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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL YOUR ONLY SOURCE FOR REGIONAL BUSINESS NEWS | westfaironline.com

FCBJ this week

June 17, 2013 | VOL. 49, No. 24

STATE TRAILS NATION IN GROWTH

MIXED REVIEWS

THE DANBURY MINI MAKER FAIRE went on despite the rain as city officials look to drum up excitement for the Danbury Hackerspace and Innovation Center … 2

maLLoY Not SoLd oN LEGaLiZiNG miXEd martiaL artS

CONNECTICUT ECONOMY CONTRACTED IN 2012

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BRIDGEPORT OFFICIALS are making preparations for a train station to be built on the Barnum Avenue property formerly occupied by Remington Arms Co. … 3

BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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ministries of First Baptist Church of Bridgeport and vice chairman of the board of Family ReEntry Inc., has made it his mission to empower the incarcerated and former prisoners to get their lives on the right track. “The purpose is to humanize the issue — that these are real problems that are happening to real families,” Grant

onnecticut was the only state to see its economy contract in 2012, according to a new report. The state’s economic output, or gross state product, decreased 0.01 percent last year, whereas the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) increased about 2.5 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. New England had the slowest growth rate of any region in the country, with Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont averaging a 1.2 percent increase in economic output. Leading the nation’s recovery were economies in the Southwest and West. Those regions averaged growth of 4.1 percent and 3.3 percent, respectively. North Dakota’s economy outpaced every other state, growing 13.4 percent. Cutbacks by the financial services, insurance and real estate industries, and by the government, were the primary factors that contributed to Connecticut’s decline in economic output, while durablegoods manufacturing and the management of companies helped soften the blow, the report indicates. Durable-good manufacturing is what drove most of the nation’s growth, according to the report. In 2012, the sector grew 9.1 percent after increasing 6.8 percent the

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SIX COMMISSIONS advocating for underserved populations that had been marked for consolidation or elimination were ultimately preserved in the state’s 2014-15 budget … 7 DIRECTING TRAFFIC to your website is only part of the battle, Bruce Newman writes … 12

MEDIA PARTNER

Glover Teixeira (top), a Connecticut native, fights Quinton “Rampage” Jackson during their Jan. 26 UFC light heavyweight bout at United Center in Chicago. Photo by Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLC, courtesy of UFC.

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FOR EX-CON LAWYER TURNED MINISTER, THE MISSION IS TO EMPOWER OTHERS BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE FREQUENCY of individuals with both a Juris Doctor and a Master of Divinity degree, Jeff Grant replied — with a chuckle — “There are more of us than you would think.” Grant, a Greenwich resident, associate minister and director of prison

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Maker movement rolls into Danbury BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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head of the Danbury Hackerspace’s official opening, organizers and government officials have been on a citywide campaign to teach residents about hackers and the maker movement. “Hackerspaces aren’t just a bunch of nerds sitting around computers,” said Mike Kaltschnee, co-founder of the Danbury Hackerspace. “They’re artists, engineers, craftsman and programmers.” The Hackerspace, which is a part of the new Danbury Innovation Center, is set to open in late August. Unlike its Stamford counterpart, the Danbury Innovation Center will have more of an emphasis on manufacturing and entrepreneurs who want to physically build things as opposed to digitally building them, organizers say. Hackerspace organizers have tapped into a national maker movement, which Kaltschnee said summons individuals, builders, craft workers and others to start making things with their hands again. In a deeply-rooted manufacturing town like Danbury, city officials have quickly embraced the idea and

the creation of the Danbury Innovation Center, which will be located downtown Danbury. The center will include the Hackerspace, co-working space for entrepreneurs and office space for SCORE, a nonprofit business development group. To raise awareness of the maker movement and the new Innovation Center, the city hosted its first Mini Maker Faire earlier this month. Held on the coattails of Tropical Storm Andrea, at least 500 people attended the rain-soaked fair grounds to learn about the new Hackerspace and about different projects makers have been doing in the region. Among the most popular booths at the fair was a 3-D printer, which produced sculptures of fair attendees using a 3-D body scanner. “The innovation center is going to be huge for us,” said Bruce Tuomala, Danbury economic development director. “A lot of the jobs that have gone away aren’t coming back. The future is going to be a lot more entrepreneurial and this is right in the sweet spot of that.” Tuomala said the city was happy to be able to foster a creative environment, as that’s where ideas and platforms turn into

businesses and careers. Hackerspaces have been popping up in cities across the country, including several in Connecticut, but the Danbury city government has been one of the first to fully embrace a Hackerspace. The city is also the first municipality to host a Maker Faire, even though hundreds of fairs have been held nationally before. “We want this to become the premier technolo�y event in Western Connecticut and biggest event in the city,” Toumala said. “Now that (residents have) seen this, it’s going to spread like wild fire.” Overall the Hackerspace plans to help entrepreneurs work on product design while they craft their business models. The group is also working in collaboration with the Stamford Innovation Center on creating an easy pathway for entrepreneurs to access both innovation centers. However the Danbury space does see itself has distinct from the Stamford space, said Jon Gatrell, another Hackerspace cofounder. “Danbury is more of a manufacturing base,” Gatrell said. “We’ll give people the opportunity to create whatever they want to create. It’s still technolo�y but it’s more of a hands-on thing, so you’re getting an

Residents gather at the Danbury Mini Maker Faire to learn about makers and the maker movement. Photo by Kevin Rabito.

object out of it.” The Danbury Hackerspace has yet to open, but the group is already planning to pursue a position as a hub in the Connecticut Innovation Ecosystem. The ecosystem, officially launched in November 2012, is a statewide network of hubs designed to help entrepreneurs start and grow their companies. Currently Danbury residents are represented by the Stamford hub, which is operated by the Stamford Innovation Center and the Business Council of Fairfield County. “People to want to be a part of a community and that’s what we’re building in Danbury,” Kaltschnee said. “There’s a movement here.”

NEWS IN BRIEF

RAILROAD HIRES TESTING CONSULTANT

Metro-North Railroad has hired a Colorado transportation research and testing firm to assess its maintenance and inspection programs in the wake of the May derailment and the unrelated death of a track worker. In addition to retaining Transportation Technolo�y Center Inc., which is a subsidiary of the Association of American Railroads, Metro-North has also continued inspections of its rail lines and joints and is exploring solutions to better protect rail workers, according to a June 10 letter from Howard Permut, president of the railroad, to members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation. Eleven days after a May 17 derailment and collision involving two Metro-North commuter trains just outside of Fairfield, Robert Lunden, a track foreman, was struck and killed by a train just after noon May 28. Lunden had been working near the West Haven Metro-North station, which is under construction, and the train had departed from New Haven prior to the incident. In the letter to U.S. Sens. Richard

Blumenthal and Chris Murphy and Rep. Jim Himes, Permut said the railroad is continuing to cooperate with the National Transportation Safety Board’s investigations into the two incidents.

Perry’s office said the governor would host receptions in both New York and Connecticut.

PERRY TO COURT CONN., N.Y. FIRMS

An insurance underwriter will soon move its headquarters to Malkin Properties’ MerrittView property off of Route 7 in Norwalk, the companies announced last week. Connecticut Attorneys Title Insurance Company (CATIC), which is one of New England’s largest domestic  title insurance underwriters, will soon relocate to the building and plans to build out the 4,140-square-feet space under a seven year and three month lease. Located near the intersection of Route 7 and the Merritt Parkway, the  MerrittView includes dining facilities, a fitness center and access to the Metro-North Commuter Railroad. Malkin representatives also recently announced CenturyLink would be moving its regional sales office to the office park. Jeffrey Newman, Kimberly Zaccagnino and Tara Long of Malkin

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is scheduled to be in the tristate region this week to pitch Connecticut and New York businesses on the Lone Star State, with a $1 million television ad campaign launching last week in advance of the trip. Perry plans to meet with business leaders in the firearm, pharmaceutical and financial services industries, according to a statement from the Texas governor’s office. The trip, which is scheduled for June 16 to 20, and the weeklong ad buy, which began June 10 with two 30-second TV spots, are both being paid for by the organization TexasOne. TexasOne is a public-private organization aimed at marketing Texas to businesses. According to Perry’s office, no tax dollars will be used for either the trip or the ad buy. While no itinerary was released,

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INSURANCE UNDERWRITER TO MERRITTVIEW

Properties represented the landlord in the transaction. John Dolan of McCall & Almy and Jackie Pinyan-Durels of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank brokered the deal on behalf of the tenant.

TASK FORCE TO STUDY FMLA

A legislative task force has been approved to study the possibility of mandating paid leave for new parents, the seriously ill and those taking care of a sick family member. Under the U.S. Family Medical Leave Act, workers must be allowed to take 16 weeks of unpaid leave if they or a family member falls ill, however eight in 10 can’t afford to take an unpaid leave, according to Connecticut’s Family and Medical Leave Insurance coalition. As a result, Connecticut General Assembly members recently voted to create a task force to study family and medical leave insurance plans  that would cover caregivers and determine who would pay for their wages. — Jennifer Bissell and Patrick Gallagher


Second train station sought in Bridgeport BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

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ridgeport officials are taking steps that would allow for the city’s second train station to be built on property that once was part of the country’s largest munitions plant. A study that examines the feasibility of a train station on Barnum Avenue has been completed and submitted to a regional advisory board, the New YorkConnecticut Sustainable Communities Consortium, for its review, said Ruben Felipe, deputy chief of staff to Bridgeport Mayor Bill Finch. Felipe said the consortium, which comprises numerous New York and Connecticut towns and government agencies, is expected to approve the train station plan at its June 26 meeting. Obtaining the consortium’s approval is the “first step” in what is expected to be an “infinitely complex” approvals process, he added. The feasibility study would then be released to the public, Felipe said.

“This is another important step forward in bringing a much needed second train station to Bridgeport, which will be an engine for economic development for the East Side, East End and the entire city.” — Bill Finch Much of the former Remington Arms Co. factory in Bridgeport is in the process of being demolished.

The city has simultaneously put out a request for proposals for the demolition of two buildings at 812 Barnum Ave. and for the remediation of the property, which is where officials hope the train station will be situated.

BUY sell

The 7-acre property had been a portion of the Remington Arms munitions manufacturing complex before it was sold to RemGrit Realty Inc. in the 1980s. In 2011, a bankruptcy court ruled that the city of Bridgeport could foreclose on

the property, with RemGrit owing millions of dollars in back taxes at the time. “This is another important step forward in bringing a much needed second train station to Bridgeport, which will be an engine for economic development for the East Side, East End and the entire city,” said Finch in a June 4 statement. The RFP calls for the demolition of a 57,600-square-foot manufacturing building and an 8,800-square-foot boiler building. The historic “shot tower” is not involved in the RFP, and is located on a separate land parcel, Felipe said. Bids are due July 10, and the city hopes for demolition to begin toward the end of the summer. Representatives of the Connecticut Department of Transportation reviewed the feasibility study and gave it an “overwhelmingly positive” review, Felipe said. “We’ve gotten favorable and positive feedback from them,” Felipe said. “I think it’s safe to say that they are encouraged about moving this project forward, so from there it’s about talking to MetroNorth (Railroad) and other partners and trying to come up with a schedule.”

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RAKOW FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013

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PERSPECTIVES

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL

Room to grow

onnecticut’s economy contracted in 2012. We repeat: in 2012, a year that saw the S&P 500 Index rise 13.4 percent, that saw the U.S. GDP grow nearly 2.5 percent and that saw 49 out of 50 states’ economies grow, Connecticut’s did not. For those who might scoff at Gov. Rick Perry’s campaign to draw businesses from Connecticut to Texas, take note: According to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Connecticut’s total economic output shrank 0.01 percent last year. On the opposite side of the spectrum was North Dakota, whose economy grew at a ridiculous 13.4 percent rate in 2012. Trailing by a considerable margin, but No. 2 nonetheless, was Texas, whose economic output grew 4.8 percent last year. Perry may not be the only governor Connecticut should be worried about. A survey of more than 200 Connecticut manufacturers that was released earlier this month showed widespread discontent with the “state of the state,” as the president of one firm put it. Of the firms that were surveyed, 52 percent reported being recruited to relocate to or expand within other states, with North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Florida and Georgia the top five recruiters. Half of the firms that were recruited said they considered either leaving Connecticut altogether or expanding elsewhere. Frank Johnson, president of the Manufacturing Alliance of Connecticut

(which commissioned the survey), told the Business Journal that companies are “not happy with the economic conditions here in Connecticut and they’re not happy with the direction the state is moving in.” Johnson went on to say that despite the good intentions of many lawmakers to support manufacturing — long a foundation of Connecticut’s economy — “There’s just a prevailing feeling in Connecticut that government is not doing all that it can to try to create a healthy manufacturing environment here.” Even if there is no mass exodus of manufacturers, Jay Mazur, president of Gordon Rubber & Packing Co. in Derby, suggested that there is little incentive for companies outside of Connecticut to relocate or expand here. “Connecticut is in a lousy financial state,” Mazur told the Business Journal. “I think you’re not going to see a whole lot of new entries into Connecticut, given the state of the state. In my opinion, it’s not a very investment-favorable climate.” And that, in a nutshell, is why Texas’ economy grew 4.8 percent in 2012 and why Connecticut’s shrank: businesses feel comfortable expanding in Texas, while they don’t feel at ease in the Constitution State. Looking at our government “leaders,” should that come as a surprise? On one hand, you’ve got the state Republican chairman, Jerry Labriola Jr., calling the state budget “a toxic cocktail of over-spending, over-borrowing and new

THEY SAID IT “The day that the bill was signed into law, women earned 59 cents for every dollar a man earned on average. Today, it’s about 77 cents. So it was 59 and now it’s 77 cents. It’s even less, by the way, if you’re an African American or a Latina. So I guess that’s progress, but does anybody here think that’s good enough?”

taxes, including a $60 million increase in the gasoline tax.” Top GOP leaders in the General Assembly accused their Democratic counterparts of “deception” when it came to negotiations — or lack thereof — over the budget. Democrats, for their part, say there was never a Republican budget proposal, and have refuted claims of “secrecy” when it came to the introduction and votes on the $44 billion spending plan (or $37.6 billion budget, depending on whom you ask). The dysfunction is not lost on businesses. Connecticut firms are not blind to the fact that efforts to balance the state’s budget relied in part on the legalization of Keno and mixed martial arts. We are not supposing to judge the moral integrity of either, only commenting on the wisdom of legalizing both solely for the revenue they will deliver to state coffers. Asked about the decline in economic output, Malloy said, “Is it good news? No, it’s not good news. ... We need to do better.” Finally, something both Democrats and Republicans can agree on.

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— President Barack Obama, who marked the 50th anniversary of the Equal Pay Act June 10 at the White House.

“I haven’t met anybody who thinks the current immigration system is working. … Now it’s time for the Gang of 100 to do its work, (and) for the entire Senate to have its say on the issue and see if we can improve the status quo.” — Sen. Mitch McConnell, the senate minority leader, on immigration reforms currently being weighed by the Senate.

“Texas is calling. Your opportunity awaits.” — Texas Gov. Rick Perry, in a TV advertisement aimed at drawing businesses to Texas that began airing in Connecticut and New York June 10.

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HAVE YOUR SAY We want to hear from you! Have an opinion column, letter to the editor or story idea? Send it to us! Please include your name, home or business address, email and phone number. We reserve the right to edit all submissions and publish them in print or online. EMAIL SUBMISSIONS TO PGALLAGHER@WESTFAIRINC.COM


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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013

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State — » From page 1

Connecticut was the only state to see its economy shrink in 2012, while New England posted the lowest average growth of any region in the United States. Graphic courtesy of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.

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said, “and at the end of the day, how can these people go through a positive transformation to change their lives and be of a better value to their society.” In that particular instance, though, the people Grant referenced are not your typical inmates. Grant’s calling — and the area in which he spends most of his time — is the inner-city prison ministry. But here, Grant refers to a different class of criminals: people convicted of so-called white collar crimes. Prison, Grant says, has a funny way of leveling the playing field between the Gold Coast financiers and the inner-city gangsters. In the past, someone from a place like Greenwich might have looked at the wave of drug- and vice-related crimes in a place like Bridgeport and said, “It’s not my problem, it won’t affect me,” but now, Grant said, “We’re in a new age when crime and criminal justice issues are pervasive, and it affects everyone in every community.” Sitting across from Grant, it’s just barely discernible that he speaks from experience. In 2006, Grant, a former corporate lawyer with an office in Mamaroneck, N.Y., was sentenced to 14 months in a low-security prison after pleading guilty to federal fraud charges. He was charged with falsely claiming in a loan application to the U.S. Small Business Administration to have had an office on Wall Street that was impacted by the

Jeff Grant

Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Prison, he said, “was a profound experience for me.” “It was something I found that I needed — it wasn’t something I looked forward to, but once I got there it was something I understood as fundamentally cleansing,” Grant said. “When I came out, I was able to be more empathetic and compassionate and understanding of the plights of others, including my family, who’d been put through an unfair journey that wasn’t of their making.” After his release from prison, Grant volunteered with various nonprofits that helped rehabilitate former convicts as they re-entered society. He found Family ReEntry in Bridgeport, where he initially helped to transform a blighted block across from the First Baptist Church that had been home to drug addicts and prostitutes into a community garden.

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previous year. Although Connecticut saw deep cuts in finance and insurance, those industries actually grew in seven of the eight U.S. regions measured by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the Mideast region, which includes New York, the financial services and insurance industries were among the lead contributors to the state’s overall growth. During a press conference following the end of the 2013 state legislative session, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy acknowledged Connecticut’s poor rankings and said the region’s slow growth was partially due to its European trading alliances. “(As) opposed to some other states, it’s not uncommon for New England states to have their chief international

partners be in Europe, and the European economy has been badly hit over the last two years,” he said. Malloy said he has sought to shrink the size of state government, noting that Connecticut’s government has condensed at a faster rate than nearly any other state, which in turn has led to a negative impact on the state’s economic output. In 2011, Connecticut also experienced a 0.01 percent decrease in economic output but was far from the only state to see its economy shrink. The economies of Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico and Wyoming all posted larger declines that year. “Is that good news? No that’s not good news,” Malloy said of the report and the state’s position. “We need to do better.”

“And that was where it all started,” he said. Later, his minister at the Second Congregational Church in Greenwich would suggest that he consider entering the seminary, which Grant did in 2009. He graduated last year from Union Theological Seminary, which is affiliated with Columbia University, and in late 2012 was appointed to First Baptist Church in Bridgeport. All the while, beginning in 2008, Grant said local individuals convicted of white collar crimes and their families would reach out to him for advice and counseling. “Since I lived in Greenwich and people knew I had been a white collar criminal, word got around that I had information that could help people with their own white collar issues,” Grant said. “And I started to get phone calls.” He attributed much of that to the shared experience. “In places like Greenwich, once someone is accused of a crime, they’re cut off from their community. I understood that, because I had gone through that myself.” The issues that define both the innercity and white collar criminal communities — feelings of isolation, shame, guilt, remorse; economic struggles; and legal and family issues — are one and the same, Grant said. He said the two communities have much to learn from one another. “The things that the suffering community had in Bridgeport were almost identical to those of the white collar community,” he said. “And so, by

empowering the Bridgeport community to speak up for itself, it actually empowers the Greenwich community as well.” The informal consultations with white collar criminals and their friends and families has grown into the Progressive Prison Project. “It’s a ministry,” Grant said, “and it’s unfolding now in kind of interesting and magical ways. ... It’s not like I have a business plan — I have a ministry that’s in its infancy.” He said the ultimate goal is to foster a compassion between communities, where, in the past, a lack of compassion has led to a social divide. “I think it’s about learning how to conduct this ministry in balance and in ways that are going to be healthy and harmonious between the communities.”


Commissions survive budget cuts BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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hen Gov. Dannel P. Malloy proposed to eliminate one of the state’s advocacy agencies and consolidate the five others into the Commission on Citizen Advocacy he may have forgotten who he was dealing with—advocates.

“When you streamline something you have to make sure things are more effective” — Teresa Younger

Originally Malloy had proposed to consolidate the commissions in his budget proposal for the 2014 and 2015 fiscal years to save an estimated $800,000 annually. However the budget passed by legislators June 3 included full funding for each of the individual commissions, which include the Commission on Aging, the Permanent Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW), the Commission on Children, and the commissions for Latino and Puerto Rican Affairs, African American Affairs and Asian Pacific American Affairs. “How much the governor knows about our actual work, I don’t think we could really say,” said Robert J. Norton, director of communications for the Commission on Aging. “But we work very closely with the legislature, they know firsthand what kind of work we do and how it supports them. It comes down to knowing the value of what we bring to the legislature and how important we are.” As part of the legislative branch, each of the commissions is tasked with conducting legislative research, monitoring

legislation, providing information and data to legislators, and then working with them as advisors and educators. Under Malloy’s proposal, each of the existing commissions’ staffs would have been reduced to one or two representatives who ultimately would have had to compete with each other to determine the joint commission’s priorities. Additionally, the Commission on Aging would have been eliminated entirely, as Malloy said it was a redundancy with the new state Department on Aging, which carries out administrated programs. “I don’t think any of the work we do would have happened,” said Julia Evans Starr, executive director of the Aging Commission. “I don’t think they would have done the work and you wouldn’t have gotten the same coordinated approach with one entity to look to, to bring it all together.” In the upcoming year, the commission plans to continue its work on the Alzheimer’s task force, livable communities initiative and efforts to rebalance the state’s long-term health care options and develop a workforce large enough to care for the growing senior population. Teresa Younger, executive director of PCSW, said she was also happy to see the women’s commission continue to operate as a stand-alone agency. The commission has been charged with some of the state’s biggest legislative issues, such as the gender pay equality, family and medical leave insurance, and sex trafficking. More than 70 letters were sent to legislators in support of the commission and when 250 people attended the commission’s Women Day event at the capitol, Younger said it was a powerful message to legislators about the significance of the PCSW. “When you streamline something you have to make sure things are more effective,” Younger said. “And the commissions had already streamlined so many of their expenses that consolidating the commissions any more wasn’t going to streamline any of their priorities. It really wasn’t going to do anything.”

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9


Promoters predict ‘quick rush’ to bring MMA BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

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ight promoters cheered the passage of a bill to legalize mixed martial arts in Connecticut, predicting that the oft-controversial but fast-growing sport could help generate millions of dollars in new tourism revenues. However, several people involved in the sport have voiced concerns that a provision of the bill could deter promoters from bringing fights to Connecticut. The bill was passed June 5 by the state Senate

after having been passed in May by the House of Representatives. Mixed martial arts, or MMA, features unarmed combat that can involve different techniques from various martial arts disciplines. MMA fights are currently permitted within the territories of the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan Indian tribes, but not in the remainder of the state. Prior to the bill’s passage, Connecticut and New York were the only two states to prohibit professional MMA fights. As of June 12, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy had yet to

sign the bill into law. Under the bill, promoters would be liable for the health care costs associated with fighters’ injuries. That differs from other states’ policies, which generally require promoters to insure their fighters during the fights themselves but not to cover their health care costs. The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), which is among the world’s largest MMA promoters, is reviewing the legislation, said spokesman Steven Greenberg. “UFC already does quite a bit for their fighters,” Greenberg said. “They are — as

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10 Week of June 17, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

far as I know — the only MMA promoter that provides all of the athletes under contract with an accident policy” that covers everything from training to the pre-fight routine to the fights themselves. Should Malloy sign the bill, Greenberg said Connecticut would be the only state among those that allow professional MMA fights to require promoters to cover fighters’ health care costs. For now, though, UFC’s priority is that Malloy gives MMA his blessing. “UFC is looking at (the health care provision) now, but the main objective from UFC’s perspective is that Governor Malloy signs it into law,” Greenberg said. Malloy’s approval is not a foregone conclusion. He told reporters at a June 6 press conference in Hartford that MMA is “not my bowl of porridge,” saying that he dislikes the sport but that he hadn’t decided on whether or not to sign the bill. “If I sign the legislation I will not be attending an event, either at the casinos where it’s currently allowed or any other facility,” Malloy said. As of the beginning of last week, Malloy had yet to make a decision on the bill, said spokesman Andrew Doba. Promoter Rob Haydak said his organization, Cage Fury Fighting Championships, already has a representative scouting out potential locations for fights in Connecticut. “For us, Connecticut is certainly a market that we have our eye on,” said Haydak, president of CFFC, which is based in New Jersey. “Any time a market opens itself up to MMA, the local economy and the state is looking at an infusion of millions of dollars.” Haydak said he wasn’t aware of the Connecticut bill’s health care provision, but said CFFC currently insures fighters for each event. “We’re very familiar with the insurance process and our underwriters do a fantastic job to make sure the fighters’ safety is paramount.” Gladius Fights, an MMA promoter based in upstate New York, is organizing a professional MMA event in Berlin, N.H., later this month. Greg Williams, a copromoter for the event, predicted there would be a “quick rush to put MMA fights on in Connecticut.” In the past, promoters would look to states like New Hampshire, where professional MMA fights are legal and regulated, or states like Vermont, where MMA is not regulated but not illegal, for event locations, Williams said. “Now that Connecticut has opened up, I’m sure there’s going to be a rush to put on some shows in places like Hartford, New Haven (and) Bridgeport,” Williams said.


CEO EVOLUTION

BY MARK FAGAN

Taking the long position

O

ver the course of this eight-part series, I have written about how a CEO can more effectively run and grow a business. My premise is that a CEO’s ability to manage is the most influential factor in determining whether an organization will achieve sustained growth and profitability. In a nutshell, the CEO is responsible for setting strate�y and vision. The CEO ultimately sets the direction, leads the company. Which markets will the company enter? With what product lines, and against which competitors? How will the company differentiate itself? What happens all too often is that CEOs take on or assist in the responsibilities and tasks that should fall to their subordinates. Why? The company might not have a certain position filled, the position might be filled by someone not qualified to accomplish the requisite tasks, or the CEO might be unsure of how to remove him or herself from day-to-day duties. Whatever the reason, it still comes down to the CEO not adequately fulfilling his or her job responsibilities. Now let’s be practical: Most small and midsize businesses may not have the bandwidth for their CEO to devote 100 percent of his or her time to the traditional responsibilities of a chief executive. The list of responsibilities is daunting, and whether they are met head on is critical to the company’s success. The more time a CEO spends on day-to-day or tactical, activities, the less time he or she has for higher-level activities. That sort of negligence may not catch up with a company overnight (whereas a company would immediately feel the effects of neglecting certain day-to-day responsibilities) but a lack of focus on long-term strate�y and goals will eventually become evident in the company’s performance compared with its peers. Ironically, one of the most critical jobs of a CEO is to find a way to allow yourself, as CEO, to perform your designated responsibilities. I have tried to offer some ideas and tools to help accomplish this. Some of those things I have discussed in the CEO Evolution series include: Managing your business through business drivers: The CEO should identify the six to eight key factors that have a major impact on your business. Many of these business drivers cross industry lines, but there are others that are specific to your industry, and may not be conspicuous. A good place to find key business drivers by industry is www.ibisworld.com.

Developing a business driver reporting system: Those key business drivers should be reported by each operating segment using a simple and clean format and at regular intervals (monthly, quarterly, etc.). The important messages will be lost if they are buried in a 20-page report crammed with statistics. Standardize the report by culling out acquisitions and other one-time events. This reporting system can cover both operating and non-operating data, such as information on how your employees are spending their time at work. Embracing a culture of accountability: Implementing a corporate strate�y requires buy-in from your management team and the creation of a culture of accountability across your entire organization. You should identify areas where the company is strongest and other areas that need improvement. Most important, show management and employees what will happen if those key business drivers are improved upon and how that will lead to rewards such as increased compensation. Creating a culture of accountability takes time, requires consistency and discipline, and must originate from and be maintained by the CEO. As CEO, your primary function is that of a leader. Your management team and employees will look for messages being sent by their CEO, and those messages will affect their behavior and how they conduct business for you. Therefore, all of your decisions should be towards the achievement of the company’s short- and long-term goals. Also, let your management team manage. Let them make mistakes and learn from their mistakes. This will allow you to remove yourself from most of the tactical duties and to execute those longterm goals, like making acquisitions, going international, or getting into a new market. Finally, make sure you know what you are good at and consider having someone else do the other stuff. I was at a recent presentation by an executive of a wellknown company in the food business. The company has sales in the hundreds of millions of dollars and employs less than 50 people. How? They outsource all their non-core business. So there it is. In the words of Donald Trump, “As long as you’re going to be thinking anyway, think big.”

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 11


SOCIAL MEDIA TRENDS

BY BRUCE NEWMAN

Do you convert?

M

ost social media campaigns require an effective website or landing page. (A landing page is any page that your audience is directed to, usually by clicking on a link.) It doesn’t do much good to drive a lot of traffic to a website only to have it bounce because of poor design or implementation. No matter how effective the social media strate�y, the end result is a failed — or unsuccessful—campaign. Websites and landing pages are often the first impression you make on your audience. If they don’t like what they see or they can’t quickly understand what you’re promoting, they will quickly leave (bounce) and never return. This is why the median time spent on a website’s home page is under five seconds. We have frequently found instances where highly attractive websites have high bounce rates, the main culprit being that viewers cannot discern the offering or what action — if any — they are supposed to take. One problem that many landing pages and some websites have is that they do not match the advertisement or stimulus that directed the audience to them. For example, suppose I click on an advertisement on how to quickly build my email list and land on a landing page on how to effectively use Twitter. In this case, my expectations were not met and I would “bounce,” probably within a few seconds. There was no consistency between the advertisement and

the landing page. Unfortunately, it is also fairly common to see an advertisement or some link direct people to a general home page that also does not meet their immediate expectations. This is often compounded by a home page that doesn’t easily and quickly tell the viewer about what they do. So here are some tips for great landing pages: 1. Be speci�ic Your landing page must match your advertisement or content. If it uses the same words or keywords, even better. The content on your landing page must be highly targeted and relevant. Remember, you can have any number of landing pages. If you have multiple ads or feeds, you can even have multiple landing pages — as long as they are contextually consistent. You may even want different landing pages depending on the traffic source. For example, traffic from Twitter will often react differently than traffic from LinkedIn. 2. Have a clear goal What is the purpose of your landing page? Make sure it is obvious to your viewer and includes a clear call to action (CTA). Since any confusion can cost you business, make it as easy as possible for your viewers to understand what action they need to take and to then facilitate them to take that action. 3. Test, test, test and use analytics Analytics will quickly tell you what

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is working and what isn’t. Always test to determine what your audience responds to and how it can be improved. Testing and analytics are extremely important in the creation of great landing pages. Regardless of how many landing pages you have created, you still need to test; the results may surprise you. 4. Simplify your sign-up form Assuming your landing page has a sign-up form, the number of fields in the form will greatly affect the number of people who sign up. The more fields you have, the fewer the number of people who will sign up. The additional information you (as a company) desire must be balanced against the desire for more sign-ups. In practice, my company generally opts for as few fields as possible in an initial sign-up form. You can always utilize methods to obtain additional information once you have people who have already completed the initial sign-up process. One way of accomplishing this is by incorporating a landing page into a

larger campaign with each subsequent touch point or step designed to obtain additional information. 5. Make sure it is optimized for mobile Mobile is rapidly increasing in popularity. Make sure your landing pages format properly on a mobile platform — even if this requires the creation of additional pages. The effectiveness of websites and landing pages can greatly affect the perception and effectiveness of your online business. Properly constructed and targeted, they can help grow your business regardless of its size or industry. Bruce Newman is the president of wwWebevents.com, a division of The Productivity Institute L.L.C., and the creator of The Complete Webinar Training Course, an online course that helps companies create and promote highly successful webinars. He can be reached at bnewman@prodinst.com.


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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 13


ASK ANDI

BY ANDI GRAY

Stick with the business plan We’re struggling to build and follow a plan. It feels unnatural to prioritize working a plan when day-today pressures crop up. It’s easy to get sidetracked. THOUGHTS OF THE DAY: Knowing where you’re going with the business long term is essential. Meet with your team regularly to report on — and evaluate —what’s happening and what’s next. Recognize that the attraction to working on short-term issues is an entrepreneurial trait that gets in the way of long-term business building. Think about the long-term goals you have for your business. Are they written down? Are the company’s stated goals clearly measurable? Are you and all of you employees aware of the company’s goals? Is everyone fully on board with doing their part to help the business meet its goals? Growth, profit, stability, predictability, peace of mind — all of these values are necessary for long-term success of any business. Do your company’s goals

include all of these essential items? Is the company on track to deliver in every area? Ask yourself the following questions • What growth percentage can my business reasonably achieve year after year? Is that fast enough to stay ahead of inflation? Is it slow enough to allow us time to identify and fix problems before they get out of hand? • What’s happening to gross and net pro�it? Are they both rising in real dollars? Are they both holding steady or increasing when measured as a percentage of revenue? • Is our plan consistent from year to year? Any holes in terms of execution? • How far out can we accurately plan revenue, cost of goods sold and expenses and reserves? At least three years? Can we adjust spending and sales to hit plan? • Do I, as owner, sleep soundly at night? What problems keep me up at night? Are my people making progress toward solving those issues? Entrepreneurs are very much focused on the here and now, get it done and make things happen immediately. That’s valuable, up to a point. As the business grows,

the owner’s focus needs to shift to longer term planning and execution. This means transitioning from entrepreneur to CEO/ Business Builder. One entrepreneurial trait that becomes a liability as the company grows is the belief that every opportunity has to be acted upon before it’s lost. Entrepreneurs have a hard time saying “no” when they see potential right in front of them. Jumping on immediate opportunity may get in the way of achieving longer term goals. Resources get tied up, expenses climb beyond what’s budgeted, things don’t pan out and there aren’t enough reserve funds to recover properly. It takes real discipline, starting at the top of the organization, to meet the plan year in and year out. Set up a structure where you and your employees meet regularly to plan and review results vs. the plan. Encourage productive criticism. Make sure that meetings are outcome driven. End each meeting by recapping who does what next, to feed both short and long term plans. Recognize your role, as owner and CEO/Business Builder, is to hold the company and everyone in it, accountable. Make sure employees and vendors under-

stand their role in meeting the company’s long-term goals. Evaluate customers — do they all meet “good customer” criteria? Are you adding customers of the future? If there are performance gaps anywhere in the business, address them before they get out of hand. Before making any short- or long-term decisions, the business builder looks at the long-term plan. Is the opportunity facing the business part of the plan or is it a distraction? Is there another opportunity that could be set aside in favor of chasing this one, and how do the payoffs compare? When does experimenting cost the business so much risk, that it’s no longer worthwhile? Looking for a good book? Try “Business Plans That Work, A Guide for Small Business” by Andrew Zacharakis, Stephen Spinelli and Jeffrey Timmons. Andi Gray is president of Strategy Leaders Inc., strategyleaders.com, a business-consulting firm that specializes in helping entrepreneurial firms grow. She can be reached by phone at (877) 238-3535. Do you have a question for Andi? Please send it to her, via email at AskAndi@StrategyLeaders.com. Visit AskAndi.com for an entire library of articles.

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FACES CHARITABLE BOOK LAUNCHED Photographer David Bravo hosted a book signing recently in his Fairfield studio. The evening, which included entertainment by Fred and Ethel, officially launched “Intersections: David Bravo Photographs,” a project that finds 100 percent of the book’s proceeds donated to The Kennedy Center, a Trumbull-based nonprofit organization.

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Photos by Bob Rozycki

1. Hector Bravo, David Bravo, Marty Schwartz. 2. Pamela Kehlenbach 3. Jennifer MacLeman, Tracy Deer-Mirek and David Klang 4. Bill Plotkin, William Plotkin and Scott Davis 5. Tiffany Sikorsky, Jo Ann McMullen and Deb Kane 6. Cindy Tolin, Carol Karpovich and Sue Ryan

MAKING AN IMPACT U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal and Rep. Jim Himes joined employees and executives of Deloitte L.L.P. at the Carver Community Center in Norwalk June 7 as part of the firm’s IMPACT Day. The event is a celebration of Deloitte’s longstanding commitment to its communities, where its 50,000-plus employees nationwide make nonprofits their top clients for the day by setting aside their work and contributing their time and talent. Tens of thousands of Deloitte personnel volunteered June 7 on approximately 800 community service projects in 80 communities. Many of these events are an extension of the firm’s yearlong commitment to those organizations. Photos courtesy of Deloitte

1. Chet Wood, vice chairman and managing partner of L.L.P., speaks with U.S. Rep. Jim Himes about the importance of business’ role in community service. 2. Jim Himes at the Carver Community Center. 3. Chet Wood, Denesh Gunasekarampulle, a senior manager of Deloitte, and Bradley Bach, a manager of Deloitte Consulting. 4. U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal joined Deloitte’s IMPACT Day volunteers. Individuals are identified from left to right.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 15


NATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

Council’s focus on small business, job growth

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t’s all about jobs and growth, and at the Business Council of Fairfield County’s 43rd annual luncheon, it was no different. Reviewing their efforts to strengthen the greater Fairfield County community and bolster businesses, Business Council members convened at the Stamford Marriott Hotel June 10 to discuss the organization’s pronounced year of growth. “Over the past year, the value that we’ve created for smaller companies and entrepreneurs has been remarkable,” said Reyno Giallongo, an officer of the Business Council board of directors and chairman and CEO of First County Bank. “We know that jobs are generally created in the small business arena and as a result of that, we’ve created more than a few tools to help.” Spurred by the state’s new Innovation Ecosystem program, the Business Council has launched and expanded several growth initiatives to help entrepreneurs and small business owners access financial, technical, professional and mentoring resources. Within Stamford, which has been designated an innovation hub through the state’s Ecosystem initiative, the Business Council is assisting a number of developing businesses through its SpeedUp Fairfield County program. The program offers Stage 2 companies — generally defined as firms with between $1 million and $50 million in rev-

enues and 10 to 100 employees — access to product and market research, as well as other mentoring services to help them continue to grow and add employees. Seventeen Stage 2 firms are currently participating in the Stamford hub. The hub is led by a partnership of the Business Council and the Stamford Innovation Center, the latter of which is focused on nascent startups. Those 17 firms are expected to create 70 to 90 jobs within the next 12 months, Giallongo said. Outside of the hub, the Business Council has also continued to expand its Growth Network, an internal initiative that is chaired by Giallongo and that is also aimed at fostering small business growth and advising entrepreneurs. This year the network grew to include 60 different service providers, including a number of lawyers, bankers, accountants, designers and industry experts in real estate, marketing, and many other areas. These services are only a couple of the programs the council worked on this year, Giallongo and his fellow Business Council board members said. Council members also spent the year lobbying on several issues at the state level, including education reform, ener�y policy, infrastructure, health care, taxes and workforce development, all with the goal of helping businesses start and grow in the state. “One of the most used and overused, four letter words in our vocabulary over the last couple years has been ‘jobs,’” Giallongo said. “But it’s really been quite a year for small businesses.”


NATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

Comply with ACA or face consequences, panelists say

BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

C

omplying with the new regulations tied to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will almost always be less expensive than paying the penalty for not offering health care plans to employees, experts said at a recent panel discussion. By 2014, employers with more than 50 full-time employees or full-time equivalents will be required to offer their employees health care coverage. While some business owners have said they’d rather save their money and pay a penalty for noncompliance, business advisers are encouraging large employers to instead comply with the mandate.

these employees count toward the total, they don’t necessarily need to be offered health insurance, Carpentieri said. Only full-time employees and their dependents must be offered “affordable” coverage. Affordability is determined on an individual basis. For plans to be deemed affordable, they must cost less than 9.5 percent of an employee’s annual income, Carpentieri said. If employees don’t have access to an affordable plan and their income is between 100 percent and 400 percent of the federal poverty level, they are eligible to receive tax credits toward buying a plan on a state-based insurance exchange. However, if a full-time employee at a firm with 50 or more full-time staff or

equivalents uses federal tax credits to pay for insurance that is marketed through a state exchange, the employer will be fined $3,000 per employee using the tax subsidy. If that company doesn’t offer its employees any health coverage in the first place, it will be charged $2,000 for every full-time employee on staff. Panelist Jason Madrak, chief marketing officer of Access Health CT — which is Connecticut’s health insurance exchange — said government officials recognize the complexities of the Affordable Care Act. Madrak said it could be up to five years before the system stabilizes and provides real cost savings for every consumer. “The insurance marketplace is for the most part wildly dysfunctional,” Madrak said. “To address the dysfunction, they

Big News for Small Business – Open a new Business e-Vantage account today… Moderator Alan G. Badey, a Citrin Cooperman managing partner, at the June 11 seminar discussing the Affordable Care Act. Photo courtesy of Citrin Cooperman.

“You have to get your arms up and around this today,” said panelist Russell J. Carpentieri, managing director of Opus Advisory Group L.L.C., at the Westchester Country Club in Harrison, N.Y. “The cost of compliance is less than the cost of noncompliance.” The June 11 Navigating Health Care event was organized by Citrin Cooperman & Co. L.L.P., a tax and consulting firm with offices in Norwalk and White Plains, N.Y., among others. One of the first steps in complying with the regulations is for a company to determine whether it has 50 full-time employees, and to determine who of those employees must be offered health care coverage, Carpentieri said. A company may only have 45 employees working full time at 130 hours a month, but if that company has at least another 10 employees who work 60 hours a month, it would be required to offer all its employees health care coverage, Carpentieri said. All employees paid by a company are counted toward its total, whether they are part time, seasonal, independent contractors, union employees or hired through a staffing agency. Although

put a crazy, patchwork system — with a whole slew of tax incentives, subsidies and stipends — in place in order to plug the holes at all sorts of levels.” Despite the complexities, Madrak said the goal of the Affordable Care Act — to provide consumers with access to affordable health care — would ultimately be achieved. Carpentieri however, said he wasn’t so sure, especially because it has yet to be seen whether the market will offer plans that allow employers to be in compliance with the law. “I think it’s one of the most damaging bits of legislation to businesses; I really do,” Carpentieri said. “Best thing we can do is hunker down, play some strate�y and see where it goes.”

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3:23 PM FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June6/5/13 17, 2013 17


Good ‘Vibes’ in Bridgeport When singer/songwriter Jerry Garcia passed on in 1995, fans of The Grateful Dead were left with a void, wondering if the music would ever be played again. So, I, a young and passionate Deadhead — as fans of the band were known — and a Fairfield County resident and businessman, hosted a memorial party for Jerry Garcia on the campus of Purchase College in 1996. Known that first year as “Deadhead Heaven — A Gathering of the Tribe,” the event brought together friends and fans of the band to celebrate Garcia’s musical legacy. In 2013, that informal get-together — known now as the Gathering of The Vibes Festival — returns for its 18th year as one of the Northeast’s preeminent music, arts and camping festivals. Drawing more than 30,000 fans to Bridgeport’s Seaside Park, the festival’s reach has evolved and broadened yet remains rooted within the traditions established in 1996. While the roots of Gathering of The Vibes are in acts like Phil Lesh & Friends and The Black Crowes, the mainstream exposure of electronic dance music (EDM) in popular culture reveals a convergence between it and jam and rock bands. The addition of the late night DJ sets by Rob Garza of Thievery Corporation and James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem this year means the Gathering of the Vibes is a festival with something for every generation. Over the last several years, we’ve witnessed the rise of EDM largely due to promotion by underground fans. This same phenomenon drove the music of the Grateful Dead, the Allman Brothers Band, and others in the emerging jam band scene of the ’60s. The festival also showcases local nonprofit organizations and hosts a non-perishable food and hygiene product drive that benefits a local food bank. Held in six different venues over its history, Vibes marks the festival’s ninth return to “The Park City,” making Seaside Park home to the Vibes more than any other venue.

Ken Hays Co-Founder Gathering of the Vibes Member, Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County

The mission of the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County is to support cultural organizations, artists and creative businesses by providing promotion, services and advocacy. For more information, visit CulturalAllianceFC.org or email infoCulturalAllianceFC.org or call 256-2329. For events lists, visit FCBuzz.org.

FCBUZZ

Arts & Culture of Fairfield County

A WILD AND CRAZY GUY COMES TO STAMFORD The Stamford Center for the Arts presents “An Evening Of Music & Comedy With Steve Martin & Steep Canyon Rangers Featuring Edie Brickell” June 21. Martin and company will perform songs from their album “Love Has Come for You,” which was released in April. Martin is currently in the fifth decade of a uniquely varied and accomplished career in which he’s excelled as a comedian, actor, author and playwright, as well as a Grammy-winning, boundary-pushing bluegrass banjoist and composer. His fellow Texas native Edie Brickell initially burst onto the national scene in the late 1980s fronting the New Bohemians and has since carved out an iconoclastic solo career that’s solidified her reputation as a uniquely compelling singer and a songwriter of rare insight.

The results of the pair’s unconventional co-writing method are both organic and inspired, combining the gentle yet feisty humanity of Brickell’s vocals with the effortless economy of Martin’s banjo work, whose understated subtlety contrasts with the fleet-fingered picking he’s employed on his acclaimed bluegrass recordings. The night will showcase new material performed by Martin and Brickell, along with the unique hybrid of bluegrass and comedy that Martin and The Steep Canyon Rangers have been delighting audiences with at their sold-out, critically acclaimed shows. Come for just the concert or attend the gala, which includes a 6 p.m. preshow reception. Proceeds from the gala benefit SCA and its arts education programs. Call Lisa at 517-3426 for more information about gala tickets. For concert tickets, visit scalive.org.

FCBUZZ GOES LIVE – AS YOU LIKE IT Shakespeare on the Sound’s outdoor presentation of “As You Like It,” through June 30 at Pinkney Park in Rowayton, is a journey of love, disguise, transformation and adventure through the forest of Arden. “This is a production to be enjoyed by the entire family,” says Claire Shannon Kelly, director of Youth Programming for Shakespeare on the Sound as well as the company’s touring educational program. “Set in the present time, the environment of the production invites the audience to feel that they are participants in the play. To me, ‘As You Like It’ is a liberating story about transformation. In the forest of Arden, Shakespeare provides a world where people can redefine themselves. Audiences will appreciate the conflict between the dark and light side of human nature where the freedom of choice exists. This delightful journey with Rosalind will leave playgoers reveling in the comedy of Shakespeare’s brilliant story.”

Adds Steven Yuhasz, the company’s executive director: “Claire has been doing tremendous work for our company for the past two years and we are excited to have her vision of ‘As You Like It’ in the park. She brings a wealth of experience working with Shakespeare and an intimate knowledge of our audience.” The park opens at 4 p.m. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early to picnic (bring your own blankets and folding chairs) and enjoy the pastoral setting on Long Island Sound. There is an education tent with free activities for all. A pre-show for young audiences begins at 6 p.m. with the main performance at 7:30 p.m. Performances are free with a suggested donation of $20; $10 for students and seniors. A limited number of reserved seats are available. Call 2991300 for reservations. For more information about the production, summer camps, library programs and the cast, visit shakespeareonthesound.org

Visit FCBuzz.org for more information on events and how to get listed. 18 Week of June 17, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Presented by: Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County


CALL FOR NOMINATIONS CRITERIA

I

n its second year, this popular award is open to any CFO who has worked a minimum of two years for a company in Fairfield County. Three winners will be chosen by a distinguished panel of judges; one from a company with fewer than 100 employees, another from a company with 101 to 500 employees and the third from a company with more than 500 employees.

NOMINATIONS ACCESSIBLE AT WESTFAIRONLINE.COM/CFO-AWARDS, NOMINATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED FROM NOW THROUGH JULY 10.

AWARDS CELEBRATION SAVE THE DATE, MEET THE CANDIDATES AND CELEBRATE THE 2013 FAIRFIELD COUNTY CFO OF THE YEAR WINNERS WITH GUESTS AND COLLEAGUES.

DATE/TIME + LOCATION OCTOBER 2 | 5:30 P.M. HOTEL ZERO DEGREES 353 MAIN AVE., NORWALK

SPONSORS

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 19


THE LIST

Nursing Homes

RANKED BY NUMBER OF LICENSED BEDS.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY NEXT LIST: JUNE 24 THRIFTS SAVINGS BANKS

NURSING HOMES

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

The Jewish Home of Fairfield County 175 Jefferson St., Fairfield 06825 365-6400 • jhe.org

St. Joseph's Manor 6448 Main St., Trumbull 06611 268-6204 • genesishcc.com

Lord Chamberlain Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 7003 Main St., Stratford 06614 375-5894 • lordchamberlain.net

Greenwich Woods Rehabilitation and Health Care Center 1165 King St., Greenwich 06831 531-1335 • greenwichwoods.com

Hewitt Health and Rehabilitation Center Inc. 45 Maltby St., Shelton 06484 924-4671 • applehealthcare.com

Danbury Health Care Center 107 Osborne St., Danbury 06810 792-8102

Bethel Health Care 13 Parklawn Drive, Bethel 06801 830-4180 • bethelhealthcare.com

Cambridge Manor 2427 Easton Turnpike, Fairfield 06825 372-0313 • cambridgem.com

Regency Heights of Stamford 53 Courtland Ave., Stamford 06902 351-8300 • cienafacilities.com

Gardner Heights Health Care Center 172 Rocky Rest Road, Shelton 06484 929-1481 • applehealthcare.com

Masonicare at Newtown 139 Toddy Hill Road, Newtown 06470 426-5847 • masonicare.org

11 12 13 14

Astoria Park 725 Park Ave., Bridgeport 06604 366-3653 • astoriapark.com

Maefair Health Care Center 21 Maefair Court, Trumbull 06611 459-5152 • athenahealthcare.com

Laurel Ridge Health Care Center 642 Danbury Road, Ridgefield 06877 438-8226 • athenahealthcare.com

Fairview Health of Fairfield 930 Mill Hill Terrace, Southport 06890 259-7894

Long Ridge of Stamford 710 Long Ridge Road, Stamford 06902 329-4026 • healthbridgemanagement.com/long-ridge

Milford Health Care Center 195 Platt St., Milford 06460 878-5958 • milfordhealthcarecenter.com

15 16 17 18 19 20

Hancock Hall 31 Staples St., Danbury 06810 794-9466 • filosa.com

Waveny Care Center 3 Farm Road, New Canaan 06840 594-5200 • waveny.org

Fairview of Greenwich 1188 King St., Greenwich 06831 531-8300

Filosa for Nursing & Rehabilitation 13 Hakim St., Danbury 06810 744-3366 • filosa.com

Notre Dame Convalescent Home 76 W. Rocks Road, Norwalk 06851 847-5893

The Watermark at 3030 Park 3030 Park Ave., Bridgeport 06604 374-5611 • watermarkcommunities.com

subacute care

transportation van

respite care

speech therapy

Services provided

physical therapy

Number of licensed beds

religious services

Facility admissions officer(s) Email address Year facility established

adult day care

Name, address, telephone number Area code: 203 (unless otherwise noted) Website

Alzheimer's care hairdresser/ barber hospice 24-hour physician coverage occupational therapy

Rank

Ranked by number of licensed beds. Listed alphabetically in event of tie.

Liz Lockwood llockwood@jseniors.org 1973

360

a a a a a a a a a a a a

Jennifer Hernandez 1960

274

a a a a

Barbara Jarmon bjarmon@lordchamberlain.net 1968 Christine O'Dea info@greenwichwoods.com 1986 Leigh Bolduc lbolduc@apple-rehab.com 1949

other resident services

Center for elder abuse prevention, geriatric assessments and care management, pet therapy, dental, ophthalmology, podiatry, trips, intergenerational programs, licensed medical home care

a a a a a a Alzheimer's support group, specialty programs, wound care, advanced practice registered nurse on staff, orthopedic and cardiac care, additional amenities include flat-screen TVs, wireless Internet

250

a a a a a a a a a a a

217

a a a a a a a a a a a

206

a a a a a a a a a a

Long-term care, outpatient therapy

Lisa Valenta 1976

171

a a a

Cardiopulmonary specialty program, on-site cardiologist and pulmonologist, wound care, IV therapy, tracheotomy care, hospice

Dina Lattimer 1994

161

Lynn Hasak lhasak@nathealthcare.com 1988 Katrina June stamford_admissions@regencyhc.com

1965 John Hortsman Administrator 1960s Kristen Mitchell 1983 Joanne Flanagan admissions@astoriapark.com 1985 Mirella Geanuracos admissions@maefairhcc.com 1994 Jean Carbone admissions@laurelridgehcc.com 1994 Deborah Delfranco delfrancod@fairviewfairfield.com 2005 Patty Abella rteekaram@longridgehcc.com 1993 Marissa Page mpage@nathealthcare.com 1978 Sherri Freitas APRN info@filosa.com 1983 Virginia Carroll vcarroll@waveny.org 1975 Michelle Cortuna 1966 Sherri Freitas APRN info@filosa.com 1947 Julie Ashley jashley@ndch-sstv.com 1952 Olga Fernandes Director of admissions 1969

a a a a a a a a a a

76.2 157.3

Type of sponsorship

Nonprofit

121 260

WND

58.5 83

Private

62 126

Proprietary

WND WND

Proprietary

54 61

Proprietary

65 100

Proprietary

160

a a a a a a a a a a

Recreation services, social services, advanced practice registered nurse on staff, therapies offered seven days a week, wound care, IV therapy

45 150

Proprietary

156

a a a a a a a a a a

Respiratory care, wound care, outpatient therapy

WND WND

Proprietary

154

a a a

154

a a a a a a a a a a a

135

Audiology, daily recreational programs, dentistry, dementia care, dietary services, IV therapy, optometry, pain management, podiatry, short-term care, skilled nursing

NA NA

For profit

Outpatient rehabilitation center

42 75

Nonprofit

a a a a a a a a a a

41 55

Proprietary private

134

a a a a a a a a a a

30 49

For profit

126

a a a a a a a a a a

25 46

L.L.C.

120

a a a a a a a a a

22 41

Proprietary

120

a a a a a a a a a a

27 60

Proprietary

120

a a a a a a a a a

96

a a a a a a a a a a a

a a a a a

a

Rcreation programs

WND WND Outpatient therapy, private rooms with private baths Rehabilitation services (outpatient and inpatient), part of comprehensive continuum of care

76

a a a a

75

a a a

64

a a a a a a a a a a a

60

a a a a a a a a a a a

IV therapy

22

a a a a a a a a a a a

Aquatic therapy, recreational therapy, full-time social worker, private room

Source: Data obtained from company respondents and facility website. Information on beds from Official U.S. Government site for Medicare; medicare.gov.

20 Week of June 17, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

a a a a a a

Number of full-time equivalent licensed nurses and certified nurses' aides

a a a a a

a

a a a a a a

WND WND 15 24

Proprietary

Proprietary

Nonprofit

WND WND

Private

WND WND

Proprietary

23 12 5 8

Nonprofit

For profit


SPECIAL REPORT

ELDER CARE

New name, $90 million expansion for care provider JEWISH SENIOR SERVICES TO CONSOLIDATE CAMPUSES, EXPAND SERVICES

from left, state rep. Kim fawcett, Bridgeport mayor Bill finch, fairfield first Selectman mike tetreau, state rep. Brenda Kupchick and Jewish Senior Services President and cEo andrew Banoff. Photo courtesy of Jewish Senior Services.

BY CRYSTAL KANG ckang@westfairinc.com

A

Fairfield senior care provider will consolidate its two facilities on a planned Park Avenue campus as part of a $90 million capital project that was announced in conjunction with the group’s 40th anniversary. Jewish Senior Services of Fairfield County Inc., which previously did business as Jewish Home for the Elderly of Fairfield County, runs senior care facilities at 175 Jefferson St. and 1 Post Road, both in Fairfield. After years of operating separately, the facilities will be united on a future campus whose exact address on Park Avenue has yet to be disclosed. “I’ve been here for ten years, and my dream and vision is to build the next generation of services for seniors and a huge part of my ener�y and effort is to build this community,” said Andrew Banoff, president and CEO of the Jewish Senior Services, at a June 11 press confer-

ence to announce the project. The nonprofit care provider plans to increase its services and upgrade its amenities as part of the consolidation project. Currently, its services are split between two locations, with one campus serving as a nursing home while the other offers adult day programs and outpatient therapy. The plan for the next year is to relocate both to a shared site with the vision of bringing together an intergenerational community and fostering mutual care and understanding without letting the age difference create barriers, Jewish Senior Services officials said. Construction and financing plans will likely be announced in September, Banoff said. He said the two existing facilities will be converted into assisted living residences, which will then be sold once the new campus opens. Jewish Senior Services has employed almost 800 people from 92 countries – many of whom reside in the greater

Bridgeport area. The name change was implemented as part of its 40th anniversary celebrations. Banoff said the firm wants to be recognized for the full scope of senior care services it provides, and not just as a nursing home. Jewish Senior Services is home to the second-largest skilled nursing facility in the state with 360 beds, firm representatives said, and it received a five-star rating for its Medicare and Medicaid services from U.S. News & World Report. Bridgeport Mayor Bill Finch, who spoke at the June 11 event, said his administration supports the new development and the rebranding and pointed out that this project exemplifies a working model of a public-private partnership. State Rep. Tony Hwang, whose district includes Fairfield, added that the new project will foster opportunities for economic growth and bring more jobs to the area. “The Jewish Senior Services is one of the largest employers,” Hwang said.

“You are an essential employer, and you empower us to succeed.” Volunteerism is also expected to grow once the new site is established. Among the parade of senior care facilities that serve over 41 million elderly people nationwide, Jewish Senior Services is among the only providers of elder abuse prevention services in Connecticut and the nation. “Elder abuse is a huge problem,” said Laura Snow, program director of the Center for Elder Adult Prevention, a division of Jewish Senior Services. “MetLife Market Institute has a national survey out that says $2.9 billion are taken from older adults each year. Connecticut has the highest rate of reported cases, which is a good thing because that means people here are talking about it.” Research suggests that elder abuse is significantly under-identified and underreported. An average of one in 14 cases are reported, according to the National Center on Elder Abuse at the American Public Human Services Association.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 21


BY ANTHONY J. ENEA

I

The burden of long-term care costs

n a study published April 3, RAND Corp. estimated that the monetary cost of dementia in the United States ranges from $150 billion to $215 billion annually. According to the study, the cost of dementia to the nation is greater than that of heart disease or cancer. Furthermore, dementia care costs are expected to double by 2040. As the number of individuals requiring long-term care continues to grow, one of the first things that will be tested is whether our existing system can adequately handle the surge. Traditionally, most individuals suffering from advanced dementia and/or other Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s related illnesses in Westchester and Fairfield

counties were treated in nursing homes. However, in the last decade there has been a significant shift from this model of care to one with greater emphasis upon “aging in place.” Today, more and more of these individuals are receiving care either at home, in an assisted living facility or in a continuing care retirement community for significantly longer periods of time. Regardless of the housing option chosen, the need will still exist for significantly larger numbers of trained health care providers to attend to a growing aging population that is living longer. The two counties will require more physicians trained in geriatric medicine, qualified home care providers and aides,

assisted living facilities and even nursing homes within the next 20 to 30 years. For seniors not financially eligible for Medicaid and who have not purchased long-term care insurance or engaged in long-term planning, the cost of such care can be devastating. For example, in Fairfield County the average private cost of 24/7 care at home can average $7,000 to $10,000 per month when utilizing a qualified agency. Obviously, this is significantly less expensive than the cost of a nursing home, which in Fairfield County averages from $385 to $425 per day, or $140,525 to $155,125 annually. Unfortunately, these costs have consistently increased year to year at doubledigit percentages, and it is difficult to

Alice always enjoyed Main Street. She still does.

The Village at Waveny is a unique assisted living residence designed to stimulate and engage memory impaired seniors. The familiar, comforting environment of small town Main Street is a site for interaction among residents and with staff. This community dynamic, along with specialized therapeutic programs, enriches and enhances the quality of life for older adults. The Village is located in New Canaan, Connecticut, where seniors from all areas are welcome for trial, short respite stays or long-term care. Find out more by calling Ginny Carroll at 203.594.5331 or visiting www.waveny.org.

22 Week of June 17, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

estimate with any degree of certainty what the costs will be in the future. Fortunately, there are a number of planning options available to seniors that will allow them to shelter their assets from the cost of care, such as gifting of assets, utilizing an Irrevocable Medicaid Asset Protection Trust, and/ or purchasing long-term care insurance. Implementing these options prior to needing care is imperative. If one is financially and categorically eligible, the federal/state program providing care for seniors either at home or in a nursing home is Medicaid (not Medicare). Medicaid is a “means tested” entitlement program that looks at both the resources (savings) and income of the senior to determine eligibility. For example, if a senior is single, he or she is not allowed to have more than $14,400 of savings and no more than $800 or $820 per month of income to be eligible for either nursing home or home care Medicaid. However, spouses are permitted to transfer assets to each other to help meet the financial eligibility requirement. The spouse to whom the assets have been transferred may need to execute a “spousal refusal” stating that he or she refuses to utilize his or her income and resources to support his or her spouse. Seniors only have two truly effective advance planning options: purchase long-term care insurance and/or transfer a portion of their assets to an Irrevocable Medicaid Asset Protection Trust or to their loved ones. The transfer of assets to a trust will create a five-year look back period (ineligibility period) for purposes of Medicaid nursing home eligibility (not Medicaid Home Care). However, once the five years have elapsed the assets transferred will not be counted as available resources. Advanced planning is imperative for seniors who wish to shelter their life savings from the cost of long-term care. The RAND Corp.’s recent findings remind us that such steps are more critical now than ever before. Anthony J. Enea is the managing member of Enea, Scanlan & Sirignano L.L.P. of White Plains, N.Y. He is the immediate past chairman of the Elder Law section of the New York State Bar Association and a founding member and past president of the New York Chapter of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. He can be reached at (914) 948-1500 or Aenea@ esslawfirm.com.


FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL Clearview Inc., contractor for St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial buildLopez, Cesar M., et al., Dan- ing, 661 Old Post Road, Fairbury. $8,500, in favor of Ho- field. Estimated cost: $19,000. con Gas of Danbury L.L.C., by Filed May 31. Philip H. Monogan. Property: 1 Edgewood St., Danbury. Filed Danbury Mall L.L.C., DanMay 29. bury. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial Lopez, Cesar M., et al., Dan- building for Old Navy, 7 Backbury. $8,500, in favor of Ho- us Avenue Main, Danbury. Escon Gas of Danbury L.L.C., by timated cost: $1.1 million. Filed Philip H. Monogan. Property: May 28. 9 Duck St., Danbury. Filed May 29. Eastcoast Construction, contractor for Nick Aivalis. Perform alterations to an existing commercial building, 6 Cross BUILDING Road, Stamford. Estimated PERMITS cost: $25,000. Filed May 31.

ATTACHMENTSFILED

commErciaL

Gesauldi Construction, Stamford, contractor for YMCA. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 909 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Estimated cost: $609,220. Filed June 3.

Blackwell Construction, Fairfield, contractor for High Ridge Office Park L.L.C. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 1 High Ridge Park, Stamford. Estimated cost: $250,000. Filed May 30. Lucy Zhang, Orange, contractor for RVV Luck Works L.L.C. Fit-out an existing commercial Caladri Development Corp., building, 121 Towne St., StamPeekskill, N.Y., contractor for ford. Estimated cost: $208,435. city of Stamford. Perform addi- Filed June 3. tions at a commercial building, 1300 Newfield Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $1.1 million. Merritt Construction L.L.C., Filed May 31. contractor for Post Benson Corp. Expand existing tenant space, 837 Post Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed May 28. Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Bob Rozycki c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7 White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: (914)694-3600 Fax: (914)694-3680

Montagno Construction Inc., Waterbury, contractor for Turn of River Middle School. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building, 117 Vine Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $1.07 million. Filed May 29. Olympic Construction L.L.C., contractor for Ridgebury Office Investment L.L.C. Perform interior renovations at an existing commercial building for Reby, 44 Old Ridgebury Road, Danbury. Estimated cost: $148,000. Filed May 29.

Saugatuck Cosntruction Group, Saugatuck, contractor for Reckson, a division of SL Green. Fit-out an existing commercial building for Med Source, 300 Main St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $74,470. Filed May 29.

Bailiwick Roofi ng and Siding Inc., contractor for John Robert Williamson. Strip and reroof an existing single-family residence, 1404 Round Hill Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $19,900. Filed June 3.

Better Homes Remodeling L.L.C., contractor for Wendell Chapman. Repair a deck at an existing single-family residence, 8 Rose Lane, Unit 2210, Danbury. Estimated cost: $1,900. Filed May 23.

Bartolomew Residence, Brookfield. Construct a new unit for a residential community, 46 Skyline Drive, Brookfield. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed May 28.

Better Homes Remodeling L.L.C., contractor for Andrew Slack. Repair a deck at an existing single-family residence, 8 Rose Lane, Unit 22-14, Danbury. Estimated cost: $1,900. Filed May 23.

Signature Cosntruction, Stamford, contractor for Ottaviano and Tehram L.L.C. Fit-out an existing commercial building, 838 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: Bauer, Stacey and Scott Bauer, $141,000. Filed May 30. Fairfield. Repair storm damage to a single-family residence, TJ & Son Inc., contractor for 254 Puritan Road, Fairfield. Danbury Mall L.L.C. Perform Estimated cost: $526,000. Filed interior alterations and renova- June 5. tions at an existing commercial building for Doc Popcorn, 7 Backus Avenue Main, Danbury. Belfor USA Grouping Inc., Estimated cost: $100,000. Filed contractor for Dolores Maria Vizhnay. Repair water damage May 29. to a single-family residence, 103C Kohanza St., Danbury. Tocci Building Corp., contrac- Estimated cost: $2,350. Filed tor for Black Rock Congrega- May 28. tion Church. Perform interior alterations and renovations at an existing commercial build- Bethel Danbury Two L.L.C., ing, 3685 Black Rock Turnpike, contractor for Timber Oaks Fairfield. Estimated cost: $11 Association. Construct a new unit for a residential commumillion. Filed May 30. nity, 13 Bristol Terrace, Unit 3501, Danbury. Estimated cost: $175,000. Filed May 2.

A&G Development L.L.C., contractor for Linda and Michael Menillo. Strip and reroof an existing single-family residence, 2142 Fairfield Beach Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $7,700. Filed June 3. B&F Construction Co., contractor for Jeremy Hood. Lay a foundation for a new singlefamily residence, 114 Lee Drive, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $200,000. Filed May 29.

Bethel Danbury Two L.L.C., contractor for Timber Oaks Association. Construct a new unit for a residential community, 16 Bristol Terrace, Unit 3504, Danbury. Estimated cost: $175,000. Filed May 2.

A Pro Builders Inc., contractor for Barbara Wells. Perform external renovations at an existing single-family residence, 181 Euclid Ave., Fairfield. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed May 28.

BridGEPort diStrict court

All Phase Construction and Ray Weiner, Bridgeport. Filed by McNichols Co. Plaintiff’s attorney: Howard E. Kantrovitz, Hamden. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for failing to pay plaintiff for materials delivered amounting to $3,741.20. Filed June 4. Better Homes Remodeling Case no. 6035731. L.L.C., contractor for Lisa Tramazzo. Repair a deck at an existing single-family resi- Angelican Church of the dence, 8 Rose Lane, Unit 24- Resurrection, Ansonia. Filed 14, Danbury. Estimated cost: by Seymour Energy Services L.L.C., Seymour. Plaintiff’s $1,900. Filed May 23. attorney: Richard Marquette, Hamden. Action: The plaintiff Better Homes Remodeling has brought this breach-ofL.L.C., contractor for Michele contract suit against the defenand William Furlong. Repair a dant for failing to pay plaintiff deck at an existing single-fam- for goods and services rendered ily residence, 8 Rose Lane, Unit in the amount of $15,354.97. 24-16, Danbury. Estimated Filed May 29. Case no. 6035632. cost: $1,900. Filed May 23.

BMS Construction L.L.C., contractor for Amy and Jesse Green. Perform interior renovations at an existing singlefamily residence, Middle River Road, Danbury. Estimated Bethel Danbury Two L.L.C., cost: $25,000. Filed May 23. contractor for Timber Oaks Association. Construct a new unit for a residential commu- Booner, James, contractor for nity, 14 Bristol Terrace, Unit Florence Booner. Perform in3502, Danbury. Estimated cost: terior renovations at an exist$145,000. Filed May 2. ing single-family residence, 27 Gregory St., Danbury. Estimated cost: $10,672. Filed May 23. Bethel Danbury Two L.L.C., contractor for Timber Oaks Association. Construct a new Booner, James, contractor for unit for a residential commu- Pamela Miller. Perform interior nity, 15 Bristol Terrace, Unit renovations at an existing sin3503, Danbury. Estimated cost: gle-family residence, 28 West$145,000. Filed May 2. view Drive, Danbury. Estimated cost: $7,183. Filed May 23.

rESidENtiaL

COURT CASES

Fast Stop Food Mart and Naim Kabbani, Fairfield. Filed by CB Richards Ellis, Westport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Donna R. Skaats, Norwich. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for defaulting on certain rent payments and charges. The outstanding balance of $100,049.90 is due the plaintiff. Filed May 30. Case no. 6035642.

MTW Properties L.L.C.. Filed by Mindee Blanco, Fairfield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Joel Z. Green, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for negligence in not completing certain aspects of a home construction agreement as per the contract. Filed Cestari Residence, Brookfield. June 4. Case no. 6035707. Construct a new single-family residence, 31 Elbow Hill Road, Brookfield. Estimated cost: $209,000. Filed May 9.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 23


on the record Stamford District Court

Kia Motors America Inc., Irvine, Calif. Filed by GKI Inc., East Hartford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Evan C. Goldstein, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breachof-contract suit against the defendant for issuing a notice of intent to the plaintiff that their franchise agreement will be cancelled. The defendant is negligent of unlawful termination; price discrimination; breach of contract and breach of fiduciary duty. Filed June 3. Case no. 13cv00798.

Clarke Builders Inc., et al., Old Greenwich. Filed by Janette Phillips-Root and Edward Root, Old Greenwich. Plaintiff’s attorney: J. Preston Ruddell, South Glastonbury. Action: The plaintiffs have brought this suit against the defendant that developed and constructed their home. The plaintiffs have sustained water damages as a result of a burst pipe and claim the defendant has breached its warranty. Filed Visiting Nurse Services Inc. June 6. Case no. 6018705. of Southern Connecticut, Maurice Bunnell and Rhonda Libertas L.L.C., Norwalk. Marshall, Hamden. Filed by Filed by Humanity L.L.C. Southern Home Care Services d.b.a. CMIT Solutions of Cen- Inc., Louisville, Ky. Plaintiff’s tral Fairfield, Fairfield. Plain- attorneys: Shannon B. Wolf tiff’s attorney: Keith S. Har- and Gregory W. Nye, Hartford riton, Armonk, N.Y. Action: and Kent Wicker, Louisville, The plaintiff has brought this Ky. Action: The plaintiff has breach-of-contract suit against brought this breach-of-contract the defendant for failing to pay suit against the defendants who plaintiff $17,307.46 for the in- had worked for the plaintiff and formation technology services then resigned and started work and solutions it had provided. for the defendants and solicitFiled June 4. Case no. 6018666. ing the plaintiff’s patients. The plaintiff demands an immediate and permanent enjoinder against the defendants from their unlawful and misappropriation of confidential inforSUPERIOR COURT mation from the plaintiff. Filed June 3. Case no. 13cv00792. Allied Interstate L.L.C., New York City. Filed by Sheryl Appleby, Cromwell. Plaintiff’s attorney: Angela K. TrocDEEDS coli, Danielson. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit pursuant to the Fair Debt Collections Act against the de- COMMERCIAL fendant who has repeatedly contacted the plaintiff about a 26 to 72 Realty Corp., Brookcredit card debt on her cellu- lyn, N.Y. Seller: Artarene and lar phone. The plaintiff claims Brinell Thompson, Bridgeport. the defendant has violated the Property: 628 to 630 Capitol Fair Debt Collections Prac- Ave., Bridgeport. Amount: tices Act of 1978. Filed May 30. $130,000. Filed May 28. Case no. 13cv00772. Global Financial Investors & Insurance Brokerage Inc., Londonderry, N.H. Filed by PHL Variable Insurance Co., Hartford. Plaintiff’s attorney: W. Glen Pierson, Wallingford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofcontract suit against the defendant for failing to pay the commission due the plaintiff pursuant to their brokerage agreement. Filed May 30. Case no. 13cv00771.

3909 Main Street L.L.C., Trumbull. Seller: Patrick J. Carolan, Bridgeport. Property: 3909 Main St., Bridgeport. Amount: $925,000. Filed June 3. E Lloyd & Associates L.L.C., Darien. Seller: Shirley B. and Anthony M. Gurliacci, Darien. Property: 37 Hillside Ave., Darien. Amount: $825,000. Filed May 20. Five Second Lane L.L.C., Bethel. Seller: Water Co. Real Estate L.L.C., Bethel. Property: 5 Second Lane, Bethel. Amount: $4.8 million. Filed May 28.

FUSA L.L.C., Seller: Y. Joan and D. Ken Song, Newtown. Property: 15 Lincoln Road, Newtown. Amount: $230,000. Filed May 28. Knobel Hill L.L.C., Darien. Seller: Dorothy K. Somogyi, Chester, Vt., and Dean K. Lindsay, Washington. Property: Lot B, Map 3651, Darien. Amount: $1.7 million. Filed May 29.

Robinson, Virginia and Michael Robinson, New Canaan. Seller: JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Jacksonville, Fla. Property: 4 Smith Ridge Lane, New Canaan. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed May 17. Ward, Mark, Stamford. Seller: The Elizabeth Z. Sweeney Rei Trust, Stamford. Property: 180 Sylvan Knoll Road, Stamford. Amount: $111,000. Filed May 28.

Sound Cove Property L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: John S. Sieh, Stamford. Property: 87 Glenbrook Road, Unit 6D, Stam- RESIDENTIAL ford. Amount: $145,000. Filed June 3. 73 1/2 to 75 Osborne Street L.L.C., Danbury. Seller: WilSpa Inc., Fairfield. Seller: Jo liam D. Holman and Mark A. Ann Englund, Fairfield. Prop- Kucks, Danbury. Property: 73 erty: 123 Papurah Road, Fair- 1/2 to 75 Osborne St., Danbury. field. Amount: $325,000. Filed Amount: $131,000. Filed May 23. May 29. Spyglass Associates L.L.C., Southport. Seller: Maria and Worthington Johnson Jr., Jackson, Wyo. Property: 260 Harbor Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1.7 million. Filed June 3.

Ahmed, Makther and Khola Sheikh, Easton. Seller: Nancy and Alexander Horner Sr., Stamford. Property: 60 Spruce St., Stamford. Amount: $60,000. Filed June 3.

Warwick Way L.L.C., New Canaan. Seller: Chris Piccin, New Canaan. Property: 7 Rural Drive, New Canaan. Amount: $445,000. Filed May 31.

Alammouri, Nabileh S., Bridgeport. Seller: Noble Estates L.L.C., Brooklyn, N.Y. Property: 70 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport. Amount: $40,000. Filed May 30.

QUIT CLAIM

Alcantara, J. Roberto, Bridgeport. Seller: 360 Asset L.L.C., Bridgeport. Property: 261 to 267 Lexington Ave., Bridgeport. Amount: $350,000. Filed May 28.

Amenda, Jessica L. and Thomas S. Yario, Southington. Seller: Tina La Bella and Joseph La Bella, Milford. Property: 127 Sylvan Knolls Road, Stamford. Amount: $145,000. Alves, Alaerte, Bridgeport. Filed May 29. Seller: HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 156 BenBello, Frances, Stamford. son St., Bridgeport. Amount: Seller: Christopher R. Bello, $145,000. Filed May 30. Stamford. Property: 26 Nurney Road, Stamford. Amount: Anarcaya, Alfonso W., Stam$35,000. Filed May 30. ford. Seller: Bank United, Miami Lakes, Fla. Property: 1 Elm City Power Holdings L.L.C., Tree Place, Stamford. Amount: Chicago, Ill. Seller: Kathleen $335,000. Filed May 29. and James M. Kelly, Danbury. Property: 38 Beaver Brook Anderson, Keryann and ReRoad, Danbury. Amount: cardo Anderson, Bridgeport. $370,000. Filed May 30. Seller: Positive Properties L.L.C., New Canaan. Property: Kelley, Jacki S. and John 105 Ridgebrook Drive, BridgeF. Kelley III, New Canaan. port. Amount: $243,500. Filed Seller: Wilton Bank, Wilton. May 29. Property: Lot 58, Cross Ridge Road, New Canaan. Amount: $899,000. Filed May 16.

24 Week of June 17, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Barrera, Noemi S. and Felix E. Barrera, Union, N.J. Seller: Charlene Jackens, Waldoboro, Maine; Barbara Ferenc, Colrain, Mass. and James F. Pietruszka, Quakerton, Pa. Property: 36 Canaan Close, 289 New Norwalk Road, New Arena, Mery, Sherman. Seller: Canaan. Amount: $625,000. Peter Sylvester, Sherman. Prop- Filed May 16. erty: 6 Candleview Drive, Sherman. Amount: $349,900. Filed Barrett, Kristina and Neal May 29. Barrett, Stamford. Seller: Michael H. Assunto, Fairfield. Auer, Sadacie S. and Stefan Property: 420 Romanock Road, Auer, Fairfield. Seller: Bess H. Fairfield. Amount: $428,000. and Serapheim D. Koutas, San Filed May 21. Diego, Calif. Property: 2979 Burr St., Fairfield. Amount: Bear, Debbie, Fairfield. Seller: $890,000. Filed May 20. Fairfield Shore L.L.C., Fairfield. Property: 1046 Fairfield Auerbach, Lauri J. and Jona- Beach Road, Fairfield. Amount: than H. Auerbach, Fairfield. $55,000. Filed June 4. Seller: Pamela Singh-Tauber and Michael J. Tauber, 61 Fallowfield Lane, Fairfield. Beaulieu, Michelle and Brody Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Howatt, New York City. Seller: Megan A. and Jack H. Whitton, May 21. Redding. Property: 141 Cross Highway, Redding. Amount: Ausderan, Lorraine and Kurt $1.2 million. Filed May 28. Ausderan, Newtown. Seller: Joseph F. Murphy III, Newtown. Property: 4 Clearview Becker, Monica and Edideal J. Drive, Newtown. Amount: Pinker, Stamford. Seller: Barbara and Dominick Maietta, $436,000. Filed May 31. Stamford. Property: 53 Harvest Hill Lane, Stamford. Amount: Bailey-Boehm, Kathleen M. $815,000. Filed May 31. and Brooke A. Boehm and Allan R. Boehm Jr., Bayville, N.Y. Seller: Catherine Duhig and Jesse Nomack, Stamford. FORECLOSURES Property: 126 Woodside Green, Unit 3B, Stamford. Amount: $205,000. Filed May 28. Clerge, Paulette and Ricardo Philogene. Creditor: Morequity Inc., Lewisville, Texas. Bailey, Christine E. and Verdi Property: Lot 40, Section B Vajseli, Danbury. Seller: Mat- Lakeside Drive, Bridgeport. thew W. Socci, Naples, Fla. Mortgage default. Filed May 30. Property: 40 Division St., Unit 1, Danbury. Amount: $175,600. Filed May 29. Ek, Barbara A., et al. Creditor: Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Property: 23 Curtis Baker, Deborah A. and Chris- Ave., New Fairfield. Mortgage topher E. Baker, Stamford. default. Filed May 30. Seller: William P. Fortune Jr., Fairfield. Property: 273 Whiting Pond Road, Fairfield. Amount: Fitch, Marc E., Creditor: Ci$745,000. Filed May 23. timortgage Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: 8 Staples St., Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed Barnett, Victor, Yorktown May 28. Heights, N.Y. Seller: Maricka and David Young, Bridgeport. Property: 207 to 209 Sheri- Gonzalez, Anna L. Creditor: dan St., Bridgeport. Amount: Federal National Mortgage As$89,900. Filed May 29. sociation, Washington, D.C. Property: 255 Saunders Ave., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed June 3. Angelsecu, Luminata S. and Cristian R. Angelusca, Easton. Seller: Ralph DeMatto, Easton. Property: 65 Tersana Drive, Easton. Amount: $546,000. Filed May 22.


on the record CREDITS, CLIENTS AND AWARDS

NEWSMAKERS

ON THE GO

AMERICARES recently presented its annual Power of Partnership Award to MERCK & CO. INC. in recognition of the company’s outstanding commitment to helping disaster survivors and improving health in the developing world. Merck is one of AmeriCares most committed donors, providing both products and financial support for the global health and disaster relief organization’s aid program.

DAY PITNEY recently announced James P. Carlon previously of Kelley Drye & Warren L.L.P. has rejoined the firm as partner in the real estate, land use and environmental department. Carlon was previously a commercial real estate associate at Day Pitney and has experience representing clients in diverse commercial real estate transactions. Carlon holds a Juris Doctorate degree from New York Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Fairfield University.

The American Heart Association Go Red For Women Leadership Breakfast “Authentic Leadership – Leading From the Heart,” 7:30 to 9 a.m., Hotel Zero Degrees, 353 Main St., Norwalk. For information, email julia.moran@heart.org or call (914) 640-3268.

KARL CHEVROLET recently donated a total of $3,300 in scholarship assistance to graduating students from lower Fair- PULLMAN & COMLEY L.L.C. recently announced the addifield County high schools. Since the New Canaan dealership tion of six new attorneys based in its Hartford office. began running its April high school scholarship promotion 28 WILLIAM R. CONNON has more than 36 years years ago, it has raised $95,700 for area scholarship programs. of experience advising and representing boards of education in a wide range of education law matters, including numerous special education SHERMAN D. LONDON, a consultant with the Trumbullhearings before the State Department of Educabased public relations firm Michael J. London & Associates, has tion. Connon holds a Juris Doctorate degree from been named this year’s recipient of the Helen M. Loy Freedom Syracuse University School of Law and a Bachelor of Information Award by the Connecticut Chapter of the Sociof Arts degree from the University of Connecticut. ety of Professional Journalists. The award honors a member of the public or an official who uses the state’s freedom of informaMICHAEL P. MCKEON represents boards of tion laws to advance open government. education, municipalities and private-sector employers across Connecticut in both federal and state courts on both the trial and appellate levels. RIDGEFIELD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE recently welMcKeon holds a Juris Doctorate degree from the comed the Center for Advanced Pediatrics at a ribbon-cutting University of Connecticut School of Law, a Master reception June 6 at its location, 901 Ethan Allen Highway, of Arts degree from the University of Missouri, and Ridgefield. a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of New Hampshire. ZACHARY D. SCHURIN represents school boards, municipalities and other public-sector clients across Connecticut on a broad spectrum of labor, employment and education law issues. Schurin holds a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Connecticut School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Hamilton College. SUSAN L. SCOTT focuses on education, labor and employment. Scott was previously a trial attorney for the Office of the Public Defender in Rhode Island. Scott holds a Juris Doctorate degree from Boston ColFrom left, Dr. Mark Vincent; Dr. Arthur Dobos; Dr. Jeanne Marconi; lege Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Dr. Jennifer Moore; Lynn Nussbaum, certified nurse practitioner; and University of Pennsylvania. Marion Roth, Ridgefield Chamber of Commerce. Photograph by JenJOHN P. SHEA JR. has represented public and nifer Mulhern. private employers in labor and employment matters for nearly 20 years. Shea also performs a sigSTRATFORD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, an affiliate of nificant amount of general municipal work and the Bridgeport Regional Business Council, and the Stratford routinely represents public and private entities in th Board of Education recently celebrated the 25 anniversary employment litigation. He holds a Juris Doctorate of the Business Education Support Team (BEST) June 13 at degree from the Washington and Lee University Stratford Town Hall. BEST has received national recognition School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from throughout its 25 years, including a letter of commendation Fairfield University. from the White House. MARK J. SOMMARUGA provided legal counsel to Connecticut municipalities and school boards, other BRUCE WHITE of Hamden, professor of computer informapublic-sector clients and private-sector clients for the tion systems in Quinnipiac University’s School of Business, was past 20 years. Sommaruga earned a Juris Doctorate derecently awarded a Fulbright-Hays grant to teach and lecture gree from the University of Connecticut School of Law in Belarus. The Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad program and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Trinity College. provides short-term study and travel seminars abroad for U.S. educators in the social sciences and humanities for the purpose of improving their understanding and knowledge of the people and cultures of other countries.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 19

THURSDAY JUNE 20 Jewish Business League hosts From Comedian to CEO by Ron Shaw, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Tower One, 18 Tower Lane, New Haven. For information, visit jblct.org. Westport-Weston Chamber of Commerce hosts Leadership Luncheon and Discussion, noon to 1:30 p.m., HSBC Bank, 19 Post Road East, Westport. For information, (203) 227-9234 or visit wesportwestonchamber.com.

TUESDAY JUNE 25 Greenwich Chamber of Commerce hosts Women Who Matter Lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., L’escale Restaurant, 500 Steamboat Road, Greenwich. For information, call (203) 869-3500 or email greenwichchamber@greenwichchamber.com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 26 Greenwich Chamber of Commerce hosts June After Six, 5:30 to 7 p.m., J House, 1114 E. Putnam Ave., Riverside. For information, call (203) 869-3500.

SNAPSHOT BLUMSHAPIRO employees dress in jeans on Fridays to raise funds for the charity of their choice. The recent effort of BlumShapiro’s Jeans for Charity program provided a donation of $3,000 to Seymour Pink, a community-based, nonprofit organization dedicated to funding breast cancer research, providing education and to empowering and assisting breast cancer victims and their families.

From left, John Zinno, Mary Hoyt, Colleen Fries, Nancy Freiler, Sharon Joyce, Colleen Garofalo, Melissa Stanton, Mary Deming, Sarah Watson, Amy Sorensen and Anne Glatt.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

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on the record Green Mountain Properties L.L.C., Trumbull. Creditor: Richard J. Sharnick, Naugatuck. Property: 1098 and 1140 Connecticut Ave., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed June 3.

B&B Home Improvement L.L.C. and William F. Brunetti Sr., et al., Newtown. $6,020, in favor of Ford Motor Credit Co. L.L.C., Livonia, Mich., by Nair & Levin P.C., Bloomfield. Property: 77 Butterfield Road, Newtown. Filed May 28.

Hall, Susan E., et al. Creditor: The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, Westerville, N.Y. Property: 102 Center Road, Easton. Mortgage default. Filed May 17.

Beckford, Ainsley F., Bridgeport. $12,588.67, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 200 Summit St., Bridgeport. Filed Morales, Margarita. Credi- May 28. tor: Bank of America N.A., Simi Valley, Calif. Property: 48 Fieldcrest Drive, Fairfield. Bernstein, Richard, Fairfield. Mortgage default. Filed June 3. $5,094.35, in favor of Clearview Inc., Fairfield, by Peter D. Fearon, Westport. Property: Siconolfi, Wendy and Antho- 275 Lalley Blvd, Fairfield. Filed ny Siconolfi. Creditor: Scudder May 23. Bay Capital L.L.C., Wakefield, Mass. Property: 128 Sterling St., Fairfield. Mortgage default. Besse, Rosemary, Newtown. Filed May 22. $409.99, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 9 Appleblossom Lane, Newtown. FORECLOSURES Filed June 3.

BY SALE

JAR Associates, Danbury. Appointed Committee: Bryan V. Soto, Danbury. Property: 1 to 3, 5 and 7 South St., Danbury. Amount: $500,000. Docket no. DBD 11cv6006974S. Filed May 28. Titan Capital ID L.L.C., Farmington. Appointed Committee: Richard S. Scalo, Bridgeport. Property: 500 Glendale Ave., Unit 2, Bridgeport. Amount: $41,500. Docket no. FBT 11cv6022881S. Filed June 3.

JUDGMENTS Anderson, Dennis, Newtown. $58,223.82, in favor of C A C V of Colorado L.L.C., Denver, Colo., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 55 Capital Drive, Sandy Hook. Filed May 29. Arata, Julio S., Fairfield. $4,667.81, in favor of FIA Card Services N.A., Wilmington, Del., by Julie B. Solomon, Albany, N.Y. Property: 673 Tunxis Hill Road, Fairfield. Filed May 20. Ashley, Dexroy, Bridgeport. $1,506.90, in favor of U.S. Equities Corp., South Salem, N.Y., by Linda Strumpf, New Canaan. Property: 38 Clearview Drive, Bridgeport. Filed June 3.

Budrowich, Edward, New Canaan. $670.92, in favor of NE Greenwich Propane Inc., Bethel, by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 839 Carter St., New Canaan. Filed May 21. Buttafuocco, Theresa A. and Luigi Buttafuocco, New Fairfield. $2,621, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by V. Michael Simko Jr., Shelton. Property: 1 Peralta St., New Fairfield. Filed June 3. Clark, Elyse, Newtown. $638.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 4 Glenmore Drive, Newtown. Filed June 3. Coletter, Susan, Easton. $2,730.96, in favor of Santa Energy Corp., Bridgeport, by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 151 Adams Road, Easton. Filed May 30. Cosgrove, Nora, Fairfield. $3,444.29, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Col., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 708 Reef Road, Fairfield. Filed May 20. Cranwell, Jeffrey R., Danbury. $3,088.61, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 20 E. Pembrook Road, Unit 31, Danbury. Filed May 23.

Cusack, Judith A., Danbury. $2,252.50, in favor of Asset Acceptance L.L.C., Warren, Mich., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 31 Pond Crest Road, Danbury. Filed May 28.

Gillotti, Linda, Bethel. $2,336.76, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 23 Aunt Patty’s Lane West, Bethel. Filed May 28.

Davis, Norman, Bethel. $1,438, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Bethel, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 12 Highland Ave., Bethel. Filed May 30.

Glaude, Telemaque, Bridgeport. $1,074.13, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 430 Holland Road, Bridgeport. Filed May 28.

Demato, Peter, Brookfield. $5,080.65, in favor of Resolute Credit L.L.C., Madison, by Michael A. Sexton. Property: 86 Riverford Road, Brookfield. Filed May 28. Dibble, Suzanne E. a.k.a. Suzanne E. Sharp, Danbury. $1,094.26, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 26 Candlewood Trailer Park, Pocono Point Road, Danbury. Filed May 28. Dixon, Sandra, Bridgeport. $957.68, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 140 Priscilla St., Bridgeport. Filed June 3. Espinel, William, Fairfield. $1,162.60, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 86 Campfield Drive, Fairfield. Filed May 22. Feminella, Anne P. and Daniel Feminella, Newtown. $11,005.17, in favor of Mutual Security Credit Union Inc., Danbury, by Brian S. Cantor, Fairfield. Property: 18 Indian Hill Lane, Newtown. Filed May 30. Ferris, Mark, Darien. $10,660.31, in favor of Barclays Bank Delaware, Wilmington, Del., by Julie B. Solomon, Albany, N.Y. Property: 3 Patton Drive, Darien. Filed May 20. Genova, John G., Bridgeport. $1,390.40, in favor of Atlantic Credit & Finance Inc., Roanoke, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 171 Rocton Ave., Bridgeport. Filed May 28.

26 Week of June 17, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Lebovitz, James, Danbury. $961.76, in favor of Danbury Emergency Services, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 2A Jeanette St., Unit 7, Danbury. Filed May 28.

Ross Solar Group L.L.C., by Jason T. Ross and Joshua Z. Ross. Landlord: City Power Holdings L.L.C. Property: 38 Beaver Brook Road, Danbury. Term: 20 years, commencing May 30, 2013. Filed May 30.

Lima, Carlos A., Bethel. $2,075.80, in favor of Yankee Gas Services Company, Hartford, by Alexander G. Snyder, Waterbury. Property: 8 Grace Court, Bethel. Filed May 30.

LIENS

Mason, Robert J., Darien. $3,011.42, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 10 Ledge Road, Darien. Filed May 22.

Glaude, Telemaque, Bridgeport. $883.64, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 430 Holland Road, Bridgeport. Filed Mazzarella, John, Brookfield. June 3. $1,334.37, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Griffin, Lori and Scott Grif- Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, fin, Newtown. $882.20, in favor East Hartford. Property: 10 S. of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, Mountain Road, Brookfield. by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Filed May 28. Property: 8 Windy Woods Circle, Newtown. Filed June 3. McClain, David W. Jr., Stamford. $20,553.04, in favor of Hansford, Sandra, New Fair- Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, field. $918.78, in favor of Dan- N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New bury Hospital, Danbury, by Haven. Property: 50 Deep Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Prop- Spring Lane, Stamford. Filed erty: 33 Fairfield Drive, New May 29. Fairfield. Filed June 3. Hazel, William A., Bridgeport. $1,307.11, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 204 Judson Place, Bridgeport. Filed May 28. Hines, Denzil L., Bridgeport. $3,860.56, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 371 Wayne St., Bridgeport. Filed May 29. Hutter, Donna, Fairfield. $1,051.50, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 351 Stratfield Road, Fairfield. Filed May 28.

McClellan, Shari, Bridgeport. $3,485.18, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 119 Louisiana Ave., Bridgeport. Filed May 28. McGran, Christine and Christopher McGran, Danbury. $13,457.09, in favor of Connecticut Light and Power Co., Hartford, by Christian R. Kurker-Stewart, Hamden. Property: Lot 9 Middle River Road, Danbury. Filed May 28.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSFILED Abrego, Ivan X., 16 Mayflower Ave., Second floor, Stamford. $17,012.12, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 3. Adam Stelmaszek & Sons Inc., 16 Edison Ave., Fairfield. $6,737.36, payroll taxes. Filed May 29. Adam Stelmaszek & Sons Inc., 16 Edison Ave., Fairfield. $525.99, payroll taxes. Filed May 29. Adams, Colleen H. and David J. Adams, 225 Primrose Lane, Fairfield. $11,092.90, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 4. Braswell Galleries Inc., 20 Pulaski St., Norwalk. $873.26, employer’s federal unemployment tax return. Filed June 3. Brushworks Inc., P.O. Box 878, Bethel. $40,880.16, payroll taxes. Filed May 31. Carroll, Gail C. and Ronald Carroll, 749 Riverside Drive, Fairfield. $60,324.60, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 4.

Cichowski, Daniel P., 60 Southport Woods Drive, Southport. $25,843.67, tax debt Melgard, Rachel, New Fair- on income earned. Filed June 4. field. $549.05, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Prop- Kusi, Cynthia, 409 Conerty: 153 Route 39, New Fair- necticut Ave., Bridgeport. $26,929.18, tax debt on income field. Filed June 3. earned. Filed May 21.

Johnson, Elizabeth, New Fairfield. $402.87, in favor of DanLEASES bury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 12 Southview Road, New M&F Master Tenant L.L.C., Fairfield. Filed June 4. Darien, by Brett Wilderman. Landlord: MF Bridgeport L.L.C., Darien. Property: 930 Kaplan, Erol, Fairfield. Main St. and 114 State St., $1,815.55, in favor of Asset Ac- Bridgeport. Term: 32 years, ceptance L.L.C., Warren, Mich., commencing May 23, 2013. by Joseph M. Tobin, New Hav- Filed May 28. en. Property: 23 Pine Tree Lane, Fairfield. Filed May 20.

Labella, Anthony and D. Nicoud, 270 Haydens Lane, Fairfield. $41,411.23, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 4. Mandell, Benjamin, 1 Blackberry Road, Danbury. $11,432.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed May 28.


on the record Morgenthaler, Deborah A. and Walter J. Morgenthaler, 12 Dagmar Place, Stamford. $15,389.41, tax debt on income earned. Filed May 29.

Davis, Katina and Jimmy Davis, 108 Weeping Willows Lane, Fairfield. $4,408.73, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 4.

Osmin, Jennifer S. and Matthew Eric Osmin, 49 White Birch Road, Redding. $35,923.92, tax debt on income earned. Filed May 29.

Passionate Care Group Homes and Chantae Altman and Alicia Gholston, 200 W. Ash St., Goldsboro, N.C. $8,472.94, payroll taxes and quarterly tax returns. Filed May 20.

Deplano, M.A. and Robe Marini Deplano, 288 Wakeman Lane, Southport. $42,368.91, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 4.

Pavela, Zrinka R. and Ivan Pavela, 26 Sara Nor Road, Shelton. $75,395.32, tax debt on income earned. Filed May 21.

Passionate Care Group Homes and Chantae Altman and Alicia Gholston, 200 W. Ash St., Goldsboro, N.C. $5,177.33, return of partnership income and payroll taxes. Filed May 21. Rosenstein, Alexandra N., 164 Applegate Road, Fairfield. $160,641.17, tax debt on income earned. Filed May 29.

MECHANIC’S LIENSRELEASED

Ridgefield Cycle Centre Inc., DeTomassis, Kimberly and 1492 High Ridge Road, StamBrian Meehan, 258 Rowland ford. $5,325.42, payroll taxes. Kantowala, Devila and HarivRoad, Fairfield. $37,337.06, tax Filed May 29. adam Kantowala, Bethel. Filed debt on income earned. Filed by Pupper Septic Inc., New June 4. Sabrowski, Kirsten and Milford, by Emilio Sotil. PropJon E. Sabrowski, 1818 Mill erty: 21 Far Horizons Drive, Gadtaula, Yaduandan, 33 Al- Plain Road, Apt. S, Fairfield. Bethel. Amount: $410.00. Filed bin Road, Stamford. $23,191.29, $82,275.48, tax debt on income May 24. tax debt on income earned. earned. Filed May 21. Filed June 3. RBS Investments Corp., Targonska, Agnieszka and Stamford. Filed by Elevator SerGadtaula, Yaduandan, Ryszard Klos, 30 Everett Road, vice Co., Torrington, by Steven 33 Albin Road, Stamford. Easton. $37,078.71, tax debt on Roth. Property: 363 Washington Blvd, Stamford. Amount: $31,499.92, tax debt on income income earned. Filed May 20. $43,594.80. Filed May 30. earned. Filed June 3.

Rubino, Chris, 28 Fleetwood Drive, New Fairfield. $11,586.22, tax debt on income Kolk, Matthew J., 111 Forest Ave., Fairfield. $287,699.33, tax earned. Filed June 3. debt on income earned. Filed June 4. Toner-Netherwood, Heather, 265 Redding Road, Redding. $41,022.72, tax debt on income Levine, Norman, 133 Shortwoods Road, New Fairfield. earned. Filed May 28. $3,271.10, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 3. Vanost, Ann and James G. Rickards, 18 Great Island, Darien. $201,941.02, tax debt on Mendoca, Fernanda P. and Reinaldo Reis, 143 Westville income earned. Filed May 28. Avenue Extension, Danbury. $25,798.65, tax debt on income West, David, 175 Montauk earned. Filed May 28. Drive, Stamford. $35,882.97, tax debt on income earned. Mendoca, Fernanda P. and Filed June 3. Reinaldo Reis, 143 Westville Avenue Extension, Danbury. $3,558.05, tax debt on income earned. Filed May 28.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSRELEASED

Greenwich Home and Garden L.L.C., Darien. Filed by Quality Craft Builders L.L.C., Monroe, by David Salerno. Property: 275 Old Post Road, Southport. Amount: $11,860.00. Filed June 4.

Mendoca, Fernanda P. and Reinaldo Reis, 143 Westville Bobil Inc., 31 Lake Ave., Dan- Avenue Extension, Danbury. bury. $98,542.94, failure to file $4,595.68, tax debt on income or file correct information re- earned. Filed May 28. turns and payroll taxes. Filed May 28. OB-GYN Professional Associates PC, 166 W. Broad St., Connor, Robert W. III, Suite 201, Stamford. $40,991.97, P.O. Box 473, Sandy Hook. 1120 corporation income tax $45,749.24, tax debt on income return. Filed May 29. earned. Filed June 3.

Williams, Earl, 18 Washington Ave., Apt. 1, Stamford. $9,046.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed June 3.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSWITHDRAWAL AFTER RELEASED Warren, Lindsay and Tanaz Warren, 46 Ludlow Road, New Canaan. $406,024.44, tax debt on income earned. Filed May 22.

MECHANIC’S LIENSFILED BLT Reserve L.L.C., Stamford. Filed by Titan Formwork Systems L.L.C., Tempe, Ariz., by David L. Bacon. Property: Development Parcel 13, The Reserve, Danbury. Amount: $105,620.48. Filed May 28. Chabad Lubovich of Western and Southern New England Inc., Stamford and P&H Construction Group Inc., Norwalk. Filed by M.A.R.S. Electric L.L.C., Danbury, by Michael Sekelsky. Property: 770 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Amount: $39,528.50. Filed May 31.

Alston, Lucy, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Marsha S. Beckford, Bridgeport, for Eastwood Condominium Association of Bridgeport Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 167 Louisiana Ave., Unit 92, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed May 28. Anderson, Fabian and Damean Anderson, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 88 to 90 Bond St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $263,392, dated June 2008. Filed May 29.

Angermueller, Victor, et al., New Canaan. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 151 Weeburn Drive, New Canaan. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original T-C Newbury Common principal amount of $1.08 milL.L.C., Stamford. Filed by lion, dated August 2004. Filed DaSilva Contracting Inc., Jai- May 30. maca, N.Y., by Daniel DaSilva. Property: 1430 Washington Blvd., Stamford. Amount: Barton, Katherine A. a.k.a. $82,200. Filed May 29. Katherine Woods and Benjamin G. Barton, Darien. Filed by Alena C. Gfeller and Wilson, Laurie J. and Neil R. Andrew P. Barson, Hartford, Wilson, New Canaan. Filed by for Webster Bank N.A., WaStone Hill Landscape Services terbury. Property: 8 Timber L.L.C., Orange, by John Hud- Lane, Darien. Action: to foreson. Property: 60 Summersweet close a delinquent mortgage in Lane, New Canaan. Amount: the original principal amount $16,285.49. Filed May 21. of $750,000, dated June 2005. Filed May 21.

LIS PENDENS Acevedo, Elda, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert A. Pacelli Jr., Bridgeport, for Roberto Clemente Homes Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 90 Hamilton Ave., Unit 12, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 28. Adams, Ronald N., Brookfield. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 50 Flax Hill Road, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $386,200, dated March 2007. Filed May 28.

Brabant, Michele E., et al., Danbury. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 101 South St., Unit 8, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $131,168, dated July 2011. Filed May 23. Braga, Mary E. and David M. Braga, et al., Newtown. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 68 Currituck Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $288,000, dated October 2004. Filed May 29. Brennan, Helen M. and Harry J. Brennan Jr., Danbury. Filed by Jo-Ann R. Sensale, Farmington, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 39 Meadowbrook Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $282,000, dated November 2006. Filed May 28. Brown, Joann, et al., Danbury. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 45 Tamarack Ave., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $165,000, dated December 2002. Filed May 28. Carmona, Gloria and Joaquin Carmona, et al., Bridgeport, Filed, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 280 to 282 Marion St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $228,800, dated August 2004. Filed June 3.

Bohannon, Calvin and Jonathan Bohannon, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 103 Crestview Drive, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $300,000, dated January 2006. Carolan, John J. Jr., et al., Filed May 29. Bridgeport. Filed by Karen E. McArthur, Armonk, N.Y., for Bolanos, Maria and Sylvia Bo- HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, lanos, et al., Stamford. Filed by N.Y. Property: 66 Northfield Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreJPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., close a delinquent mortgage in Columbus, Ohio. Property: the original principal amount 19 Minor Place, Stamford. Ac- of $150,000, dated May 2006. tion: to foreclose a delinquent Filed June 3. mortgage in the original principal amount of $416,500, dated March 2005. Filed May 29.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 27


on the record Cascuna, Rocco B., et al., Stamford. Filed by Kevin Casini, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 826 Newfield Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $317,000, dated July 2006. Filed May 28.

DaSilva, Amandio A. and John G. Baia, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 129 to 131 Anson St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $95,950, dated March 1998. Filed May 29.

Escarate, Marlene, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 638 to 652 Seaview Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $167,920, dated November 2005. Filed May 29.

Giannattasio, Mary Estate, Bridgeport. Filed by Kevin Casini, Hartford, for OneWest Bank F.S.B., Pasadena, Calif. Property: 530 Frenchtown Road, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $412,500, dated August 2006. Filed June 3.

Charles, Glenda a.k.a. Glenda Lafayette, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jason E. Brooks, Stamford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 399 Woodlawn Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $169,000, dated July 2006. Filed June 3.

Davis, James C., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert A. Pacelli Jr., Bridgeport, for Embassy Towne Homes Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 2675 Park Ave., Unit 22, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 28.

Espinal, Oscar, et al., Stamford. Filed by Paul Lewis Otzel, Milford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 72 Matthews St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $436,000, dated February 2006. Filed June 3.

Giribaldi, Michelle M. and Wilson Fajardo, et al., Stamford. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 35 Arlington Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $351,000, dated December 2005. Filed May 29.

Charles, Reginald J. and Moses H. Mohammed, Newtown. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 14 Carol Ann Drive, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $349,165, dated September 2009. Filed May 28.

Davis, Kelly J. and Warren G. Davis and Ivan Cohen and E. Cary Donegan Jr., et al., New Fairfield. Filed by Jason J. Morytko, Branford, for Veronica O. Connell, Fairfield. Property: 145 Beaumont St., New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $230,000, dated December 2003. Filed May 23.

Cohen, Tonahjan, Bridgeport. Filed by Anthony J. LaBella, Fairfield, for Bridgeport Gateway Apartments Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 1060 Connecticut Ave., Apt. 113, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 29. Cortes, Neydy Y., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 500 Success Ave., Unit 27, Building 77, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $67,050, dated June 2007. Filed May 28. D’Amato, Karen L. and Frank M. D’Amato, Danbury. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for Birchwood Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 27 Crows Nest Lane, Unit 8D, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed May 29.

De Araujo, Rogerio Dias, et al., Danbury. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for Birchwood Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 27 Crows Nest Lane, Unit 15H, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed May 29. Decesare, Mary Jane, et al., New Fairfield. Filed by Jason E. Brooks, Stamford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 221 Palamar Drive, New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $305,000, dated November 2003. Filed June 3. Dimiceli, Catherine L., et al., Danbury. Filed by Franklin G. Pillicy, Watertown, for Fairview Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges. Filed May 23. Echevarria, Jose M., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 81 Ridge Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $188,000, dated January 2006. Filed May 30.

Etzold, Nicole, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert A. Pacelli Jr., Bridgeport, for Cove Condominium Association of Black Rock Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 65 Elsworth St., Unit 303, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 28.

Laufer, Margaret J. and Donald R. Laufer, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 65 Hemlock St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $168,000, dated Jackson-Clarke, Tiffany and January 2007. Filed May 30. Sasha Jackson-Barnes, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Paul Lewis Otzel, Milford, for Nationstar Lawrence, Betty and Willie J. Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Lawrence, et al., Bridgeport. Texas. Property: 129 Cleveland Filed by Jeffrey M. KnickerAve., Bridgeport. Action: to bocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan foreclose a delinquent mort- Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, gage in the original principal Ohio. Property: 170 to 172 to amount of $206,196, dated Sep- 174 Orchard St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delintember 2009. Filed May 28. quent mortgage in the original principal amount of $132,000, Jorge, Elizabeth and Jaime dated April 1989. Filed June 3. Jorge Jr., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Michael D. Reiner, Farmington, for American Tax Leak, Dorothea, Danbury, Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Filed, for Plymouth Park Tax Property: 12 Ameridge Drive, Services L.L.C., Whippany, N.J. Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose Property: 68 Rowan St., Dantax liens levied by the city of bury. Action: to foreclose past due tax liens. Filed May 23. Bridgeport. Filed May 30. Howlett, James P., et al., Stamford. Filed by William W. Ward, Stamford, for Linden House Association Inc., Stamford. Property: 236A Glenbrook Road, Unit 117, Stamford. Action: to foreclose on a condominium lien. Filed May 30.

Hall, Sherine A. and Estate of Ellis L. Hall, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 14 to 16 Herkimer St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $137,500, dated Kay, Pamela J. and Kenneth A. Kay and Estate of Evelyn WilFero, Denise and Luis Gar- March 2002. Filed May 28. son Kay, New Fairfield. Filed cia, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Kevin Casini, Hartford, for by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for PNC Bank N.A., Henry, Michelle M., et al., Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Pittsburgh, Pa. Property: 212 Bridgeport. Filed by Thomas Lewisville, Texas. Property: 115 Hooker Road, Bridgeport. Ac- J. Welch, Shelton, for Webster Ridgeview Ave., New Fairfield. tion: to foreclose a delinquent Bank N.A., Waterbury. Proper- Action: to foreclose a delinmortgage in the original princi- ty: 787 Norman St., Bridgeport. quent mortgage in the original pal amount of $223,200, dated Action: to foreclose a delin- principal amount of $625,500, quent mortgage in the original dated November 2008. Filed March 2008. Filed May 28. principal amount of $293,150, May 21. dated March 2007. Filed June 3. Frank, Chase R., Danbury. Kochman, Jill, et al., BridgeFiled by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, 11 Whaley St., Danbury. Hildrich, Alana B., et al., port. Filed by Paul Lewis OtAction: to foreclose a delin- Stamford. Filed by Steven zel, Milford, for Connecticut quent mortgage in the original G. Berg, Norwalk, for Hayes Housing Financial Authority, principal amount of $204,100, House Condominium Asso- Bridgeport. Property: 325 Ladated December 2005. Filed ciation Inc., Stamford. Prop- fayette St., Unit 4208, Bridgeerty: 44 Strawberry Hill Ave., port. Action: to foreclose a May 23. Unit 2A, Stamford. Action: to delinquent mortgage in the foreclose on unpaid common original principal amount of Gans, Ingrid Estate and Rich- charges and assessments. Filed $160,000, dated April 2006. ard F. Gans, New Fairfield. May 30. Filed May 30. Filed by Patrick J. Rosenberger, Hartford, for TD Bank N.A., Portland, Maine. Property: 11 Hostos, Carmen I. and Pedro Kuznetsova, Julia, et al., Fairway Green, New Fairfield. J. Hostos, et al., Bridgeport. Stamford. Filed by Jeffrey M. Action: to foreclose a delin- Filed by John J. Ribas, Bridge- Knickerbocker, Hartford, for quent mortgage in the original port, for WPCA of the city of JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., principal amount of $30,000, Bridgeport. Property: 96 Texas Columbus, Ohio. Property: dated October 2010. Filed May Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to 126 William St., Stamford. Acforeclose on a sewer use lien. tion: to foreclose a delinquent 20. Filed May 30. mortgage in the original principal amount of $405,000, dated Giaccone, Anthony, et al., January 2006. Filed May 28. Bridgeport. Filed by Paul Lewis Hostos, Carmen I. and PeOtzel, Milford, for Connecticut dro J. Hostos, et al., BridgeHousing Financial Authority, port. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Bridgeport. Property: 325 La- Hartford, for JPMC Specialty fayette St., Unit 2201, Bridge- Mortgage L.L.C., San Diego, port. Action: to foreclose a Calif. Property: 96 Texas Ave., delinquent mortgage in the Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose original principal amount of a delinquent mortgage in the $298,200, dated February 2008. original principal amount of $187,500, dated August 2005. Filed May 30. Filed June 3.

28 Week of June 17, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Leak, Dorothea, Danbury. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for Beneficial Financial I Inc., Mettawa, Ill. Property: 68 Rowan St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $274,735, dated February 2007. Filed May 28. Longo, Justine and Anthony Longo, et al., Stamford. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 26 Weed Hill Ave., Unit 40, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $281,250, dated December 2003. Filed May 28. Malcolm, Dorna, Bridgeport. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 179 Kent Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $328,500, dated September 2006. Filed May 30. Marsick, Rebecca and Jeffrey Marsick, New Fairfield. Filed by Sonja J. Straub, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 50 Louvain St., New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $665,602, dated March 2010. Filed May 30.


on the record Mastroni, Susan and James Mastroni, et al., Newtown. Filed by Robert N. Sensale, New Haven, for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 282 Berkshire Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose tax liens levied by the city of Newtown. Filed May 29. McDade, Virginia C. and James P. McDade, et al., Newtown. Filed by Robert N. Sensale, New Haven, for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 15 Yogananda St., Newtown. Action: to foreclose tax liens levied by the city of Newtown. Filed May 29. McLaughlin-Fainlight, Linda, New Fairfield. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 347 Hill Farm Road, New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $1.2 million, dated February 2007. Filed May 23. Moore, Dorothy, et al., Danbury. Filed by Robert N. Sensale, New Haven, for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 18 Spring St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose past due tax liens. Filed May 29. Morrow, R. Patrick, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert A. Pacelli Jr., Bridgeport, for Cartright Towers Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 80 Cartright St., Unit 5E, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 28. Munoz, Maria Ofelia and Jiovanni Castano, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 143 Jackson Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $220,000, dated December 2004. Filed May 30.

Mutino, Susan L. and Peter A. Mutino, Darien. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 8 Apple Tree Lane, Darien. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $1 million, dated May 2004. Filed May 29.

Ortiz, Tommy J. and Fernando Vega Jr., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for PNC Bank N.A., Pittsburgh, Pa. Property: 135 Price St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $135,500, dated June 2009. Filed June 3.

Naramore, Nancy M., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert A. Pacelli Jr., Bridgeport, for Cartright Towers Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 80 Cartright St., Unit 3G, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 28.

Ospina, Jair A., et al., Stamford. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 55 Tremont Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $450,000, dated September 2004. Filed May 28.

Naula, Caroline and Angel Naula, et al., New Fairfield. Filed by Richard D. Arconti, Danbury, for Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Property: 19 Williams Road, New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage. Filed May 30.

Paige, Karen E. and David A. Paige, et al., Danbury. Filed by Steven R. Smart, Danbury, for Robert Ciccarelli and Jack R. Dalpe, Danbury. Property: 6 Aspen Way, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $60,000, dated April Negron, Monica, et al., Bridge- 1987. Filed May 23. port. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Palmer, Deena K. and Joseph Property: 119 and 121 Dewey Mirsky, et al., Easton. Filed St., Bridgeport. Action: to fore- by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, close a delinquent mortgage in for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt the original principal amount Lake City, Utah. Property: 320 of $145,000, dated March 2007. Center Road, Easton. Action: Filed May 28. to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $650,000, dated July Odwyer, Edith F. and Michael 2006. Filed May 30. J. Odwyer, et al., New Fairfield. Filed by Jason E. Brooks, Stamford, for Deutsche Bank Parrish, Judith and Richard National Trust, trustee, Los D. Parrish, New Fairfield. Filed Angeles, Calif. Property: 114 by Loren M. Bisberg, FarmingSouthport Woods Drive, Unit ton, for Bank of America N.A., 5B1, New Fairfield. Action: to Charlotte, N.C. Property: 13 foreclose a delinquent mort- Oswego Road, New Fairfield. gage in the original principal Action: to foreclose a delinamount of $285,000, dated quent mortgage in the original June 2005. Filed May 30. principal amount of $265,000, dated August 2006. Filed June 4. Ortega, Norma, et al., Danbury. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Wells Powell, Nora A. and Thomas Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, E. Powell, et al., Stamford. Md. Property: 7 Dean St., Unit Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, 102, Danbury. Action: to fore- Farmington, for CitiMortgage close a delinquent mortgage in Inc., O’Fallon, Mo. Property: the original principal amount 21 Old Colony Road, Stamford. of $137,365, dated February Action: to foreclose a delin2010. Filed May 28. quent mortgage in the original principal amount of $245,222, dated April 2004. Filed May 29.

Shipp, Y. Anita, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Karen E. McArthur, Armonk, N.Y., for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 203 Edgemoor Road, Unit A, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $192,000, dated September 2005. Filed June 3.

Riccardo, Kerri and Adam H. Goldberg, et al., Stamford. Filed by Matthew B. Woods, Norwalk, for Hudson City Savings Bank, Yonkers, N.Y. Property: 24 Pinewood Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $360,000, dated September 2009. Filed May 29.

Rosarion, Hilliene, et al., Stamford. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 441 to 443 Cove Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $432,000, dated September 2003. Filed May 28.

Richards, Marie and Robert L. Richards Sr., New Fairfield. Filed by Patrick J. Walsh, Ridgefield, for Ridgefield Bank Mortgage Corp., Ridgefield. Property: 91 Pease Ave., New Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $375,000, dated May 2007. Filed June 4.

Rubano, Henrietta, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Adam L. Avallone, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 462 Glendale Ave., Unit 25, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $125,000, dated February 2006. Filed May 29.

Rivera, Ada R., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Marsha S. Beckford, Bridgeport, for Tremont West Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 105 Tremont Ave., Unit K, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a statutory lien on this unit. Filed May 28.

Rybacka, Teresa and Roman E. Rybacka, et al., Stamford. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 95 Liberty St., Apt. C3, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $306,000, dated September Terranova, Monica and Freddy Solorzano, et al., Stamford. 2006. Filed May 29. Filed by Jessica L. Braus, Fairfield, for Deutsche Bank NaSamedy, Raymonde, et al., tional Trust, trustee, Los AnBridgeport. Filed by Steven G. geles, Calif. Property: 6 Hoover Berg, Norwalk, for Abbe Square Ave., Stamford. Action: to foreUnit Owners Association Inc., close a delinquent mortgage in Bridgeport. Property: 1901 E. the original principal amount Main St., Unit 2, Bridgeport. of $378,250, dated February Action: to foreclose on unpaid 2004. Filed May 28. common charges and assessments. Filed June 3. Totah, Nabil M. Estate, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Schimmeck, Anne C. and Karl Knickerbocker, Hartford, for E. Schimmeck, New Canaan. Wells Fargo Bank N.A., FredFiled by Kevin A. Coles, Fair- erick, Md. Property: 24 Cottage field, for Kaeser Construction St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreCo., Westport. Property: 47 close a delinquent mortgage in Douglas Road, New Canaan. the original principal amount Action: to foreclose on a me- of $51,000, dated April 2003. Filed June 3. chanic’s lien. Filed May 22.

Rodriguez, Elena, Bridgeport. Filed by Anthony J. LaBella, Fairfield, for Bridgeport Gateway Apartments Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 1060 Connecticut Ave., Apt. 43, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 29. Rodriguez, Nelsi and Martin T. Barreto, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 1440 Wood Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $308,000, dated July 2006. Filed June 3. Rojas, Otilla and Helberth Rojas, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Kevin Casini, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 55 Mencel Circle, Unit C, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $116,400, dated August 2005. Filed May 28.

Serra, Lorna T., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 220 Thorme St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $252,000, dated August 2007. Filed June 3.

Skok, Charlene R., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Robert A. Pacelli Jr., Bridgeport, for Foxledge II Condomium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 2955 Madison Ave., Unit 7, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on an association lien. Filed May 28. Taveras, Reyna and Jose A. Perez, Danbury. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 29 Myrtle Ave., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $420,000, dated June 2007. Filed May 29.

Uruchima, Lauro and Narcisa Criollo, et al., Danbury. Filed by James W. Donohue, Farmington, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 57 Liberty Ave., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $400,000, dated November 2006. Filed May 28.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 29


on the record Valdiva, Giovanna and Jeremias Barrera, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hartford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 1590 to 1592 Park Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $279,100, dated May 2003. Filed May 30. Vallee, Leah M., et al., Brookfield. Filed by Joshua Pedreira, Hartford, for PNC Bank N.A., Pittsburgh, Pa. Property: 47 Huckleberry Hill Road, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $246,137, dated August 2003. Filed May 28. Vernazza, Robin Lynn and Daniel Vernazza, et al., Stamford. Filed by John P. Fahey, Farmington, for Provident Funding Associates L.P., Santa Rosa, Calif. Property: 153 Culloden Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $175,000, dated June 2001. Filed May 31. Void, Annette, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Thomas J. Welch, Shelton, for Connecticut Housing Financial Authority, Bridgeport. Property: 61 to 63 Lewis St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $136,900, dated September 1988. Filed June 3. Washington, Derek, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Dennis R. LaVette, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 329 to 331 Pearl St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $264,000, dated March 2006. Filed May 28.

Woodfi n, Pauline J., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Amy L. Harrison, Farmington, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 88 Lakeside Drive, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $261,100, dated May 2007. Filed May 29.

293 Selleck Street L.L.C., Stamford, by Doron Sabag and James B. Hoffman. Lender: Connecticut Community Bank N.A. d.b.a. The Greenwich Bank and Trust Co., Greenwich. Property: 293 Selleck St., Stamford. Amount: $506,250. Filed May 31. Eppoliti Industrial Realty Inc., Ridgefield, by Michael Ippolii. Lender: Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Property: 15 Great Pastures Road, Danbury and 0 Wooster St., Bethel. Amount: $2.4 million. Filed May 28.

Yamin, Catherine Elaine, et al., Newtown. Filed by Robert N. Sensale, New Haven, for American Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 38 Black Bridge Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose tax liens levied by the city of, Newtown. Hoyt Bedford Associates L.P., Filed May 29. Stamford, by Paul Lenhart. Lender: Patriot National Bank, Yurkovic, Tracey and Dean Stamford. Property: 86 Morgan Yurkovic, et al., Stamford. St., 82 Hoyt St., 921, 929 to 935, Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hart- 941, 949 and 949A Bedford St., ford, for JPMC Specialty Mort- Stamford. Amount: $5 million. gage L.L.C., San Diego, Calif. Filed May 31. Property: 42 Lanell Drive, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the Imperial Real Estate Holdoriginal principal amount of ings L.L.C., New Canaan, by $540,000, dated April 2006. Moshira Soliman and Robert L. Deak. Lender: Sachem Capital Filed May 28. Partners L.L.C., Branford. Property: 29 to 31 Strawberry Hill Ziou, Mary and Louis Ziou Road, New Canaan. Amount: Jr., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by $750,000. Filed May 22. Karen E. McArthur, Armonk, N.Y., for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los An- JC Penney Properties Inc., et geles, Calif. Property: 200 Pond al., Danbury, by Bradley SyverSt., Bridgeport. Action: to fore- son. Lender: Goldman Sachs close a delinquent mortgage in Bank USA, New York City. the original principal amount Property: 7 Backus Ave., Danof $168,750, dated May 2007. bury. Amount: $2.2 billion. Filed May 23. Filed June 3.

MORTGAGES

commErciaL 26 to 72 Realty Corp., Bridgeport, by Moses Singer. Lender: Secure Capital Group L.L.C., Stratford. Property: 628 to 630 Capitol Ave., Bridgeport. Amount: $120,000. Filed May 28.

LD Acquisition Co II L.L.C., El Segundo, Calif., by Keith M. Drucker. Lender: Regions Bank, Houston, Texas. Property: 48 Newtown Road, Danbury. Amount: $55 million. Filed May 30. Levine Sapan Levine L.L.C., Danbury, by Jeffrey Levine and Richard Levine. Lender: Webster Bank N.A., Waterbury. Property: 35 Shelter Rock Road, Danbury. Amount: $882,000. Filed May 23.

30 Week of June 17, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

LT Propco L.L.C., New York City, by Lucas Evans. Lender: General Electric Capital Corp., Norwalk. Property: 110 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Amount: $60 million. Filed May 30. Redding Country Club Inc., Redding, by Joseph Carlucci and Frederick A. Landwehr. Lender: Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Property: 91, 109 and 125 Lonetown Road, Redding. Amount: $313,000. Filed May 30.

coNStructioN

Charlotte Little Creative, 10 Differentially recessed conOak Crest, Darien 06820, c/o tacts for multigate transisCharlotte Little. Filed May 31. tor of SRAM cell. Patent no. 8,460,991 issued to Josephine B. Chang, Mahopac, China Sky Restaurant, 2675 N.Y.; Leland Chang, New York Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport City, N.Y.; Chung-Hsun Lin, 06605, c/o Han Ren Chi. Filed White Plains, N.Y.; and Jeffrey June 4. W. Sleight, Ridgefield. Assigned to International Business MaChupacabra Saloon & Grill, chines Corp., Armonk. 482 E. Main St., Bridgeport 06608, c/o Alexandro Mendez. Document-type classification Filed June 3. for scanned bitmaps. Patent no. 8,462,394 issued to Cleaning Queens, 2 West St., Zhigang Fan, Webster, N.Y.; Danbury 06810, c/o Angela and Ramesh Nagarajan, Pittsford, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Harrell. Filed May 29. Corp., Norwalk.

Cooper Beech Limousine L.L.C., 105 Ohio Ave., Halftone-independent scanner Eppoliti Industrial Realty Inc., Bridgeport 06610, c/o Martin profiling. Patent no. 8,462,389 issued to Vishal Monga, Webster, Ridgefield, by Michael Ippolii. Figueroa. Filed June 3. N.Y.; Shen-Ge Wang, Fairport, Lender: Union Savings Bank, N.Y.; and Raja Bala, Webster, Danbury. Property: 15 Great Danbury Youth Track & Filed N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Pastures Road, Danbury and 0 Wooster St., Bethel. Amount: Association, 34 Grand St., Apt. Norwalk. 2, Danbury 06810, c/o Gail H. $200,000. Filed May 28. Williams. Filed May 28. Minimizing spectrophotometer impact on spot-color acFive Second Lane L.L.C., Bethel, by Ronald Snadowsky. Darlistan Hayes (Real Estate curacy. Patent no. 8,462,386 isLender: Savings bank of Dan- Renting & Leasing), 265 Burn- sued to Edul N. Dalal, Webster, bury. Property: 5 Second Lane, sford Ave., Bridgeport 06606, N.Y.; Wencheng Wu, Webster, Bethel. Amount: $820,000. c/o Shane Anthony Cole. Filed N.Y.; Alvaro E. Gil, Rochester, June 5. N.Y.; and Peter A. Crean, WebFiled May 28. ster, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk. G and T Development L.L.C., Data Wire Solutions d.b.a. A-Mack Communication, 20 Stamford, by Goitom Bellete. Lender: First County Bank, Surrey Drive, Brookfield 06804, System and method for offerStamford. Property: 119 Eagle c/o Thomas McCormack. Filed ing multiple products. Patent no. 8,458,027 issued to Jay Drive, Stamford. Amount: May 28. S. Walker, Ridgefield; Andrew $700,000. Filed May 29. S. Van Luchene, Santa Fe, N.M.; Fitness L.L.C. d.b.a. Cross and Deirdre O’Shea, Orinda, LTW Builders Inc., New Ca- Fit Hook’d, 4 Horseye Coach Calif. Assigned to Walker Dignaan, by Lindsay Warren. Road, Sandy Hook 06482, c/o ital L.L.C., Stamford. Lender: The Bank of Fairfield, Lauren Milano, Nicole MonFairfield. Property: 82 Winfield tello and Nathan Blew. Filed Systems and methods to select a Lane, New Canaan. Amount: May 30. credit migration path for a con$2.1 million. Filed May 29. sumer. Patent no. 8,463,698 issued to Alexander A. Liu, New York City, N.Y.; and Ron Hynes, RidgePATENTS field. Assigned to MasterCard InNEW BUSINESSES Auditing search requests in a ternational Inc., Purchase. 4 Dog Construction, 24 East relationship-analysis system. Ave., Second floor, New Ca- Patent no. 8,458,22- issued +THIS WEEK’S naan 06840, c/o Rural Con- to Tamer Rashad, Watchung, struction L.L.C. Filed May 22. N.J.; Kenneth Brady, RidgeELECTRONIC RECORDS field; Kenny Keung Lee, BrookSECTION CONTAINS: lyn, N.Y.; Jillian Moo-Young, Anthony’s Small Engine Re- New York City, N.Y.; and pair, 2 Francis J. Clarke Circle, Sapna Vyas, Forest Hills, N.Y. 80 more New Businesses Bethel 06801, c/o Anthony M. Assigned to Bank of America on Westfaironline.com. Fiore. Filed May 31. Corp., Charlotte, N.C. 190 more Residential Deeds on Argon Tire Co., 265 BurnsWestfaironline.com. ford Ave., Bridgeport 06606, c/o Shane Anthony Cole. Filed 25 more Judgments on June 5. Westfaironline.com. 15 more New Businesses BTWC, 2 Shelter Rock Lane, on Westfaironline.com. Danbury 06810, c/o Frederick C. Mills Jr. Filed May 23.


UCONN’s Next Generation Connecticut Is Part of the Solution By John R. Rathgeber Even as we fight through a slow economic recovery, Connecticut still has an array of world-class businesses that can secure a bright future for all of us and our families. Our state’s strategic location, quality of life, and skilled workers are prized by some of the globe’s most innovative companies who call Connecticut their home. But we must continually work to improve our economic competitiveness in order to create the opportunities that will sustain, improve, and maximize Connecticut’s impressive advantages. Our goal isn’t to become the lowest cost place to do business, but rather to be the best location for high valued-added businesses of all sizes to invest and grow—the businesses that pay good wages and benefits and support strong local communities and economies. Connecticut’s businesses also are facing rising global competition for their goods and services. With innovation and productivity, they are meeting the challenges from their competitors in neighboring states and around the globe. Critically important to sustaining Connecticut’s economy-driving businesses is having an elite public sector research university that graduates high achieving students with degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM); an institution that attracts vital research dollars and eagerly partners with local businesses. The General Assembly’s overwhelming approval for Next Generation Connecticut will help transform UCONN into that kind of university. We believe that Next Generation Connecticut has the potential to stimulate the kinds of new investments, and develop the talent and innovation we need, to drive economic growth in our state. Over the past two decades, UCONN has come a long way in rising in the rankings of the nation’s

public universities. With the support of the Governor and the legislature, it now will expand its highly respected engineering and material science programs, create nationally recognized centers of excellence, and modernize its laboratory space and research technology. UCONN President Susan Herbst envisions the university becoming a true partner with the private sector in creating a world-class 21st Century economy in Connecticut. She sees this partnership building both on the strengths of our existing businesses and encouraging new entrepreneurs. President Herbst knows how important university involvement has been in the economic transformation and renewed vitality of other areas, such as the Greater Atlanta region, Research Triangle in North Carolina, California’s Silicon Valley, Austin, Texas, and nearby in Boston. Most important, she and her team have the talent to create similar success stories right here in Connecticut through UCONN’s commitment to STEM and the biosciences. But to achieve these goals and make Connecticut the best place for value added businesses to grow and invest resources, state policymakers have to make some very important decisions. As Professor Michael Porter of Harvard has said, it’s not possible to choose one initiative, ignore others, and hope to be successful. Connecticut needs to: f Exhibit greater fiscal responsibility going forward by adhering to the state’s Constitutional spending cap, setting realistic spending priorities, and truly committing to leaning the cost of government services. Only then will we end the cycle of state budget deficits and reduce our unfunded long term obligations that so concern the business community and taxpayers.

f Implement public education reforms to raise overall student performance and close the achievement gap, which the new state budget thankfully addresses; and provide rigorous technical educational opportunities to those students seeking careers in advanced manufacturing and trades. f Take advantage of opportunities to reduce the cost of doing business, such as through legislative initiatives this year to improve access to cheaper and cleaner energy sources; and avoid policies that artificially make it more expensive or difficult to do business here. f Create a regulatory climate that weighs the economic consequences of different policy options and makes timely determinations. f Invest in public infrastructures needed to support economic growth and expand access to regional, national and global markets. The legislature this year fell short in some of these categories and made progress in others; clearly more work needs to be done. Meeting these challenges, together with making UCONN a nationally recognized leader in STEM and biosciences-related disciplines, will help secure a much brighter future for our state’s economy and our ability to attract the good paying jobs people need. We simply have to be competitive against the best places to do business, regardless of their location, if we want to attract the private sector investments we need in Connecticut.

John R. Rathgeber is president and CEO of the Connecticut Business & Industry Association.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of June 17, 2013 31


2013

FAIRFIELD COUNTY

40 40

Come meet and celebrate the best and brightest business leaders, under the age of 40

UNDER

June

20

5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Entertainment, award ceremony, food and beverages

353 Main Avenue, Norwalk

MaSter of CereMonieS Bobby Valentine Executive Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Sacred Heart University

Keynote SpeaKer Linda McMahon Former CEO of WWE and U.S. Senate candidate

sPONsORs

PARTNERs

BRIDGEpORt REGIONAl BUSINESS COUNCIl, tHE BUSINESS COUNCIl OF FAIRFIElD COUNty, GREAtER DANBURy CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, DARIEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, tHE GREAtER VAllEy CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, GREENWICH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, NEW CANAAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, GREAtER NORWAlk CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, StAMFORD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, WEStpORt-WEStON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, WIltON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND FAIRFIElD COUNty BUSINESS JOURNAl

Guest tickets are $40. All Fairfield chamber members $25. Register online at westfaironline.com or email afrey@westfairinc.com For telephone information, call (914) 694-3600, ext. 3005.


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