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May 6, 2013 | VOL. 49, No. 18

Mental health discrimination no easy fix

Jennifer Bissell

FCBJ this week IN ONE OF THE COUNTRY’S foremost investment banks, wealth management is taking on a greater role … 2

apa criticiZEs statE’s Handling of insurancE covEragE practicEs BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

R

epresentatives of the American Psychiatric Association say the Connecticut Insurance Department should be doing more to stop discriminatory practices by mental health insurance plans. Insurance Department Commissioner Thomas Leonardi announced in late April that the department had reviewed Anthem Health Plans Inc.’s policies and that about 28,000 previously denied mental health claims would be reprocessed, which could amount to nearly $400,000 in reimbursements. However APA CEO James Scully said the agreement does little to solve the underlying problem of discrimination. In a prepared statement, he called the deal a “back door attempt to achieve some positive press,” amid the APA’s lawsuit against Anthem and its parent company, WellPoint Inc. Anthem is headquartered in Wallingford. Earlier in April, the APA, along with the Connecticut Psychiatric Society and the Connecticut Council on Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, filed a lawsuit against Anthem and WellPoint for allegedly violating the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. The complainants contend the companies don’t treat mental health claims the same as physical claims, leading to greater financial burdens and time constraints for patients. “This is just a total press game — they

AFTER 11 YEARS AT THE HELM, AmeriCares CEO Curt Welling plans to retire, leaving large shoes to fill … 3 A FAIRFIELD RESIDENT looks to fill the knowledge void around senior living options … 9 DIGITAL LAW has come to the forefront for one tristate law firm, which recently established a social media and Internet practice … 15

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Not skipping a beat

PAGE 5

Designer Sarah Phillips poses in her Wilton home office next to a piece from her new collection.

Renaissance in Danbury WitH HacKErspacE, doWntoWn MoMEntuM Builds

BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

MIKE KALTSCHNEE FELT SLIGHTED. Put off. Annoyed. “And nothing gets an entrepreneur going like being annoyed,” Kaltschnee said. It was January 2012 and Connecticut Innovations Inc. — the state’s quasi-governmental investment fund — was on the verge of announcing its Innovation Ecosystem initiative. At the time, few resources existed for entrepreneurs in search of startup guidance outside the Hartford-New Haven corridor, and there was little if any talk of creating an incubator in Danbury.

“The irony of that is, statistically, all of our numbers” — from the region’s 6.6 percent unemployment rate to its commercial real estate absorption rate — “are leading the state,” said Bruce R. Tuomala, economic development director for the city of Danbury. “Danbury — our region — has the second-highest per capita income in the state,” Tuomala said. “We have the lowest unemployment rate in the state. The fact that we were completely out of the loop in the hightech discussion ... was frustrating.” So Kaltschnee and Jon Gatrell sought to form an innovation hub of their own in Danbury, with Kaltschnee saying the next » Renaissance, page 6

» Mental health, page 6

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7Planning for all elements


Changing of the guard

WEaltH ManagEMEnt paying dividEnds for invEstMEnt BanKing giant

Kevin M. Peters, a managing director and wealth adviser with Morgan Stanley Wealth Management.

BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

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s the banking powers-that-be distance themselves from the risky bets that contributed to the financial crisis, wealth management has increasingly become a haven for institutions in search of a safer, more consistent — albeit less lucrative — source of income. But to describe Morgan Stanley’s wealth management arm as a safety net would be an understatement. The firm’s wealth management unit accounted for 41 percent of Morgan Stanley’s revenues in the first quarter, up from 34 percent when CEO James P. Gorman took the helm three years ago. The trend is likely not an accident. Prior to being named CEO in January 2010 and chairman two years later, Gorman got his start with Morgan Stanley as president and COO of Global Wealth Management. If a four-word phrase could cut to the core of the wealth management unit’s success, this would be it: “Clients don’t leave us.” The simple, yet powerful, declara-

tion comes courtesy of Kevin M. Peters, a Morgan Stanley managing partner and wealth adviser, who knows a thing or two about wealth management himself. The Peters Group, with five staff and two junior executives — “And when I say junior, one has 18 years’ experience and one has five years’ experience and is a former CEO” — oversees more than $3 billion in assets for its clients, whose ranks include some of Morgan Stanley’s most senior executives. “We have many families now in the second, third and fourth generations,” Peters said. “We are very good at what we do and I’ve built people around me that help support what I do and what we do for our clients. We treat clients like family — if it’s legal and ethical, we want to be sure to provide it to our clients.” Peters attributed his team’s and the wealth management unit’s successes to a thoughtful integration of Morgan Stanley’s capital markets staff and its financial advisers. Prominently featured within the Morgan Stanley Wealth Management headquarters in Purchase, N.Y., is a 135-person trading desk. “Morgan Stanley is 76 years old right now,” Peters said. “We are a venerable investment bank. We have that capital markets blood in the company.” With capital markets staff tasked specifically with helping Morgan Stanley’s financial advisers grow their clients’ assets, “Think about what we have now,” Peters said. “No one else can say that. We’ve got the best of both sides of the

business coming to Morgan Stanley wealth management.” Matthew McAndrew, an executive director who works on the Purchase trading floor, said the key is in the “connectivity.” “Because we are embedded within wealth management, we’re all aligned really well to make sure we’re disseminating anything we can to (Morgan Stanley financial advisers),” McAndrew said. A culture of information-sharing between traders, analysts and financial advisers “is the norm,” he said. “In turn, the benefit to the client there is it leads to a quicker and more informed decision, which puts you in a better position to capitalize on a market opportunity,” McAndrew said. “Hopefully, we are a couple steps ahead because market opportunities come and go quickly.” Buying on the upswing When Morgan Stanley struck a deal last September to buy Citigroup’s stake in the firms’ joint retail brokerage, Gorman called it “a significant milestone for Morgan Stanley in the implementation of our strate�y.” The purchase of Citi’s remaining 35 percent stake in Morgan Stanley Smith Barney L.L.C. isn’t expected to be finalized until the end of 2013 at the earliest, but the strate�y referenced by Gorman is already paying dividends. Morgan Stanley wealth management posted a pre-tax margin of 17 percent in the first quarter — the highest in the unit’s history — exceeding analysts’ projections

and even Gorman’s own goal for a 15 percent margin. The firm’s bread and butter — its institutional securities unit — saw revenues and profit decline 14 percent and 30 percent, respectively, in the first quarter. In contrast, the wealth management group reported that revenues rose 5 percent and profit was up a whopping 48 percent compared with the first quarter of 2012. Peters and McAndrew emphasized that Morgan Stanley’s focus on its wealth management unit has allowed the firm’s financial advisers to treat individuals in the same way that institutions — such as pension funds or endowments — are accustomed to being handled. Within the wealth management division, analysts are “proactively engaged with the financial adviser who is then engaged with the client on market developments, and how that relates back to their portfolio,” McAndrew said. “Institutions benefit from that coverage all the time. ...We think we are unique at Morgan Stanley Wealth Management in providing those insights to clients.” McAndrew said that level of collaboration and client services had “been there for a while, but it’s really taken hold over the last couple of years since the joint venture (with Citigroup) in 2009.” Peters said, “We take the best of the Morgan Stanley resources and economists and strategists and it gives us a framework. ... I think that’s part of the technolo�y and the mindset of management here. We want to deliver best-inclass to each client.”

Investor con�idence rises TRISTATE AREA INVESTORS ARE MORE bullish on the u.s. economy’s growth prospects for the rest of 2013 than the average investor surveyed by Morgan stanley’s wealth management unit, a new report shows. nearly three-quarters — 74 percent — of the connecticut, new york and new Jersey investors surveyed by Morgan stanley said they thought the national economy would finish the year on par with if not better than it is currently, versus 66 percent of national respondents. Joseph J. Matthews, a financial adviser and branch manager of Morgan stanley’s fairfield office, said local investors are more confident than they have been in years, but that they are

just beginning to embrace the current economic improvements. “in spite of what we’re seeing in the economy ... people are just starting to embrace that environment with how they’re structuring their portfolios,” Matthews said. about a third of the tristate investors who were polled by Morgan stanley said they believe real estate will be the best-performing asset over the next three years. However, “the average cash position held by people who were polled was 22 percent, which is relatively high, and 48 percent of those polled thought gold would be one of the better investments over the next year or two,” Matthews

2 Week of May 6, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

said, with the latter occurrence coming despite recent drops in the price of gold. globally, Matthews said there is still about $10 trillion in money market accounts in addition to $1.5 trillion in cash being held by u.s. corporations. Matthews predicted the recent stock market surge would continue and the housing tailwind would continue. “What that’ll do is it’ll increase the level of risk people are willing to take on, and it will change their spending habits,” he said. “these are all positive things for the economy.” at present, though, “it appears investors are being overly cautious,” Matthews said. — Patrick Gallagher


Welling to depart AmeriCares after 11 years

Curt Welling on a 2013 trip to Japan. Photo courtesy of AmeriCares

BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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n just 11 years at the helm, AmeriCares CEO Curt Welling has overseen a fivefold increase in both the total amount of humanitarian aid that has been distributed and in the nonprofit’s employees. When he first took over as CEO of the Stamford nonprofit in 2002, AmeriCares — 20 years old at the time — had dispersed a total of $2 billion in aid around the globe and had about 45 employees. To date, the

company has disbursed more than $11 billion in aid and employs about 250 people. “Our mission is to help people live longer, healthier lives,” said Carol Shattuck, AmeriCares chief of staff. “When we look at what we’ve done to reach more people, the numbers tell it all. Eighty percent of the aid we’ve delivered has happened in last 11 years under Curt.” After recently announcing plans to leave the company, Welling said it was the right time to step down. The nonprofit delivers medicine, medical supplies and aid throughout the United States and the

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world to improve global health and provide disaster relief, and has just completed a five-year strategic plan to increase its organizational impact. “For the last 11 years of my life, after my family, AmeriCares has been the most important thing in my life,” Welling said. “It has been deeply rewarding for me at many levels. So this is very emotional. But I think it’s the right time.” Welling, 63, said he plans to stay at AmeriCares until a new CEO makes his or her transition into the company. Afterward, he plans to continue a few AmeriCares projects and possibly explore a new career in academia, teaching or speaking on the intersection between business and the nonprofit world. He also is open to starting a new job at another organization, he said. Calling his reign at AmeriCares “your classic founder transition,” Welling said he was able to expand the organization simply by building on the foundation built by founder Bob Macauley, who died in 2010. Commonly, entrepreneurs will be passionate about the businesses they create, but can only carry it to certain point, Welling said. Beyond that, he said it takes a new

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leader to make the investments necessary to bring the business to the next level. In the case of AmeriCares, Welling said he knew the company needed to make strategic investments in finance and technolo�y. Then the challenge was in motivating employees to get on board with the company’s new direction. “The big thing is that you can’t do it too quickly,” Welling said. “You can’t walk into an organization with passionate people and say ‘Out with the old and in with the new.’ You need to show respect and give time for reflection and show people what the new organization can be.” Welling said he is proud of how the organization has grown and how much more impactful it’s been. “We’ve taken a very good idea and taken it to a new level of scale and impact,” he said. “I’m proud of that.” “People come to work here because they want to be here,” said Shattuck, who has worked with Welling since he first started at AmeriCares. “When you have a leader that is as passionate as the staff is and can motivate them to do even better, it’s really exciting. It’s been a great 11 years.”

RAKOW FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013

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PERSPECTIVES

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL

Opening the door

ast week, in just 12 words, professional basketball player Jason Collins went from a little-known NBA journeyman to a household name. “I’m a 34-year-old NBA center. I’m black. And I’m gay.” And with that simple declaration, Collins became the first active player in any of the four major U.S. professional sports (baseball, basketball, football and hockey) to come out as gay. The sports world was flooded with reactions, but perhaps none was more gratifying than that of Carolyn Moos, who dated Collins for eight years and was engaged to marry him until he called it off. “This does alleviate some of the pain,” Moos told ESPN columnist Rick Reilly. “I’m so happy for him. He deserves to live the life he wants.” In a first-person Sports Illustrated article, Collins wrote, “No one wants to live in fear. I’ve always been scared of saying the wrong thing. I don’t sleep well. I never have. But each time I tell another person, I feel stronger and sleep a little more soundly.” Collins said he had long yearned to share his true identity, but added, “Loyalty to my team is the real reason I didn’t come out sooner. When I signed a free-agent contract with Boston last July, I decided to commit myself to the Celtics and not let my personal life become a distraction.”

Republicans and Democrats will always have their sacred cows. But on issues like gun control, immigration and gay rights, the tide is turning. Despite the recent setback for reform in Congress, gun control advocates will have their day with nine in 10 Americans favoring expanded background checks. Immigration reform is gaining steam, evidenced by a six-figure donation to the National Immigration Forum Action Fund by hedge fund mogul and Republican campaign fund bundler Paul Singer. And gay rights is more than just a movement — it’s a reality, an inevitability. First it was the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” followed by arguments before the Supreme Court for the overturn of the Defense of Marriage Act. Most recently, more than 160 Republican and Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives have co-sponsored a bill to prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. In more than 25 states, individuals can be fired or overlooked for employment due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. According to Rep. Jim Himes of Greenwich, 43 percent of gay people and 90 percent of transgender people report being discriminated against in the workplace. The Employment Non-Discrimination Act — first introduced in 1974 — was reintroduced April 25 and seeks to cor-

THEY SAID IT “We know the opposition is prepared to spend millions of dollars to try and defeat immigration reform yet again. But, this time it is different. not only are faith, law enforcement and business leaders working together. But, civic leaders like Mr. singer are investing their hard-earned resources in the path to victory.”

rect that by protecting individuals in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender populations. As Himes notes, “Not only is protecting LGBT people from discrimination the right thing to do morally, it is also good for our economy: America’s businesses are at their best when they hire the brightest and most talented workers, and it simply doesn’t make sense to overlook someone because of something that has nothing to do with their ability to do their job.” Jason Collins has never been labeled a star. But he has played a key role at the highest levels of his sport, from high school championships to the NCAA Final Four to nine NBA playoff appearances in 12 seasons, and is often called “a pro’s pro.” Being gay, he says, has never hindered his ability to do his job, and nor should it now that he has gone public with his sexual orientation. Collins is a free agent, and at age 34 there is a chance he won’t be resigned next season. After his revelation was made public, ESPN surveyed executives of 14 NBA teams; six said they expect to see Collins on an NBA roster next year, and the remainder expressed doubts. Not one attributed their doubts to Collins being gay, with one executive saying, “I don’t think he was going to be in the league next season no matter what. I don’t think (sexual orientation) is the issue. I think ‘Can he still play?’ is the issue.” And that’s how he should be judged: on his ability to get the job done and on how he performs relative to his peers. Everyone — from the trading floor to the production line — deserves that right.

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— Ali Noorani, executive director of the National Immigration Forum Action Fund, on a six-figure donation from hedge fund mogul Paul Singer.

“during the last session i supported an increase, but for a host of reasons it never came to pass. …it is my hope that this year we can get it done.” — Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, who told reporters he now believes there is support for increasing the Connecticut minimum wage from $8.25 to $9 by Jan. 1, 2015.

“the vast majority of small businesses in connecticut already pay more than the minimum wage. those that pay the minimum can’t afford to pay more and governor Malloy is going to push them over the edge.” — Andrew Markowski, director of the Connecticut chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business, in response to Malloy’s shift in favor of a minimum wage hike.

4 Week of May 6, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

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Fashion relaunch in Wilton

dEsignEr saraH pHillips is picKing up rigHt WHErE sHE lEft off BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

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fter nearly 20 years, Sarah Phillips is relaunching her fashion line — not from the streets of Manhattan, but from the comforts of her Wilton home. Once famous for designing Hillary Clinton’s inaugural ball gown in 1993, Phillips retired at the top of her profession in 1995 to start a family and later move from New York to Connecticut. But with her son off to college now, Phillips says it’s time for a comeback. “It’s a multitude of feelings — anxiousness, anxiety, stress,” Phillips said of the relaunch of Sarah Phillips New York. “We’re nervous and excited. The hard work is finally coming to fruition.” For years, Phillips’ clothing could be found at Saks Fifth Avenue, Henri Bendel, Neiman Marcus and other specialty boutiques. But this time she’s starting off differently. She’s selling directly to private clients, allowing them to choose specific colors and get a custom fit. Her

first trunk show will be held at the J House hotel in Greenwich May 18 and 19. Additional shows in Connecticut and New York will follow.

do manufacture in the United States and the way that we work benefits the client because they don’t have to pay retail. It’s direct from the designer to the client.”

“We need to encourage and do as much as we possibly can to help small business owners. It’s extremely difficult to start a business and it’s much more difficult than it was when I first started in the ‘90s.” — Sarah Phillips

Phillips’ new line features silks and lightweight wools and a design she calls sculptural, dramatic and timeless. Several of her pieces in the roughly 25-piece collection are based off her original collection in the 1990s. The fabrics are from Italy and France, but Phillips said it was important to her that the clothing be made in the United States. A factory in New York City sews the clothing. “With the economic climate right now, it’s very important to support the country as best we can,” Phillips said. “I

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The price of the line ranges from $500 to $2,600, which is about half as expensive as it would be in stores, Phillips said. As Sarah Phillips New York gets up and running, its principal said the company has been running very smoothly, but noted that it has been difficult to restart her company in Connecticut. It’s more expensive, there are more taxes and there are too many regulations, she said, especially compared with when she started her company more than two decades ago in New York.

In terms of running the business, Phillips also said it’s also more complicated operating in Connecticut, considering she can’t just run across the street to meet buyers or factory employees. She’s not as close to the high density of customers either. But this time around, she also has access to the Internet and email, which makes some of those meetings less necessary. Despite those challenges, Phillips has no plans to leave the state. Her home and employees are all in Connecticut. As she grows however, she plans to keep a New York City office and create a sales team across the country. She also plans to eventually sell her collection in stores. “I’m a small business owner, which is one thing that this country desperately needs,” Phillips said. “I have eight parttime employees, but the business climate is difficult. We need to encourage and do as much as we possibly can to help small business owners. It’s extremely difficult to start a business and it’s much more difficult than it was when I first started in the ’90s.”

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RAKOW FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013

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Mental health — » From page 6

cut this deal in the closet,” said Colleen Coyle, general counsel for the APA. “This is a very important issue for our patients and it’s just becoming exponentially more important now that states are setting up their insurance exchanges.” The Parity Act, passed in 2008, requires insurance companies to offer mental health benefits. It also prohibits terms or conditions that make it harder for individuals to receive mental health treatment in comparison with physical treatment. In the APA complaint, Anthem and WellPoint are accused of refusing to cover psychoanalysis if a doctor has done a medical evaluation in the same appointment. As a result, either doctors aren’t reimbursed for their work or patients have to schedule twice as many appointments, pay twice as many co-pays and take twice as much time off from work, the complaint states. Anne Melissa Dowling, deputy commissioner of the state Insurance Department, said the department is

Renaissance — » From page 1

step is to link up with the statewide ecosystem initiative. “We realized that the way to create these high-growth companies — maybe even find the next Facebook — is to help these entrepreneurs get started,” Kaltschnee said. “We haven’t even opened yet and already we have 12 companies signed up.” Danbury Hackerspace Inc., a nonprofit that looks to combine the features of a business incubator and with a venue for people interested in computers and technolo�y, is set to open this summer at the former Union Savings Bank space that adjoins the Danbury Library. The Hackerspace came about as the result of a request for proposals issued by the city for the 4,500-square-foot site being vacated by Union Savings Bank, which moved into a larger space in the downtown. With the help of $550,000 in funds allocated last November by the city, the Hackerspace will feature an open co-working space, light industrial equipment such as a 3-D printer, a café and an office that will be used by SCORE, a nonprofit backed by the U.S. Small Business Administration that provides small business education and mentoring services. Kaltschnee said it was unusual for a hackerspace — of which there are more

spending a lot of time looking into Parity Act compliance. A number of new rules and code regulations related to the law have gone into effect over the last couple years and it takes time to build up the data to review compliance, Dowling said. Additionally, the department is anticipating more changes this year based on legislation that could come about as a result of the Sandy Hook Advisory Commission’s recommendations. “This is one of the focus areas of the agency going forward,” Dowling said. “A lot of it is working from the same understanding of what parity is, talking to all the carriers involved to make sure they’re executing claims and paying providers appropriately.” When the issue of how Anthem processes mental health claims came to the department’s attention, Dowling said they worked to immediately address it. Though the APA says it should have been included during the department’s review of Anthem, Dowling said it would have been inappropriate. The regulatory work the department does is not the same as a statewide effort to improve mental health coverage, Dowling said. “We asked (Anthem) to correct what

they could immediately and asked them to do what they can as they move to the new codes,” Dowling said. “We’re not dealing with (APA’s) issues and with their lawsuit.” Maria Pepe VanDerLaan, a partner at Murtha Cullina L.L.P. and attorney for the APA, said the Insurance Department’s agreement with Anthem was only a BandAid and that more work needed to be done to improve access to mental health care. “Nobody in the mental health industry was aware of that deal and it is extremely disappointing if you are in an organization, or have made it your life calling, to protect the rights of mental health patients,” VanDerLaan said. “They completely shut providers out of the discussion. You’d think if they were interested in having an intelligent conversation, my clients would have been invited to the table.” As far as the APA is concerned, the lawsuit is still in full swing. “Historically in society, mental health is just something people didn’t talk about and didn’t want to deal with,” VanDerLaan said. “Insurance companies have frankly treated it similarly. They treat it as if there is a stigma around it.”

than 1,000 nationally — to receive the level of government support his venture has gotten from Danbury officials. “When we started this in January (2012), I bumped into the mayor and said, ‘My partner and I are interested in starting a hackerspace in Danbury.’ And he said, ‘I know what they are … pitch me on it.’” Tuomala said “It was a no-brainer for us,” adding, “We want to be the technolo�y hub of western Connecticut.” Kaltschnee said he and Gatrell would happily oblige. “We need to build a network of entrepreneurs,” Kaltschnee said, applauding Connecticut Innovations’ efforts at creating such a network. “Now that we’re tied into this, we’re going through the process to become the next hub.”

“Of course, October 2008 changed everything,” Gartner said. “What we see our focus on now is higher education and learning. … With the innovation center (Danbury Hackerspace) coming in on top of that, it just feeds really well into what’s been bubbling under the surface.” Last November, in addition to approving $550,000 to renovate the former Union Savings Bank and to outfit the Hackerspace, the Danbury City Council approved new incentives for downtown businesses and voted to lift a moratorium on café liquor licenses. With plans by BRT General Corp. to build a 580-unit affordable and market-rate housing development just off Main Street and ongoing expansions by Western Connecticut State University and Naugatuck Valley Community College, Gartner said momentum is building. “We have an incredibly low crime rate. We have a walkable downtown. We have an attractive inventory of historic buildings ... and the public transportation comes right downtown,” she said. “It’s that holistic approach.”

Changing tide The Hackerspace is among the centerpieces of a citywide effort to attract more businesses and patrons to downtown Danbury. “We’ve really been trying to change things up because we have a commitment to the downtown — we want to make this a vibrant downtown,” said Andrea Gartner, managing director of CityCenter Danbury. Prior to the fall of 2008, CityCenter Danbury, which formally manages the Danbury Downtown Special Services District, had focused primarily on arts and culture, dining and entertainment.

6 Week of May 6, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

At Virtual Density L.L.C., which just celebrated its fifth anniversary, founder and CEO Christopher Furey explains what drew him to downtown Danbury ... 15

Malloy shifts on minimum wage hike

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, pictured April 4, signs a comprehensive gun reform package into law. Photo courtesy of the governor.

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n an apparent policy shift, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy recently told reporters in Hartford that he would support an increase in the state’s minimum wage from $8.25 to $9 by Jan. 1, 2015. A pending bill in the state Senate proposes to increase the minimum wage to $9.75 over the next two years. Malloy, who previously expressed reservations over the increase, said he believes an increase to $9 over the next two years is attainable. “During the last session I supported an increase, but for a host of reasons it never came to pass,” Malloy said April 26, according to published reports. “It is my hope that this year we can get it done.” Malloy reportedly said he has spoken with members of the business community and believes there is support for a phased-in increase to $9. Earlier this year, Malloy said he would prefer that the minimum wage be raised on a national basis by Congress. “I absolutely support the president’s move to raise nationally to $9 and I’m open to discussion about what we should do in Connecticut,” Malloy said in March, adding, “I would prefer it be done on a national basis.” The comments were met with disdain by the Connecticut chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business. “This won’t elevate anyone from poverty, but it will make it harder for family-run restaurants, convenient stores and other small businesses to hire parttime workers,” said Andrew Markowski, Connecticut NFIB director, in a statement. — Patrick Gallagher


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BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

T

he host always plans for beautiful weather and smooth sailing. It’s the job of people like Victoria Dubin, Chris Dessi, Joe Guilderson, Jill Prince and Mark Weinstein to prepare for the elements, plan for all contingencies and to still deliver. The quintet headlined the April 25 roundtable, “WOW: Event planning from the experts,” which featured a discussion — and some added surprises — of how to best leverage an event space, entertainment, graphics and social media. But at the end of the day, Dubin said, what’s most important is not the venue or entertainment, but you as the host. “The most successful event is when you, as the person throwing the event, know what your objective is and know the kind of feeling you want to evoke,” said Dubin, founder of Victoria Dubin Events Ltd. in Purchase, N.Y. “I always say to my clients, ‘I can get you the most incredible venue, the best entertainment, the most beautiful décor ... but it’s you, as the individual, who is going to make your event successful.’” The event, presented by the Business Journal and Wag magazine and hosted by Gabriele’s Italian Steakhouse in Greenwich, featured everything from an a cappella group to a belly-dance artist to David Ferst, who goes by Magic Dave. Dubin said one job of event planners is “to look for fresh ideas, to try to be creative and to try to come up with things that people have not seen before. ... Everything you do, everything should be purposeful.” Her fellow panelists advocated a holistic approach. “The branding is important and finding that image that conveys the branding” can make or break an event, said Weinstein, president of CGI — formerly Color Group Imaging Labs — in

Hawthorne, N.Y. “It could be a graphic or visual or a photographic image, but something that conveys your brand.” Likewise, the entertainment should tie into the broader theme, said Prince, co-owner of Hal Prince Music and Entertainment in Mount Kisco, N.Y. “Every event needs music and I think for the wow factor, consider music that’s going to fit the mood and vibe of your venue,” Prince said. Social media can be used to reinforce the theme of an event, before, during and after, said Dessi. “You can’t just open the door and let them come in and then that’s the end of your job,” said Dessi, founder and CEO of Silverback Social, a Chappaqua, N.Y., digital media firm. Instead, he advocated the use of traditional social media platforms and tools like EventBrite or Constant Contact that help to get the word out prior to an event and to proliferate photos, videos and other marketing material after an event takes place. During the event itself is “when the real social media fun stuff happens,” Dessi said, citing platforms that encourage live-tweeting and that can even be used to collect donations via text messaging. The key, Guilderson and his fellow panelists reinforced, is sound planning and preparing for every contingency. Guilderson, president of Corporate Audio Visual Services in Elmsford, N.Y., said it’s important to start with the logistics, such as whether a venue has the electrical capacity to support the planned entertainment and lighting elements. And, he said, “factor time.” “Everything takes time and everything coordinates together,” he said. “Every single person affects how a production flows and time is the number one thing, whether it’s to rehearse or to set up.”

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013

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asK andi

BY ANDI GRAY

Waste not, want not by controlling inventory PARTS COME IN FROM LOTS OF DIRECTIONS – PICKED UP AT STORES AND DELIVERED TO OUR SHOP. PARTS ALSO GO OUT THE DOOR LOTS OF WAYS. I’M SURE THINGS GET LOST AND THROWN AWAY. WE COULD BE BLEEDING LOTS OF MONEY. HELP! THOUGHTS OF THE DAY: Set up a system to check inventory in and out. Automate the connection between check in/out and accounting. Set up obvious inspection systems and reporting so that everyone knows you’re watching. Set a goal to reduce inventory costs. Every time a part goes somewhere other than into a customer invoice, it means the company makes less money than it could. Wasting money because there are not enough controls in place is crazy. You might as well pull some dollars out of your pocket and burn them. Start with a system to check inventory in and out. Look at all vendor parts invoices from the last quarter. This will help you see how parts flow into the company. Set up control systems. Issue a pur-

chase order for each part that gets bought, whether by someone in the field, the office or the shop floor. On the purchase order require notation as to purpose of the order: for a specific customer, for inventory on a truck or for shop inventory. Also require the name of the person placing the order. Issue purchase orders in sequence: treat them like another check register. If people in the field need to place orders, give them a pad of sequentially numbered purchase orders. Make people record lost and broken parts. When something gets thrown out, it has to be reported on a form, detailing who threw it away and why. Use these forms to record any inventory that is no longer sitting around available for use. Make this the basis for inventory writeoffs in the accounting system. Check inventory in and out with automated systems. Bar code every part and give it a specific location in the shop. It’s easier to find parts if they’re always in the same location and easier to eyeball stock that is low if shelves are marked and inventory quantity is visible. Make sure that what flows in from

8 Week of May 6, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

vendors and gets checked out by employees also gets reported to accounting. This is where an automated bar-coding system can pay significant dividends. Give every part a number and scan it in and out of inventory. Put handheld scanners on the trucks and at job sites. Reporting how parts are used will increase your ability to properly charge clients. You’ll also be better able to evaluate the price and profitability of the goods you’re producing if all inventory is accounted for. Get help from the makers of your accounting system; any good accounting system maker understands the need to track inventory. Make it obvious that you’re tracking inventory. Put cameras up and let people know you’re using them. Report weekly on inventory status. Do regular cycle counts to identify problems before they become massive. Do annual full inventory counts. Set up charts to report on inventory issues: waste, missing parts, lost dollars, excess use in the field or the shop, etc. Cut down on losses by making people more aware and by reducing opportunity for waste. Involve everyone in the company in

inventory cost reduction. Teach people about the importance of tracking inventory in and out, controlling waste, etc. Relate it to job retention: the more waste is reduced, the less pressure to cut jobs in down cycles. Relate inventory cost reduction upside to opportunity for people to participate in the profits, as well. Have a company picnic to celebrate hitting an improvement milestone. Set up a bonus for the first group to achieve a goal. Run the numbers. Figure out what a 10 percent reduction in inventory would mean to your bottom line. That number should give you incentive to work on the project. Looking for a good book? Try “Smart Inventory Solutions: Improving the Management of Engineering Materials and Spare Parts” by Phillip Slater. Andi Gray is president of Strategy Leaders Inc., strategyleaders.com, a business-consulting firm that specializes in helping entrepreneurial firms grow. She can be reached by phone at (877) 238-3535. Do you have a question for Andi? Please send it to her via email at AskAndi@StrategyLeaders.com. Visit AskAndi.com for an entire library of articles.


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fairfiEld rEsidEnt EducatEs faMiliEs on EldEr carE options, costs BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

I

t was during a visit with her father that Ann Jamison first realized something was wrong. Jamison’s father, Dirk Bollenback, had lived alone since his wife’s passing and was unable to drive on his own. After a visit to the doctor, the diagnosis was clear. “One of the biggest things that was missed was that he was lonely and he was depressed and he was isolated,” Jamison said. “We realized that he needed to find a different living situation.” Bollenback, with his daughter’s aid, moved into an assisted living community. And he has since remarried. “He has thrived,” Jamison said. “Now he is back with his peers.” The process shook her, though, Jamison admits. “I felt crippled – paralyzed – when my crisis happened and I didn’t know what to do.” Jamison, a longtime Fairfield resident, founded Senior Living Options L.L.C. toward the end of last summer in an effort to provide families with the information about elder care options that she and her father had lacked. “I decided that having my own business would allow me to have that concierge, white-glove level of service that families are looking for,” she said. While she keeps an office in Stamford, Jamison conducts most of her business from the road, meeting with families and helping them to understand their needs, their options and the costs. Jamison, who currently operates Senior Living Options on her own, works with a network of providers ranging from independent living communities to assisted living facilities to nursing homes. She works to educate families about the costs of each facility, what services and activities they offer and what level of care they provide, often bringing in an elder care attorney or financial planner to assist with the process. The assistance comes free of charge for Jamison’s clients. Jamison said she works with a network of senior care providers, and that she will receive a fee when families select a provider.

However, she emphasized that she does not lean in favor of any one institution or type of facility. “There are times when I don’t make any money,” she said. “Even then, it’s still worth it.” Jamison said that in the nine months since opening up shop, demand has far outpaced what she initially expected. And for good reason: more than 10 million Americans over the age of 50 care for their aging parents, according to research by the MetLife Mature Market Institute. The proportion of adult children who provide personal care and/or financial assistance to a parent has more than tripled over the last 15 years, and today, at least a quarter of all adult children provide one of those forms of assistance to a parent. “I just want to make sure people understand what their options are ... and the implications of their decisions,” Jamison said. “A lot of adult children haven’t even had these conversations with their parents. ...My ideal situation would be if people came to me before a crisis happens.” While the Internet can be a valuable resource, “It doesn’t tell you about all the nuances,” she said, from the offerings of a given facility to the costs. According to a November 2012 report by the Mature Market Institute, costs for most types of senior residences rose from 2011 to 2012. The national average daily rate for a private room in a nursing home was $248, up from $239 in 2011, and the average for a semi-private room was $222, up from $214. The average monthly base rate in an assisted living community rose to $3,550 from $3,477 in 2011, while the average rates for adult day services and for home health aides were mostly unchanged at $70 a day and $21 an hour, respectively. Additionally, Jamison said, the laws can affect costs and service options from state to state. Jamison works primarily in the tristate area and extends somewhat into Massachusetts and Rhode Island, with each state featuring subtle differences pertaining to senior care providers and payment options. “That’s the kind of information you don’t get over the Internet.”

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NEWS IN BRIEF

HEDGE FUND AGREES TO $21.5M FINE

Level Global Investors L.P. agreed April 29 to pay $21.5 million to settle charges that its co-founder and several employees had engaged in insider trading of Dell Inc. and Nvidia Corp. securities. According to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, former analyst Spyridon Adondakis allegedly had obtained financial performance information illegally about the two companies and passed on the information to cofounder Anthony Chiasson to execute trades and reap “millions of dollars in illegal profit.” Following news reports in 2011 that the government would investigate the company, Level Global Investors announced it would shut down, which it is still in the process of doing. The company has not admitted or denied the charges; however, Adondakis has previously pleaded guilty in a parallel settlement for insider trading. The SEC is still pursuing insider trading charges against Chiasson, who, in a parallel proceeding, was convicted of securities fraud last year.

BOW TIE ACQUIRES CINEMAS

Bow Tie Cinemas is coming soon to a theater near you.

The Ridgefield-based theater chain announced that it has acquired almost all of the Clearview Cinema theaters from Bethpage, N.Y.-based Cablevision Systems Corp. The transaction includes Clearview’s New York theaters in Bedford, Larchmont, Mamaroneck, Mount Kisco, White Plains and Yonkers. Financial terms were not disclosed. Bow Tie, which has sites in Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Trumbull, Westport and Wilton, will become the eighth largest theater chain with 388 screens in 63 locations across seven states. It will have the largest number of theater locations in the New York metropolitan area. Cablevision acquired the theater chain in 1998 and put it on the block last year saying that it was not a strategic asset for the company. Bow Tie said it intends to make substantial investments in its newly acquired theaters.

Fein created the Connecticut Securities Commodities and Investor Fraud Task Force, which investigates cases of investor fraud, Ponzi schemes, insider trading and other financial crimes. He also created the Project Longevity, an effort to reduce gun violence. “Personally, it is the right time for me and my family that I move on,” Fein, 52, said in a statement. “But I do so humbly and profoundly grateful for the trust placed in me by the president and the attorney general.”

FILM CENTER TO EXPAND

All eyes are on the Connecticut Film Center (CFO) as it takes out a new working capital loan. Based in Stamford, the center recently received a $2.5 million loan to expand its production facilities. First Niagara Bank provided the loan. “The rapid growth of Connecticut’s

television industry necessitates a pool of working capital that will allow us to act quickly when new opportunities arise,” Kevin Segalla, CFC president, said in a statement. “First Niagara took the time to understand our business and created a loan structure that enables us to keep pace with the speed of our industry.” In 2009, the film center built its $22 million production facility to welcome outside TV and film productions and in 2010 it played a key role in the transformation of the former Clairol headquarters into the new headquarters for NBC Sports and Chelsea Piers Connecticut sports facility. First Niagara said the loan was a part of the bank’s new emphasis on commercial lending within the tristate region, where it has branches in Fairfield County, the lower Hudson Valley and northern New Jersey. — Sam Barron and Jennifer Bissell

STATE’S TOP PROSECUTOR TO RESIGN

David B. Fein, a U.S. Attorney for the District of Connecticut, announced his resignation April 30 with the intention of returning to the private sector. A U.S. attorney for roughly three years,

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s CEO, delegating tactical responsibilities to others and creating a culture that motivates your employees to execute the day-to-day activities effectively is easier said than done. But to do so successfully will allow the CEO more time to spend on strategic planning and projects — of which there is no shortage. As operating and structural improvements are made within an organization, that firm (and its CEO) will begin to see more options and opportunities. Those can include the addition of a new product or the elimination of an unprofitable product or service, relocations or lease renegotiations, succession planning, franchising or the hiring of additional staff in response to an unmet need. Two other strategic opportunities that might seem overwhelming, but shouldn’t be overlooked, are acquisitions and the development of international markets.

role, as well as those of the target’s key staff. Pay close attention to people issues: from management down to the rank and file. Most acquiring companies fail to pay enough attention to the cultural factors. If people are not going to buy into the culture of your organization or are not united around your vision and goals, don’t go any farther. • Integration: Integration is an ongoing process, not a short-term activity, and requires a well thought-out plan with roles and responsibilities clearly defined prior to the start. To reduce customer attrition, visit the target’s important customers and explain how they will benefit from the acquisition. The key is to deliver on what was discussed and promised to the firm being acquired, and its employees, on a timely basis. The new employees will likely feel vulnerable and insecure. They are going to be looking for evidence that this was a good decision, but a lack of communication and delays during the integration stage will only serve to sow doubt.

Acquisitions: Managing an acquisition is about choosing the right target, performing due diligence, integrating systems and, most importantly, knowing when to walk away from a bad deal. • Choosing a target: Acquisitions are all about adding value on multiple levels. First, the target should enable lower costs through economies of scale and better cost management. Second, it should create more market power by bringing together additional products or services under your brand name. Third, the target should help your organization change the competitive dynamic, whether by taking out a competitor, becoming more vertical or adding products and services to your portfolio. • Due diligence: The objective of this stage is to ensure the target acquisition would be a strong fit and to identify potential deal-breakers. Here, it’s important to examine the target’s market position, determine whether its products and/or services fill a unique niche and identify any potential threats or weaknesses to its product/service line. It’s also important to understand the cost of integration, from production to marketing and IT. How easily will you be able to integrate their operations and systems into yours? Finally, don’t forget about the people involved. The CEO or owner of the target is accustomed to being in charge. It’s important to define his or her future

Going international: With a stagnant economy, more and more businesses have entered into new markets by necessity rather than choice. Regardless of which category your firm would fit into, here are some basic tips: • Prepare a business plan: Evaluate your needs, costs and set goals. To bring your products and services into new markets is to form a new unit of your business, so it is essential to assess your readiness and commitment to grow just as you would with any other new venture. • Identify and understand your markets: Is your target market familiar with your product or service? Will it mesh with the local culture and customs? The U.S. Department of Commerce is an excellent source of information on foreign markets, as is Export.gov, which brings together resources from multiple cabinet-level departments. With international ventures, the importance of understanding cultural differences cannot be overstated. As a CEO looking to expand beyond the U.S. markets, you need to understand and be comfortable with the cultures of the markets you are seeking to access. • Evaluate and select distribution methods: This means opening a foreign subsidiary, working with agents or setting up joint ventures. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages depending on the country, so it’s impor-

tant to understand the legal and tax ramifications of each before choosing. • Be aware of taxes and pricing: You should be aware of import duty taxes and transfer pricing requirements, as well as the pricing of your competition. Some countries have black markets for certain goods that are large and sophisticated enough to limit your ability to profit. • Understand the availability and costs of �inancing: It’s important to know what options are available to financing capital investments and startup costs. One alternative is the U.S. Export-Import Bank (ExIm.gov), but it is generally more expensive than domestic lending.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 11


BY ADAM J. COHEN

Ten tips for avoiding municipal tax penalties

E

ach July, nearly everyone who owns real estate, motor vehicles or business equipment in Connecticut owes municipal taxes. Paying later means paying more. Interest runs at 1.5 percent per month (18 percent annually), state marshals and collection agencies add 15 percent to collect the debt, and liens and attorneys’ fees increase payments even further. Here are 10 tips for avoiding those penalties. 1. Escrow your taxes: If your bank allows you to roll your taxes into your regular mortgage payment, do it. It’s usually free, it spreads out the annual liability into monthly payments, and it makes the bank liable for any late payment penalties. Remember that most escrows don’t cover debts owed to fire districts, special service districts and water/sewer com-

missions, so keep paying those separately. 2. Update your address: People are legally presumed to know that they owe taxes on their property and state law specifically says that not getting a bill from the town is no defense to nonpayment. So if you move or change your P.O. box, notify both the assessor’s office and tax collector’s office of your town and also make sure the Department of Motor Vehicles updates your driver’s license, registration file and “tax town code.” If you don’t receive a tax bill, call town hall and ask why. 3. Calendar due dates: Taxes are due once, twice or four times each year depending on the town and the type of tax. These installments are usually due on July 1, Oct. 1, Jan. 1, and April 1 annually, but most towns only mail a single bill in

June or July for all of them. It’s up to you to remember to pay each installment by its due date. 4. Turn in your old license plates: When you get rid of an old car, don’t keep your license plates in your garage. Taxes on motor vehicles will keep accruing until you turn in your plates to the DMV. If you get a tax bill for a car you no longer own, don’t assume it’s a mistake. Tax liability is fixed on the assessment date – usually Oct. 1 – which means you still owe the tax for that year even if you sell or junk the car afterward. 5. File accurate and timely personal property declarations: Businesses must file sworn statements of their taxable equipment and fixtures by Nov. 1 every year (unless that deadline is extended), and face an automatic 25 percent penalty

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12 Week of May 6, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

for every item they leave out or undervalue. 6. Apply for tax relief in advance: There are dozens of federal, state and local programs which can significantly reduce or defer tax liability on the basis of income, age, disability, military service, how the property is used and so on. However, nearly all of them require application and approval before the tax is assessed, not after it’s due. Talk to the town assessor or your attorney about your eligibility. 7. Don’t bother trying to negotiate: Interest and fees are mandated by state law and there is no legal way to negotiate them. Instead, pay as much and as quickly as you can to avoid more of them. 8. Don’t rely on who was “supposed” to pay: If you own property on the assessment date (usually Oct. 1), you are responsible for the tax when it later becomes due no matter who was “supposed” to pay it for you. If your lease, sales contract or divorce decree says that your tenant, purchaser or ex-spouse should pay the taxes on your property, you’re still going to need to pay if they don’t. Talk to your lawyer afterward about making them reimburse you. 9. Understand what bankruptcy does and does not do: Filing bankruptcy only delays most tax liability. Interest and fees keep accruing and new taxes must still be paid on time while the bankruptcy case is pending and after it ends, unsatisfied tax liens can still be foreclosed. Talk to your attorney before filing bankruptcy about what it will accomplish. 10. Feel overtaxed? Talk to the assessor: Town tax collectors have no control over the amount you owe. Talk to the assessor if you think your property is worth less than the town’s valuation or talk to your city council or board of selectmen if you think the mil rate or annual budget are too high. Remember, though, that overassessment, if true, is no defense to a tax collection lawsuit. Adam J. Cohen is general counsel to the Connecticut Tax Collector’s Association and an attorney with Pullman & Comley L.L.C., with offices in Bridgeport, Hartford, Stamford and Waterbury. He can be reached at ajc@ pullcom.com.


FACES THE WOW FACTOR Business leaders packed Gabriele’s Italian Steakhouse in Greenwich April 25 to hear a panel comprising some of the region’s foremost event organizers discuss how to keep gatherings fresh, original and fruitful. The luncheon featured event planner Victoria Dubin, as well as Marc Weinstein of CGI, Jill Prince of Hal Prince Music & Entertainment, Chris Dessi of Silverback Social and Joe Guilderson of Corporate Audio Visual Services — not to mention a few surprises along the way.

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Photos by Bob Rozycki

1. Phyllis Hirschauer 2. Kathleen Atkins 3. Robert Lella, Jeannine Johansen and Tony Mazzulli 4. Michelle Mattera 5. Chereese Jervis-Hill and Alison McCarthy 6. Nina Fiasconaro 7. Elizabeth Oraegbu 8. Lorraine Bambino and Jean Marie Connolly 9. Andee Schell and Bill Cortellessa 10. Jacklyn Lim and Kat McKee 11. Elizabeth Ball and Jocelyne Kristal 12. Sara James and Alison Calvert 13. Pamela Kiernan and Phil Luria

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 13


Listed alphabetically

THE LIST

Customer Relationship Manager (CRM) and Sales Leads Providers

Sales Leads and CRM Providers

Regional Next list: May 13 Largest Public Companies

Listed alphabetically. Name Address Telephone Website

The Allen Group Inc. 50 Washington St., Fifth floor, Norwalk, CT 06854 (203) 855-5777 • theallengroup.com

Aristo Data Systems 1010 Summer St., Suite 102A, Stamford, CT 06905 (203) 322-1113 • aristodata.com

Astral Computing Inc. 100 Executive Blvd., Suite 204, Ossining, NY 10562 (914) 478-9100 • astralcomputing.net

Carlstone Consulting L.L.C. 31 Jennie Lane, Westport, CT 06880 (203) 226-0026 • carlstone.com

Chateaux Software 50 Riverside Ave., Westport, CT 06880 (203) 222-7118 • chatsoft.com

Year established or year software released

Description/services

1997

Database management systems and custom business applications operating in diverse computer hardware environments, Windows and Unix platforms, new application design and development, mobile applications, interactive games, legacy software integration, re-engineering and application migration

1986

Business: general ledger enhancements, accounts payable, accounts receivable and sales enhancements, allocation maintenance, GL import with analytical accounting transactions, AP import with analytical accounting transactions, reporting

2002

Information technology management, network security, web-based applications, including records management systems, CRM solutions, document libraries and business process streamlining

1990

CRM solutions, network, security, support and web solutions

1985

Business intelligence and application integration solutions

1996

Database programming, custom-targeted solutions, hosting and data center, networking services

2003

Centralized database management, sales performance management (SPM), CRM solutions, Content Management System (CMS), eMarketing solutions, project management, Software as a Service (SaaS)

1988

High-performance software for data and image capture

2006

Managed services, consulting, technical training, software services, including hosted CRM

1999

Website design and marketing, customized programming, multimedia, customized programming, applications/scripts, including CRM services

The Computer Company Inc. 15 Commerce Drive, Cromwell, CT 06416 • (860) 635-0500 12 Cambridge Drive, Trumbull, CT 06611 • (203) 372-800 computercompany.net

Cool Life Systems 2280 State Route 208, Montgomery, NY 12549 (800) 988-8850 • coollifesystems.com

Datacap 660 White Plains Road, Tarrytown, NY 10591 (914) 366-0100 • datacap.com

Diversified Network Systems L.L.C. 57 North St., Suite 321, Danbury, CT 06810 (203) 778-8880 • diversifiednetworksystems.com

E-Wiz Solutions Inc. 120 Kisco Ave., Suite F, Mount Kisco, NY 10549 (914) 202-9468 • ewizsolutions.com

Full Throttle Consulting* (914) 552-6771 • fullthrottleconsulting.com

Hudson Fusion 30 State St., Suite 204, Ossining, NY 10562 (914) 762-0900, hudsonfusion.com

HV Tech Solutions P.O. Box 241, Fort Montgomery, NY 10922 (914) 214-4466 • hvtechsolutions.com

Impact Business Technology L.L.C. 10 Turnberry Lane, Sandy Hook, CT 06482 (203) 364 0052 • impactbt.com

Imperium 164 Kings Highway North, Westport, CT 06880 (203) 221-1500 • imperium.com

LG Software Consulting L.L.C. Monroe, CT 06468 (203) 880–9019 • lgsoftwareconsulting.com

Objective Consulting Inc. 828 S. Broadway, Tarrytown, NY 10591 (914) 524-4151 • spiders.com

Ultra Golden Software L.L.C. 35 Narrow Rocks Road, Westport, NY 06880 (203) 227-4009 • ultragolden.com Questions or comments, call (914) 694-3600, ext. 3005. Source: Company websites, thomasnet.com, manta.com. * Adressses not listed. NA Not available.

14 Week of May 6, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

NA

Business coaching, expansion planning, email marketing soltuions, social media plans, inbound marketing, Salesforce.com implementation, training and customization

1996

Website design, social media marketing, search-engine marketing, mobile apps, eCommerce solutions, web applications, print design, animation and videos

1993

CRM solutions and services, web development, data recovery, network monitoring and security, consulting, troubleshooting and repair

2003

Business solutions, including web design and build, spam filtering, custom web applications, Internet marketing; support and networking services

1990

Database systems for business intelligence (specializes in advertising services, marketing and market research)

2008

Software applications and web development company

1993

Custom software and mobile application development across the business spectrum

1995

Custom software development for business and administration, primary application areas include business management, iPhone applications, budgeting and planning, mathematical modeling and systems integration


SPECIAL REPORT Digital Age Patrick Gallagher

Virtual certainty

ManagEd it coMpany sEt on doWntoWn danBury HoME BY PATRICK GALLAGHER pgallagher@westfairinc.com

I

n business, redundancy is generally synonymous with waste — with one notable exception. “Most businesses can’t afford redundant servers,” said Christopher Furey, founder and CEO of Virtual Density L.L.C., a managed IT services and cloud computing firm. “We can’t afford not to offer redundant servers.” This spring, Virtual Density celebrates its five-year anniversary and marks one year since moving from the DanburyBrookfield border to the heart of downtown Danbury. Now that he’s here, Furey, a 30-year veteran of IT management, is intent on pitching the downtown as a location ripe for business activity. “When I moved to Danbury, I really made a commitment to this city,” Furey said. “I love it here. ... Downtown Danbury might have a bad reputation, but it’s only a reputation.” The move has been a boon for business and helped Virtual Density to stay online during Hurricane Sandy and the ensuing winter storms, said Furey, who after two relocations in five years is sold on downtown Danbury. “For anyone looking for office space, why wouldn’t you want the visibility a downtown offers?” Furey said. “What we

need to let folks know is, while they can be in an office building somewhere, they could also be part of the community.” In addition to the foot traffic a downtown location brings, Furey said he was drawn to Danbury’s City Center thanks to the underground wiring. “We didn’t go down during the worst of the worst storms of the past 12 months,” he said. Furey, who previously founded Savvy Networks and served as CEO of Another 9 L.L.C. in Tarrytown, N.Y., formed Virtual Density in Tarrytown in March 2008. The company acquired MagsNet, an Internet service provider (ISP) and web hosting provider, in March 2010, and relocated to the firm’s offices on Federal Road in Danbury. As part of its search for a more permanent home, Furey said the company looked at the Matrix Corporate Center in Danbury, noting that “it’s a great property.” But, he said, “The downtown needs some vitality. ... The landlords here, they’re not asking for guarantees. They’re happy to have you.” At its present location, Virtual Density pays a third the rent it had on Federal Road, Furey said. Just as he seeks to debunk any negative talk about the downtown, Furey said one of his primary goals is to educate clients on the values — and truths — behind the cloud, which he describes as “This

Nick Sparaco, Jennifer Morandi and Christopher Furey of Virtual Density L.L.C.

vague thing that people are interested in but don’t fully understand.” “There’s a difference between the cloud and the fog,” Furey said, referencing “this rumor that the cloud is not secure.” Furey likened Virtual Density to HBO, “But we deliver business servers over the wire, not entertainment.” Virtual Density works primarily with startups, emerging growth companies and other small to midsize businesses that don’t have the capital on hand to pay for high-priced servers. “When you’re small, you need to be nimble and understand what the busi-

ness risk is,” he said. Instead of depending on hardware, which Furey says can be expensive to buy and repair and which still requires backups, Virtual Density helps companies to store files and back up entire systems — including any files and applications — on remote servers that are in turn supported by multiple ISPs and electrical sources. Today, Virtual Density provides a range of data backup and disaster recovery services, hosted website and email services and managed IT. “We went from, ‘Can we back up files and folders’ to ‘Can we get a company back on the air again?’” Furey said.

Law �irm adds social media practice BY JENNIFER BISSELL jbissell@westfairinc.com

A

tristate area law firm opened a new practice group in April specifically for tackling issues related to social media, privacy and the Internet. Daniel Schwartz, an attorney at Pullman & Comley L.L.C., said the group was formed due to the growing number of cases surrounding social media and how businesses disseminate information to the public.

“There are a billion people on Facebook. It is natural for corporations, particularly ones in Connecticut, to have issues that flow from it,” Schwartz said. “We see this — data privacy and social media — as an area that will continue to grow.” Government agencies and the court system are just beginning to grapple with Internet issues, Schwartz said. The U.S. Securities Exchange Commission recently set guidelines about financial disclosures over social media and the U.S. Food and Drug

“THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA CAN BE TERRIFIC AND IT CAN ALSO BE SCARY AT THE SAME TIME. TAKING TIME TO THINK ABOUT WHAT EMPLOYEES POST AND SHARE TYPICALLY LEADS TO MORE GOOD DECISIONS BEING MADE.” — Daniel Schwartz

Administration is considering the ramifications of advertising potentially risky drugs and medical devices in a 140-character message on Twitter. Schwartz said he’s seen a number of firms start similar practice groups across the nation, but noted that Pullman & Comley may be one of the first in Connecticut to open a practice group with an interdisciplinary team. The group includes attorneys from varying law backgrounds including labor and employment, litigation, tech» Law firm, page 17

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 15


social MEdia trEnds

E

BY BRUCE NEWMAN

Seven email segmentation strategies

mail marketing remains a critical part of online marketing. Despite some recent negative articles and statements concerning its effectiveness, it still remains one of the most important methods of generating attention and driving traffic toward a landing page or website. According to Attachments.me, there are 3.3 billion email accounts worldwide. That’s a lot of email accounts — and email messages. Chadwick Martin

Bailey reports that although 66 percent of users under 30 rely heavily on their smartphones, they still regularly access their email — just through their phone instead of a computer. We might not like email and at times might even be overwhelmed by its sheer volume and yet, we still review our messages on a regular — if not frequent — basis. Effective email strategies require the segmenting or grouping of your audience. By segmenting your audience, you

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can provide it with the specific content it is interested in. For example, a targeted audience interested in SEO (search engine optimization) would be more interested in new marketing techniques than some article on ethics. As analytics become more sophisticated (and pervasive), online marketers are able to better segment their audience into increasingly smaller and better-targeted groups. This allows them to provide the specific materials and information that

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are of interest to these groups. Providers of quality and relevant information benefit from enhanced brand recognition and are considered industry leaders. Incidentally, this is one of those oft-discussed instances where the quality of followers beats the quantity. Here are seven basic email segmentation criteria that will help you organize your email marketing list. You can easily create additional segmentation criteria – with the proviso that it is highly relevant to your market niche. 1. Location This is particularly important if you are dealing with a geolocation business, particularly if it is a brick and mortar business such as a restaurant. For an online business, you might want to do some segmentation by country or region. 2. Age and gender Depending on your offering, age and gender can play have a huge impact on your response. People of different ages react very differently to the same stimuli. A simple example is the divide in cellphone use for people under and over 30 years old. 3. Title This could also refer to a level in a company – say mid-management, or to a specific area such as customer support. 4. Type of business Since you want to be as specific as possible, you can include several of the relevant characteristics of the business, including its revenue and number of employees. Many marketers consider the number of employees as the key component in determining the size of a business. 5. Previous purchases Amazingly, previous purchases are frequently overlooked when developing a segmentation strate�y. Marketers spend a lot of time evaluating new buyer characteristics while largely overlooking existing customers who are far more likely to make an additional purchase of products or services. Cart abandonment is an important area that also falls under this heading. Really sharp marketing companies such as Godaddy will often take note of an abandoned cart and contact the cart owner within two days – sometimes even with a discount coupon to entice the buyer to complete their purchase. 6. Areas of interest/customer activity This area is of particular interest to marketers since it denotes customer interest and activity including click » Email, page 17


Law Firm — » From page 17

nolo�y and corporate law. Schwartz is also the author of Connecticut Employment Law Blog, one of the most widely read law blogs in the country. “We’ve actually been doing this kind of work for some time, but the practice group is formalizing what we’ve already been doing,” Schwartz said. “Now we have a group of individuals from a vari-

Email — » From page 16

behavior; downloaded articles and which web pages have been accessed. Surveys can also illuminate areas of interest and potential segmentation points. 7. Duration of subscription Some companies provide initial emails and offers to new subscribers (fewer than 30 days) and special interactions for long-term subscribers. This segmentation criteria is rapidly growing in importance. The degree of segmentation that you specify can greatly affect the results of your marketing and sales efforts. The better you target your audience, the better the result of your email and marketing campaigns. Bruce Newman is the president of wwWebevents.com, a division of The Productivity Institute L.L.C. Newman is a social media guru and webinar production and promotion expert. He is also the creator of The Complete Webinar Training Course, an online course that helps companies create and promote highly successful webinars. Bruce can be reached at bnewman@prodinst.com.

ety of different backgrounds and experiences who can address these issues, coordinate with each other and best serve our clients.” The firm has offices in Bridgeport, Hartford, Stamford, Waterbury and White Plains, N.Y. To prevent and protect against future lawsuits, Schwartz said it is important for business owners to develop social media policies and guidelines for their employees. It’s not as simple as putting up a

firewall and blocking websites from employees’ computers, he said. Employees should understand what kind of information is inappropriate to announce online, how their privacy settings work and how to protect against hacks and data breaches. Something as innocuous as losing the password to the company’s Twitter account could be a major problem if handled poorly. “The power of social media can be terrific and it can also be scary at the same time,” Schwartz said. “Taking

time to think about what employees post and share typically leads to more good decisions being made.” Schwartz said it was exciting to set up a new practice and helping clients solve their problems with they don’t have the clearest solutions. “This key area of law is still so new that we don’t have a lot of court decisions defining the parameter,” Schwartz said. “For a lawyer to be able to help shape that is exciting. It’s a very rewarding area for our practice.”

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Title Sponsor: Marcum LLP Platinum Sponsors: OneBeacon Technology Insurance, Pullman & Comley, LLC, Response, LLC, Webster Bank, Wellstone Insurance Media Sponsors: Business New Haven, Fairfield County Business Journal FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 17


INSPIRING THE ARTS IN GREENWICH the greenwich arts council (gac) was founded in 1973 as a 501©(3) nonprofit membership organization with the express purpose of supporting artists and developing audiences for the arts in greenwich and the surrounding areas. this mission encompasses the visual, literary and performing arts in all forms with a particular commitment to working with living artists encouraging new ideas and expression. the gac functions both as an arts — presenting organization developing its own program of exhibitions, performing arts and educational events, as well as an arts — management organization operating an extensive arts center at the landmarked old town Hall Building in downtown greenwich. the arts center provides professional performance and administrative space to six of the leading arts and cultural organizations in greenwich. arts education is another core component of our mission. the council provides free arts education outreach to the public schools geared to enhance existing academic curricula, especially among the least advantaged school populations in greenwich. gac aggressively engages both the residential and business sectors of greenwich. an important signature event for the greenwich arts council presented every May is “art to the avenue,” which brings 150 artists to exhibit their art works in the windows of an equal number of shops and retailers in the greenwich downtown for the entire month, turning the main avenue into a strolling art gallery. this is the largest such event of its kind in fairfield county. Encouraging these sorts of mutually beneficial interactions between the arts and business is yet another way that gac fulfills its mission.

Paul Master-Karnik Executive director greenwich arts council Member, cultural alliance of fairfield county

The mission of the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County is to support cultural organizations, artists and creative businesses by providing promotion, services and advocacy. For more information, visit CulturalAllianceFC.org or email infoCulturalAllianceFC.org or call 256-2329. For events lists, visit FCBuzz.org.

FCBUZZ

Arts & Culture of Fairfield County

THE GLASS HOUSE IN NEW CANAAN “SNAP!”S TO IT

E.V. Day, Concept sketch for “SNAP!” (2013) and Tauba Auerbach, Concept sketch for “Gnomon/Wave” (2013). Both courtesy of the artists.

this season the glass House, a site of the national trust for Historic preservation in new canaan, is featuring E.v. day’s “snap!,” as well as a new sculpture by tauba auerbach, “gnomon/Wave.” conceived for the building known as da Monsta, the last one completed by philip Johnson on the glass House campus, “snap!” comprises four recent sculptures as well as site-specific installations for the building’s interior and exterior. day is the first artist the glass House has invited to reinterpret the building, originally intended as a visitor center and now used as a project space for contemporary art. upon arrival at the glass House, visitors will immediately encounter day’s reinterpretation of da Monsta. responding to Johnson’s statement that “the building is alive,” day boldly casts a series of massive red nets across its undulating volume, capturing da Monsta and staking it to the ground. after entering da Monsta, visitors first see individual sculptures by day, including “spinneret” (a study for “spidey striptease”); “Wet

net;” “pollinator;” and “Bandage dress” (white with chains). once viewers enter the second gallery, they’ll find a dramatic, site-specific installation that explores the expressive contours of da Monsta with a deconstructed Herve leger bandage dress deployed as an architectural element. Made for the exhibit series “night (1947-2015),” “gnomon/ Wave” is auerbach’s first sand sculpture and rests on the Mies van der rohe glass coffee-table inside the glass House, where it evokes a solid wave of light composed of tiny particles. the physical form of the work resembles that of a gnomon, the sundial’s pin. throughout the day, “gnomon/Wave” will cast a moving shadow along and through the glass table. it will be on view until early september. “night” presents a series of contemporary sculptures that contend with the legacy of “night,” a 1947 sculpture by alberto giacometti that disappeared from the glass House in the mid-1960s, as well as the architecture of the glass House itself. guest curator Jordan stein organized this unfolding sculpture exhibition, held in the same spot where giacometti’s “night” once stood. on display for three to six months at a time, the individual works presented in “night”“disappear” after their run, making room for new works and new absences. Built between 1949 and 1995 by one of america’s most celebrated architects the glass House sits on 49 pastoral acres, along with 13 other structures. it features a permanent collection of 20th century painting and sculpture as well as temporary exhibitions. the tour season runs from May to november and advance reservations

DRAWING ON ARTISTIC TALENT the loft artists association (laa) will hold its fourth annual “drawing show” exhibition in its stamford gallery from May 10 to May 24. the event features work by member artists as well as people of all ages in the community who participated in a free “draw on!” workshop at laa in april. using pencils, pens and ink, crayons, markers, oil pastels, craypas, oil sticks and charcoal, participants were encouraged to let their creativity run free. “from young children to retired business executives — everyone had an opportunity to express their artistic vision in this unique show,” noted philippa lodato-suppa, an laa member who chaired the event. the drawing show iv – Marks on a page” is brought to the fairfield county community by laa to coincide with the annual community drawing festival run by the

aldrich contemporary art Museum in ridgefield. this drawing celebration is one of many in connecticut, new york, new Jersey, Massachusetts, and new Hampshire. it will be on exhibit at the laa gallery at 845 canal st. in stamford. the public is invited to the opening reception May 10 from 6 to 9 p.m., where prizes will be awarded. admission and parking are free. for directions The Loft Artists Association draws on local talent. and more information, visit loftartists.com or call 323-4153.

Visit FCBuzz.org for more information on events and how to get listed. 18 Week of May 6, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

Presented by: Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County


FAIRFIELD COUNTY

BUSINESS JOURNAL Bowen, Jennifer and Daniel. Perform interior renovations at an existing single-family residence, 306 Barberry Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $12,500. Filed April 17.

Compo Optical Inc. and Susan Westrup, Westport. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Lincolnshire, Ill. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Andrew R. Bilodeau and Ryanna Fagan, Ira, Fairfield. $60,000, T. Capalbo, Warwick, R.I. Acin favor of Audio Design Inc. by COmmERCiAL tion: The plaintiff has brought Richard C. Feldman. Property: this breach-of-contact suit 75 Craig Court, Fairfield. Filed BLT Management, Stamford, CFJ Realty, contractor for CFJ April 16. contractor for 4 Harbor Point Stratford Development. Fit-out Realty Development L.L.C. Lay against the defendant for failing Square L.L.C. Fit-out an exist- an existing commercial building a foundation for a new single- to pay the required payments according to a loan agreement ing commercial building at 15 Giordano & Co. Inc. and Harbor Point Road, Stamford. at 300 Long Beach Blvd., Strat- family residence, 184 Bullard with plaintiff. The defendant James Giordano, New Canaan. Estimated cost: $27,390. Filed ford. Estimated cost: $15,000. St., Fairfield. Estimated cost: had failed to make required pay$150,000. Filed April 18. Filed April 22. $400,000, in favor of Wells Fargo April 16. ments when due. Filed April 23. Bank N.A., Frederick, Md., by Case no. 6034797. Lloyd S. Lowinger. Property: Lot Stratford Hospitality. Perform CFJ Realty, contractor for CFJ 9, Map 3882, New Canaan. Filed Gomes, Gary, contractor for external renovations at an existing Realty Development L.L.C. Lay April 17. the town of Stratford. Con- commercial building, 225 Lord- a foundation for a new single- Finlay Printing L.L.C., Bloomstruct wind turbines at an exist- ship Blvd., Stratford. Estimated family residence, 186 Bullard field, and Kevin D. Kalagher, Ellington. Filed by General Electric ing commercial property at 719 cost: $51,016. Filed April 23. St., Fairfield. Estimated cost: Capital Corp. Plaintiff’s attorBirdseye St., Stratford. Estimated $150,000. Filed April 18. ney: James S. Brownstein, WoodATTACHMENTScost: $10,000. Filed April 23. bridge. Action: The plaintiff has Superior Finishes L.L.C., conRELEASED tractor for the town of Stratford. CT Basement, contractor for brought this breach-of-contract KBE Building Corp., contrac- Perform external renovations at Caterina Pond. Perform interior suit against the defendant for Billet, Lucy N., Bridgeport. tor for Commerce Bank. Perform an existing commercial build- renovations at an existing single- failing to pay for equipment $162,222.20, in favor of Norwalk interior renovations at an existing, 2725 Main St., Stratford. family residence, 8 McLaren delivered by the plaintiff. The Health Care Center Inc., Nor- ing commercial building, 1733 Estimated cost: $225,550. Filed Road, Darien. Estimated cost: amount of $166,899.15 is due walk. Property: 4120 Main St., Black Rock Turnpike, Fairfield. the defendant. Filed April 18. $20,000. Filed April 18. April 23. Bridgeport. Filed April 22. Estimated cost: $143,743. Filed Case no, 6034753. April 19. Tartora, Carmen Family Ltd., Deluca, Nick. Perform roof reLopes, Ana Maria and Cesar, et contractor for Fairfield Medical pairs at an existing single-fam- Fishbone L.L.C. d.b.a. Fjord al., Bridgeport. $38,000, in favor Landis Partners Inc., GreenGroup. Fit-out an existing com- ily residence, 1790 Cutspring Fisheries Market & Fjord of East Haven Builders Supply, wich, contractor for 79 Elm St., mercial building at 1280 Post Road, Stratford. Estimated cost: Kitchen and Jardar Nygaard, East Haven, by Bruce L. Elstein, L.L.C. Perform additions and Cos Cob. Filed by Sid Wainer & Road, Fairfield. Estimated cost: $2,200. Filed April 24. Bridgeport. Property: 1 Edge- alterations at an existing comSon, New Bedford, Mass. Plain$25,000. Filed April 18. wood St. and 9 Duck St., Unit D, mercial building, 61 Elm St., tiff’s attorneys: Andrew R. BiBridgeport. Filed April 17. DJ’s Roofi ng, contractor for lodeau and Ryanna T. Capalbo, New Canaan. Estimated cost: Kevin Lee. Reroof an existing Warwick, R.I. Action: The plain$140,000. Filed April 19. RESiDEntiAL single-family residence, 10 Rock- tiff has brought this breach-ofland Ave., Stratford. Estimated contract suit against the defenLawncroft Cooperative Cem- A and J Home Improvement, cost: $4,600. Filed April 23. dant for failing to make payment etery. Perform renovations at an Yonkers, N.Y., contractor for on products and/or services deexisting commercial building, Tejal Wadhwani. Convert a livered by the plaintiff. The de1740 Black Rock Turnpike, Fair- four-family residence into a fendant has failed to render payCOURT CASES field. Estimated cost: $642,637. two-family residence, 28 Powell ment for the sum of $2,561.85. Filed April 18. Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: Filed April 23. Case no. 6034795. $110,860. Filed April 16. BRiDGEPORt Mandel, Irwin, Stamford, conForces of Nature Inc., Sonoma, Items appearing in the Fairfield tractor for 425 Fairfield Avenue Anthom Building L.L.C., Sto- DiStRiCt COURt Calif. Filed by Crossbow Group County Business Journal’s On The L.L.C. Perform interior renova- nybrook, N.Y. Construct a new Record section are compiled from L.L.C., Westport. Plaintiff’s attions at an existing commercial various sources, including public single-family residence, 8 Shore Alex Food Inc. d.b.a. Compare torney: Stephen J. Curley, Stamrecords made available to the media building, 425 Fairfield Ave., Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: Foods Supermarkets and Car- ford. Action: The plaintiff has by federal, state and municipal Building 1, Stamford. Estimated $900,000. Filed April 15. los Pena, Bridgeport. Filed by brought this breach-of-contract agencies and the court system. cost: $60,000. Filed April 16. Clipper Magazine L.L.C. d.b.a. suit against the defendant for While every effort is made to ensure Clpper Magazine. Plaintiff’s at- failing to pay for advertising, the accuracy of this information, Better Homes Construction, torney: Linda Strumpf, New Ca- marketing and consulting serno liability is assumed for errors Rita and Brothers L.L.C., Stamor omissions. In the case of legal Stamford, contractor for Celeste ford. Reduce to core, 888 River- Baranowski. Perform external naan. Action: The plaintiff has vices provided by the plainaction, the records cited are open bank Road, Stamford. Estimated additions at an existing single- brought this breach-of-contract tiff. The defendant has failed to public scrutiny and should be suit against the defendant for to render payment for the sum inspected before any action is taken. cost: $13,000. Filed April 16. family residence, 9 Amherst failing to pay for the ad it placed of $14,167.08. Filed April 22. Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: in plaintiff’s magazine. The de- Case no. 6034779. Questions and comments regarding $5,250. Filed April 18. this section should be directed to: fendant has failed to pay for serBob Rozycki vices rendered. Filed April 24. c/o Westfair Communications Inc. Case no. 6034833. 3 Gannett Drive, Suite G7

ATTACHMENTSFILED

BUILDING PERMITS

Signature Construction, Stamford, contractor for RFR Realty L.L.C. Perform external renovations at an existing commercial building, 127 Greyrock Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $1.3 million. Filed April 18.

White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: (914)694-3600 Fax: (914)694-3680

Frenchie L.L.C., Stratford. Filed by Katona Corner L.L.C., Fairfield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Stephan B. Grozinger, Weston. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failure to make payments on a lease termination and surrender agreement. Filed April 25. Case no. 6034864. H. Greg Investments Inc., Doral, Fla. and Guisepper Augastino Boccanfuso III, Hallandale Beach, Fla. Filed by Domenick Boccanfuso, Westport. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Brenton J. Elliott and Michael A. Laux, Westport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for unjust enrichment as the plaintiff executed two quitclaim deeds to the defendant who held the properties in trust for the plaintiff. The defendant sold the properties and failed to transfer the property back to the plaintiff. Filed April 24. Case no. 6034838. M2 Systems Corp., Maitland, Fla. Filed by Indoor Billboard Northwest Inc., et al. Arizona, Colo. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Alan J. Rome and John J. Robacynski, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for the failure to pay the loan in question. Filed April 25. Case no. 6034867. OB/GYN Professional Associates P.C. and Corinne E. de Cholnoky M.D., Stamford. Filed by Melanie Foster, Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorneys: Andrew W. Skolnick, David A. Slossberg and David C. Shufrin, Milford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for malpractice and negligence and the wrongful death of an infant. Filed April 24. Case no. 6034831. Quinn Contracting L.L.C., Fairfield. Filed by Vincent Sorentino, Mlford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Kyle T. Auty, Milford. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to obtain the necessary permits and to perform work agreed upon in a timely manner. Filed April 23. Case no. 6034800.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 19


on the record The Boeing Co., et al. Filed by Joan and Dominic Caristo, Niantic. Plaintiff’s attorney: Christopher Meisenkothen, New Haven. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for asbestos exposure while working for the defendant. The defendant had failed to provide adequate warnings and safety instructions about the dangers of being exposed to and inhaling asbestos and asbestos-related products. Filed April 17. Case no. 6034724. UAG Fairfield CM L.L.C. d.b.a. Mercedes-Benz of Fairfield. Filed by Hearst Media Services/ Connecticut Post. Plaintiff’s attorney: Howard Evan Ignal, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay for advertising services provided by the plaintiff. Filed April 24. Case no. 6034827. Village at Long Hill Green L.L.C. and Benedetto, Frank and Assunta di Marco. Filed by Sam Devellis, Trumbull. Plaintiff’s attorney: Joseph P. Ziehl, Monroe. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-ofconract suit against the defendant for failing to close the sale of property under the agreedupon provisions. Filed April 23. Case no. 6034798.

Will Rodgers & Associates and Will Rodgers, Salt Lake City, Utah. Filed by The Lawyers Group Advertising Inc., Darien. Plaintiff’s attorney: Lori M. Dion, Fairfield. Action: The plaintiff has brought this breach-of-contract suit against the defendant for failing to pay for advertising services pursuant to an agreement. Filed April 24. Case no. 6034825.

Danbury District Court Bank of America N.A. Filed by the Law Office of Randolph T. Lovallo PC and William D. Kynast, Ridgefield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Randolph T. Lovallo, Ridgefield. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for its failure to release the plaintiff’s mortgage in a timely manner. Filed April 22. Case no. 6012236.

Stamford District Court

Eyelematic Manufacturing Co. Inc., Watertown. Filed by Juan Rivera, Waterbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: James V. Sabatini, Newington. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for violation of the Americans with disabilities act as the plaintiff suffered from a medical condition for which the defendant did not make any concessions. The plaintiff returned to work and found that his employment was terminated. Filed April 22. Case no. 13cv00582.

Add the Flavor L.L.C., Nutley, N.J., Corey Capasso, New York, Bruce Angus, Weston and Mogo Sport L.L.C., Wilton. Filed by David Fuhrer Enterprises L.L.C., Los Angeles, Calif. Plaintiff’s attorney: James T. Shearin, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit against the defendant for a breach of partnership agreement, contract and fiduciary duty. Filed April 17. Case no. 6018002. Cytec Industries Inc., et al., West Paterson, N.J. Filed by Kathrin Kurek, Hartford. PlainPelli Inc. d.b.a. Servpro of tiff’s attorney: Anthony J. InterStamford, Stamford. Filed by landi, East Berlin. Action: The Connecticut Tank Removal Inc., plaintiff has brought this suit Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: against the defendant for genLouis J. Bonsangue, Greenwich. der discrimination, unequal pay Action: The plaintiff has brought and retaliation and wrongful this breach-of-conract suit discharge as the plaintiff found against the defendant for failing that she was being paid less than to pay for services rendered. Filed a colleague of the opposite sex. April 24. Case no. 6018082. The plaintiff claims compensatory and punitive damages. Filed Sam & Ty L.L.C., et al., Nor- April 25. Case no. 13cv00595. walk. Filed by Impactiva S. De R.L. Plaintiff’s attorney: Gary Miller Motorcars Inc., GreenJ. Greene, Farmington. Action: wich. Filed by EUMAR PharThe plaintiff has brought this ma GMBH, et al. Ravensburg, breach-of-contract suit against Germany. Plaintiff’s attorney: the defendant for failing to pay for Stefan R. Underhill. Action: services provided. Filed April 22. The plaintiff has brought this Case no. 6018034. suit against the defendant for a breach of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act as the plaintiff SUPERIOR COURT had brought the vehicle from the defendant and was assured that Precision Metal Products Inc., the vehicle would be covered by Milford. Filed by Diamilette Mc- the warranty. It was found that Miller, New Haven. Plaintiff’s the vehicle in question was not attorney: John R. Williams, New compatible with the emissions Haven. Action: The plaintiff has tests in Germany. Filed April 24. brought this suit against the de- Case no. 13cv00588. fendant as she was injured while on duty. The defendant refused DEEDS to provide the plaintiff with reasonable accommodation of her disability as prescribed by her COMMERCIAL physician. The plaintiff requests a trial by jury, compensatory and punitive damages. Filed April 22. 988 Reef Road L.L.C., Westport. Seller: 988 to 990 Reef Road Case no. 13cv00577. L.L.C., Saddle River, N.J. Property: 988 to 990 Reef Road, FairAircastle Advisor L.L.C., Stam- field. Amount: $330,000. Filed ford. Filed by Sandra Moody, April 16. East Haven. Plaintiff’s attorney: Laurel Fedor, Westport. Action: The plaintiff has brought this suit Brooklawn Offices L.L.C., against the defendant for viola- Derby. Seller: Brooklawn Suites tion of the plaintiff’s civil rights L.L.C., Fairfield. Property: 90 act, pregnancy discrimination Brooklawn Ave., Bridgeport. and the family medical leave act. Amount: $255,131. Filed April 18. The plaintiff requests a trial by jury, reinstatement and recovery CVP 49 L.L.C., New York City. of lost wages and benefits. Filed Seller: 49 West Putnam Avenue April 21. Case no. 13cv00575. L.L.C., Greenwich. Property: 49 W. Putnam Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $3.6 million. Filed April 12.

20 Week of May 6, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

EAI L.L. L.L.C., Yonkers, N.Y. Seller: Myrna Atwater, Bridgeport. Property: 1111 to 1113 North Ave., Bridgeport. Amount: $150,000. Filed April 22. Luna Holdings L.L.C., Greenwich. Seller: Winthrop Drive L.L.C., Old Greenwich. Property: 44 Winthrop Drive, Old Greenwich. Amount: $3.8 million. Filed April 19. Main Coffee House L.L.C. and G&M Investments L.L.C., Trumbull. Seller: Lucy Billet Inter Vivos Trust, Bridgeport. Property: 4150 Main St., Bridgeport. Amount: $750,000. Filed April 22.

Adams, Jillian and Joseph C., Bronx, N.Y. Seller: Mary T. and Michael J. Ryan, New Fairfield. Property: 16 Pondfield Road, New Fairfield. Amount: $307,500. Filed April 16. Adelman, Wesley E. and Scott, Fairfield. Seller: Janis Bowersox, Fairfield. Property: 207 Shoreham Village Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $560,000. Filed April 23. Amalfitano, Robert W., Danbury. Seller: Emily and Aaron Crandall, Danbury. Property: 5 Sunset Ridge, Danbury. Amount: $275,000. Filed April 18.

Anderson, Karl M., St. Francis, Wis. Seller: Barbara A. and WilNew Canaan Library Inc., New liam V. Burnside III, Ridgefield. Canaan. Seller: Joan B. and Wil- Property: 21 Keeler Place, Ridgeliam M. Hutchinson, New Ca- field. Amount: $625,000. Filed naan. Property: 56 South Ave., April 12. New Canaan. Amount: $785,000. Filed April 19. Anderson, Susan and Eric, Greenwich. Seller: 45 Highview Pech, Caroline R. and John Avenue L.L.C., Stamford. PropW. Leslie Jr., Southport. Seller: erty: 45 Highview Ave., GreenCharlene Sumner Revocable wich. Amount: $2.5 million. Trust, Wellington, Fla. Property: Filed April 16. 328 Sasco Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $4.5 million. Filed Aubrey Living Trust, StamApril 16. ford. Seller: Echo Valley L.L.C., Fairfield. Property: 59 Old Post Maple Real Estate L.L.C., Rock Lane, Norwalk. Amount: Westport. Seller: Joseph Roth- $899,000. Filed April 19. man Westport L.L.C., Westport. Property: 1529 Post Road East, FORECLOSURES Westport. Amount: $3.4 million. Filed April 22. Arpi, Luis Arturo Creditor: Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Toda Capital L.L.C., Norwalk. Property: 9 Starr Ave., Danbury. Seller: FM Investments L.L.C., Mortgage default. Filed April 22. Norwalk. Property: 61, 63 and 67 Aiken St., Norwalk. Amount: $257,500. Filed April 22. Arteagas, Servio T., et al. Creditor: First County Bank, Stamford. Property: 4 Sherman St., Woodrow Holdings L.L.C., Stamford. Mortgage default. Bridgeport. Seller: Theresa De- Filed April 15. Mattia, Southport. Property: 155 to 157 Woodrow Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $360,000. Filed April 22. Gautrau, Roger Administrator, et al. Creditor: Connecticut Housing Finance Authority, Fort Washington, Pa. Property: QUIT CLAIM 3 Stetson Place, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed April 22. Franklin, Kathleen A. and Joseph M., Naples, Fla. Seller: Rose A. and Frank L. Giambrone, McCarthy, Patricia Anna and Greenwich. Property: 4 Put- Donald James. Creditor: HSBC nam Hill, Unit 2G, Greenwich. Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Amount: $590,000. Filed April 15. Property: 16 Mountain View Ave., Ridgefield. Mortgage default. Filed April 15.

Pawloski, John. Creditor: Wells Fargo Bank N.A., San Antonio, Texas. Property: 41 Balmforth Ave., Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed April 22. Rivera, Enrique. Creditor: Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls S.D. Property: 1998 Seaview Ave., Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Filed April 23. Straiton, Adelaida and Algeris Jerez. Creditor: Union Savings Bank, Danbury. Property: 7 Spruce Mountain Road, Danbury. Mortgage default. Filed April 17. Suib, June Murphy, et al. Creditor: Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 5 Obtuse Road South, Newtown. Mortgage default. Filed April 18. Westrup, Susan and Kim L. Creditor: Hudson City Savings Bank, Paramus, N.J. Property: 26 Little Fox Lane, Westport. Mortgage default. Filed April 22.

FORECLOSURESBY SALE Bayview Loan Servicing, Coral Gables, Fla. Appointed Committee: Frederick J. Martin, Monroe. Property: 106 Clark St., Bridgeport. Amount: $113,400. Docket no. 09cv60034595. Filed April 18.

JUDGMENTS Alfaro, Walter, Stamford. $8,536.92, in favor of Discover Bank, Salem N.H., by Raymond G. LeFoll, Rocky Hill. Property: 60 Pine Tree Drive, Stamford. Filed April 12. Appell, Eleanor, New Fairfield. $3,845.90, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 331 and 408 Route 37, New Fairfield. Filed April 18.

Armstrong, Robert E., Stamford. $1,454.85, in favor of Capital One N.A., Glen Allen, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East HartRESIDENTIAL ford. Property: 32 Hanrahan St., Molina, Byron, et al. Credi- Stamford. Filed April 12. Ache, Nicole K. and Alexander tor: Deutsche Bank National C., Bethel. Seller: Lynn Napol- Trust, trustee, West Palm Beach, itano-Vazquez and Joseph A. Fla. Property: 89 Marconi Ave., Vazquez, Newtown. Property: 10 Bridgeport. Mortgage default. Saw Mill Ridge Road, Newtown. Filed April 17. Amount: $277,780. Filed April 22.


on the record CREDITS, CLIENTS AND AWARDS

CHRISTOPHER ZELL has been appointed senior client manON THE GO ager of specialized industries at Bank of America. Zell assists business executives and owners in accessing financial managePULLMAN & COMLEY L.L.C was recently recognized as one ment services. Zell holds a Bachelor of Science degree in finance WEDNESDAY MAY 8 the Best Places to Work in Connecticut 2013. The winners were from Central Connecticut State University and an MBA from Women’s Leadership Council Annual Luncheon, noon, Vazselected through a statewide survey, which was designed to the University of Connecticut. zano’s Four Season, 337 Kenyon St., Stratford. For information, identify, recognize and honor the best places of employment in visit brbrc.org. Connecticut.

THURSDAY MAY 9

PRUDENTIAL CONNECTICUT REALTY recently announced the top sales executives in its Norwalk office.

National Society for the Gifted and Talented hosts Mission Possible Fundraising Event, 7 to 10 p.m., Hyatt Regency, 1800 E. Putnam Ave. Old Greenwich. For information, call (800) 572-6748 or visit nsgt.org.

SUE COOPER was awarded the Top Listing Agent. MARK NAMM won the Top Selling Award.

SNAPSHOT

NEWSMAKERS

ROBERT J. GRANATA has been promoted to executive vice HOTEL ZERO DEGREES NORWALK recently celebrated its opening with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Norwalk Mayor Richard president and chief credit and risk officer at First County Bank. Moccia attended. Granata is responsible for the mortgage operations, credit administration and enterprise-risk management programs.

FRANK P. MICALIZZI of Ridgefield and previously of JPMorgan Chase has been promoted to group vice president at M&T Bank. Micalizzi is responsible for the middle-market, nonprofit and health care business segments. He is a graduate of Davis and Elkins College in West Virginia. AL MIRIN of New Canaan has been appointed executive director in Cushman & Wakefield’s investment sales group. Mirin will be responsible for the private capital group, which specializes in middle-market building sales. Mirin holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from the State University of New York.

WESTPORT RESOURCES, an independent investment and financial planning firm in Westport, recently announced the following appointments. CHRISTOPHER DELAURA, previously of UBS, has been promoted to chief operating officer of the company’s wealth management division. DeLaura holds a bachelor’s degree in finance and information systems from New York University. ASHLEY SCHEXNAILDRE has joined the company as controller of Westport Resources Management Inc. and Westport Resources Investment Services Inc. Schexnaildre holds a master’s degree in accounting from the University of Virginia and a bachelor’s degree in finance from Providence College.

From left, Randy Salvatore, Tim Simpson, Ramze Zakka, Mayor Richard Moccia and Connecticut state Sen. Bob Duff

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

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on the record Arnow, Alan L., Fairfield. $10,074.13, in favor of Discover Bank, Salem N.H., by Raymond G. LeFoll, Rocky Hill. Property: 154 Tahmore Drive, Fairfield. Filed April 22.

Cohen, Hillary M., Bridgeport. $1,054.40, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Sara M. Gould, Stamford. Property: 166 Old Brookfield Road, Unit 8C6, Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

Farrell, Joanne L., Stamford. $1,001.64, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 65 Summit Ridge Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Kelly, Susan M., Stamford. $594.77, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 2398 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Mauldin, Mark, Ridgefield. $2,471.17, in favor of Casey Fuel Co. Inc., Ridgefield, by Joseph A. Egan Jr., Ridgefield. Property: 10 Strawberry Ridge, Ridgefield. Filed April 10.

Perez, Carmen, Bridgeport. $1,009.06, in favor of Unifund Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio, by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 205 Ortega Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 17.

Baker, Richard P., Fairfield. $7,816, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Colo., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 374 Pine Creek Ave., Fairfield. Filed April 22.

Cohen, Hillary M., Bridgeport. $1,893.05, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Sara M. Gould, Stamford. Property: 166 Old Brookfield Road, Unit 8C6, Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

Festa, Ralph, Bridgeport. $26,572.67, in favor of Discover Bank, New York City, by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 76 Judith Drive, Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

Kinsman, Marianne and Mark, Brookfield. $442.17, in favor of Carlson Therapy Network P.C., Cheshire, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 19 Clearview Drive, Brookfield. Filed April 19.

Maxwell, Claudette, Bridgeport. $1,936.22, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 177 Jewett Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 17.

Pham, Hoi V., Bridgeport. $1,494.34, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Sara M. Gould, Stamford. Property: 49 Merrimac St., Apt. 1, Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

Ballard, Jose, Stamford. $958.57, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 102 Holcomb Ave., Stamford. Filed April 12.

Colburn, Carol, Fairfield. $5,539.47, in favor of Precision Recovery Analytics Inc., Hawthorne, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 139 Old Barn Road, Fairfield. Filed April 22.

Forte, Frank V., Fairfield. $11,648.31, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 184 Sigwin Drive, Fairfield. Filed April 22.

Kopko, Valentina and Thomas A. Jr., Bridgeport. $2,500, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by V. Michael Simko Jr., Shelton. Property: 39 Valley Stream Drive, Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

McClain, Nadine, New Fairfield. $1,391.21, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 2 Flak Lane, New Fairfield. Filed April 15.

Pham, Thanh H., Bridgeport. $914.11, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 49 Merrimac St., Apt. 1, Bridgeport. Filed April 22.

Bellehumeur, Suzanne, Stamford. $4,872.16, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 41 Ogden Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Collins, Ani, Bridgeport. $1,858.75, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 146 Jones Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 17.

Genoa, Candida, Bridgeport. $1,161.62, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 16 Melrose Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

McEvoy, Scott P., Stamford. $1,240.39, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 31 Turn of River Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Pia, Holly, Bridgeport. $664.79, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 19 Henry St., Bridgeport. Filed April 18.

Bernal, Claudia, Brookfield. $1,113.93, in favor of U.S. Equities Corp., South Salem, N.Y., by Linda Strumpf, New Canaan. Property: 3 Robins Lane, Brookfield. Filed April 19.

Cooper, Michael D., Bridgeport. $44,950.17, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 6 Valley Road, Bridgeport. Filed April 22.

Gillen, Peter A. Jr., Norwalk. $16,076.04, in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 3 Trailside Drive, Norwalk. Filed April 22.

McEvoy, Scott P., Stamford. $858.23, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 31 Turn of River Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Pierre-Louis, David J., Stamford. $140.91, in favor of Capital One N.A., Richmond, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 500 Long Ridge Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Bria, Barbara A., Stamford. $1,174.42, in favor of Great Seneca Financial Corp., Rockville, Md., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 83 Givens Ave., Stamford. Filed April 12.

Corley, Valerie, Stamford. $125.49, in favor of Palisades Collection L.L.C., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 71 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 209, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Gregoire, Nancy and Matthew, Redding. $897.97, in favor of Ridgefield Diagnostics Imaging, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 20 Deer Hill Road, Redding. Filed April 22.

Molina, Alfredo, Stamford. $750.26, in favor of Capital One N.A., Glen Allen, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 44 Maher Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Rhode, Janice, Bridgeport. $2,701.99, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 182 Brushy Hill Road, Bridgeport. Filed April 22.

Britt, Roger, Stamford. $920.97, in favor of Pailsades Collection L.L.C., Englewood Cliffs, N.J., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 21 Stephen St., Stamford. Filed April 12. Cassell, Susan M., Stamford. $525, in favor of Stamford Hospital, Stamford, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 58 Lindstrom Road, Stamford. Filed April 12.

Coubron, Jeanette and Cal Drywall L.L.C., Bridgeport. $7,041.24, in favor of Marjam Supply Co., Hartford, by Eric Hard, West Hartford. Property: 809 Cleveland Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 18.

Groberio, Selvino, Bridgeport. $932.79, in favor of Asset Acceptance L.L.C., Warren, Mich., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 355 Ruth St., Bridgeport. Filed April 17.

Hale, Edwin, Bridgeport. $639.98, in favor of Western Dishuk, Robert, Bridgeport. Connecticut Medical Group, $638.76, in favor of Western Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury. Property: 19 Henry St., Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Bridgeport. Filed April 18. Danbury. Property: 55 Mill Plain Road, Unit 3-5, Bridgeport. Filed Cestone, Mark, Bridgeport. April 22. Jones, Edward, Bridgeport. $2,336.61, in favor of Cavalry $716.25, in favor of Danbury DiSPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., agnostic Imaging, Danbury, by by Joseph M. Tobin, New Ha- Eriquez, Frederick J., Bridge- Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Propven. Property: 113 Kahanza St., port. $473.99, in favor of West- erty: 40 Tamanny Trail, BridgeBridgeport. Filed April 15. ern Connecticut Medical Group, port. Filed April 17. Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 8 Somers St., Cherry, Jill, New Fairfield. Bridgeport. Filed April 22. Karashik, Steven, Ridgefield. $3,295.81, in favor of Unifund $2,209.93, in favor of Midland Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio, by JoFunding L.L.C., San Diego, Caseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Esposito, Scott, Bethel. $482.20, lif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Property: 7 Hillview Drive East, in favor of Western Connecticut Hartford. Property: 43 MaNew Fairfield. Filed April 22. Medical Group, Danbury, by manasco Road, Ridgefield. Filed Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Prop- April 15. erty: 2 Fairchild Drive, Bethel. Filed April 18.

22 Week of May 6, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Lalla, Sharon L., New Fairfield. $612.85, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 4 Sobel Drive, New Fairfield. Filed April 19. Lewis, Dorothy, Bridgeport. $2,898.49, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 10 Tilden Road, Bridgeport. Filed April 18. Lindsey, Melissa, New Fairfield. $3,039.73, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: P.O. Box 8215, New Fairfield. Filed April 15. Lombardo, Daniel, Bridgeport. $469.90, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 10 Fox Den Road, Bridgeport. Filed April 18. Longhi Rinaldo, Bridgeport. $976.98, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 204 Burnsford Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 17.

Mora, Vincent V., Bridgeport. $14,447.97, in favor of American Express Centurion Bank, New York City, by Sara M. Gould, Stamford. Property: 8 Mallory St., Bridgeport. Filed April 15. Oboy, Susan I., Bethel. $13,911.79, in favor of Portfolio Recovery Associates L.L.C., Norfolk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 10 Pell Mell Drive, Bethel. Filed April 22.

Luz, Vinicius Zucoloto, Bethel. $12,296.77, in favor of Danbury Hospital, Danbury, by V. Michael Simko Jr., Shelton. Property: 7 Hudson St., Bethel. Filed April 22.

Pacheco, Edgar E., Sandy Hook. $16,386.07, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Colo., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 28 Old Greenwich Road, Sandy Hook. Filed April 22.

Marston, Annette, Stamford. $2,053.27, in favor of Capital One N.A., Glen Allen, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 217 Seaside Ave., Stamford. Filed April 12.

Paquay, Segundo, Bridgeport. $16,403.19, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Col., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 93 Franklin St., Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

Richards, Robert Sr., Fairfield. $17,228.26, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 91 Pease Ave., Fairfield. Filed April 22. Rodgriguez, Martina, Bridgeport. $3,039.09, in favor of Cavalry SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 725 Howard Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 17. Russo Rose, Greenwich. $2,224.69, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 282 Bruce Park Ave., Apt. 2, Greenwich. Filed April 12. Samoskevich, Frederick A. Jr., Newtown. $7,585.41, in favor of Citibank N.A., Sioux Falls, S.D., by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 22A Philo Curtis Road, Newtown. Filed April 19.


on the record Sanchez, Martin, Bridgeport. $892.10, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 33 Hillside Ave., Bridgeport. Filed April 17.

Thompson, Abbie, Stamford. $3,474.35, in favor of Midland Funding L.L.C., San Diego, Calif., by Holly Nelen, East Hartford. Property: 20 Spruce St., Apt. 11, Stamford. Filed April 15.

Sauveur, Ivel, Stamford. $683.50, in favor of Norwalk Hospital Association, Norwalk, by Robert E. Johnson, East Hartford. Property: 1 Orange St., Stamford. Filed April 12.

Torres, Luisa, New Fairfield. $424.21, in favor of Western Connecticut Medical Group, Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 2 Hewlett Road, New Fairfield. Filed April 18.

Siguenza, Maria, Bridgeport. $1,902.24, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Colo., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 55 Cross St., Unit C4, Bridgeport. Filed April 15.

Vanegas, Guillermo A., Bridgeport. $2,807.25, in favor of Cach L.L.C., Denver, Colo., by Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Property: 215 Wilson St., Bridgeport. Filed April 17.

Amherst Group Ltd, 21 Hendrie Ave., Riverside. $29,245.66, payroll taxes and annual return of withheld federal income tax. Filed April 15.

Greenwich Child & Adolescent Psyciatry L.L.C., 7 Riversville Road, Greenwich. $19,814.13, payroll taxes and quarterly tax returns. Filed April 15.

Avdiu, Opala, 302 Compo Road South, Westport. $278,254.76, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22.

Grubard, Gary M., 38 Harrison St., Danbury. $42,534.18, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15.

Bowman, Marian R. and Andrew B., 807 Cascade Drive, Fairfield. $84,872.29, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 17.

Haig, Pater C., 4 Maple Ave., Apt. 1, Bethel. $39,021.10, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22.

Parry, Nora Y. and Mark N., 10 Long Meadow Road, Riverside. $110,494.40, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSRELEASED

Paynter, Janice L. and Daniel M., 24 Palisades Road, Newtown. $112,361, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22.

Alavian, Seyed H., 29 Burroughs Road, Fairfield. $8,262.61, trust fund recovery penalty and/or excise taxes imposed. Filed April 17.

Peoples, Camille, 2340 North Ave., Bridgeport. $29,053.79, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 23.

Appadu, Phlomena and Franky H. Carr, 31 Walnut Tree Hill Road, Sandy Hook. $51,926.20, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22.

Reiss, Ronald J., 404 W. Halvorsen, Helge, 37 Long Lots Lyon Farm Drive, Greenwich. Road, New Canaan. $495,125.75, $80,251.35, tax debt on income trust fund recovery penalty and/ earned. Filed April 15. or excise taxes imposed. Filed April 16. Rufino, Santiago Moreno, 7 Silva, Virginia A., Bridgeport. Vendinha, Carmen, Bridgeport. New Street, Apt. 33, Danbury. $2,468.82, in favor of Cavalry $680.76, in favor of Danbury Carr, Hilary and Christopher T., 465 Pinfield Road, Fairfield. James, Raymond, 66 Ob$17,840.02, tax debt on income SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Hospital, Danbury, by Robert L. Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. Peat, Danbury. Property: 38 Farm $124,693, tax debt on income tuse Road South, Brookfield. earned. Filed April 16. earned. Filed April 17. $41,358.05, tax debt on income Property: 3 Oak Trail, Bridge- St., Bridgeport. Filed April 22. earned. Filed April 22. port. Filed April 15. Smith, Scott, 237 Branchville Christensen, Karen, 32 Arther Road, Ridgefield. $1.4 million, Villavicencio, Juana, BridgeSokolski, Yolanda, Fairfield. port. $516.02, in favor of West- St., Greenwich. $14,420.11, tax Klein, Virginia, 48 Lounsbury tax debt on income earned. Filed $1,360.34, in favor of Portfolio ern Connecticut Medical Group, debt on income earned. Filed Road, Fairfield. $27,023.99, trust April 15. fund recovery penalty and/or exRecovery Associates L.L.C., Nor- Danbury, by Robert L. Peat, April 15. cise taxes imposed. Filed April 17. folk, Va., by Robert E. Johnson, Danbury. Property: 17 Topstone Vogel, Anne M. and Frank, 91 East Hartford. Property: 80 Cedar Drive, Bridgeport. Filed April 17. D’Ambrosio Donuts Inc., 1908 Alberts Hill Road, Sandy Hook. Road, Fairfield. Filed April 22. Black Rock Turnpike, Fairfield. Klein, Virginia and Raymond, $14,482.65, tax debt on income Villaviciencio, Elda, Bridge- $51,539.31, corporation income 48 Lounsbury Road, Fairfield. earned. Filed April 22. Steer, Richard, Bridgeport. port. $672.40, in favor of Dan- tax return; failure to file or file $3,140, tax debt on income $1,227.96, in favor of Portfolio bury Hospital, Danbury, by Rob- correct information returns. earned. Filed April 22. W L M Construction L.L.C. and Recovery Associates L.L.C., Nor- ert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 3 Filed April 17. Wanderlee L. Machado, 3 Ridgfolk, Va., by Joseph M. Tobin, Fairview Drive, Unit 4, BridgeKronen, Ron, 16 Cherry Drive, eside Road, Danbury. $10,987.82, New Haven. Property: 466 Savoy port. Filed April 22. Ellis, Gerald F., P.O. Box 1151, New Fairfield. $51,081.89, tax payroll taxes and quarterly tax St., Bridgeport. Filed April 17. New Canaan. $398,714.69, tax debt on income earned. Filed returns. Filed April 16. Woods, John Steven, Bridge- debt on income earned. Filed April 15. Stewart, Roger, Bridgeport. port. $10,699.67, in favor of Dan- April 22. Wicker, Howard J., 839 $1,439.54, in favor of Cavalry bury Hospital, Danbury, by V. Mascetta, Lori M. and Chris- Wintergreen Ave., Hamden. SPV I L.L.C., Valhalla, N.Y., by Michael Simko Jr., Shelton. Prop- Frank, Erich J., 1294 Menard St., topher C., 3 Lamar Road, Dan- $122,008.92, tax debt on income Joseph M. Tobin, New Haven. erty: 25 Locust Ave., Bridgeport. Uniondale, N.Y.. $302,276.05, bury. $33,766.50, tax debt on in- earned. Filed April 23. Property: 28 Park Wood Terrace Filed April 22. tax debt on income earned. Filed come earned. Filed April 16. Drive, Bridgeport. Filed April 15. April 15. Woodside, James M., 35 Zahansky, Bonnie and Jeff, et Menozzi, Carrie L. and Pierre Franklin St., Unit 2, Westport. T Brothers Construction L.L.C. al. Newtown. $390.55, in favor Freund, Peter C., 7 Heu- Matt, 785 Riverside Drive, Fair- $11,856.26, tax debt on income and Kevin Truchsess, Bridge- of Superior Plus Energy Services, sted Drive, Old Greenwich. field. $17,012.32, tax debt on in- earned. Filed April 22. port. $2,519.59, in favor of Ka- Winsted, by William G. Reveley, $425,006.82, tax debt on income come earned. Filed April 17. mco Supply Corporation of New Vernon. Property: 2 Blackman earned. Filed April 15. England, Wallingford, by Robert Road, Newtown. Filed April 16. Morales, Rigoberto, 23 FEDERAL TAX LIENSA. Ziegler and Taryn D. Martin, Friedman, Craig D., 19 Cross Dryden St., Apt. 2, Stamford. PARTIAL RELEASE Plainville. Property: 34 Stevens Highway, Westport. $1.01 mil- $204,380.39, tax debt on income St., Bridgeport. Filed April 15. LIENS lion, tax debt on income earned. earned. Filed April 16. Guerrero, Monica M., 46 SylFiled April 22. van Knoll Road, Stamford. Thigpen, Aubrey K., Bridge- FEDERAL TAX LIENSNemirow, Joan K. and Bruce I., $43,325.32, tax debt on income port. $543.56, in favor of Carlson Frydman, Perry, 12 Edgerton 54 Lyons Plains Road, Westport. earned. Filed April 16. Therapy Network P.C., Cheshire, FILED St., Darien. $54,844.69, tax debt $290,552.33, tax debt on income by Robert L. Peat, Danbury. Property: 193 Platt St., Bridge- Adam Stelmaszek & Sons Inc., on income earned. Filed April 16. earned. Filed April 15. Guerrero, Monica M., 46 Sylport. Filed April 18. 16 Edison Ave., Fairfield. $525.99, van Knoll Road, Stamford. payroll taxes. Filed April 17. $229,879.44, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 16. Brown, Willie Jr., 22-239 Marina Village Ridge Ave., Bridgeport. $17,534.68, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 17.

Asset Security Inc., 12 Laurel Wood Drive, New Fairfield. $24,439, payroll taxes and quarterly tax returns. Filed April 15. Carr, Franky H., 31 Walnut Tree Hill Road, Sandy Hook. $45,533.20, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22. Copprue, Lera Greenidge and Delano R., 43B Northfield St., Greenwich. $45,413.51, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15. Fiorito, Patricia Z. and Samuel F., 1 Martino Lane, Danbury. $16,154.03, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 16. Flower, Jeannine and Andrew, 244 Compo Road South, Westport. $31,074.40, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15. Foster, Janet Bianco and Andrew, 17 Hickory Drive, Westport. $39,169.85, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15. Foster, Janet Bianco and Andrew, 17 Hickory Drive, Westport. $13,707.66, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15. Fovama Oriental Rugs Ltd., 1385 Post Road East, Westport. $14,203.39, payroll taxes. Filed April 15. Mario’s Auto Service Inc., 52 Pembroke Road, Danbury. $2,214.50, payroll taxes. Filed April 22. Peteray, Nancy G., 439 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan. $29,247.42, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 16.

THE RECORDS SECTION IS NOW AVAILABLE BY DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION. Go to westfaironline.com/buy/records-section/ for more information and to view a sample.

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 23


on the record Pilchard, Edward B., 189 Hanover Road, Newtown. $303,751.97, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22. Robinson, Emma, 384 Cascade Road, Stamford. $154,677.25, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 16. Robinson, Emma Only, 325 Riversville Road, Greenwich. $7,340.58, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15. Robinson, Walter, 176 Seabright Ave., Bridgeport. $32,162.37, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 23. Rothe, Brian E., 9 Stony Brook Road, Brookfield. $3,477.48, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15.

MECHANIC’S LIENSFILED Accurate Fire Sprinkler, Southington and Seaview Plastic Recycling, Bridgeport. Filed by Supply Network Inc., Hastings, Mich., by Sara Walton. Property: 938 Crescent Ave., Bridgeport. Amount: $7,783.72. Filed April 18. Berkshire Shopping Center L.L.C., Bridgeport. Filed by Progroup Network Inc., Fairhaven, Mass., by David Maura. Property: 67 Newtown Road, Bridgeport. Amount: $4,968. Filed April 17. Caldwell & Walsh Building Construction Inc., Sandy Hook and Highland HC L.L.C., Ridgefield. Filed by Silvestri Fencing, Danbury, by Albert L. Silvestri Jr. Property: 123 to 125 S. Main St., Newtown. Amount: $4,562.31. Filed April 16.

Bradley, Rubin T., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Adrienne Roach, LIS PENDENS Hartford, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York Aguayo, Victor H., Newtown. City. Property: 79 to 81 Lee Ave., Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farm- Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose ington, for Bank of America a delinquent mortgage in the N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: original principal amount of 6 Old Gate Lane, Newtown. Ac- $225,000, dated May 2006. Filed tion: to foreclose a delinquent April 18. mortgage in the original principal amount of $409,400, dated Briceno, Juan Ruben, BridgeSeptember 2007. Filed April 18. port. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Bank of Allen, Hazel Estate, et al., America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Bridgeport. Filed by John J. Ri- Property: 248 to 250 Iranistan bas, Bridgeport, for Plymouth Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to forePark Tax Services L.L.C., Whip- close a delinquent mortgage in pany, N.J. Property: 257 Hollister the original principal amount of Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to fore- $244,000, dated January 2008. close tax liens levied by the city of Filed April 18. Bridgeport. Filed April 22.

Stahl, Irene F., 73 Pemberwick Road, Greenwich. $60,731.83, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15.

Alston, George E. Jr., et al. Norwalk. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Cenlar F.S.B., Trenton, N.J. Property: 50 Meadow St., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $297,000, dated February 2009. Ridgefield Modular Home Filed April 19. Corp., Ridgefield. Filed by Michael Mazzucco Jr., Danbury. Property: 24 North St., Ridge- Anderson, Clova M., et al., field. Amount: $21,194. Filed Bridgeport. Filed by Franklin G. April 16. Pillicy, Watertown, for Seaview Village Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 760-2 Seaview Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on unpaid MECHANIC’S LIENScommon assessments. Filed RELEASED April 17.

Ullman, Sabrina and Clifford M., 11 Taunton Lake Drive, Newtown. $24,706.83, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 17.

Berkey, Duane, Westport. Filed by Nick Aivalis, Stamford. Property: 6 Parsell Lane, Westport. Amount: $12,305. Filed April 15.

Viglielmo, Melissa, 954 S. Pine Creek Road, Fairfield. $39,625.12, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22.

MUNICIPAL REMEDIATION LIENS

Shanley, Maria and Paul, 30 Taylor Road, Bethel. $9,311.70, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22. Smith, Niora, 2218 Seaview Ave., Second floor, Bridgeport. $6,671.69, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 17.

Zippi, Gordon, 99 Reynolds Drive, Fairfield. $28,438.52, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 22.

FEDERAL TAX LIENSWITHDRAWAL AFTER RELEASE Kutai, Alon D., 414 Sound Beach Ave., Old Greenwich. $44,988.61, tax debt on income earned. Filed April 15.

Kocsis, Jennie, Bridgeport. Amount: $1,975. Filed for the city of Bridgeport by Christopher Rosario. Property: 60 Lenox Ave., Bridgeport. Expenses for the inspection and removal of debris. Filed April 22. Ochoa, Jessica, Bridgeport. Amount: $575. Filed for the city of Bridgeport by Christopher Rosario. Property: 1347 Pembroke St., Bridgeport. Expenses for the inspection and removal of debris. Filed April 22.

Brown, Larry V., et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Loren M. Bisberg, Farmington, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 194 to 196 Adams St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $216,800, dated February 2006. Filed April 18.

Chaber, George H. Jr., Bethel. Filed by Paul Lewis Otzel, Milford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 18 Deer Run, Unit 34, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $196,000, dated September 2005. Filed April 22. Corbano, Rose and Paulo Sarri, et al., Danbury. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for Park Ridge Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 8 Rose Lane, Unit 24-19, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed April 22.

Courtney, Randall, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Franklin G. Bu, Tuan and Ngoc Le, et al., Pillicy, Watertown, for Seaview Danbury. Filed by John J. Ribas, Village Condominium AssociaBridgeport, for Plymouth Park tion Inc., Bridgeport. Property: Tax Services L.L.C., Whippany, 770-4 Seaview Ave., Bridgeport. N.J. Property: 51 Park Ave., Unit Action: to foreclose on unpaid 2-9, Danbury. Action: to fore- common assessments. Filed close tax liens levied by the city of April 17. Danbury. Filed April 15.

Bush, Mamie L. and Jerry Sr., Bartoli, Frank Trust, et al., Danbury. Filed by Michael D. Danbury. Filed by Michael D. Reiner, Farmington, for American Reiner, Farmington, for Ameri- Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. can Tax Funding L.L.C., Jupiter, Property: 5 Bayberry Lane, DanFla. Property: 27 Crows Nest bury. Action: to foreclose a tax lien Lane, Unit 5E, Danbury. Action: held by the plaintiff, against real to foreclose a tax lien held by the property. Filed April 17. plaintiff, against real property. Filed April 17. Carpenter, Kimber Z. and Paul A., et al. Newtown. Filed by Bautista, Giovanna E. a.k.a. Gerald A. Gordon, Hartford, for Giovanna E. Donaires, et al., Wells Fargo Bank N.A., FrederStamford. Filed by Jo-Ann Sen- ick, Md. Property: 19 Parmalee sale, Farmington, for JPMorgan Hill Road, Newtown. Action: to Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, foreclose a delinquent mortgage Ohio. Property: 69 Clinton Ave., in the original principal amount Unit 1A, Stamford. Action: to of $195,000, dated September foreclose a delinquent mortgage 2003. Filed April 16. in the original principal amount of $206,000, dated February Castelli, Tiffany and Daniel D. 2008. Filed April 15. Heller, et al., Stamford. Filed by William W. Ward, Stamford, Berry, Lataya R., et al., Bridge- for Soundview Towers Associaport. Filed by Franklin G. Pillicy, tion Inc., Stamford. Property: 50 Watertown, for Seaview Village Glenbrook Road, Unit 6A, StamCondominium Association Inc., ford. Action: to foreclose a lien Bridgeport. Property: 780-2 held by the Plaintiff, against real Seaveiw Ave., Bridgeport. Action: property. Filed April 15. to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed April 17.

24 Week of May 6, 2013 • Fairfield County Business Journal

Cedeno, Sencion, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for The Bank of New York Mellon, trustee, New York City. Property: 7 Cornell St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $208,000, dated August 2004. Filed April 23.

Cragin, Andrea S. and Geoffrey S., Darien. Filed by Randall J. Carreirra, New Preston, for Preferred Air Systems Inc., Danbury. Property: 6 Dellwood Road, Darien. Action: to foreclose on a mechanic’s lien. Filed April 15. Culhane, Drew, et al., Danbury. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for Birchwood Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 27 Crows Nest Lane, Unit 7I, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed April 16. Davis, Katrina, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Mary Kate Mrazik, Farmington, for Connecticut Housing Financial Authority, Bridgeport. Property: 2209 North Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose tax liens levied by the city of $229,270, dated October 2009. Filed April 18.

Decaro, Angelo, et al. Greenwich. Filed by Frederic S. Ury, Fairfield, for VFC Partners 19 L.L.C. Property: 15 Lafayette Court, Unit 3B, Greenwich. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the principal amount of $4.9 million, dated December 2007. Filed April 16. Dennis, Dorothy, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Greentree Townhouse Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 715 Frenchtown Road, Unit 49, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed April 22. Diaz, Lillian and Kenneth Sellers, Norwalk. Filed for Goldman Sachs Mortgage Co., New York City. Property: 105 S. Main St., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $494,000, dated September 2007. Filed April 22. Donaher, Vanessa S. and Matthew, et al. Newtown. Filed by Paul Lewis Otzel, Milford, for Nationstar Mortgage L.L.C., Lewisville, Texas. Property: 30 Mount Pleasant Road, Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $109,000, dated August 2007. Filed April 22. Doyle, Sean P., et al. Westport. Filed by Paul Lewis Otzel, Milford, for Morequity Inc., Evansville, Ind. Property: 12 Fairport Road, Westport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $221,623, dated November 2003. Filed April 18. Duprey, Bernice, Denice and Ernie, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by John J. Ribas, Bridgeport, for Plymouth Park Tax Services L.L.C., Whippany, N.J. Property: 316 Sylvan St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose tax liens levied by the city of Bridgeport. Filed April 18. Elliston, Marjorie, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Kevin Casini, Hartford, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 1285 Norman St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $278,350, dated November 2007. Filed April 22.


on the record Fairclough, Lisa M. and Scott G., et al. Redding. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Banc of America Funding Corporation Mortgage. Property: 32 Blueberry Hill Road, Redding. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount dated January 2005. Filed April 18. Fernandez, Edith M. and Jesus, et al. Norwalk. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 10 Woodbury Ave., Norwalk. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $431,920, dated October 2004. Filed April 22.

Genetti, Patti Gail Estate, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by John J. Ribas, Bridgeport, for Plymouth Park Tax Services L.L.C., Whippany, N.J. Property: 211A Louisiana Ave., Unit 343, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose tax liens levied by the city of Bridgeport. Filed April 18. Gilmartin, Roger, Ridgefield. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 195 St. Johns Road, Ridgefield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage, dated October 2003. Filed April 10. Goday, Yesenia, et al., Stamford. Filed by Tamar T.J. Blazer, Stamford, for Woodside Green Association inc., Stamford. Property: 100 Woodside Green, Unit 7, Stamford. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed April 15.

Ferreira, Josmar and Vincencio Castillo, et al., Danbury. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for Vita Village Condominium Association Inc., Danbury. Property: 8 Scuppo Road, Unit 14, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common Golding, Catherine and John J., Fairfield. Filed by Erik Loftus, assessments. Filed April 22. East Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. PropFigueroa, Veronica and Car- erty: 529 to 531 Black Rock Turnmen Morales, et al., Bridgeport. pike, Fairfield. Action: to foreFiled by Mario Arena, Hartford, close a delinquent mortgage in for PNC Bank N.A., Pittsburgh, the original principal amount of Pa. Property: 7 Nob Hill Circle, $416,000, dated December 2006. Unit 114, Bridgeport. Action: to Filed April 18. foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $85,263, dated November Gonzalez, Enid and Jesus, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Erik Lof2002. Filed April 18. tus, East Hartford, for U.S Bank N.A., trustee, Salt Lake City, Forshaw, Lori and James, et Utah. Property: 193 to 195 Haal., Danbury. Filed by Adrienne nover St., Bridgeport. Action: to Roach, Hartford, for Wells Fargo foreclose a delinquent mortgage Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Prop- in the original principal amount erty: 8 Union Circle, Danbury. of $204,500, dated September Action: to foreclose a delinquent 2005. Filed April 22. mortgage in the original principal amount of $297,000, dated Guerrero, Francisco, et al., August 2004. Filed April 16. Danbury. Filed by Alan P. Rosenberg, West Hartford, for Racing Galves, Michael S., et al., Brook Meadows II CondominBridgeport. Filed by Steven ium Association Inc., Danbury. G. Berg, Norwalk, for Green- Property: 10 Scuppo Road, Unit tree Condominium Associa- 10A2, Danbury. Action: to foretion Inc., Bridgeport. Property: close on unpaid common assess715 Frenchtown Road, Unit 38, ments. Filed April 22. Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed April 18.

Hardman, Jennifer D. and Ian K., et al., Stamford. Filed by Mario Arena, Hartford, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 518 Woodbine Road, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $713,600, dated August 2004. Filed April 15. Heredia, Evangelina H. and Juan Carlos Rakela, et al., Danbury. Filed by Erika L. Mascaro, Farmington, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 8 Francis Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $306,000, dated March 2006. Filed April 15.

Huynh, Fawn, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 3000 Madison Ave., Unit 2996, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $134,400, dated December 2005. Filed April 18. Jiadi, Sharon L., et al., Danbury. Filed by Jo-Ann Sensale, Farmington, for Charles Schwab Bank N.A., Reno Nev. Property: 2 Cornell Road, Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $45,000, dated November 2005. Filed April 22.

Jones, Priscilla H. and Edward F., et al., Stamford. Filed by Himebaugh, Audrey K. and Kevin Casini, Hartford, for Wells Robert C., et al. Brookfield. Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Filed by Mark A. Piech, Farm- Property: 37 Riverside Ave., Unit ington, for JPMorgan Chase C, Stamford. Action: to foreBank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. close a delinquent mortgage in Property: 23 Obtuse Hill Road the original principal amount of North, Brookfield. Action: to $270,000, dated November 2005. foreclose a delinquent mortgage Filed April 15. in the original principal amount of $359,000, dated October 2005. Joyce, Hazel K., Danbury. Filed Filed April 19. by Michael D. Reiner, Farmington, for American Tax Funding Ho, Dong S. and Michael Q. L.L.C., Jupiter, Fla. Property: 119 Xu, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by W. King St., Danbury. Action: to Erika L. Mascaro, Farmington, foreclose a tax lien held by the for JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., plaintiff, against real property. Columbus, Ohio. Property: 1211 Filed April 17. to 1217 E. Main St., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original princi- Kadam, Stephanie and Arun, pal amount of $296,250, dated et al., Bridgeport. Filed for Deutsche Bank National Trust, October 2006. Filed April 17. trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 368 Lenox Ave., Bridgeport. Hobbs, Peter S., Fairfield. Filed Action: to foreclose a delinquent by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for mortgage in the original princiHSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, pal amount of $202,000, dated N.Y. Property: 71 to 83 to 85 Mel- August 2006. Filed April 22. ville Ave., Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount Knowles, Brook, et al. Norwalk. of $150,000, dated August 2003. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Kingsley Court CondominFiled April 24. ium Association Inc., Norwalk. Property: 11 Bedford Ave., Unit Huq, Nurul and Parveen, Dan- E3, Norwalk. Action: to foreclose bury. Filed by Erika L. Mas- on unpaid common charges and caro, Farmington, for JPMorgan assessments. Filed April 19. Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 4 Irving Place, Danbury. Action: to foreclose Krafick, Maureen J. and Wila delinquent mortgage in the liam A. Jr., Fairfield. Filed by original principal amount of Mark A. Piech, Farmington, for $429,000, dated December 2006. Flagstar Bank, Jackson, Mich. Property: 324 Oakwood Drive, Filed April 15. Fairfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $381,600, dated September 2010. Filed April 17.

Linton, Jacqueline D. a.k.a. Jacqueline Nelson, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Steven G. Berg, Norwalk, for Greentree Condominium Association Inc., Bridgeport. Property: 715 Frenchtown Road, Unit 41, Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common charges and assessments. Filed April 18.

Magilton, Athina H. and Edward W., et al. Brookfield. Filed by Amy L. Harrison, Farmington, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 9 Stony Hill Road, Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $250,000, dated May 2004. Filed April 19.

Lippman, Kenneth J., Westport. Filed by Adrienne Roach, Hartford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 18 Sylvan Road South, Westport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $525,000, dated November 2004. Filed April 19.

Maher & Murtha L.L.C. and Thomas M. Murtha, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Lucas B. Rocklin, New Haven, for Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Property: 528 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $263,500, dated April 2009. Filed April 22.

Littell, Julie A. and David R., Darien. Filed by Erika L. Mascaro, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 2178 Boston Post Road, Darien. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $610,000, dated September 2007. Filed April 17. Lombardi, Roger A., Danbury. Filed by Jason E. Brooks, Stamford, for Deutsche Bank National Trust, trustee, Los Angeles, Calif. Property: 9 Orchard St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $225,000, dated September 2005. Filed April 22. Lopez, Luis; and Maria M. and Jose G. Bernardino, Danbury. Filed by Erika L. Mascaro, Farmington, for HSBC Bank USA N.A., Buffalo, N.Y. Property: 105 Liberty St., Danbury. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $480,000, dated August 2005. Filed April 22. Lopez, Rebecca M., et al., Stamford. Filed by Erika L. Mascaro, Farmington, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 70 Frank St., Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $461,600, dated June 2007. Filed April 12.

Mansfield, Joyce E. a.k.a. Joyce E. Barry, et al. Bethel. Filed by Amy L. Harrison, Farmington, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 20 Plumbtrees Road, Bethel. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $169,000, dated March 2003. Filed April 17. McCants-Shaw, Sheila and Brian A. Shaw, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Erik Loftus, East Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 644 Lincoln Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $361,550, dated July 2007. Filed April 22. McLean, Megan R. and Peter A. Jr., Newtown. Filed by Lucas B. Rocklin, New Haven, for Newtown Savings Bank, Newtown. Property: 27 Queen St., Newtown. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $333,700, dated May 2004. Filed April 23. Muharem, Morina, et al., Stamford. Filed by Kristen Boyle, Hartford, for Ocwen Loan Servicing L.L.C., West Palm Beach, Fla. Property: 40 Standish Road, Unit 9E3, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $158,400, dated March 2006. Filed April 15.

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FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 25


on the record Munoz-Gonzalez, Alejandro, et al., Stamford. Filed by Kevin Casini, Hartford, for Bank of America N.A., Charlotte, N.C. Property: 102 Summer St., Unit 102, Stamford. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of $200,000, dated March 2007. Filed April 15.

Neira, Romulo, Danbury. Filed by Amy L. Harrison, Farmington, for JPMC Specialty Mortgage L.L.C., San Diego, Calif. Property: 216 Westville Avenue Extension, Danbury. Action: to foreclose on unpaid common assessments. Filed April 16.

Parks, Kristen M. and Thomas James, et al. Brookfield. Filed by MORTGAGES Kevin Casini, Hartford, for Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Property: 102 Stony Hill Road, COmmERCiAL Brookfield. Action: to foreclose a delinquent mortgage in the original principal amount of 26 Federal Road L.L.C., Dan$138,800, dated February 2002. bury, by Anthony M. Rizzo Jr. Lender: Newtown Savings Bank, Filed April 15. Neto, Sonia M.A. and Jose Newtown. Property: 26 FedMourao, et al., Danbury. Filed eral Road, Danbury. Amount: Munson, Calvin F. and Elliot by Mario Arena, Hartford, for Pelaez, Norma and Celso, et al. $300,000. Filed April 15. Stone, et al. Fairfield. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Fred- Greenwich. Filed by Paul Lewis Jeffrey M. Knickerbocker, Hart- erick, Md. Property: 173 Bushy Otzel, Milford, for The Bank of ford, for JPMorgan Chase Bank Hill Road, Danbury. Action: to New York Mellon, trustee, New 97 Washington Street InvestN.A., Columbus, Ohio. Property: foreclose a delinquent mortgage York City. Property: 108B Weav- ments L.L.C., Westport, by 348 to 350 Castle Ave., Fairfield. in the original principal amount er St., Greenwich. Action: to Randi S. Cooper. Lender: FairAction: to foreclose a delinquent of $342,900, dated January 2004. foreclose a delinquent mortgage field County Bank, Ridgefield. mortgage in the original princi- Filed April 15. in the original principal amount Property: 97 Washington St., pal amount of $210,000, dated of $660,000, dated July 2007. Norwalk. Amount: $391,000. Filed April 18. December 1999. Filed April 24. Filed April 19. Northrop, Robert J. Estate, et al., Bridgeport. Filed by Adrienne Myers, Dorothy O. Estate, et Roach, Hartford, for JPMorgan Perlman, Jeanette, et al. Sher- GTR Properties L.L.C., Danal., Bridgeport. Filed by John J. Chase Bank N.A., Columbus, man. Filed by Jeffrey Knick- bury, by Taranjit S. Randhawa. Ribas, Bridgeport, for Plymouth Ohio. Property: 145 Granfield erbocker, Hartford, for Wells Lender: Fairfield County Bank, Park Tax Services L.L.C., Whip- Ave., Bridgeport. Action: to fore- Fargo Bank N.A., Frederick, Md. Ridgefield. Property: 24 to 30 Mill pany, N.J. Property: 88 to 90 Sug- close a delinquent mortgage in Property: 3 Fox Run, Sherman. Plain Road, Danbury. Amount: gets Lane, Bridgeport. Action: to the original principal amount Action: to foreclose a delinquent $300,000. Filed April 22. foreclose tax liens levied by the of $150,750, dated August 2005. mortgage in the original princicity of Bridgeport. Filed April 18. Filed April 23. pal amount of $300,000, dated JDB Enterprises L.L.C., DanJuly 2003. Filed April 10. bury, by Donald W. Brown. Lender: Savings Bank of Danbury, Danbury. Property: 15 Thorpe St., Danbury. Amount: $168,000. Filed April 16.

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MLS Number: sXXXXXX Type: Residential Year Built: 1880 Bedrooms: 3 Bathrooms: 1.5

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Stamford, CT Listing price: US$114,900

Stamford, CT Listing price: US$114,900

Stamford, CT Listing price: US$114,900

Email Hdebartolo@westfairinc.com or go to westfaironline.com

26 Week of May 6, 2013 • FairField County Business Journal

AMW Doors and Windows L.L.C., 745 Hancock Ave., Bridgeport 06605, c/o Mantz Construction L.L.C. Filed April 17.

Dry powder inhaler and system for drug delivery. Patent no. 8,424,518 issued to Chad C. Smutney, Watertown; P. Spencer Kinsey, Sandy Hook; Carl R. Sahi, Coventry; BenAPR Associates Inc., 140 Ham- oit Adamo, Mount Kisco, N.Y.; ilton Ave., Greenwich 06830, c/o John M. Polidoro, Conventry; The Corner Market. Filed April 9. Scott McLean, Waterbury; Dennis Overfield, Fairfield; and Aquatic Technologies Inc., 81 Anthony Bryant, Stratford. AsWhisconier Road, Brookfield signed to Mannkind Corp., Va06804, c/o Shaun Monastro. lencia, Calif. Filed April 17. Elicitation method for custom Aspire Fitness, 44 Main St., image preferences using keyThird floor, Westport 06880, c/o words. Patent no. 8,429,559 isS I S U Elite Fitness. Filed April 19. sued to Dale Ellen Gaucas, Penfield, N.Y.; Kirk J. Ocke, Ontario, N.Y.; and Michael David Shepherd, Ontario, N.Y. Assigned to Xerox Corp., Norwalk.

PATENTS

Container. Patent no. D680,424 issued to Eric Brian MacLean, Appleton, Wis.; Lindsay Marie Cardinal, Cincinnati, Ohio; Gregory Peter Dalea, Hudson, Ohio; Peter Brian Clarke, Fairfield; James Edward McCay, Fairfield; John Philip Kalinowsky Danbury; Edmund Farmer, Seymour; Ryan Vincent Lee, Crest Hill, Ill.; Todd Anton Stricker, Geneva, Ill.; Timothy D. Kleiber, Olathe, Kan.; and Louis J. Young, Main Coffe House L.L.C. and Raymore, Mo. Assigned to The G&M Investments L.L.C., J.M. Smucker Co., Orrville, Trumbull, by Bangalore Ma- Ohio. hesh. Lender: Naugatuck Valley Savings and Loan, Naugatuck. Device and method for moniProperty: 4150 Main St., Nor- toring consumer test compliwalk. Amount: $562,500. Filed ance. Patent no. 8,424,721 issued April 22. to Srinivasan Krishnan, StamPost Road Maple Real Estate L.L.C., Westport, by John A. Nelson. Lender: Bank of New Canaan, New Canaan. Property: 1529 Post Road East, Westport. Amount: $2.4 million. Filed April 22.

NEW BUSINESSES 227 Wine Bar L.L.C., 227 Greenwood Ave., Bethel 068801, c/o Linda and Michael Rizzo. Filed April 16. Abby’s Ice Cream, 214 Brown Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Elba Abigail De La Pena. Filed April 11.

ford; Amir Ashkenazi, Hamden; Jomer Lalo Delacruz, Naugatuck; Marc Gregory Ticzon, Stratford; Jonathan Garrett Winn, Fairfield; Jean-Marc Dessirier, Stratford; and Tobias Christian Trumpp, Milford. Assigned to Conopco, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

Lock deferral for real-time garbage collection. Patent no. 8,429,658 issued to Joshua Seth Auerbach, Ridgefield; David Francis Bacon, New York, N.Y.; Perry Cheng, New York, N.Y.; and David Paul Grove, Ridgefield. Assigned to International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, N.Y. Method and apparatus for providing supplementary product sales to a customer at a customer terminal. Patent no. 8,429,031 issued to Jay S. Walker, Ridgefield; Andrew S. Vanluchene, Norwalk; and Daniel E. Tedesco, Stamford. Assigned to Ebay Inc., San Jose, Calif. Ta-TaN selective-removal process for integrated device fabrication. Patent no. 8,426,316 issued to John Michael Cotte, New Fairfield; Nils Deneke Hoivik, Pleasantville, N.Y.; Christopher Vincent Jahnes, Upper Saddle River, N.J.; and Robert Luke Wisnieff, Ridgefield. Assigned to International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, N.Y.


Business ConneCtions HealtHcare

State Spending

How Overtime Impacts State Debt

Healthcare Update: Yet Another Employer Fee

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he Connecticut General Assembly is considering a bill (HB 6614) requiring employers with 250 or more employees—of which 100 must be in Connecticut—to pay a fee to the state if certain employees, or their dependents, opt-in to the state’s HUSKY A or B program. It’s a problematic bill for a number of reasons: f Can’t compete: The HUSKY program is a subsidized state insurance program for low-income individuals. It’s difficult if not impossible for private-sector companies to compete with HUSKY because it’s not only subsidized but very generous in its benefits. Companies that offer health insurance to their employees will have to pay this fee even if even just one employee chooses to avail him- or herself of a government sponsored program. f Hits many employers: This bill won’t just impact large retail chains but instead will significantly

G

impact many local businesses of different types. According to the 2010 United States Census, Connecticut is home to more than 500 businesses with more than 250 employees—and of those companies, more than 200 are S Corporations, family businesses, sole proprietorships, partnerships and non-profits. On top of that, when the state first rolled out HUSKY it reached out to employers and asked them to encourage their lower-income employees to enroll in the new program. Why penalize businesses now for doing just what state asked them to do? With healthcare costs rising and employers struggling to afford providing benefits for their employees, this proposal makes the situation worse for many Connecticut businesses. ➤ Read more at gov.cbia.com

Now’s the time to take action and find out what the ACA means for your business. We’ll help you sort through the clutter. Hear from experts in f Law f Taxes f Benefits management f Insurance f Public administration Sessions are designed for employers of all sizes, and focus on the compliance strategy most relevant to your company. We’ll give you an overview of where we’ve come from, where we are, and potential forks in the road. You’ll also get the most up-to-date information on timelines, decision points, and deadlines. Topics f How insurance and medical delivery systems are evolving f Your ability to contain

That may be, but it was recently brought to our attention that some records made available through the state comptroller’s new Open Connecticut website suggest otherwise. Individual employee compensation records from three different agencies reveal the following: State Employee #1 (Dept. of Mental Health and Addiction Services) f Salary: $60,565 f Overtime: $177,953.96 f Differential payments: $6,121.87 State Employee #2 (Department of Correction) f Salary: $55,565

What the Affordable Care Act Means for Business

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It’s the subject of CBIA’s current public campaign and a report we released earlier this year. Some say that there’s little state government can do right now, in view of multi-year agreements with state employee unions.

f Longevity payments: $424

eventS

lthough Jan. 1, 2014, is largely viewed as the “go date” for the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA), employers, insurers, and government officials have begun the daunting task of understanding new mandates and developing compliance strategies.

iven the growth of state spending and the struggle of Connecticut’s taxpayers to afford it, every effort should be made to make state government as efficient as possible.

f Overtime: $116,132.37

costs and maintain a competitive, compliant employee benefits program f Perspectives on the best short- and long-term courses f Effective communications f Early achiever experiences

f Longevity: $414 f Differential: $3,640 f Accumulated leave: $4,615.47 f Meal allowance: $3,816 State Employee #3 (Dept. of Public Safety)

Date

Friday, May 10, 2013

f Salary: $94,575

Time

8:30 am–3:30 pm

Place

Aqua Turf Club 556 Mulberry St., Southington

f Overtime: $134,987

Cost

CBIA/SHRM members, CBIA agents, $95; nonmembers, $125

Register cbia.com/events

f Longevity: $459 f Differential: $2,202 f Meal allowance: $7579 This is not to say that these employees did not deserve the pay they received, but it should raise questions about how the departments and their payrolls are being managed. What’s more, under current rules, those hefty overtime payments will be part of the equation when figuring the employees’ retirement pensions.

Scan to RegiSteR

From these snapshots, it’s not difficult to imagine why Connecticut’s per-taxpayer obligation for state retiree pensions is the highest in the U.S. ➤ Read more at gov.cbia.com

FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL • Week of May 6, 2013 27


LEARN ABOUT BEING BOSS: PLAY BOSS IN A UNIQUE GAME-LIKE FORMAT, BUSINESS OWNERS AND DECISION MAKERS WILL BE GROUPED INTO TEAMS AND FACED WITH CHALLENGES AND SITUATIONS THAT SIMULATE REAL-LIFE EXPERIENCES. LET THE GAME BEGIN! THERE’S NO OTHER EVENT LIKE IT! CONDUCTED BY:

ANDI GRAY

Strategy Leaders and author of Ask Andi HOSTED BY:

Westfair Communications Inc. DATE / TIME

MAY 30

5:30 p.m. – Meet, greet, savory buffet on us 6 p.m. – Program begins 7:30 p.m. – Wrap up

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1133 Westchester Ave. White Plains

The Owner’s Game” is an excellent way to add value and a true learning situation for small business owners looking to think through the issues confronting their business growth and future sale. It is a far more dynamic and superior learning tool than just another slideshow presentation from a good speaker…” Murray Stoltz, President Manchester Capital Management

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Fairfield County Business Journal - 050613