no. 6019740.

SUPERIOR COURT Chenango Brokers L.L.C., Hancock, N.Y. Filed by American Modern Home Insurance Co. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Deborah Etlinger and Susan Evans Jones, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for its failure to inspect a property, which was unoccupied. Filed Sept. 5. Case no. 13cv1311. Ciphercloud Inc., San Jose, Calif. Filed by Protegrity Corp., Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Stephen P. McNamara, Stamford. Action: Action: The plaintiff has brought this patent-infringement suit against the defendant directly infringing on the claims of 281 patent by having made, used or sold a database security system that embodies the claimed invention. Filed Sept. 6. Case no. 13cv1317.

DEEDS

QUIT CLAIM

1365 Valley Road L.L.C., New Canaan. Seller: Chris Ann and Phillip R. Corryn, New York City. Property: 1365 Valley Road, New Canaan. Amount: $1.07 million. Filed Sept. 5. 228FBR L.L.C., Fairfield. Seller: Priscilla B. and Daniel S. Christianson, Fairfield. Property: 228 Fairfield Beach Road, Fairfield. Amount: $650,000. Filed Sept. 6. 229 Linden Tree Road L.L.C., Wilton. Seller: Judith Kane, Greenwich. Property: 229 Linden Tree Road, Wilton. Amount: $570,000. Filed Sept. 9. Ahmad, Ashfaq, Bethel. Seller: Carol Ann and Raymond D. Schneider, Bethel. Property: 24 Weed Road, Bethel. Amount: $302,000. Filed Sept. 9. Ansell, Lynne E. and Jeffrey P. Ansell, New Canaan. Seller: James A. Fieber trustee, New Canaan. Property: Lot 4, Map 7398, New Canaan. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed Sept. 6. Ansell, Lynne E. and Jeffrey P. Ansell, New Canaan. Seller: NF Weed L.L.C., New Canaan. Property: Lot 5, Map 7398, New Canaan. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed Sept. 6.

Lucia, Stephanie A. and Ronald J. Lucia Jr., Stamford. Seller: Sharon H. and Peter S. Lucia, Monroe. Property: 58 Treat Ave., Stamford. Amount: $161,500. Filed Sept. 3.

Aschiero, Veronica, Danbury. Seller: Joan and Paul Karp, Danbury. Property: 5 Alan Road, Danbury. Amount: $235,000. Filed Sept. 4.

Pani, Manuel J., Danbury. Seller: Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Property: 15 Hillside St., Danbury. Amount: $130,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Banfield, Kelsey M. and Duncan S. Banfield, Fairfield. Seller: Mary R. and Barry Y. Piels, Fairfield. Property: 208 S. Benson Road, Fairfield. Amount: $775,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Roche, Carol; John C. Bonney; David C. Boney; John Farrington and Ann Matie Flaherty, New Fairfield. Seller: Tana Bourdage-Allman, Rimrock, Ariz. Property: 56 Woodcreek Road, New Fairfield. Amount: $26,500. Filed Sept. 6. Sabatini, Joseph Jr., Stamford. Seller: Carrie Levitt Kaplan and Barry Kaplan, Stamford. Property: 154 Sylvan Knoll Road, Stamford. Amount: $188,000. Filed Sept. 6. Silver Oak Development L.L.C., Shelton. Seller: Customers Bank, Phoenixville, Pa. Property: Units 9, 10 and 12 at River Ridge, Shelton. Amount: $500,000. Filed Sept. 9.

RESIDENTIAL 100 Rose Hill L.L.C., New Fairfield. Seller: Darlene Zalutko, Danbury. Property: 100 Rose Hill Ave., Danbury. Amount: $150,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Baylis, Lee D., Clarkston, Mich. Seller: Katherine A. and Michael A. Marusa, Newtown. Property: 38 Alpine Circle, Newtown. Amount: $490,000. Filed Sept. 9. Bollman, Jean Ann and Richard N. Bollman, Darien. Seller: Neil Mahoney, Stamford. Property: 1 Shore Road, Unit 4, Stamford. Amount: $720,000. Filed Sept. 3. Brennan, Melissa D. and William Brennan, Monroe. Seller: Lisa E. and Kevin J. Santiana, Monroe. Property: 20 Blanket Meadow Road, Monroe. Amount: $660,000. Filed Sept. 3. Bruni, Kalie and Pedro Desouza, New Rochelle, N.Y. Seller: Lisa A. Melilli, Brooklyn, N.Y. Property: 41 King St., Norwalk. Amount: $345,000. Filed Sept. 9. Buckley, Lauren M. and Patrick K. Buckley, Norwalk. Seller: Vivian Carellini, Trumbull. Property: 3 Lakewood Drive, Trumbull. Amount: $302,000. Filed Sept. 5.


on the record Bulanadi, Cherylene and Nathaniel Bulanadi, Norwalk. Seller: Home Renewers Inc., Bethel. Property: 129 Haviland Road, Ridgefield. Amount: $529,000. Filed Sept. 3. Burke, Susan E. and Brett M. Szczesny, Stamford. Seller: Lana C. Fleishman and James E. Marina, Stamford. Property: 85 Harpsichord Turnpike, Stamford. Amount: $785,000. Filed Sept. 3. Burmann, Nahid L., Southbury. Seller: Youlin Li, Danbury. Property: 1302 Pinnacle Way, Danbury. Amount: $245,000. Filed Sept. 3. Campbell, Erica and Scott Campbell, Stamford. Seller: Jill and Robert Valinsky, Fairfield. Property: 361 Lockwood Road, Fairfield. Amount: $560,000. Filed Sept. 5. Capizzi, Thomas Frank, Brookfield. Seller: Dawn E. and Robert Pickerill, Brookfield. Property: 1 Gereg Glen Road, Brookfield. Amount: $548,100. Filed Aug. 27. Cappeli, Louis R. Family L.P. II, White Plains, N.Y. Seller: St. John Urban Development Corp., Stamford. Property: Atlantic Centre Condominium, Stamford. Amount: $5.2 million. Filed Sept. 6. Carroll, Constanza and Timothy J. Carroll, Shelton. Seller: Cranberry Estates L.L.C., Fairfield. Property: 11 Cisco Drive, Shelton. Amount: $495,000. Filed Sept. 3. Chakar, Mirta L. and Charles P. Chakar, Danbury. Seller: Kim M. and Robert B. Carr, Danbury. Property: 51 Smoke Hill Drive, Danbury. Amount: $315,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Curillo, Jorge R., Stamford. Seller: Joani and Freddie L. West, Norwalk. Property: 11 Adamson Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $343,000. Filed Sept. 9.

EMB Homes III L.L.C., Wilton. Seller: Jerome W. Denman, Wilton. Property: 233 Chestnut Hill Road, Wilton. Amount: $320,000. Filed Sept. 9.

Cutler, Dana L. and Robert A. Cutler, White Plains, N.Y. Seller: Stacy L. and Michael A. Moeller, Norwalk. Property: 100 Partrick Road, Westport. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed Sept. 3.

Embacher, Monica and Iulian Giuran Benetato, Hamden. Seller: Residential Credit Solutions L.L.C., Fort Worth, Texas. Property: 96 Stonehouse Road, Trumbull. Amount: $545,000. Filed Sept. 9.

D’Aulizio, Catherine and Thomas N. D’Aulizio, Shelton. Seller: Andrew Anthony Tatarenko and Peter Stefan Tatarenko, Clifton, N.J. Property: 35 Rivendell Drive, Unit 35, Shelton. Amount: $205,000. Filed Sept. 6. Davis, Angela and Edward Davis, Stamford. Seller: Susan Lamont, Stamford. Property: 35 Sleepy Hollow Lane, Stamford. Amount: $427,000. Filed Sept. 3. DeAngelis, Marisa and Jordan El-Hag, Katonah, N.Y. Seller: Amy Z. and Michael E. Sonderman, Ridgefield. Property: 58 Blue Ridge Road, Ridgefield. Amount: $427,500. Filed Sept. 4. DeMoura, Jessica, Shelton. Seller: Willard J. Nicholas Jr., Shelton. Property: 433 Shelton Ave., Shelton. Amount: $305,000. Filed Sept. 3. Desu, Bharathi and Rao V. Desu, Stamford. Seller: Margaret Ann and Glenn R. Coppola, Stamford. Property: 65 Amherst Place, Stamford. Amount: $510,000. Filed Sept. 3. DeVito, Mary Janet and John A. DeVito, Danbury. Seller: Maura P. Keenan and Jody Rajcula, Danbury. Property: 14 Lake Terrace Drive, Danbury. Amount: $937,500. Filed Sept. 9.

Clark, Richard V., Brookfield. Seller: Katherine Ann Quinn, Danbury. Property: 1204 Bradford Drive, Danbury. Amount: $235,000. Filed Sept. 3.

DiStefano, Anna and Michael DiStefano, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. Seller: Zoy and Stavros Beretis, Danbury. Property: 9 Westwood Drive, Danbury. Amount: $455,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Collins, Robin R. and Douglas R. Collins, Ridgefield. Seller: Walter G. Samylenko, Brookfield. Property: 86 Lakeside Drive, Ridgefield. Amount: $505,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Dwyer, Curtis T., Stamford. Seller: Elizabeth Ann and Panagiotis Mastogiannis, Stamford. Property: 39 Maple Tree Ave., Homesite 38, Stamford. Amount: $375,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Conlon, Erin Leigh, Riverside. Seller: Michael Moran, Norwalk. Property: 296 Main Ave., Unit 17, Norwalk. Amount: $214,000. Filed Sept. 4.

Dyer, Patricia M. and David E. Petiford, Danbury. Seller: Kelley and James Raleigh, Danbury. Property: 32 Judith Drive, Danbury. Amount: $545,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Conroy, Judith A., Stratford. Seller: Geraldine and Roger L. Felner, Stratford. Property: 370 Oceanview Terrace, Stratford. Amount: $339,000. Filed Sept. 9. Cosgrove, Gloria G., Brookfield. Seller: Patricia G. and Richard L. Padgett, Danbury. Property: 20B Starrs Plain Road, Danbury. Amount: $540,000. Filed Sept. 3.

Dyuranso, Daria and Brian F. Chase, New York City. Seller: Charline V. Dale, Darien. Property: 10 Holly Lane, Darien. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed Sept. 9. Eller, Kristin and William Eller, Fairfield. Seller: Lisa C. and Alex J. Frawley, Fairfield. Property: 309 Nonopoge Road, Fairfield. Amount: $605,000. Filed Sept. 4.

Eway, Lori M., Danbury. Seller: Dieter Properties L.L.C., Brookfield. Property: 15 Knollcrest Drive, Brookfield. Amount: $290,000. Filed Aug. 27. Fernandez, Emily L. and Ari I. Bauer, Danbury. Seller: Diana L. and Michael C. Tara, Danbury. Property: 9 Orwich Court, Unit 9, Danbury. Amount: $445,000. Filed Sept. 5. Ferreira Da Costa, Maria Nilza, Danbury. Seller: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 4 Darien Road, New Fairfield. Amount: $107,299. Filed Sept. 4. Ferris, Katherine R., Stamford. Seller: Jennifer L. and Andrew Dubois, Stamford. Property: 1400 Bedford St., Unit 8, Stamford. Amount: $400,000. Filed Sept. 5. Fisher, Jennifer and Bryan Fisher, Shelton. Seller: Mary P. Golda, Monroe. Property: 11 Historic Drive, Monroe. Amount: $465,000. Filed Sept. 3. Freidenrich, Amy and Eric Freidenrich, Woodside, Calif. Seller: Deborah Learn Kadigian and Dikran Janus Kadagian, Ridgefield. Property: 14 Market St., Ridgefield. Amount: $3.7 million. Filed Sept. 4. Froelich, Joseph, New Fairfield. Seller: Maureen E. Milnar, Brookfield. Property: 4 Fairmouth Court, Unit 3E, Brookfield. Amount: $162,500. Filed Aug. 27. Fuji, Nancy C. and Michael P. Fuji, Irvine, Calif. Seller: Mary C. and Christopher Cockerill, Darien. Property: 9 Clubhouse Circle, Darien. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed Sept. 6.

FORECLOSURES Augustave, Maggie. Creditor: BAC Home Loans Servicing L.P., Plano, Texas. Property: 17 Novak St., Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Sept. 3. Cadelina, Marie Lou Inong and Noel Cadelina, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Jacksonville, Fla. Property: 4 Papp St., Unit B, Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Sept. 3.

Cross, Rosie V. and Gregory L. Cross, et al. Creditor: PNC Bank N.A., Miamisburg, Ohio. Property: 2 Squantz View Drive, New Fairfield. Mortgage default. Filed Sept. 9.

Berube, Robert, Newtown. $831.05, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 11 Meadowbrook Lane, Newtown. Filed Sept. 6.

Espinel, Anita, Fairfield. $1,983.25, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 86 Campfield Drive, Fairfield. Filed Sept. 3.

Gilbertie, Taylor and Tyler Gilbertie, et al. Creditor: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 9 Ludlowe Court, Fairfield. Mortgage default. Filed Sept. 9.

Brown John, Marilyn, Bethel. $646.67, in favor of Bethel Volunteer Fire Department Inc., Bethel, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 78 Milwaukee Ave., Bethel. Filed Sept. 6.

Ferguson, Scott, Redding. $965.55, in favor of Ridgefield Diagnostics Imaging, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 718 Redding Road, Redding. Filed Sept. 9.

FORECLOSURES BY SALE

Brown, Eautha K., Darien. $12,836.54, in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 25 Goodwives River Road, Darien. Filed Sept. 9.

Fields, Michael, Danbury. $414.84, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 8 Hickory St., Danbury. Filed Sept. 9.

Cenlar FSB, Ewing, N.J. Appointed committee: Daniel W. O’Grady, Newtown. Property: 15 Diamond Drive, Newtown. Amount: $158,377.31. No. DBD cv106004064S. Filed Sept. 9. JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Appointed committee: Joseph P. Secola, Danbury. Property: 86 Deer Hill Ave., Danbury. Amount: $217,289.72. Docket no. 10cv6002684S. Filed Sept. 3. Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Appointed committee: Dean L. Lewis, New Fairfield. Property: 21 Charcoal Ridge Road, New Fairfield. Amount: $229,407. Docket no. DBD cv116006032S. Filed Sept. 9.

JUDGMENTS Adams, Linda and Gary Adams, New Fairfield. $436.71, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 18 Albion Road, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 4. Adams, Linda and Gary Adams, New Fairfield. $302.19, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 18 Albion Road, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 4. Alfaro, Walter, Stamford. $2,065.79, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by William L. Marohn, New Haven. Property: 240 Wardwell St., Stamford. Filed Sept. 3. Anderson, Wendy F., Fairfield. $3,853.53, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 250 Old Black Rock Turnpike, Fairfield. Filed Sept. 5. Baboo, Marianne a.k.a. Marianne Lyons, Danbury. $641.30, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 2A Jeanette Road, Unit 71, Danbury. Filed Sept. 9.

Collias, Theodore, Wilton. $451.74, in favor of Western Connecticut Imaging, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 182 Deer Run Road, Wilton. Filed Sept. 9. Cologgi, Jody, Trumbull. $1,002.55, in favor of Advanced Radiology Consultants L.L.C., Trumbull, by Richard Terry, Hamden. Property: 31 Lobsterback Road, Trumbull. Filed Sept. 9. Conklin, George, Sandy Hook. $1,095.65, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 9 Alpine Circle, Sandy Hook. Filed Sept. 6.

Garcia, Maria, Stamford. $1,364.06, in favor of Stamford Hospital, Stamford, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 68 West Ave., Stamford. Filed Sept. 5. Gissen, Thomas, Sandy Hook. $8,655.02, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 35 Horseshoe Ridge Road, Sandy Hook. Filed Sept. 6. Green, Brenda, Danbury. $947.83, in favor of Western Connecticut Imaging, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 21 King St., Danbury. Filed Sept. 9.

Couch, Patricia, Stamford. $9,018.05, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 237 Sun Dance Road, Stamford. Filed Sept. 5.

Hasegan, Valentina, Stamford. $3,346.66, in favor of National Credit Adjusters L.L.C., Hutchinson, Kan., by Sara M. Gould, Stamford. Property: 45 Three Lakes Drive, Stamford. Filed Sept. 3.

Danforth, Laura, New Canaan. $11,359.82, in favor of Costello & McCormack P.C., Fairfield, by Kieran J. Costello, Fairfield. Property: 109 Milport Ave., New Canaan. Filed Sept. 9.

Henry, Suzanne M., Danbury. $5,500, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Benjamin P. Mann, Enfield. Property: 38 Fleetwood Drive, Danbury. Filed Sept. 9.

Deleon, Roberto, Danbury. $1,463.74, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 51 to 71 Park Ave., Unit 2-49, Danbury. Filed Sept. 3.

Hitchens, Randall L., Brookfield. $862.25, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 41B Secor Road, Brookfield. Filed Aug. 27.

Dellaventura, Catherine, Bethel. $483.84, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 150B Grassy Plain St., Bethel. Filed Sept. 6. Dika, Rexhui, New Fairfield. $2,947.72, in favor of Shellfish Company Inc., Branford, by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 23 Margerie Road, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 5. Elliott, Dina A., Easton. $937.94, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 50 E. Common Road, Easton. Filed Sept. 9.

Hombra, Fidel, Danbury. $596.63, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 18 Highland Ave., Danbury. Filed Sept. 9. Hunter Miller, Valerie, Danbury. $664.70, in favor of Danbury Emergency Services, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 32 Driftway Road, Danbury. Filed Sept. 9. Illarramendi, Francisco, New Canaan. $89,822.12, in favor of American Express Centurion Bank, Salt Lake City, Utah, by Benjamin P. Mann, Enfield. Property: 61 Parade Hill Lane, New Canaan. Filed Sept. 6.

Charles, Steven, et al. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 25 Grand St., Unit 154, Norwalk. Mortgage default. Filed Sept. 9.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 23


on the record Mattimore, James W., New Fairfield. $2,648.99, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 59 Possum Drive, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 5.

Schuchak, Svitlana and Yuriy Schachak, Norwalk. $13,060.46, in favor of Norwalk Hospital Association, Norwalk, by Christopher J. Jarboe, Norwalk. Property: 12 Imperial Drive, Norwalk. Filed Sept. 5.

Kasseris, Elena, Bethel. $459.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 27 Deer Run, Bethel. Filed Sept. 6.

Melgard, Rachel R., New Fairfield. $1,672.94, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 153 State Route 39, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 5.

Schwarz, Timothy R., New Canaan. $20,458.51, in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 423 Wahackme Road, New Canaan. Filed Sept. 4.

Kelly, John C., New Fairfield. $2,087.17, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 11 Windmill Road, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 4.

Mota, Roman, Danbury. $436.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital Dental Service, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 58 Balmforth Ave., Danbury. Filed Sept. 9.

Serecsics, Peter, Bethel. $5,689.37, in favor of Corbally, Gartland and Rappleyea L.L.P., Poughkeepsie, N.Y., by Bradford Kendall, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Property: 145 Walnut Hill Road, Bethel. Filed Sept. 9.

Kitson, Edward R. Jr., Shelton. $2,787.04, in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 39 Big Horn Road, Shelton. Filed Sept. 3.

Musolino, Kathleen, Redding. $750.56, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 16 Deacon Abbott Road, Redding. Filed Sept. 9.

Kwong, Matthew J., Newtown. $1,582.93, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 9 Bradley Lane, Newtown. Filed Sept. 6.

Neumann, Daniel, Trumbull. $2,399.40, in favor of Advanced Radiology Consultants L.L.C., Trumbull, by Richard Terry, Hamden. Property: 120 Campbell Road, Trumbull. Filed Sept. 9.

Lalla, Sharon, New Fairfield. $395.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 4 Sobel Drive, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 9.

Nichols, Diana, Fairfield. $1,204.20, in favor of Advanced Radiology Consultants L.L.C., Trumbull, by Richard Terry, Hamden. Property: 100 Evergreen Hill Road, Fairfield. Filed Sept. 9.

John, Anthony L., Danbury. $461.10, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, East Syracuse, N.Y., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 8 Westwood Drive, Danbury. Filed Sept. 3.

Landesberg, Lawrence A., Fairfield. $849.25, in favor of Santa Energy Corp., Bridgeport., by Janine M. Becker, Bridgeport. Property: 56 Prince St., Fairfield. Filed Sept. 5. Lenz, Steven M., Monroe. $25,575.21, in favor of Capital One N.A., Glen Allen, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 127 Sentry Hill Road, Monroe. Filed Sept. 4.

Nicolari, Timothy, Danbury. $1,364.55, in favor of Western Connecticut Imaging, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 32 Taagan Point Road, Danbury. Filed Sept. 9. Pinheiro, Daniela, New Fairfield. $874.82, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Russell L. London, Newington. Property: 8 Bear Mountain Road, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 5.

Lopez, Jose, Stratford. $410.05, in favor of Bridgeport Radiology Associates, Bridgeport, by Richard Terry, Hamden. Property: 619 Birdseye St., Stratford. Filed Sept. 9.

Quinn, Jeanine, Bethel. $535.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 17 Deer Run, Bethel. Filed Sept. 6.

Loya, Tricia, Bethel. $1,474.87, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 23 Midway Drive, Bethel. Filed Sept. 6.

Ragoo, Karran, Danbury. $646.56, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 15 Farm St., Danbury. Filed Sept. 9.

Lucas, Donald, Wilton. $608.10, in favor of Bethel Volunteer Fire Department Inc., Bethel, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 18 Sugarbush Court, Wilton. Filed Sept. 4.

Reilly, Patrick, New Fairfield. $940.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 85 Pine Hill Road, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 9.

Macchi, Claire, Bethel. $1,728.48, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 30 Hickock Ave., Bethel. Filed Sept. 6.

Rios, Richard, Brookfield. $894.68, in favor of Danbury Emergency Services, Danbury, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 12 Beverly Drive, Brookfield. Filed Aug. 26.

Sergi, Joseph, Monroe. $475.03, in favor of Western Connecticut Imaging, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 17 Penny Royal Lane, Monroe. Filed Sept. 9. Stavridis, Brighid E., Danbury. $998.43, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 11 Thaddeus Ave., Danbury. Filed Sept. 9. Sumair, Seuchand, Danbury. $14,349.24, in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 54 Park Ave., Danbury. Filed Sept. 9. Voight, Michelle, Newtown. $536.51, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 12 Washbrook Road, Newtown. Filed Sept. 9. Weston, Virginia, New Fairfield. $1,056.99, in favor of Northeast Radiology, New York City. Property: by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 41 Candlewood Drive, New Fairfield. Filed Sept. 9.

LEASES 2 to 8 Post Restaurant L.L.C., Westport, by Robert Werhane. Landlord: Nathall 29PR L.L.C., South Norwalk. Property: 2 to 8 Post Road West, Westport. Term: 15 years, commencing Aug. 12, 2013. Filed Sept. 6.

LIENS

BROKER’S LIENS Bowen, Jennifer and Daniel Bowen, Fairfield. Filed by William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty, Stamford, by Paul Breunich. Property: 306 Barberry Road, Fairfield. Amount: $36,250. Filed Sept. 6.

Rodriguez, Melissa, Danbury. $619.16, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 10 Scuppo Road, Unit A5, Danbury. Filed Sept. 9.

24 Week of September 23, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

FEDERAL TAX LIENSFILED

Carlson, Anita T., 19 Crescent St., Shelton. $17,615.91, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 5.

3 D Service Station Inc., 527 Glenbrook Road, Stamford. $46,658.98, corporation income-tax return; employer’s Federal Unemployment Tax return; and payroll taxes. Filed Sept. 6.

Chagslasian, Sheila and Andrew Chagslasian, 22 Great Hill Road, Weston. $29,473.56, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9.

3 D Service Station Inc., 527 Glenbrook Road, Stamford. $524.29, employer’s federal unemployment tax return. Filed Sept. 6. Askalsky, Helen and Alexander Askalasky, 29 Sterling Road, Trumbull. $3,026.27, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Bloom, Peter M., P.O. Box 2321, Westport. $32,496.19, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Bouton, Andrew L., 14 Deerfield Drive, Sandy Hook. $13,310.69, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 3. Bouton, Andrew L., 14 Deerfield Drive, Newtown. $9,046.91, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 3. Brody, Karen H., 15 Barrister Lane, Fairfield. $60,317.38, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Camargos, Marcone G., 19 Library Place, Apt. 1, Danbury. $66,623.06, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 3. Champagne, Scott, 324 Stanley Road, Monroe. $25,705.95, trust fund recovery penalty and/or excise taxes imposed. Filed Sept. 9.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSREFILE NOTICE Ryan, Peter M., 1024 Stillwater Road, Stamford. $123.74, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 6. Venanzi, Anna Maria and Eugene T. Venanzi, 42 Larkspur Road, Stamford. $54,022.94, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 6.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSRELEASED Allison, Harold J., 21 Farrell Road, Newtown. $84,265.36, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Brennan, Mary Sharon, 6 Rita Drive, New Fairfield. $10,414.93, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9.

Chigogidze, Zurab, 57 Rock Spring Road, Apt. 13, Stamford. $49,707.77, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 6. Dowdle, Stephanie and John D. Dowdle, 98 Indian Waters Drive, New Canaan. $20,979.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 4. Evans, Joseph, 109 Kohanza St., Apt. 71B, Danbury. $23,346.26, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Evans, Julia and Joseph Evans, 15 Abbott Ave., Danbury. $51,851.66, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Evans, Julia and Joseph Evans, 15 Abbott Ave., Danbury. $14,134.37, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Gallatins Golden Rack Inc., 268 Atlantic St., Stamford. $4,204.68, payroll taxes. Filed Sept. 6. GTE Overseas Corp., 1 Stamford Forum, Stamford. $578,070.99, 6672/941trust fund recovery penalty and/or excise taxes imposed; and payroll taxes. Filed Sept. 6. Harris, Julia and Edward Z. Hughes, 65 Partridge Road, New Canaan. $58,300.73, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 4. Jeremiah, Gerald, 333 Glenbrook Road, Stamford. $4,413.11, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 6. Lekarczyk, Krzysztof, 114 Cliff St., Shelton. $7,220.78, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 5. Lobue, Gina M., 202 S. Main St., Norwalk. $7,844.15, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 9. Marsilio, Kathleen, 597 Westport Ave., Unit C259, Norwalk. $148,442.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 4. Marsilio, Kathleen, 597 Westport Ave., Unit C259, Norwalk. $148,442.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 3. Marsilio, Kathleen, 305 Newton Turnpike, Weston. $66,041.65, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 4. Marsilio, Kathleen, 597 Westport Ave., Unit C259, Fairfield. $82,139.32, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 4.

Rubio, Mark, 300 Atlantic St., Sixth floor, Stamford. $78,399.91, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 6. Schnaitmann, Camilla M. and Kevin M. Schnaitmann, 130 Far Horizon Drive, Monroe. $8,151.92, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 3. W Kimball Inc., 99 Hanover Road, Newtown. $15,840.91, payroll taxes. Filed Sept. 9. Westrell, Christopher J., 10 South St., Unit 93, Danbury. $49,632.42, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 3.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSWITHDRAWAL AFTER RELEASE Drayson, Wai Fan Hoi and Peter B. Drayson, 206 Old West Mountain Road, Ridgefield. $48,825.52, tax debt on income earned. Filed Sept. 3.

MECHANIC’S LIENSFILED Beller, Jennifer, Brookfield. Filed by Drew Osgood, Brookfield. Property: 458 Candlewood Lake Road, Brookfield. Amount: $3,000. Filed Aug. 29. Filanowski, Susanna and Brian Filanowski, Norwalk. Filed by. Raise High Construction L.L.C., Norwalk, by Joseph R. Carter. Property: 12 Englewood Road, Norwalk. Amount: $26,519.59. Filed Sept. 6. Hills of Monroe Association and Consolidated Management Group, Monroe. Filed by Advanced Asphalt Recycling L.L.C., Seymour, by Jonathan Metclaf. Property: The Hills of Monroe, Buildings 102 and 104, Monroe. Amount: $51,544. Filed Sept. 6. Imperial Real Estate Holdings L.L.C., New Canaan. Filed by Joseph Robert Gluse Architect L.L.C., Shelton. Property: 20 Locust Ave., New Canaan. Amount: $4,065.54. Filed Sept. 9. Imperial Real Estate Holdings L.L.C., New Canaan. Filed by Joseph Robert Gluse Architect L.L.C., Shelton. Property: 20 Locust Ave., New Canaan. Amount: $4,000. Filed Sept. 9. Ligon, Grant H. and Patrick B. Merrill, Redding. Filed by Ferrandino Enterprises L.L.C., Ridgefield, by Jason Ferrandino. Property: 81 Piine Tree Road, Redding. Amount: $68,939.30. Filed Sept. 9.


on the record Saugatuck Construction Group L.L.C., Stamford. Filed by V.P.A. Concrete L.L.C., Naugatuck, by Agostino Fernandes. Property: 500 Shelton Ave., Shelton. Amount: $17,319.10. Filed Sept. 5. Saugatuck Construction Group L.L.C., Stamford. Filed by Double “D” Designs & Construction L.L.C., Stamford, by Dominick M. Angotta, Stamford. Property: 500 Shelton Ave., Shelton. Amount: $64,628. Filed Sept. 6. Tomassetti, Jillian I. and Kevin P. Tomassetti, Weston. Filed by Land Tech Consultants Inc., Westport, by Peter T. Romano. Property: 4 White Birch Ridge Lane, Weston. Amount: $12,420.89. Filed Sept. 5.

LIS PENDENS Ainley, Marie Anne a.k.a. Marie Anne Gajdosik, et al., Bethel. Filed by Kenneth J. Pollock, Hartford, for Ocwen Loan Servicing L.L.C., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 25 Long Meadow Lane, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $156,000, dated June 2004. Filed Sept. 9. Artisi, Ran, et al., Danbury. Filed by Assaf Z. Ben-Atar, Bridgeport, for Lake Waubeeka Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 36 to 38 Carol St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose on alien. Filed Sept. 3. Bazata, Christine M. and Robert J. Bazata, New Canaan. Filed by Stephen J. Curley, Stamford, for Cebo Material Movers Inc., Stamford. Property: 1937 Ponus Ridge Road, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose on a mechanic’s lien. Filed Sept. 6. Beletskiy, Aleksandr, et al., Trumbull. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 36 North St., Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $405,000, dated September 2006. Filed Sept. 4. Brain, Jewel M., et al., Stamford. Filed by Andrew S. White, Hamden, for First Niagara Bank N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 46 Bertmar Drive, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $425,200, dated January 2004. Filed Sept. 4.

Braunstein, Marie T. and Mitchell Braunstein, et al., New Fairfield. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 26 Overbrook Drive, New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $153,900, dated July 1993. Filed Sept. 4. Canevari, Peter, Monroe. Filed by Franklin G. Pillicy, Watertown, for High Meadows Condominium Association Inc., Monroe. Property: 1 Highland Drive, Monroe. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges. Filed Sept. 9. Capalbo, Elizabeth M., et al., Brookfield. Filed by Gregg A. Brauneisen, Danbury, for Sandy Lane Village Condominium Association Inc., Brookfield. Property: 92 Homestead Lane, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed Aug. 27. Capozza, Gerardo, et al., Weston. Filed by Victoria L. Forcella, Hartford, for E*Trade Bank, Arlington, Va. Property: 47 Blueberry Hill Road, Weston. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $200,000, dated July 2004. Filed Sept. 6. Carretero, Stefan, Danbury. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Residential Credit Solutions Inc., Fort Worth, Texas. Property: 47 Locust Ave., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $390,000, dated June 2007. Filed Sept. 9. Chiodi, Leslie S. and Joseph A. Chiodi, Ridgefield. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Citimortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 54 Hickory Lane, Ridgefield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $514,000, dated November 2005. Filed Sept. 9. Christofferson, Thomas H., et al., New Canaan. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 85 Four Winds Lane, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $3.9 million, dated July 2007. Filed Sept. 9. Clark, Deborah A. and David A. Clark, Bethel. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Ocwen Loan Servicing L.L.C., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 85 to 87 Plumbtrees Road, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $192,000, dated November 2006. Filed Sept. 9.

Cobb, Elizabeth D. and Jeffrey B. Cobb, Weston. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 118 Weston Road, Weston. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $675,000, dated December 2001. Filed Sept. 5.

Desmond, Jean and Jean Petropoulos, Norwalk. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls S.D. Property: 30 Richmond Hill Road, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $300,000, dated April 2007. Filed Sept. 5.

Confident, Kevin, Stamford. Filed by Jessica L. Braus, Fairfield, for Selene Finance L.P., Houston, Texas. Property: 22 Robin St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $421,170, dated December 2011. Filed Sept. 5.

Difalco, Jean K. and Alfred Joseph Difalco Jr., Danbury. Filed by Anna Gersham, Armonk, N.Y., for Wilmington Trust Co., Wilmington, Del. Property: 14 Skyline Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $292,000, dated April 2007. Filed Sept. 9.

Conte, Claudia M.; Jessica Conte and Patricia C. Conte, Stamford. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 74 Palmer Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $363,250, dated May 2009. Filed Sept. 4. Cuddy, Kevin M. (Estate), et al., Stamford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 91 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 1127, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $234,000, dated November 2006. Filed Sept. 4. Cunningham, Ellen Ray (estate), et al., Stratford. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Federal National Mortgage Association, Washington, D.C. Property: 634 Success Ave., Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $282,000, dated October 2006. Filed Sept. 9. Dascenzo, Cara and Lee Dascenzo, Stratford. Filed by John P. Fahey, Farmington, for Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Co., Des Moines, Iowa. Property: 163 Circle Drive, Stratford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $130,000, dated April 2004. Filed Sept. 9. David, Milan, et al., Danbury. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 26 Judith Drive, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $564,750, dated October 2006. Filed Sept. 4. Derubis, Ursula, et al., Shelton. Filed by Kenneth J. Pollock, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 75 Country Place, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $160,000, dated April 2004. Filed Sept. 4.

Drakeford, Marlene and English L. Drakeford, et al., Stamford. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 52 St. George Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $510,000, dated March 2005. Filed Sept. 5. Fieber, Susan, et al., Darien. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 566 Hoyt St., Darien. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $500,000, dated November 2007. Filed Sept. 9. Flores, Pedro, et al., Shelton. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for National Residential Assets Corp./, 45 Willoughby Road, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $452,000, dated March 2009. Filed Sept. 6. Flynn, Jacqueline E. and William Z. Flynn, et al., Danbury. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 37 Tamanny Trail, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $190,000, dated September 2002. Filed Sept. 4. Fraioli, Robert, et al., Brookfield. Filed by Christopher K. Leonard, Danbury,, for Sandy Lane Village Condominium Association Inc., Brookfield. Property: 23 Homestead Lane, Unit 81, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed Aug. 27. Garzon, Karen B. and Pedro M. Garzon, Norwalk. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for First Niagara Bank N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 16 Walnut Ave., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $430,000, dated January 2007. Filed Sept. 5.

Gold, Judith S. and Emanuel R. Gold, et al., New Fairfield. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 22 Sail Harbor Drive, Unit 67, New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $680,000, dated January 2008. Filed Sept. 3. haigney, Jacqueline, et al., Stamford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for OneWest Bank F.S.B., Pasadena, Calif. Property: 811 Riverbank Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $596,684, dated September 2004. Filed Sept. 5. Hamilton, Laura Ann and Mark A. Hamilton, Norwalk. Filed by Christopher R. Thompson, Farmington, for Spart GP Holding REO Corp., San Antonio, Texas. Property: 77 Glenwood Ave., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $380,000, dated September 2005. Filed Sept. 6. Hendrickson, Carole L. and John H. Hendrickson, et al., Westport. Filed by Kathryn Sylvester, Stamford, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 27 Salem Road, Westport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $750,000, dated January 2006. Filed Sept. 9.

Jackson, Carole and Christopher C. Jackson, Redding. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 76 John Read Road, Redding. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $166,500, dated November 2010. Filed Sept. 5. Kallivrousis, Elizangela M. and Danny R. Kallivrousis, et al., Brookfield. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 3 Homestead Lane, Unit 91, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $166,500, dated April 2007. Filed Aug. 26. Kaplan, Erol, et al., Fairfield. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 25 Pine Tree Lane, Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $476,000, dated March 2007. Filed Sept. 3.

Khan, Mohammad S., et al., Danbury. Filed by Christopher K. Leonard, Danbury, for Brookside of Danbury Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 7 Pandanaram Road, Unit 43, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed Sept. 3. Kin, Iftikhar Ud and Mohammed Faisal Iftikhar, et al., Danbury. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 79 Park Ave., Unit 406, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $102,800, dated October 2002. Filed Sept. 4. Krishna, Suneeta P. and Jayardman Krishna, et al., New Canaan. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for EMC Mortgage L.L.C./, 369 Pinney Road, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $1.1 million, dated April 2000. Filed Sept. 5. Kurfehs, Linda R., et al., Brookfield. Filed by Dyan M. Kozaczka, Orange, for Stony Hill Cillage Condominium Association Inc., Brookfield. Property: 118 Heatherwood Drive, Unit 18, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Aug. 29. Lamouille, Lauren E. and Cedric G. Lamouille, Stamford. Filed by Kathryn Sylvester, Stamford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 128 Knapp St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $353,500, dated May 2011. Filed Sept. 6.

Lapaix, Juan C., Danbury. Filed by Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 50 Austin St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $491,417, dated May 2005. Filed Sept. 3. Linton, Polly A. and Donald L. Linton, et al., Fairfield. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 593 Winnepoge Drive, Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $159,425, dated February 2011. Filed Sept. 3. Lucas, Barbara A., et al., Norwalk. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 222 Sunrise Hill Road, Unit 100, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $215,000, dated December 2007. Filed Sept. 4.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 25


on the record Mattioli, Janice A., et al., Shelton. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for PNC Bank N.A., Pittsburgh, Pa. Property: 47 Beech Tree Hill Road, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $157,500, dated July 1992. Filed Sept. 3.

Pinto, Ricardo, et al., Monroe. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 282 Barn Hill Road, Monroe. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $280,000, dated March 2007. Filed Sept. 6.

Sirisuth, Puengpet, et al., New Canaan. Filed by Jo-Ann Sensale, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 610 Old Stamford Road, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $525,000, dated May 2004. Filed Sept. 6.

Miranda, Shirley and Yordan Miranda, Trumbull. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 82 Evelyn St., Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $336,000, dated March 2008. Filed Sept. 9.

Piwowarski, David J., et al., Monroe. Filed by Dyan M. Kozaczka, Orange, for Northbrook Condominium Association Inc., Monroe. Property: 2 Cascade Circle, Monroe. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges. Filed Sept. 5.

Sultan, Al-Nasir A., et al., Fairfield. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Audubon Condominium Association Inc., Fairfield. Property: 403 Unquowa Road, Fairfield. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed Sept. 4.

Moore, Selvyn A. and Anthony Moore, et al., Stamford. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 26 Betts Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $245,000, dated July 2004. Filed Sept. 5. Nunovero, Victor E., et al., Norwalk. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 13 Ingleside Ave., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $328,000, dated January 2006. Filed Sept. 5. Perry, Douglas E. Jr., Brookfield. Filed by John J. Bowser, Danbury, for Brookfield Hills Condominium Unit Owners Association Inc., Brookfield. Property: 29 Monkia Lane, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed Aug. 27.

Rodgerson, Kris, et al., Monroe. Filed by Dyan M. Kozaczka, Orange, for Northbrook Condominium Association Inc., Monroe. Property: 5 Rockview Circle, Monroe. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges. Filed Sept. 5. Ryan, Lynda M. and James T. Ryan, et al., Trumbull. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 70 Sherman Ave., Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $232,000, dated January 2003. Filed Sept. 4. Sandolo, Filomena and Roberto Sandolo, et al., Stamford. Filed by Jo-Ann Sensale, Farmington, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 20 Donata Lane, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $168,750, dated October 1996. Filed Sept. 5. Simpson, Robert (Estate), et al., Trumbull. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for PNC Bank N.A., Pittsburgh, Pa. Property: 11 Indian Ledge Drive, Trumbull. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $300,000, dated April 2003. Filed Sept. 9.

Torrielli, Umberto, et al., Monroe. Filed by Dyan M. Kozaczka, Orange, for Northbrook Condominium Association Inc., Monroe. Property: 5 Stillmeadow Circle, Monroe. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges. Filed Sept. 5. Troiano, Kelly Marie and Don Thomas Troiano, et al., Danbury. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Ocwen Loan Servicing L.L.C., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 80 Hillandale Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $255,000, dated October 2005. Filed Sept. 4.

Troy, Ellen and Peter A. Troy, Norwalk. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 62 Winding Lane, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $326,250, dated March 2005. Filed Sept. 4.

Valle, Manuel, Stamford. Filed by Cheryl F. Hefferman, Hamden, for Chicago Title Insurance Co., Omaha, Neb. Property: 67 Noble St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose on a judgment lien against the defendant. Filed Sept. 5.

Rich Cappelli Associates L.L.C., White Plains, N.Y., by James P. Blose, Bronxville, N.Y. Lender: Hudson Valley Bank N.A., Yonkers, N.Y. Property: Atlantic Centre Condominium, Stamford. Amount: $3.5 million. Filed Sept. 6.

Warner, Michael Thomas, et al., Shelton. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Citimortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 314 Pheasant Glen, Shelton. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $243,000, dated August 2008. Filed Sept. 5.

S&W Brookfield L.L.C., Boston, Mass., by Steven B. Samuels. Lender: Webster Bank N.A., Boston, Mass. Property: 84, 104, 110, 112, 128 and 140 Federal Road, Brookfield. Amount: $35 million. Filed Aug. 29.

Nutmeg State Properties L.L.C., Orange, by Jason M. Shea. Lender: Entertainment Financial L.L.C., South Windsor. Property: 428 Rowayton Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $411,400. Filed Sept. 5.

MoRTGaGES

nEW BUSinESSES

commerciaL 295 Hunyadi Avenue L.L.C., Fairfield, by Dean Kardamis. Lender: Bank of Fairfield, Fairfield. Property: 289 Hunyadi Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $1 million. Filed Sept. 5. Dunham Pond Development L.L.C., Brookfield, by Anthony O. Lucera. Lender: Greater Hudson Bank N.A., Middletown. Property: The Woods at Dunham Pond Condominiums, New Fairfield. Amount: $800,000. Filed Sept. 9. Four Twenty-Two Summer Street Inc., Stamford, by Mario J. Lodato Jr. Lender: Housing Development Fund Inc., Stamford. Property: 422 Summer St., Stamford. Amount: $3.6 million. Filed Sept. 5. J. Bruno Realty L.L.C., Stamford, by David M. Bruno. Lender: Fairfield County Bank, Ridgefield. Property: 54 Poplar St., Stamford. Amount: $470,000. Filed Sept. 5. Kardamis Construction L.L.C., Fairfield, by Dean Kardamis. Lender: Bank of Fairfield, Fairfield. Property: 35 Eunice Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $1 million. Filed Sept. 5.

+THIS WEEK’S

ELECTRONIC RECORDS SECTION CONTAINS:

15 MORE COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS

on Westfaironline.com.

126 MORE RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS

15 MORE FORECLOSURES on Westfaironline.com.

30 MORE FEDERAL TAX LIENS-FILED

on Westfaironline.com.

on Westfaironline.com.

140 MORE RESIDENTIAL DEEDS

40 MORE NEW BUSINESSES

on Westfaironline.com.

on Westfaironline.com.

26 Week of September 23, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

construction

Wise, Michael A., et al., Ridgefield. Filed by Gregg A. Brauneisen, Danbury, for Fox Hill-Ridgefield Condominium Association Section III Inc., Ridgefield. Property: 20 Silver Spring Lane, Ridgefield. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed Sept. 3.

New England Avenue L.L.C., Fairfield, by Dean Kardamis. Lender: Bank of Fairfield, Fairfield. Property: 108 New England Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $1 million. Filed Sept. 5.

A.K. Taxi, 8 North Ave., Apt. 8C, Norwalk 06851, c/o Aleem Khan. Filed Sept. 6. Akademos Inc., 200 Connecticut Ave., Unit 2B, Norwalk 06854, c/o John Squires. Filed Sept. 9. Al Dexter Septic & Drainage, 65 W. Rocks Road, Norwalk 06854, c/o Anastasia Andrea. Filed Aug. 22. Apadana Home and Design, 31 to 35 S. Main St., Norwalk 06854, c/o CT Rugs and Home L.L.C. Filed Sept. 4. Architects & Builders Associates L.L.C., 3 Silent Grove Court, Norwalk 06854, c/o Hector L. Montanez. Filed Aug. 21. Barrett Contractor, 8 Jansen St., Danbury 06810, c/o David Barrett. Filed Sept. 3. Bright Beginnings Family Child Care, 168 N. Taylor Ave., Norwalk 06851, c/o Lynn Sawyer. Filed Aug. 22. Busy Being Well, 25 Charter Ridge, Sandy Hook 06482, c/o Michelina C. Disibio. Filed Sept. 6. Castro Professional Painter, 14 Naromake Ave., Norwalk 06854, c/o Juan Castro. Filed Sept. 3. Cesar Drywall & Painting, 155 W. Cedar St., Apt. 3, Norwalk 06855, c/o Cesar Pasache Montes. Filed Aug. 22.

Child Advocates of SW Connecticut, 383 Main Ave., Suite 409, Norwalk 06851, c/o Stacey G. Sobel. Filed Aug. 30.

Coaccavale’s Fruit & Vegetable Farm, 1 Bari Drive, Newtown 06470, c/o Robert Cocivi. Filed Aug. 28. Colonial Chiropractic Centre of Newtown, 19 Church Hill Road, Newtown 06470, c/o Della M. Schmid D.C. Filed Sept. 9. Concentra Urgent Care, 60 Watson Blvd., Stratford 06615, c/o American Current Care PA. Filed Sept. 9. Connecticut Ice Cream Truck, 17 Park Hill Ave., Norwalk 06855, c/o Keith Bonenfant. Filed Aug. 20.

PaTEnTS Efficient service rules creation through subjective logic and temporal pattern recognition. Patent no. 8,538,908 issued to Zhiguo Li, Webster, N.Y.; and Rajinderjeet Singh Minhas, Rochester, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Photoconductors containing biaryl polycarbonate charge transport layers. Patent no. 8,535,859 issued to Jin Wu, Pittsford, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. System and method for managing digests comprising electronic messages. Patent no. 8,539,030 issued to; Michelle Q. Wang Baldonado, Palo Alto, Calif.; Paula S. Newman, Los Altos, Calif.; and William C. Janssen Jr., Mountain View, Calif. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Time sequencing of editing steps in a two-dimensional digital document. Patent no. 8,539,347 issued to Steven J. Harrington, Webster, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. Web-feed system having compensation roll. Patent no. 8,538,306 issued to Ming Yang, Fairport, N.Y.; Roger G. Leighton, Hilton, N.Y.; Frank Albert Porter, Penfield, N.Y.; and Carlos Manuel Terrero, Ontario, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk.


Business ConneCtions HealtHcare 2014

economy

Top 10 Things to Know About Obamacare

Sign of the Times: Credit Available, Demand Weak

N

ow is a good time for a brief review of what Connecticut employers need to know about impending federal healthcare legislation, known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Rollout of new ACA rules is coming in just a few months—January 2014. Detailed information about the ACA is available 24/7 at CBIA’s Healthcare Resource Center (cbia.com/healthcare2014), including: 1. Employee Notice: You must provide employees with notice of the state health exchange by October 1, when the exchange begins open enrollment. 2. Employee Benefits Summary: A Summary of Benefits and Coverage form must be provided to employees to explain their benefit options. 3. Large or Small Employer? The ACA has its own definitions of large and small employers. You must determine if your company breaks the 50-employee threshold and counts as a large employer. 4. Counting Employees: Counting employees means more than counting heads. It’s a complicated calculation that includes part-time and seasonal employees and should be done now. 5. Play or Pay Delayed: With the employer penalty now delayed, employers with 50 or more employees will not face potential penalties until 2015. If you have fewer than 50 employees, you will not face penalties.

6. W-2 Reporting Delays: Reporting certain information on your employees’ W-2 forms has been deemed optional by the IRS. 7. Wellness Programs and Preventive Care: New regulations cover financial incentives and types of allowable wellness programs and includes a focus on preventive care. 8. New Taxes and Fees: The ACA is introducing new taxes and fees, such as the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) fee (which applies to insurers and self-insured businesses), as well as new taxes, such as the Medicare tax (with thresholds of $250,000 for those who are married and file jointly, $125,000 for those who are married and file separately, and $200,000 for others). 9. Subsidies: Individuals, and employers with fewer than 50 employees, may be eligible for financial subsidies through the state exchange 10. Nondiscrimination Rules: Non-grandfathered fully funded plans must comply with nondiscrimination rules (self-funded plans must already comply under previous laws). However, until the IRS issues additional guidance, employers are not subject to penalties. Learn more at cbia.com/healthcare2014

What the Affordable Care Act Means for Employers

T

he Obama Administration has issued a oneyear delay—until January 1, 2015—for some of the most visible and problematic provisions of the Affordable Care Act. But many parts of the law affecting businesses remain on schedule and are slated to take effect over the next few months. Do you know what this means for your company? Find out by attending this program, which focuses on businesses with 50 or more employees. You will learn:

 How to effectively inform your employees of the law’s requirements and insurance options Presenters:  John F. O’Connell, Jr., CEBS, CLU, President, C.M. Smith Agency, Inc.  Garry Straker, CEBS, Principal Partner, CohnReznick  Mark F. Williams, Counsel, Carmody & Torrance LLP

 The status of the law as it currently stands  What requires your attention NOW, SOON, and LATER  How to best use your time between now and later  What options the latest delay opens up for compliance, finance, and benefit plan administration strategies

S S R NiE R EE FO Pa 0 O Oy M 5 L O h P C iT M W EE R O M

events

Date

Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013

Scan to RegiSteR

Time 8:30–11:30 am Place Crowne Plaza Hotel, 100 Berlin Rd., Cromwell Cost

CBIA members, $90; Nonmembers, $125

 Register at cbia.com/events

A

s an economy recovers from recession, economists expect that the availability of credit and the demand for credit will rise in tandem. That’s not the case in Connecticut. On the one hand, credit availability for businesses hit a five-year high through the first six months of the year according to the Second Quarter 2013 CBIA/Farmington Bank Credit Availability Survey. However, demand for credit among the state’s businesses fell three percentage points from the first quarter, with just 26% of those surveyed indicating they sought financing in the April-June timeframe. “That’s really an indication of the continued uncertainty surrounding the state’s economic recovery,” CBIA economist Peter Gioia said today. “While we’ve seen modest gains in jobs and capital investment, that hasn’t been of a scope we would expect from a strong, sustained recovery.” The Farmington Bank Credit Availability Index (FBCAI) hit a five-year high in the second quarter, jumping 10 points from the first three months of the year to 45.2 points. The FBCAI’s future expectations component, which measures credit availability three-to-six months from now, improved to 43.4 points, or almost seven index points higher than the previous quarter. “There’s every indication that credit conditions remain in an upward trend and look to remain favorable heading into the second half of the year,” said John Patrick, president and CEO of Farmington Bank. Some 22% of respondents rated current credit conditions as either good or excellent in the most recent survey—a five percentage point jump over the first quarter—while 52% said they were average. “It appears that most area businesses are securing the credit they need for long-run growth,” said Don Klepper-Smith, chief economist and director of research at DataCorePartners. “The wild card in all of this is healthcare reform, which is likely to impose higher costs on Connecticut businesses, implying greater demand for credit. It will be interesting to see how this all unfolds over the next year.”

 Read more at gov.cbia.com

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of September 23, 2013 27


YOU’RE INVITED TO THE ONE AND ONLY

CFO OF THE YEAR AWARDS CELEBRATION IN FAIRFIELD COUNTY

Meet and mingle with the nominees, award winners, judges and your business colleagues and join in the excitement when three CFO winners are announced and receive their distinguished awards.

DATE/TIME + LOCATION

OCTOBER 2 | 5:30 P.M. HOTEL ZERO DEGREES 353 MAIN AVE., NORWALK

Complimentary hearty hors d’oeuvres and beverages. RESERVE NOW

space is limited. Contact Holly DeBartolo (914) 358-0743.

SPONSORS

SUPPORTERS


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