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303.730.8858 VOLUME 38 • NUMBER 34 • JULY 16, 2020

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GV Council resolves to bypass part of police reform law

A theme oft-repeated by teens was that they knew the importance of taking responsibility for their mistakes, so why shouldn’t police?

R

esidents of Greenwood Village and the surrounding area gathered outside GV City Hall on July 9 for a peaceful protest against a resolution the city council adopted earlier in the week to protect its police officers from the possibility of “incurring a financial penalty decided by a city council potentially influenced by media and passions of the day” in the future. Joining the protest were people who came to express their desire for justice in the death of 23-year-old Aurora

resident Elijah McClain while in the custody of City of Aurora police officers last summer. On July 8, Channel 9 News’ Kyle Clark reported that, “Greenwood Village’s city council has voted unanimously to undermine a new state law meant to hold police officers accountable.” Denver Post coverage of the story culminated in the page one headline in the Post on July 10, “Greenwood Village faces backlash for police stand.” The recently passed statewide police reform law says, in Section 13-21-13(4) “ A peace officer’s employer shall indemnify its peace officers for any

The Greenwood Village City Council resolves in all cases to defend any police officer in any suit or proceeding brought under SB 20-217 and pay or indemnify its police officers against all expenses… – GV Resolution liability incurred by the peace officer and for any judgment or settlement entered against the peace officer for claims arising pursuant to this section; except that, if the peace officer’s employer determines that the officer did not act upon a good faith and reasonable belief that the action (taken by the officer) was lawful, then the peace officer is personally liable and shall not be indemnified by the peace officer’s employer for five percent of the judgment or settlement or $25,000, whichever is less.” The GV resolution says, “The Greenwood Village City Council resolves in all

cases to defend any police officer in any suit or proceeding brought under SB 20-217 and pay or indemnify its police officers against all expenses, court costs, including expert fees, court fees, attorney fees, judgments, fines and amounts paid in settlement or satisfaction of judgment actually incurred by them in connection with such action, suit or proceeding.” Proposed by GV Mayor Pro Tem Dave Kerber, the resolution drew the enthusiastic support of his fellow council members, including Dave Bullock, who told Channel 9 News, “It goes well beyond

supporting our officers. It sends a message to the community, the state, the country that we have a very different attitude towards law enforcement and the rule of law in Greenwood Village.” Bullock said that he has seen protests in cities where he feels police departments are not supported and “that will not happen” in Greenwood Village. Council Member Libby Barnacle, a former prosecutor, in registering her yes vote for the resolution said, “I would just like to make a record that I am 1,000 percent behind this and Continued on page 6

See related opinion piece from Councilmember Bullock on pg 7.

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Be safe. Stay Strong.

PAGE 2 | THE VILLAGER • July 16, 2020

Employers should pay attention to workers’ emotional health BY FREDA MIKLIN GOVERNMENTAL REPORTER

On July 9, South Metro Denver Chamber’s Health and Wellness Council hosted a virtual meeting on the subject of “Employee Mental Health – Supporting Our Teams During This Complex Time.” Forty people signed up to attend the presentation by Laurie Elliott, Vice President of Counseling at AllHealth Network (AHN). AHN is not-for-profit organization that accepts most funding sources and serves all ages from 11 locations in DTC, Highlands Ranch, Littleton, Parker, and Castle Rock. They also operate in 31 schools, seven police departments, the Douglas County Jail and the courts at the Arapahoe County Justice Center serving the 18th Judicial District. AHN offers mental health  and substance use counseling and psychiatric services for children and adults of all ages. Posing the question, “Why is mental health an important issue right now?” Elliott explained that we are all at the effect of two unplanned events: 1. COVID-19, which has brought on quarantine, illness/death, job and financial losses, working virtually, home schooling, cancelled vacations, new ways of getting what we need, e.g., groceries and restaurant food. 2. George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis and racism in the spotlight, bringing with it protests, riots, violence, community cohesion and division, unrest, Black Lives Matter and its cousin White Fragility, which is the “feelings of discomfort a white person experiences when they witness discussions around racial inequality and injustice.” Elliott emphasized the importance of individual self-care during this unprecedented time. She recommended staying on a schedule, taking fully-disengaged breaks from work when you aren’t busy, eating healthy, limiting alcohol and caffeine, moving around, exercising regularly, and most importantly, getting good sleep. If you

wake up during the night and can’t get back to sleep after 15 minutes, leave your bedroom and do something else, then go back to bed and try again. When your mind starts to review and worry about all the

2020 has put everyone in a high state of prolonged stress, which can result in fear, anger, anxiety, depression, and exhaustion.

things that happened that day and all the negative outcomes that tomorrow may bring, think about something that has no emotions attached to it. Elliott said she learned how to say the alphabet backwards. For some, counting backwards by an odd number like seven works. Choose something that requires the intellectual part of your brain to engage. That will quiet the emotional part that gets in the way of rest. Focusing on the result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Elliott presented a timeline of a crisis (see illustration). She explained that during the heroic phase of the time we are all living through, we rallied, bought masks, put signs on the floor about social distancing, and generally prepared for what we hoped would be a short-term problem. After the honeymoon phase, we moved to disillusion-

ment, when we began to think, “When can I fly safely? When will my kids go to school? When can I go to a wedding?” During this phase, our well-being is “well below baseline.” As we try to work through the stress associated with the uncertainty of our current circumstances, Elliott had these recommendations for employers: 1. Remember that 2020 has put everyone in a high state of prolonged stress, which can result in fear, anger, anxiety, depression, and exhaustion. 2. Stay connected to employees. Pay attention to how they are feeling and give them any resources they may need to cope, including those they may require for mental health. 3. Encourage employees to practice self-care and show appreciation for their work. Have lunch with them if it’s safe to do so. Encourage them to take stretch breaks and walks in the fresh air. Try to find something fun to share, like dog videos. 4. Model vulnerability and transparency. On diversity, equity, and inclusion, look at the subject honestly and be open with employees about it. 5. Be kind, give yourself and others grace. Reach out to give and receive support. Hand-write thank you

This timeline represents the emotions associated with a crisis, including the one we are living through.

Elliott shared that according to a recent study in the Harvard Business Review, a publication she follows regularly, roughly 40% of people at every senior­ity level of a company have seen a decrease in mental health. notes for special efforts. 6. Look for warning signs that employees’ mental health is suffering. These can include increased absences, poor concentration and focus, worsening of chronic illness, reassurance seeking, reliance on negative coping strategies like alcohol, tobacco, and drugs, psychiatric illnesses like depression and anxiety, and trauma related symptoms. Elliott shared that according to a recent study in the Harvard Business Review, a publication she follows regularly, roughly 40% of people at every senior­ ity level of a company have seen a decrease in mental health. She also shared the phone number for the Colorado Crisis Line: 1-844-493-TALK or text TALK to 38255. Closing on a positive note, Elliott reminded participants that, “We will emerge from this time in our history. Our daily choices and actions will determine the outcome.” Fmiklin.villager@gmail.com

South Suburban launches interactive parks, trails and facility maps SUBMITTED BY SSPRD

South Suburban Park and Recreation District’s (SSPRD) new interactive trails, and parks and facilities maps provide a more robust experience and offer easy access to SSPRD’s amenities. The maps allow users more functionality and customization than ever before via their mobile or desktop device. The maps were created using

ArcGIS Online and are now available on South Suburban’s website. They profile 100 park sites, 26 open spaces and cover elevation profiles for 54.2 miles of trail.

South Suburban Parks and Facilities Map

https://www.ssprd.org/ District-Maps Features include:

• Search functionality for all SSPRD parks and facilities • Background viewing controls • Layer controls with the ability to turn on/off features • Parks locator that shows all parks/facilities within a user specified distance of their location or a manually entered location pin • Directions tab that allows for multiple locations

• Filtering options that allow you to search parks or facilities by certain amenities

South Suburban Trails Map

https://www.ssprd.org/Trail-Map Features include: • Search function for all SSPRD trails • Background viewing controls • Layer controls with the ability to turn on/off features

• Elevation profile for each major trail. SSPRD provides and manages parks, trails, open space and recreation facilities and programs for nearly 157,000 residents living in Littleton, Lone Tree, Sheridan, Columbine Valley, Bow Mar, western Centennial and portions of unincorporated Jefferson, Douglas and Arapahoe counties.


Be safe. Stay Strong.

July 16, 2020 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 3

Douglas County commissioners make good on threat to leave Tri-County Health BY FREDA MIKLIN GOVERNMENTAL REPORTER

O

n July 9, after months of talking about it, Douglas County commissioners made good on their threat to pull out of the Tri-County Health Department (TCHD) with the official statement, “Effective immediately, our Board directed staff to begin the work of creating a separate public health department that will appropriately meet the needs of Douglas County,” said Roger Partridge, County Commissioner and Board Chair.” TCHD is comprised of Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas Counties. Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in Colorado, Douglas County has experience significantly different case and outcome numbers than have Arapahoe and Adams County. As of July 11, Douglas County has had 1,237 total COVID-19 cases reported, 184 of which required hospitalization, and 52 of which resulted in death. There have been 5,720 reported cases, 1,064 of which required hospitalization, and 351 of which resulted in death in Arapahoe County. Through July 11, Adams County has reported 4,740 cases of COVID-19, 620 hospitalizations, and 157 deaths. Douglas County commissioners have concluded that it does not make sense for them to be subject to the same rules and guidelines as are applied to Adams and Arapahoe Counties because the virus has had a much smaller impact to their community. Compared to Arapahoe County only, Douglas has had 78 percent fewer cases, 83 percent fewer hospitalizations, and 85 percent fewer fatalities. Compared to Adams County, Douglas has had 74 percent fewer cases, 70 percent fewer hospitalizations, and 67 percent fewer fatalities. While they were at it, they officially declined to go along with TCHD’s mandate issued a day earlier to wear masks while in public. Said Commissioner Abe Laydon, “Regarding the mask mandate opt-out, our remarkably favorable public health data, paired with the community’s current 75% mask-wearing voluntary compliance observed by TCHD, and based on Dr. Douglas’ recommendation that a mask mandate was not necessary for Douglas County, led us to this conclusion.” Commissioners did remind Douglas County residents to employ safe practices as recommended by the Cen-

Douglas County Commissioners, from left to right, Roger Partridge, Lora Thomas, and Abe Laydon.

ters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to avoid COVID-19 with the statement, “In addition to wearing

a cloth face covering, and staying home when you are sick, the spread of COVID-19 can be reduced through phys-

ical distancing and frequent hand washing. Learn more about protecting yourself and others at https://www.cdc.

gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/ prevent-getting-sick/ about-face-coverings.html We asked Douglas County Manager Doug DeBord what the process and the timing of the change might look like. Wendy Manitta Holmes, director of communications and public affairs for Douglas County Government, told The Villager that, “By statute, a one-year written notice of our (Douglas County’s) intent to withdraw (from Tri-County Health Department) is required. By no later than July 11, 2021 Douglas County will have appointed a new Board of Health. That Board will be required to prepare and approve a new public health plan for Douglas County. There are formalities associated with this process. Fmiklin.villager@gmail.com

Back-to-School Telephone Town Hall Thursday, July 16 @ 7 p.m. Officials from Arapahoe County school districts and the Tri-County Health Department will answer questions about the latest plans for the fall term. Visit arapahoegov.com/townhall

OPEN SPACES MASTER PLAN SURVEY:

IMPACT YOUR SPACE

Help us plan for the future of Arapahoe County’s parks, trails and open spaces for the next decade and beyond. Take our online survey in English or Spanish until July 24, 2020. arapahoegov.com/osmasterplan COVID community testing event STRIDE Community Health Center will be providing COVID-19 testing each Wednesday in July at Smoky Hill High School in Aurora. Visit stridechc.org

GET COUNTED! There’s still time to submit your Census survey! Take 10 minutes and make a difference for the next 10 years. arapahoegov.com/census2020

COUNTS U.S. CENSUS 2020

Advance Arapahoe deadline extended Arapahoe CARES is extending the application deadline for its Advance Arapahoe Business Impact Grants to August 1. Businesses in unincorporated parts of the County are being given priority consideration. Visit arapahoegov.com/arapahoecares

arapahoegov.com


Be safe. Stay Strong.

PAGE 4 | THE VILLAGER • July 16, 2020

God bless and protect the police

Rest assured that this newspaper, The Villager, supports law and order and our local police departments. Certainly, police are human and can make mistakes like everyone else. We only had one perfect human being in history, and we crucified him on a cross. There’s a famous old newspaper quote that goes like this… “Newspapers print our mistakes and doctors bury theirs.” The Greenwood Village City council wanted to support their police department, so they voted to give them unlimited liability protection against a new state law allowing certain penalties against police officers for outrageous conduct up to personal penalties of $25,000. While it would take a series of steps to ever reach that figure it is still intimidating for those who serve in a blue uniform

Spent the past week traveling to Western Colorado over the July 4th weekend. Partially to see what is going on around the state, but primarily to attend a memorial service for a first cousin whose ashes were taken back to Craig for her internment from her residence in Boulder. We spent some time in Vail and attended the Sunday Farmer’s Market that has become a Vail Valley attraction in that mountain community. With Covid-19 the summer event has been vastly curtailed with only a scattering of food booths and only a few farm produce booths from Grand Junction. There were no peaches for sale, but it is early for the really famous Palisade peaches with reports that 90 percent of this year’s crop was destroyed by an early frost. The local

and put their lives on the line for the public day and night. The city council in Greenwood Village wanted to assure their police that they have their backs. This assertive action brought protests from citizens, the governor and the attorney general. They felt the council was going too far to protect police after the recent Legislature passage of Senate Bill 20-217. 24 Republicans joined with the Democrat majority to pass the new bill aimed at inhibiting any real, or alleged, police conduct. Police departments are under attack across the nation and some major cities are considering reducing budgets that could reduce police presence on the streets of America cities. The pretense for this movement stems from the murder of George Floyd used as the

Centennial Rotary Club is selling peaches for August delivery. Call Phil Chipouras for orders at 303-489-1743. Everyone was wearing masks and it is now mandatory to wear masks in Eagle County. We did travel up to Minturn, a few short miles from Vail to their market that was also curtailed from past years with just a few food and clothing booths. No outdoor tables and chairs. *** From Vail we went West to Wolcott and headed across to Toponas, Yampa, and Oak Creek reaching U.S. 40 near Hayden. They were bailing hay on the famed Farrington Carpenter ranch, now part of the Nature Conservatory non-profit organization. This wonderful ranch is shielded from any future developments.

fulcrum for massive protests, riots, burning, and looting of government buildings and private business firms. Some mayors and council members in these riot-torn cities have acquiesced to the mobs on the grounds of Constitutional rights to assembly and peaceful protests. The civil disobedience has turned into violent marches, tearing down statues and monuments, using violence and threats to rewrite United States history as seen through the eyes of the anarchists who preach government overthrow. The silent majority has been very patient with the protesters, giving this group the false assumption that we’re willing to let them rewrite history and tear down statues placed to honor figures who were highly regarded at their time in history. History is filled with inequities, violence, religious wars, tribal conflicts, cruel rulers, and

Carpenter graduated from Princeton University law school and came West to Hayden to practice law and ranch in 1913. Served in the navy during World War 1 and then returned to Hayden. In 1926 he obtained the historic ranch property where he engaged in raising prized cattle and bulls. He became a local, state, and national iconic figure in ranching, law, and community service. He passed away in 1980, leaving two sons, Edward Carpenter in Grand Junction, and famous attorney Willis V. Carpenter, who practices law here in Denver. Several miles away from the Carpenter Yampa river ranch rests the Hayden coal fired power plants that provide a vast amount of electricity to the western power grid system. These power plants in Hayden and Craig are scheduled to be retired in 2030.

ongoing conflicts. We can’t change the past, but we can strive to improve the future. Protests and youthful voices should be heard to stem excessive police actions, thwart any signs of lingering racism, and improve educational opportunities for all students, young and old. Covid-19 has cast a grim shadow over our nation that has made our land frightened and somewhat bewildered. Nothing like this has happened since the Spanish Flu in 1917/18. America is founded on law and order and private property rights. America has been the guiding light for liberty and freedom and proved these beliefs in blood, freeing the slaves in the Civil War. Few major nations have embraced minorities and diversity as much as the United States of America. I stand with our police here and across America. God bless and protect them!

The famed Peabody Trapper coal mine is a short distance away, shipping massive amounts of coal to eastern slope coal-fired electric generating plants via railroad cars loaded with coal. It is going to take many windmills and solar panels to replace these mining operations. The energy business in far N.W, Colorado has been a boom to the area, providing tax dollars and jobs to hundreds of coal mining residents in Steamboat, Hayden and Craig. *** A news item from the historic Central City Register Call, the state’s oldest continuous newspaper from July 8, 1870: “Reports have been received that the Utes had massacred a party of prospectors in North Park.” ***

OP-ED - Protest at Police District 1 - disaster averted BY DAVE GRUBER AURORA CITY COUNCIL MEMBER

I’ve written about the protests at City Hall and how there were three groups involved. One set was there to honor Elijah McClain and listen to the violin tribute. Another set was there with the same purported purpose, but they were ready to participate in a violent confrontation. The third set was there to do damage. A similar protest was held at Aurora’s District 1 police station on the Fitzsimons Campus on July 3rd. This one didn’t follow the plan of those intending to damage the city. I salute interim Police Chief Vinessa Wilson for that, and I’d like to share the rest of the story.

The protest started the same way as the one at City Hall. Protesters, including 3 council members and other politicians, came to exercise their First Amendment rights. Throughout the evening, they surrounded Police District 1 and refused to let anyone enter or leave. This effectively shut down a key police station in a high-crime district and left a security void for the city. The protesters remained confrontational throughout the night, but many began to leave before 11:00. A bit after 10:30, those planning damage went to work. While the more hardcore protesters were still chanting, this group snuck in containers of gasoline and hid them in bushes around the

building. They also brought in make-shift weapons. Another crew of theirs went to work on the roads surrounding the station and put up barricades of pipes, bricks and stones. These were designed to slow down and hinder emergency vehicles. Those planning damage then implemented their plan. They first secured the police station doors with rope - officers were locked inside. They did the same with the rear fence gate so police vehicles couldn’t get out. They had set the stage for a catastrophe. Their plan must have assumed the Chief would deploy police in full riot gear to rescue the officers trapped inside. Once the police engaged the protesters, this

group would throw gasoline on the building and set it on fire. Aurora Fire Department would respond to the flames, but would be delayed as they stopped to remove the barricades on the streets. Meanwhile, the people who caused the damage would sneak out so the remaining protesters would face the police alone. Flames and claims of police brutality would be the story on national news. Chief Wilson didn’t do what they thought she would do. She ordered her officers to stand down and wait when the doors were roped shut. That decision made all the difference. Throughout the late night,

Continued on page 5

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Reverend Martin Niemoller “In Germany, the Nazis first came for the communists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn’t speak up because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me and by that time there was no one left to speak for me!”

2020 Member

QUOTE of the WEEK

Life’ofs the mostWEEK QUOTE persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’ – Martin Luther King, Jr.


Opinion Be safe. Stay Strong.

Disaster averted Continued from Page 4 fired foam rounds to stop

protesters began to leave the area and go home. As the crowd dissipated in the early hours of Saturday morning, the folks planning to light the building on fire realized they could not escape and take the gasoline containers with them. They snuck out and left their cache hidden in the bushes. At 3:30 AM, the police arrived. They didn’t come to push people out, they simply showed up and explained it was time for the protestors to move across the street from the police station. The protestors complied but it wasn’t over. As Officers tried to cut the ropes off the doors to relieve the police held inside, protestors fired mortar style fireworks at them. Officers

the attack. The gasoline containers were found in the morning. My point in telling you the rest of the story is that we are not done with the crew who is planning to damage our city. The windows of City Hall, our history museum and the courthouse are still boarded up. So are the windows of the Arapahoe County building across the street. We fully expect to see more dangerous activity as more protests occur over the next few months. The only news outlet that covered this event was KDVR. https://kdvr.com/ news/local/aurora-policetrapped-inside-district-1for-nearly-7-hours-duringprotests-last-friday/

July 16, 2020 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 5

Why I voted to indemnify police officers against financial liability BY DAVE BULLOCK GREENWOOD VILLAGE CITY COUNCIL

On July 6, 2020, the Greenwood Village City Council voted unanimously to support our police officers with regard to a provision in a bill passed by the Colorado state legislature, SB20-217 which stripped away financial indemnity for police officers. Of the feedback we have received from residents who live in the Village, it has been overwhelmingly in favor of our vote. The majority of those opposed have come from people living outside the City. The resolution our Council passed has received considerable media attention and much of what has been reported is false. First and foremost, nothing in this resolution protects a police officer who commits a crime. If an officer commits an illegal act, the City has full rights and authority to terminate their po-

sition, arrest and prosecute them just like any citizen. Therefore, charges in the media and by others claiming that we are giving license to police officers to act illegitimately are deliberately untrue. The primary reason we voted unanimously for this resolution was to create a safer environment for the residents and businesses in Greenwood Village. If we cannot hold onto good police officers, our City will become a more dangerous place to live, work and socialize. Since the state legislature passed SB20-217, a significant number of police and sheriff officers in the state have resigned with reports of more to come. In Greenwood Village, one officer resigned and four others were considering it which represents nearly 10% of our force. Many good men and women serving in law enforcement are exhausted

by the recent riots and attacks on them and their fellow officers. That combined with calls around the state and country to defund the police have many officers choosing to seek employment in other professions. The country is at a tipping point where we risk losing large numbers of good officers that work hard each day to keep our communities safe. Every decent person is appalled by what happened to George Floyd in Minneapolis and other similar acts around the country. I condemn the actions of those bad police officers and fully support the movements for racial equality. But all law enforcement personnel should not be wrongly judged by the actions of a few. I believe that our state legislature passed SB20-217 as an emotional knee-jerk reaction to those events and the bill Continued on page 7


Be safe. Stay Strong.

PAGE 6 | THE VILLAGER • July 16, 2020

GV bypassing part of police reform law Continued from page 1

I am totally comfortable betting on the officers and the leadership of the GV police department.” The resolution drew the attention of Colorado Governor Jared Polis, who said, about SB 20-217 which he signed into law on June 19, “it was designed to restore trust between communities and law enforcement…I’m confident communities across the state will follow it.” Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser weighed in on Twitter, saying, “This is wrong. We can’t let this stand.” State Rep. Leslie Herod, who sponsored Senate Bill 20217, said, “I’m wondering what message they’re sending to the citizens if they would allow an officer to act in bad faith and still have their back, no matter what. I think that’s completely inappropriate. I think it’s backwards looking and it’s not in the spirit of what we’re trying to do as a community moving forward.” Republican state Sen. Bob Gardner from Colorado Springs, who voted for the bill, is reported to have described the resolution as an “attempted end run” around the new law. State Rep. Meg Froelich, a former member of the GV city council, did not mince words. “Greenwood Village City Council could have passed

a resolution condemning racism, they could’ve passed a resolution supporting their police, they could’ve passed a resolution putting in additional training or bonuses for good policing. Instead GV City Council decided to void one of the most important parts of a bipartisan piece of legislation and make the statement that you can kneel on someone’s neck for 8 1/2 minutes in GV if you’re a police officer, the city’s taxpayers will pick up the tab,” she said. Even Cory Christensen, police chief of Steamboat Springs and president of the Colorado

ABOVE: GV had its parking lot and city hall building locked down tight with barricades and a snowplow truck, but that didn’t stop protesters from gathering there. No one from city government was visible or acknowledged the protesters. LEFT: Chris Coleman, a GV resident, came because he “thought it was outrageous to throw all the hard work to curb police violence in the trash” and he “wants people of color to feel safe in GV.”

Association of Chiefs of Police, told the Denver Post that GV’s resolution “doesn’t seem prudent to me, to be honest.” State Sen. Jeff Bridges, whose district includes Greenwood Village, spoke to The Villager after talking to GV City Manager John Jackson about the resolution. Said Bridges, “I understand that the GV city council had reason to believe that they’d lose officers if they didn’t do this, but the bill provides complete protec-

Protest organizer Cherry Creek High School (CCHS) senior Talia Richard-Lande (center), a GV resident, spoke to the crowd while fellow organizer and CCHS senior Ramsey Headrick (left) and Tay Anderson, Denver Public Schools Board of Education member looked on.

Photos by Freda Miklin

Protesters marched down Quebec Street.

to the community. We have had dash cameras for 20 years.” They explained the adoption of the resolution this way. “Seeing the lack of reasoned support by city councils throughout the country, one senior officer (in GV) has already determined that this risk in addition to his life was not one that he was willing to endure. Other officers who are also risking their lives on a day to day basis seeing municipalities who want to defund their efforts calls into question for them whether it is really worth protecting people who don’t want them. Other municipalities may have different cultures, training and problems that we do not face. We will not judge the efforts of other cities to do what they believe best for their citizens, but based on our workforce, our training and our culture, we do not believe

tion for officers who act legally. To overrule part of a bipartisan bill and say our police aren’t subject to the very same standard as every other officer in the state is deeply disturbing.” An official statement issued on July 9 by the city said that the This family came to protest “the GV city resolution was council’s decision to shield police liability not intended to from questionable activities,” though they “shield its police believe the police are “necessary for a safe from accountabil- society, but they must act properly.” ity,” since officers can be disciplined or terminated that the potential financial penat any time. They noted that alties of our police officers in “many of the items that the Greenwood Village will make state legislature included in SB any measurable difference in 20-217 have been in force for whether they will act in a proa long period of time in Green- fessional or criminal way.” wood Village. We already ban GV’s action continued to choke holds. We review every have repercussions a week after show of and use of force case it was taken. On July 13, the not only when deadly force is City of Westminster issued a used or there is a complaint but public statement clarifying that when any force is used even in- it intended to provide its officluding situations where a taser cers only the limited immunity may be drawn and not even prescribed under the police refired. We do not chase unless form law, after earlier stating it the chase involves a felony and would indemnify them “for any immediate threat to human life liability.” Fmiklin.villager@gmail.com that outweighs the greater risk


Be safe. Stay Strong.

July 16, 2020 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 7

Why I voted to indemnify police Continued from Page 5

was completed in less than two weeks. Hastily passed laws based on emotion does not deliver good public policy. Therefore, it was incumbent upon our Council to do what is right for Greenwood Village. The evidence for this argument is irrefutable. In major cities across the country where local elected officials are calling to defund the police or reduce their size, violent crime has risen significantly. In cities such as New York, Chicago, Minneapolis and Los Angeles, criminals are emboldened by what they see as weakened police forces. Some of these cities have experienced the highest levels of violent crime in their history in just the past few weeks. National surveys confirm that most people want a strong and ethical police force in their communities. Law abiding citizens are appalled by what they are experiencing in their neighborhoods and fear for their families as their communities have become a more dangerous place to live and work. In many of those cities, most notably the Seattle Chop zone, these policies have already created a semi-lawless society which has resulted in mob rule, violence and murders. The media and others have mischaracterized one of my statements when I said that we are different in Greenwood Village. The purpose of that statement was then and still is now that the recent vote by our City Council conveys the message that we support our police officers as they fulfill their duties responsibly. We have no intention of defunding our police and we will support the rule of law. We passed this resolution to retain our police officers so that the significant rise in violent crime being experienced in other cities does not happen in Greenwood Village. If someone is breaking into your home in the middle of the night, would you rather call a police officer or a social worker? While this may sound like a silly question, it may become reality in cities that are calling to defund the police. The Minneapolis City Council has recently said that they will defund the police and move those monies and resources to more social workers. Several other major cities are talking about doing the same thing. I

do not want that to happen in Greenwood Village and that is why we are different. Police officers risk their lives to protect our neighborhoods and businesses. They run towards danger when everyone else is running away, they often have bullets flying at them when trying to save others and they must make split-second life and death decisions on a regular basis. Many officers are just not willing to accept a personal financial risk on top of the life-threatening situations which is why communities are in jeopardy of losing so many good police officers. I find it ironic and even hypocritical that the state legislature stripped away financial immunity for police officers but kept it for themselves in their government capacity. Most business and government leaders and employees have some type of financial immunity through D&O insurance (business) and government purchased insurance which includes coverage for the President, Congress, the Governor,

state legislatures and staff, municipal officers and staff, Mayors, City Councilmembers and many more. The fact is that it would be difficult if not impossible to find good people to serve in many business and government capacities if they were not provided financial immunity. Kyle Clark, a 9 News TV anchor recently made a statement that people should not live, work, shop or drive through Greenwood Village for fear of being mistreated by the police. That statement was not only irresponsible, but it was just patently the complete opposite of the truth. The evidence speaks for itself. Violent crime is on a steep rise in those cities where leaders are not supporting their police. Greenwood Village has and will continue to be one of the safest places in the state to live and work. I believe that history will prove that our City Council is on the right side of this issue and I was pleased to vote in favor of the resolution that supports our police officers.

The Villager welcomes news tips, letters & photos from our readers 303-773-8313 gerri@villagerpublishing.com


Be safe. Stay Strong.

ABOU

THE LAW

BY DONALD PETERSON Dear Readers,

How does estate planning affect the distribution of your assets at death?

It is critical to an overall estate plan to prepare the appropriate documents to ensure that your assets are distributed upon your death, in accordance with your wishes. Estate planning allows you to name people to act on your behalf in financial and medical situations when you are unable to do so and allows you to name a guardian and/or conservator for a minor or disabled child. Wills and Trusts are part of an overall estate plan, and are usually accompanied by other documents which are applicable during your lifetime, such as Financial/General and Healthcare

Power of Attorney documents and a Living Will/Medical Declaration. In some circumstances, when someone has a taxable estate, then more complex planning may be used to minimize the amount of estate tax due upon the person’s death. Many options are available when planning how to pass your estate. To plan the distribution of your assets, you must decide what to give away, when to give it, who will receive it, and when will they receive it. You may also want to consider some methods that are less expensive and others that will reduce any estate taxes. A Will is a statement that describes how your assets will be distributed after your passing. A Will allows you to give items that you own, including real estate, vehicles, business holdings, money and personal property, to others whom you want, after your estate debts have been paid. A Will may also state whom you want as the guardian of a minor or a disabled child. Additionally, in a Will, you can appoint a Personal Representative, to handle your affairs after your death. A Trust is a document where real or personal property is held by a person, called the Trustee,

for the care or benefit of another person, the Beneficiary. The two basic types of Trusts are those created at your passing (which are Testamentary Trusts) and those you create during your lifetime (referred to as Living Trusts or Revocable Trusts). A Testamentary Trust is established in your Will and takes effect only after your passing and after your estate has been administered. Testamentary Trusts, like Living or Revocable Trusts, can be established to save or minimize estate taxes and to manage assets for minor or disabled adult children. A Will or Living Trust that meets all of the legal requirements remains valid until you revoke it. You may revoke either a Will or Living Trust at any time. A Will or Living Trust that is valid in another state is also valid in Colorado, and therefore, simply moving to another state does not revoke a Will or Trust.

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demic. Simply being married does not give you the legal right to gain access to your spouse’s medical records or make medical decisions on your spouse’s behalf, even in an emergency. To avoid this problem and to help others care for you and to achieve your overall estate planning goals, the following documents create an effective medical/estate plan package: 1. Healthcare Power of Attorney; 2. General Financial Power of Attorney; 3. Advanced Directive for Medical/Surgical Treatment (“Living Will”); and 4. Will (or a Will with a Trust). Careful medical/estate planning should include preparation

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Can I stop Social Security if I go back to work? Dear Savvy Senior,

I lost my job last month because of the coronavirus crisis. With little savings, I’ve been thinking about starting my Social Security benefits early to help me get by. But my question is, if I find a new job BY JIM MILLER can I stop my Social Security benefits and restart them at a later date so they can continue to grow? Almost 63 Dear Almost, Yes, there are actually two ways you can stop your Social Security retirement benefits (once you’ve started collecting them) and restart them at a later date, which would boost your benefits. But in order to do this certain rules and conditions must be met. Here are your options.

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and signing of these documents, to accomplish your goals and protect you, both during your lifetime, and at the time of passing. The Power of Attorney documents allow you to designate those agents whom you authorize to help you on your behalf during your lifetime, and the Will/Trust documents allow you to nominate others to help with your estate after your passing, as well as to identify the beneficiaries and the distributions to them, to accomplish your estate planning goals. As a courtesy, there is no charge for my initial consultation with clients. I have served seniors and their families for over 43 years regarding their medical and estate planning needs.

A 30% REDUCTION ON ESTATE PLAN DOCUMENTS IS CURRENTLY BEING OFFERED DUE TO THE COVID-19 CRISIS!

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PAGE 8 | THE VILLAGER • July 16, 2020

Withdraw your benefits

One way to pause your Social Security benefits is to simply withdraw your Social Security application. But this must be done within 12 months of starting your benefits and you’ll also have to repay what you’ve received so far. If you choose this option, Social Security will treat your application for early benefits as if it never happened. To withdraw your benefits,

you’ll need to complete Form SSA-521 (SSA.gov/forms/ssa521.pdf) and send it to your local Social Security office. Also be aware that you can only withdraw benefits once in a lifetime.

Suspend your benefits

If you aren’t eligible for withdrawal, but you’ve reached your full retirement age and have not yet reached age 70, another option is to voluntarily suspend your retirement benefits. With the suspension option you don’t have to repay the benefits you’ve received, and you can restart them anytime you wish, or they will be automatically be reinstated at age 70. (See SSA.gov/ planners/retire/ageincrease. html to find your full retirement age.) By suspending your benefits you’ll earn delayed retirement credits, which means your benefit amount increases for every month of the suspension. Your payment will go up by two-thirds of 1 percent monthly or 8 percent annually. A benefit of $1,500 monthly, for example, increases by $10 for each month you have benefits suspended. You can request a suspension by phone (800772-1213) or in person at your local Social Security office. Continued on page 12


Be safe. Stay Strong.

July 16, 2020 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 9

Digging into the data on Colorado charter schools

Introducing Common Sense Institute New Name | New Look | Same Mission | It’s Just Common Sense

CSI’s mission is to examine the fiscal impacts of policies, initiatives, and proposed laws so that Coloradans are educated and informed on issues impacting their lives. CSI employs rigorous research techniques and dynamic modeling to evaluate the potential impact of these measures on the Colorado economy and individual opportunity. To learn more, become involved or to make a donation visit commonsenseinstituteco.org

An In-Depth Look at Graduation Rates for Students of Color BY DR. BRENDA BAUTSCH DICKHONER CSI EDUCATION FELLOW JULY 2020

Researchers across the country have found that charter schools can be particularly effective at raising student achievement and improving outcomes for students of color, and Colorado’s graduation rates data reflects this as well. This report compares 2019 graduation rates for traditional brick and mortar high schools in Colorado.

Colorado Graduation Rates by Region

• The statewide 4-year graduation rate for charter schools was 93% in 2019 compared with 89% at non-charter high schools. • Charter schools have higher graduation rates than district-run schools in the Metro, North Central and Pikes Peak regions, lower graduation rates in the West Central region, and comparable rates in the Southwest region. • In the North Central and Pikes Peak regions, charter schools have 4-year graduation rates that are eight to nine percentage points higher than those of non-charter schools. Colorado Graduation Rates for Students of Color (2019) • Both the 4-year and 6-year graduation rates for Black and African American students were 5.7 percentage points higher than the respective graduation rates for Black and African American students

(93%). • The 6-year graduation rate for Black and Hispanic Hispanic charter students graduate school students (97%) is the highat higher rates at est rate among all charter schools than student subgroups district-run schools at charter and noncharter schools. in Colorado Considering the 6-year graduation rate, traditional brick and mortar at district-run schools. charter schools have essen• The 6-year graduation rate tially closed the gap between for Black and African Ameriwhite students and students of can students at charter schools color. (95%) was two percentage • Within schools that have points higher than the six-year a high concentration of nongraduation rate for white stuwhite students (over 70%), students of color at charter dents at non-charter schools

and bad charter schools just as there are good and bad district-run schools. Charter schools have Charter schools remain a critical part higher graduation of Colorado’s edurates on average than cational ecosystem district-run schools in by providing famiColorado lies with options for different learning environments that can better meet their schools have an 87.8% 4-year children’s needs and graduation rate compared to by proving capable of improv80.2% for their peers at dising outcomes for traditionally trict-run schools. underserved students.

Conclusion

Charter schools are not a silver bullet; there are good

Common Sense Institute

Read the full report at www. commonsenseinstituteco.org

Introducing Common Sense Institute New Name | New Look | Same Mission | It’s Just Common Sense

CSI’s mission is to examine the fiscal impacts of policies, initiatives, and proposed laws so that Coloradans are educated and informed on issues impacting their lives. CSI employs rigorous research techniques and dynamic modeling to evaluate the potential impact of these measures on the Colorado economy and individual opportunity. To learn more, become involved or to make a donation visit commonsenseinstituteco.org


PAGE 10 | THE VILLAGER • July 16, 2020

Rotary Denver Southeast’s virtual passing of the gavel Jim Kreutz is new president Service Above Self is the mantra of Rotarians worldwide and certainly true of one of the most active clubs in the U.S. that happens to be in our own community. Ordinarily, Rotary Denver Southeast established in 1985 (of District 5450) meets for breakfast at Madden Museum of Art in Greenwood Village. But during this exceptional time, the club has been meeting virtually via Zoom and that included passing of the gavel recently when Jim Kreutz was installed as president. Immediate Past President Greg Hoskinson thanked his board for a successful year and cited two outstanding major fundraisers – the golf tournament and State of the State luncheon. Jim Kreutz grew up in the suburbs of Houston, Texas and landed at CSU on a football scholarship where he met his future wife, Martha Hill. The two role models were ambitious, generous and gifted leaders - passed on to the family they created - three daughters and seven grandchildren. (Martha Kreutz served three terms in Colorado’s House of Representatives. Daughter Julie King’s husband, Ross was a former president of Rotary Southeast. Attorney daughter Emily Maxfield was former Assistant DA in Arapahoe County, state attorney and former Magistrate of Denver. Daughter Sara Conway’s son George was just elected student body president at CU.) Kreutz received his law degree from South Texas School of Law, and was appointed Assistant Attorney General of Colorado. He later ran for Lt. Governor of Colorado and was Douglas County Attorney for nine years. Altogether, he has practiced law for 50 years including private practice primarily in civil law and commercial litigation. Jim joined this club in 1991 when it met at another John Madden entity – the Metropolitan Club. He has served on many of the community committees and endeavors including Project CURE assistance and Bags of Fun just to name a few. He was most active on the International Committee with water projects in Honduras and Nigeria as well as orphan homes in Mexico. “Our club is not only for service, but also allows networking and social events. It is an organization

that strengthens civility, which we need so much right now and it provides an opportunity to help those less fortunate – to coin a much overly-used phrase. We live to give!” He welcomed input and suggestions from members with ideas for the year, fulfilling their hopes and dreams for the club. “I look forward to the year and need everyone to help,” he said. The club has its own 501 (c) 3 Foundation. 2020-2021 Board Members are: President Elect – Doug Imhoff, Past President – Greg Hoskinson, Treasurer – Bonnie Thomas, Secretary – Ruth Nauts, Community Service – Christa Reich, International Service – Rob McMaher, Youth Service – Steve Radcliffe, Fellowship – Peg Rudden, Fundraising – Richard Swomley, Membership – Ed Myer, Administration – Jan Lovelady, RI Foundation – Karen Briggs Harrell, Public Relations – Kim DeCoste, Sargent At Arms – Colin Kresock and DSE Technology – Jeff Zalkind. Former club president Karen Loeb reported on a district and club award. Denver Southeast Rotary club received the annual “Helping Hands” award from Brush Rotary Club and will possess a beautiful bronze globe held by helping hands, created by sculptor/poet Sarah Perkins, for this fiscal year. Denver Southeast was awarded because of its “Young Achievers Program,” an outstanding recognition honoring students who have overcome tremendous obstacles while achieving success in school. This club also selects a winner of the memorial Kevin B. Farrell Leadership Award given annually to a Rotarian who humbly demonstrates a commitment to leadership development training for high schoolers and adults. This year’s recipient was Bill Manning of Evergreen Rotary Club for his longtime contributions to the district’s Rotary Youth Leadership Award (RYLA) camp fully sponsored by Rotary. In a private interview, Jim Kreutz shared the beauty of Rotarians doing business successfully together. The Rotarian’s 4-WAY TEST of things we think, say, or do: 1. Is it the TRUTH? 2: Is it FAIR to all concerned? 3. Will it build GOODWILL? 4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

Spouses are active participants in Rotary as well. Pictured here are Jim Kreutz, his wife Martha and Sami Rajabi, wife of past president Abbas Rajabi. Photo by Dr. James Stambaugh

James K. Kreutz

“Our club is not only for service, but also allows networking and social events. It is an organization that strengthens civility, which we need so much right now and it provides an opportunity to help those less fortunate – to coin a much overly-used phrase. We live to give!” – Jim Kreutz

Immediate Past President Greg Hoskinson

Martha and Jim Kreutz surround their daughters Julie King, Sara Conway and Emily Maxfield

International Banner for the Year - Three Doors of Opportunity

Helping Hands Award created by sculptor/poet Sarah Perkins

Pat McGuckin will chair the Woohoomanity Challenge (bike ride) on Saturday, September 12 raising funds for complete polio eradication and COVID-19 Relief


Be safe. Stay Strong.

July 16, 2020 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 11

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CCSD students compete virtually in National Speech and Debate Tournament SUBMITTED BY ANNA DOSBORN DOLAN The first half of the year 2020 finds the United States gripped by pandemic and wracked by protests. The nation is deeply divided politically and public discourse is often ugly and hateful. Yet in the midst of this social strife, thousands of young people are practicing and perfecting the art of effective communication and civil discourse. And they’re doing it through high school speech and debate. “The ability to communicate with people in a civil way, in a way that you respect their viewpoints but you’re also able to communicate your own, is probably the most important skill that I’m going to carry from debate,” said Sonya Zakarian, a senior at Cherry Creek High School. “Many people have very strong political views or opinions on things, but when they go through debate, they begin to be able to see different sides of an issue and to better understand,” said Maria Barun, also a CCHS senior. “I may not agree with you but I understand where you’re coming from and I can respect where you’re coming from.” Zakarian and Barun are among 31 students from the Cherry Creek School District who qualified for and competed in the 2020 National Speech and Debate Tournament, held June 15-20. More than 6,000 students from across the country participated in the tournament, which was supposed to be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, but was held online instead, because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Martha Benham, who has coached the CCHS speech and debate team for 17 years, said the remote competition presented some unique challenges. “We did a lot on Zoom this spring and the kids have adapted really well, but there’s certainly a loss of human interaction that makes it a little tougher,” she said. Barun and fellow CCHS senior Kyle Mathy competed in an event

called “Public Forum Debate.” It was the perfect event for Mathy, who says he’s always been politically minded. He believes his participation in speech and debate has helped prepare him for a possible career as a lobbyist. “It’s taught me the proper way to express strong political beliefs,” he said. Zakarian and fellow CCHS students Hannah Marians and Krithik Ramesh competed in an event called “Congressional Debate,” where students discuss the pros and cons of proposed legislation, much as the members of Congress do. During the first round of competition, Zakarian weighed in on proposed bills to limit Russia’s influence in Crimea, implement income share agreements for college students and to remove sanctions from Venezuela to promote peace in that country. “One of the main benefits (of

Congressional Debate) is learning more about international politics,” Zakarian said. Knowledge of world events is also critical in “International Extemporaneous Speaking.” In that event, competitors are given a topic, such as “What is the best solution to the conflict in Yemen?” or “Has China’s belt and road initiative been successful?” Competitors, including CCHS senior Shreyas Sriram, then have 30 minutes to prepare a sevenminute presentation on the topic. “The most gratifying part of this program is that it gives you an opportunity as a young member of society to have your voice heard on important issues,” Sriram said. “I really feel like the platform that speech and debate gives all of us is really valuable, to not only learn more about the world, but to make

Continued on page 13

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in Manhattan, Kansas and spent most of his younger years in Boulder, Colorado where he met his first wife, Edith (Ede) Dobbins at Boulder High School. He attended the University of Colorado as a member of ATO (Alpha Tao Omega) to earn a combined Civil Engineering and Business degree. His senior year at CU he married Ede and they were married for 50 years until she passed away in 2000 from cancer. Bob’s first job out of college was working for John Vincent Atanasoff, the inventor of the computer. Bob Gathers was a legend in his time in the data processing field with Gathers and Associates and later Gathers Software with

offices all over the country. He was the first to write a COBOL program generator where programmers just had to fill in the blanks to write the programs. Most of their work was in accounting, especially for oil and gas companies with their unique accounting needs. Later, Bob worked on a project called HECTOR (Human Emulation Computer to Originate Reasoning) with the goal of teaching a computer to think. He was smart and fun and loved by all who knew him. We will miss him terribly. A small family memorial service will be held sometime in September. Memorial gifts may be made to the Cancer League of Colorado and the Colorado Chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society.

The Reverend R. Robert Smith - August 6, 1921June 20, 2020

as a volunteer hospital chaplain for over seven years. He is survived by his wife, Maryan Sneed, his daughter Barbara Smith Eychaner (Jim) of Carmichael, CA and three grandchildren, Anne Eychaner of Carmichael, Jay Eychaner of Chicago, and Zachary Smith of Tucson. Also surviving are blended family members Kimberly Sneed, David Sneed (Jill), and their children Nolan, Lauren and Justin. He was preceded in death by his parents, his brother Frank, his first wife, Violet, and his son Stuart. Bob and Maryan have lived

in HEB for 13 years, starting out in a single family house and later downsizing to a duplex on the north side. They were drawn to HEB because of the indoor swimming pool which they used extensively before Bob’s declining health issues. Memorials may be sent to St. Martin in the Field Episcopal Church, PO Box 460906, Aurora, CO 80046 or The Brookwood Community, 1752 FM 1489 Rd., Brookshire, TX 77423. Due to Covid-19, private family services will be held July 11 at St. Martin’s.

Robert Clayton (Bob) Gathers passed away peacefully at Porter Hospice in Denver, Colorado on July 7, 2020. He was 90 years old. He is survived by his wife of 18 years, Martha (Marty) Chance Gathers, his siblings Sarah Stone, Chuck Gathers and Paul Gathers and his three daughters Susie Law (Don Law), Ellie Mohler (Jim Mohler) and Sharon Gould (Ben Gould) as well as 9 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren. Bob was born March 9, 1930

Bob was born in Ohio and grew up in Washington, DC. He served in Luzon in the Army Signal Corps during World War II. After the war he worked for 30 years at Western Electric, moving to Colorado from New York City. Upon retiring from business he fulfilled a life- long dream of becoming an Episcopal priest. He attended seminary at Nashotah House in Wisconsin and was ordained to the priesthood in 1979. After his ordination he served the diocese of Colorado at parishes in Littleton and Denver. Fr. Smith also served

Can I stop Social Security benefits?

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Working and Collecting Benefits

If you start collecting Social Security and you do go back to work, but your income is modest, you may want to continue drawing your benefits while working at the same time. But if your

earnings are higher, it makes sense to stop your benefits. Social Security has a “retirement earnings test” that says if you’re under your full retirement age and you earn more than $18,240 in 2020, Social Security will deduct $1 from your benefits for every $2 you earn over that amount. Those who reach

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full retirement age in 2020 a less stringent rule applies. In this case, $1 gets taken out for every $3 you make above $48,600 until you reach the month of your birthday. It’s also important to know that if you were to lose some or all of your Social Security benefits because of the earning limits, they aren’t lost forever. When you reach full retirement age, your benefits will be recalculated to a higher amount to make up for what was withheld. Also, if you do decide to work and collect Social Security benefits at the same time, you need to factor in Uncle Sam too. Because working increases your income, it might make your Social Security benefits taxable. Here’s how this works. If your combined income is between $25,000 and $34,000 as an individual or between $32,000 and $44,000 as joint filers, you will pay tax on up to 50 percent of your Social Security benefits. If you earn above the upper limit of these ranges, you will pay tax on up to 85 percent of your benefits. To help you calculate this see the IRS publication 915 at IRS.gov/ pub/irs-pdf/p915.pdf.


Be safe. Stay Strong.

July 16, 2020 • THE VILLAGER | PAGE 13

Virtual speech and debate Continued from page 11

decisions and start to contribute positively to making change happen.” CCHS assistant coach, Carlye Holladay, said the students are simply inspiring. “It gives us hope to see that they understand these issues and that they can talk about them at a depth that most adults can’t. In some ways, that makes them so much more effective at sharing the message,” she said. Some of the students who joined Creek’s 250-member Speech and Debate Club did so to overcome shyness or a fear of public speaking. “When I first joined I was absolutely terrified of public speaking,” recalled Clara Ouyang, a 2020 CCHS graduate. “I would cry in the hallway in middle school before any public speaking events. I wanted to grow up and be a lawyer. I thought this would be a good step toward developing courage and learning about who I am, so in the future I would be able to change minds and make an impact.” Ouyang, who competed in Dramatic Interpretation and Poetry at nationals, is now bound for the University of Indiana in Bloomington, where she plans to study business. “I’m just a shy person, so for me, the most challenging part was overcoming that,” said Siddarth Ijju, a 2020 CCHS graduate who competed in an event called “World Schools Debate,” where a team of students have to defend both sides of current issues. He’s now headed to the University of California at Berkley to study computer science and business. His World Schools Debate teammates include fellow 2020 graduates Angela Zhao, who will study applied psychology at New York University, Nathan Miao,

who’s headed to Georgia Tech to pursue a degree in computer science, and Nimisha Mallela, who will study biology at CU-Boulder. They all agree the benefits of participating in speech and debate are significant. “I think it’s helped me become a better advocate for what I believe in,” Miao said. “I can hold my own with other people who have differing opinions.” “Speech and debate really made it easier for me to understand other people and to think on my feet,” Zhao added. “I found a really accepting community in debate because we can accept each other’s viewpoints, but also offer support in many aspects,” Malella said. While some of the national speech and debate events require competitors to prepare on the spot, others require months of rehearsing and refining. That’s the case for CCHS senior Laurie Frederickson, who competed in “Informative Speaking” with a ten-minute presentation on languages, and CCHS junior Aryan Roy, who competed in “Humorous Interpretation,” performing “The Internet is distracting... Oh look, a kitten!” by Ian McWethy. “It really boosts your creativity,” Roy said. “It increases your critical thinking and problem-solving skills.” Frederickson searched for 40 different sources to help her make a case about the impact language has on our perceptions of people. “I spent time throughout the whole year crafting this speech and making sure all the evidence I use is relevant,” she said. “Diving into my writing and analyzing it on such a minute level has really taught me a lot about how to build

an argument, what words work best and how to relate to my judges and to people in general through writing.” Benham and Holladay, the CCHS speech and debate coaches, say it’s been a pleasure to work with their students during this extraordinary time. “They’re amazing kids. They have beautiful voices and great ideas. Whatever we can do to help shape their ability to develop their message is a privilege and an honor,” Benham said. Congratulations to all of the Cherry Creek Schools speech and debate students, and to these students who competed at the 2020 National Speech and Debate Tournament:

Cherokee Trail High School

Joel Joseph– Humorous Interpretation of Literature Kevin Kim – Cross Examination Debate - Top 37 Vinay Malik – International Extemporaneous Speaking Mitchell Pfeiffer – Cross Examination Debate - Top 37 Abbygail Snogren – Program Oral Interpretation

Cherry Creek High School Maria Barun – Public Forum

2020 Sequoia 4x4 has muscle and performance BY H. THROTTLE AUTOMOTIVE COLUMNIST

Toyota says, “Let’s Go Places” so this week’s test vehicle was a go- to high places in the Sequoia 4x4. This muscle SUV has a 401-horsepower engine with a six-speed sequential transmission. The leather seats are high off the ground with running boards to exit and enter the cabin. Comfort, power, and 2- or 4-wheel drive with the turn of a knob. The Sequoia is designed to pull a trailer or boat along with push button fold down third row seats opening a gigantic trunk space. The TRD tuned shocks provide a pleasant ride and a double wishbone suspension system supports the size and strength of this larger SUV. A menacing grille announces the Toyota brand and the metallic magnetic gray paint shines in the sunlight. The final assembly is in Princeton, Indiana. The Sequoia has a sug-

gested manufacturer’s price of $64,035 with most options included. The vehicle has not been rated yet by the Highway Safety Commission but has all of the Toyota Safety Sense features that are the best in the business. The sound system is perfection with 14 speaker JBS sound system and easy to control with dials. The sound system and heating and cooling vents are vented to the rear seats with separate controls for the seating for seven

passengers. With the power and size and the 5.7L engine, the fuel economy drops to an average of 14 mpg. The lower mileage can be forgiven when the surge of power as this behemoth roars down the freeway with ease and perfect handing. A powerful SUV to tackle work or play is well adapted to Colorado weather and offroad performance with skid plate and 4-wheel drive. This is a muscle machine for hard use.

Debate Raymond Dai – Cross Examination Debate - 24th Place Speaker in CX, Top 52; Extemporaneous Debate- Top 160 Anna Fischer – Duo Interpretation of Literature - Top 30 Laurie Frederickson Informative Speaking, Impromptu - Top 30 Eun Jae Hur – Cross Examination Debate 23rd Place Speaker in CX, Top 52 Siddarth Ijju – World Schools Debate - Top 64 Andrew Jung – Duo Interpretation of Literature - Top 30 Nimisha Mallela – World Schools Debate - Top 64 Hannah Marians – Congressional Debate Kyle Mathy – Public Forum Debate Nathan Miao – World Schools Debate - Top 64 Clara Ouyang – Dramatic Interpretation of Literature Krithik Ramesh – Congressional Debate – Presiding Officer Aryan Roy – Humorous Interpreta-

tion of Literature Shreyas Sriram – International Extemporaneous Speaking, Commentary - Top 60 Sonya Zakarian – Congressional Debate; Extemporaneous Debate - Top 160 Angela Zhao – World Schools Debate - Top 64; Expository Top 60; Poetry - Top 60

Eaglecrest High School

Cade Bachman – Extemporaneous Debate - 14th Place Aspen McCart – Storytelling - 5th Place Giovanni Murtha – Public Forum Debate Rian Nelson – Duo Interpretation of Literature Hailey Staats – Congressional Debate

Grandview High School

Paxton Decker – Congressional Debate

Smoky Hill High School

Peter Alisky – National Extemporaneous Speaking - 4th Place Elishevlyne Eliason – Original Oratory Aiden Nave – Congressional Debate


PAGE 14 | THE VILLAGER • July 16, 2020

LEGALS

—Continued from previous page—

2017 FIRST

ARAPAHOE COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ARAPAHOE COUNTY COLORADO HOTEL & RESTAURANT NEW LIQUOR LICENSE In accordance with Colorado Revised Statutes, Banyan Lane Holdings, LLC d/b/a EVEN Hotel has requested the Arapahoe County Liquor Authority to grant a new Hotel & Restaurant Liquor License at 7380 S. Clinton Street, Englewood, CO 80112. A public hearing will be held in the West Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 S. Prince St., Littleton, CO 80120-1136, via telephone by calling (303) 795-4758 on Wednesday, July 29, 2020, at 2:00 P.M. or as soon thereafter as the calendar of the Liquor Authority permits. OFFICERS: Nawaz Gilani, 30 NE 44th Street, Miami, FL 33137, Manager; Yasmin Gilani, 4391 Banyan

FIRST PLACE Best Public Notice Section

2018 NNA Better Newspaper

PLACE — Best Section

Lane, Miami FL 33137, Member; and, Nazir Gilani, 4391 Banyan Lane, Miami FL 33137, Member. The application and additional information are available in the County Attorney’s Office, County Administration Building, 5334 S. Prince St., Littleton, Colorado 80120-1136. Due to Covid-19 Restrictions our office is closed to the public. Please direct all inquiries by telephone to the Arapahoe County Liquor Licensing Authority at 303-795-4539. Petitions or Remonstrances may be filed at the County Attorney’s Office on or before the date of the hearing. BY ORDER OF THE ARAPAHOE COUNTY LIQUOR AUTHORITY Tiffeni Contiguglia, Clerk DATE OF APPLICATION: June 9, 2020 Published in The Villager Published: July 16, 2020 Legal # 9771 ___________________________ ARAPAHOE COUNTY

Advertising Contest Award-winning Newspaper

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CASE NO LDC19-003, REQUIRED NEIGHBORHOOD OUTREACH / LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE AMENDMENT PROPOSAL: Arapahoe County is proposing a Land Development Code Amendment to require neighborhood outreach for certain development case types. The proposed amendment would include: the development case types that would require neighborhood outreach as part of the application submittal process, at what stage the outreach would occur, noticing requirements, and required proof of notice. The amendment would also provide guidance on when and where outreach would be conducted. The Development Application Manual, the companion document to the Land Development Code, would be updated to include process instructions and outreach summary requirements. Arapahoe County is proposing to update the following Code sections to capture outreach requirements

and the case types requiring neighborhood outreach: new section 5-2.1.B.2, ‘Neighborhood Outreach’ (under existing section 5-2.1, ‘Application Submittal and Approval Process’, and part B, ‘Application Process’); Table 5-1.1.1 (Summary Of Review And Decision-Making Authority And Public Hearing And Notice Requirements); and Table 5-2.2.1 (Public Hearing Notice Requirements). NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on August 4, 2020 at 6:30 pm, or as soon thereafter as the calendar of the Arapahoe County Planning Commission permits, a public hearing will be held; at which, all interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning the above-described Case No. LDC19-003, Required Neighborhood Outreach/Land Development Code Amendment. The hearing will be held at 6954 S. Lima Street, Arapahoe Room, Centennial, CO, 80112. Please note, due to the ongoing COVID-19 emergency the hearing will be conducted through remote access. Please check https://www.arapahoegov.

SPECIAL DISTRICTS NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT NOTICE is hereby given that the Cherry Creek Vista Park and Recreation District, PO Box 359, Littleton, Colorado, will make final payment to Goodland Construction, Inc., of 760 Nile Street, Golden, Colorado for all Work done by said Contractor in connection with, or Work done on the Cherry Creek Vista II Park Improvements, unincorporated Arapahoe County, State of Colorado. Any person, co-partnership, association of persons, company or corporation that has furnished labor, materials, team hire, sustenance, provisions, provender, or other supplies used or consumed by such contractors or their subcontractors, in or about the performance of the Work contracted to be done or that supplies rental machinery, tools or equipment to the extent used in the prosecution of the Work, and whose claim therefor has not been paid by the contractors or their subcontractors, at any time up to and including the time for final settlement for the Work contracted to be done, is required to file a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid, and an account of such claim, to the Cherry Creek Vista Park and Recreation District, on or before the date and time herein above shown for final payment. Failure on the part of any claimant to file such verified statement of claim prior to such final settlement will release Cherry Creek Vista Park and Recreation District, its directors, officers, agents and employees, of and from any and all liability for such claim. Cherry Creek Vista Park and Recreation District By: /s/ Sarah Shepherd District Manager Published in The Villager First Publication: June 25, 2020 Last Publication: July 2, 2020 Legal # 9750 ___________________________ 00 65 33 NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT GREENFIELD ESTATES OUTFALLS IMPROVEMENTS (Contract No. CPR19-00011-C-4) Notice is hereby given that on July 24, 2020, Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority shall make final payment to L & M Enterprises, Inc. in connection with full payment for all services rendered, materials furnished and for all labor performed in and for the abovereferenced PROJECT. 1. Any person, co-partnership, association of persons, company or corporation that has an unpaid claim against the said PROJECT for or on account of the furnishing of labor, materials, team hire, sustenance, provisions, provender or other supplies used or consumed by such CONTRACTOR or any SUBCONTRACTOR in or about the performance of said WORK contracted to be done or that supplies rental machinery, tools, or equipment to the extent used in the prosecution of the WORK whose claim therefore has not been paid by the CONTRACTOR or the SUBCONTRACTOR may at any time up to and including said time of such final settlement file a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid on account of such claim. 2. All such claims will be filed with

Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority, 7437 South Fairplay Street, Centennial, Colorado, 80112, on or before the abovementioned date and time of final settlement. 3. Failure on the part of a creditor to file such statement prior to such final settlement will relieve Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority from any and all liability for such claim. OWNER: Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority Name: Paul Danley Title: Executive Director Published in The Villager Published: July 2, 2020 and July 16, 2020 Legal # 9759 ___________________________ NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT GREEN ACRES TRIBUTARY CHANNEL IMPROVEMENTS AND DOVE VALLEY WATER QUALITY POND (Contract No. CPR16-00020-C-2) Notice is hereby given that on July 31, 2020, Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority shall make final payment to Naranjo Civil Constructors, Inc., 627 27th Street, Garden City, Colorado 80631 in connection with full payment for all services rendered, materials furnished and for all labor performed in and for the above-referenced PROJECT. 1. Any person, co-partnership, association of persons, company or corporation that has an unpaid claim against the said PROJECT for or on account of the furnishing of labor, materials, team hire, sustenance, provisions, provender or other supplies used or consumed by such CONTRACTOR or any SUBCONTRACTOR in or about the performance of said WORK contracted to be done or that supplies rental machinery, tools, or equipment to the extent used in the prosecution of the WORK whose claim therefore has not been paid by the CONTRACTOR or the SUBCONTRACTOR may at any time up to and including said time of such final settlement file a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid on account of such claim. 2. All such claims will be filed with Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority, 7437 South Fairplay Street, Centennial, Colorado, 80112, on or before the abovementioned date and time of final settlement.

Notice is hereby given that at 10 a.m. on July 30th, 2020, Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority shall make final payment to Insituform Technologies Inc. 9654 Titan Court, Littleton CO 80125 in connection with full payment for all services rendered, materials furnished and for all labor performed in and for the above-referenced PROJECT. 1. Any person, co-partnership, association of persons, company or corporation that has an unpaid claim against the said PROJECT for or on account of the furnishing of labor, materials, team hire, sustenance, provisions, provender or other supplies used or consumed by such CONTRACTOR or any SUBCONTRACTOR in or about the performance of said WORK contracted to be done or that supplies rental machinery, tools, or equipment to the extent used in the prosecution of the WORK whose claim therefore has not been paid by the CONTRACTOR or the SUBCONTRACTOR may at any time up to and including said time of such final settlement file a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid on account of such claim. 2. All such claims will be filed with Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority, 7437 South Fairplay Street, Centennial, Colorado, 80112, on or before the abovementioned date and time of final settlement. 3. Failure on the part of a creditor to file such statement prior to such final settlement will relieve Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority from any and all liability for such claim. OWNER: Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority Published in The Villager Published: July 2, 2020 and July 16, 2020 Legal # 9761 ___________________________ Southgate Sanitation District Notice of Final Payment Notice is hereby given that the Southgate Sanitation District (“District”), Arapahoe and Douglas Counties, Colorado, will make final payment at its office at 3722 E. Orchard Road, Centennial, Colorado on July 24, 2020 to Quality Pipe Services for all work done by said Contractor in construction work performed within the District on the following project: Project Contractor: Quality Pipe Services

3. Failure on the part of a creditor to file such statement prior to such final settlement will relieve Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority from any and all liability for such claim.

Project Name: 2019 Manhole Rehabilitation Project

Published in The Villager Published: July 2, 2020 and July 16, 2020 Legal # 9760 ___________________________ 00 65 33 NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT

Work area areas are located within the City of Lone Tree, City of Greenwood Village, and City of Centennial, Colorado. Work generally consisted of the rehabilitation of forty-one (41) existing concrete and brick and mortar sanitary sewer manholes in various states of deterioration.

PARKER RD & JEWEL AVE STORM SEWER LINING (CONTRACT NO. CPR1900007-C20-2)

Project Location: Arapahoe County and Douglas County, Colorado.

Any persons, co-partnership, association of persons, company, or

corporation that furnished labor, materials, equipment rentals, sustenance or other supplies used or consumed by any contractor, in or about the performance of said work are hereby notified to file any claim on account of furnishing any of said items to the District, to the attention of David Irish, District Manager, at the above address on or before 4:30 PM on Thursday, July 23, 2020. Failure on the part of such claimant to file such verified statement of claim prior to such deadline, will release the District, its officers, agents, and employees from any and all liability for such claim. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS SOUTHGATE SANITATION DISTRICT By: John Spisak, Secretary Published in The Villager First Publication: July 16, 2020 Last Publication: July 23, 2020 Legal # 9778 ___________________________ Southgate Sanitation District Notice of Final Payment Notice is hereby given that the Southgate Sanitation District (“District”), Arapahoe and Douglas Counties, Colorado, will make final payment at its office at 3722 E. Orchard Road, Centennial, Colorado on July 24, 2020 to Garney Construction Company for all work done by said Contractor in construction work performed within the District on the following project: Project Contractor: Garney Construction Company Project Name: Colsman Tunnel Rehabilitation Project Project Location: Arapahoe County, Colorado. Work area areas are located within the City of Greenwood Village and City of Centennial. Work locations are generally beginning at the District’s headquarters at 3722 E Orchard Road and running west for 7,650 LF to a structure at E Orchard Road near S. Cherrywood Circle. Any persons, co-partnership, association of persons, company, or corporation that furnished labor, materials, equipment rentals, sustenance or other supplies used or consumed by any contractor, in or about the performance of said work are hereby notified to file any claim on account of furnishing any of said items to the District, to the attention of David Irish, District Manager, at the above address on or before 4:30 PM on Thursday, July 23, 2020. Failure on the part of such claimant to file such verified statement of claim prior to such deadline, will release the District, its officers, agents, and employees from any and all liability for such claim. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS SOUTHGATE SANITATION DISTRICT By: John Spisak, Secretary Published in The Villager First Publication: July 16, 2020 Last Publication: July 23, 2020 Legal # 9779 ___________________________

com/AgendaCenter/Planning-Commission-2 for a link to the agenda and specific information on how to attend and participate. The agenda for this meeting will typically be posted by the Friday afternoon preceding the hearing. More information about this proposal is available at the offices of the Arapahoe County Public Works and Development Department, Planning Division, 6924 S. Lima St., Centennial, CO 80112, or by calling (720) 874-6650 during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday). Joan Lopez, Clerk to the Board Published in The Villager Published: July 16, 2020 Legal # 9772 ___________________________ ARAPAHOE COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CASE NO LDC20-001 A-1 AND RR-1 ACCESSORY STRUCTURE SETBACKS / LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE AMENDMENT PROPOSAL: Arapahoe County is proposing an amendment to the Arapahoe County Land Development code to modify accessory building setback requirements in the A-1 and RR-A zone districts. The current regulations require any accessory structure be built behind the principal structure. The modifications would eliminate the requirement for accessory structures to be behind the principal structure, and would require that any accessory structures be 100 feet from the front property line. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on August 4, 2020 the Arapahoe County Planning Commission will hold a Public Hearing at 6:30 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter at 6954 S. Lima St. 80112, Arapahoe Room, Centennial, CO; at which, all interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning the above-described LDC20-001, an amendment to the Land Development Code. Please note, however, due to the ongoing COVID-19 emergency the hearing will be conducted through remote access – please check https:// www.arapahoegov.com/622/Planning-Commission for a link to the agenda and specific information on how to attend and participate. The agenda will typically be posted by the Friday afternoon preceding the hearing. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on August 25, 2020, at 9:30 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the calendar of the Arapahoe County Board of County Commissioners permits, a public hearing will be held; at which, all interested persons will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning the above-described LDC20-001, an amendment to the Land Development code. The public hearing is scheduled for the East Hearing Room, 5334 S Prince St., Littleton Colorado 80120, however, please note that due to the ongoing COVID-19 emergency the hearing will be conducted through remote access – please check the weekly public meeting agenda at https://www.arapahoegov.com/ AgendaCenter/Board-of-CountyCommissioners-1 for specific information on how to attend and participate. The agenda will typically be posted by the Friday afternoon preceding the hearing. More information about this proposal is available at the offices of the Arapahoe County Public Works and Development Department, Zoning Division, 6924 S. Lima St., Centennial, CO 80112 (by appointment only) or by calling 720-8746711 or by emailing zoning@ arapahoegov.com during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday). Joan Lopez, Clerk to the Board Published in The Villager Published: July 16, 2020 Legal # 9773 ___________________________ ARAPAHOE COUNTY NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT To whom it may concern: This notice is given with regard to items in the custody of the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office that have been released for public auction. The Sheriff’s Office will release numerous items including but not limited to, bicycles, jewelry, audio/ visual equipment, automotive parts, tools, sports equipment (such as camping, rafting, skiing gear, etc.), household goods and other items of personal property to a private auction company identi-

fied as Propertyroom.com and/or Roller Auction. These items will be released for on-line bidding on the last Tuesday of each month for Roller Auction and the last day of the month for Propertyroom. com. Both auctions are open to the public. If any citizen believes they have property in the possession of the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office that can be identified, and for which they can show proof of ownership associated with a written report that has been filed with the Sheriff’s Office prior to this announcement, can contact the evidence section of the Sheriff’s Office. Joan Lopez, Clerk to the Board Published in The Villager Published: July 16, 2020 Legal # 9774 ___________________________ ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLOARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 2020-02 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on July 28, 2020, at 9:30 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, at the Arapahoe County Administration Building, 5334 S. Prince St., Littleton, CO, the Board of County Commissioners for Arapahoe County will consider for adoption Arapahoe County Ordinance No. 202002 (NOTE: Due to the ongoing COVID19 emergency the hearing may be conducted through remote access – please check the July 28, 2020 public meeting agenda at https://www.arapahoegov.com/ AgendaCenter/Board-of-CountyCommissioners-1 for specific information on how to attend and participate. The agenda will typically be posted by the Friday afternoon preceding the hearing). The proposed ordinance reads as follows: ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 2020-02 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING LIMITED RETAIL MARIJUANA STORES IN UNINCORPORATED ARAPAHOE COUNTY WHEREAS, pursuant to C.R.S. §§ 30-11-101(2) and 30-15-401(1), Arapahoe County has the power to adopt and enforce ordinances regarding health, safety, and welfare issues otherwise prescribed by law; and WHEREAS, pursuant to C.R.S. § 30-11-103, the Board of County Commissioners has the authority to exercise all powers for the County; and WHEREAS, Colorado Constitution, Article XVIII, Section 16(5) (f) authorizes the County to enact an ordinance governing the time, place, manner, and number of retail marijuana businesses, which may include a local licensing requirement; and WHEREAS, similar authorization to govern the time, place, manner, and number of retail marijuana businesses, which may include a local licensing requirement may be found in C.R.S. §44-10-104(3); and WHEREAS, by prior action on August 27, 2013, the Board adopted Resolution No. 130560 enacting Ordinance No. 2013-01 Prohibiting the Establishment, Maintenance, and Operation of Marijuana Establishments Within unincorporated Arapahoe County; and WHEREAS, four (4) licensed medical marijuana stores (the “Licensed Stores”) have been in operation within unincorporated Arapahoe County for around eight years; and WHEREAS, the Licensed Stores have operated in compliance with the Arapahoe County Land Development Code nonconforming use regulations and in conformity with Colorado Constitution and state law; and WHEREAS, it is the decision of the Board of County Commissioners of Arapahoe County to terminate Ordinance No. 2013-01 and allow the Licensed Stores the opportunity to also be used as a retail marijuana store. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Board of County Commissioners of Arapahoe County, the following:

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Be safe. LEGALS

Stay Strong.

July THE VILLAGER VILLAGER ||PAGE PAGE 23 15 July16, 162020 2020,•THE

NOW OPEN

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Park Meadows Mall

Classified Advertising SERVICES

Dependable Yard Work: Modest rates.Friendly and dependable. Local references. Call Greg at 720-404-8032 tfn

Handyman who can do it right the first time. Local repairman. Call Doug at 303-756-5655

HELP WANTED Newmont International Services Limited Manager, Global Risk Management (Greenwood Village, CO) to govern Risk Mgmt Standard w/in bus. Reqs Bach deg. in Finance, Risk Mgmt, Business Mgmt, or rel & 5 yrs. of rel mining ops risk analysis exp. In lieu of Bach & 5 yrs of exp, employer will accept 10 yrs of rel mining ops risk anal exp. For full job details, all reqs & to apply online, visit: https://bit.ly/MgrGlobalRiskMng mtN-CO Director, Global Inclusion and Diversity (Greenwood Village, CO) to dvlp & manage Inclusion & Diversity (I&D) Strategy for enterprise globally that reflects all countries w/in which bus has ops/ proj. Reqs Bach or Master deg in HR, Natural Resources Mgmt, or rel field & post-bach prog exp in field of HR in mining industry (8 yrs w/Bach or 6 yrs w/Master). For full job details, all reqs & to apply online, visit: https://bit.ly/DirGIandDiversityN--CO

Senior Technical Lead, Payroll (Greenwood Village, CO) to provide IT soln dsgn, deliv & supp to improve comp sys w/in payroll div for US, Canada, Ghana, Australia, Peru, & Suriname. Reqs Bach deg. in Comp Engg, IT, or rel field & 8 yrs of IT exp incl 4 yrs of IT exp w/in mining industry’s payroll. For full job details, all reqs & to apply online, visit: https://bit.ly/ SrTechLead-PayrollN-CO Sr. Manager–Strategic Spend Category and Sourcing Programs Management (Greenwood Village, CO) to manage Lifecycle Procurement & Category Mgmt Prog function w/in supply chain. Reqs Bach deg in Supply Chain, Engg (any), or rel field & 7 yrs of post-bach prog rel exp, incl 5 yrs exp w/in mining supply mgmt. For full job details, all reqs & to apply online, visit: https://bit.ly/ SrMgr-Strategic SpendN-CO j22

—Continued from previous page— SECTION I. INTENT The Board of County Commissioners (the “Board”) finds, determines, and declares that Ordinance No. 2013-01 is terminated and the establishment of retail marijuana stores at specific locations as described herein are authorized, and no other retail marijuana businesses are authorized within unincorporated Arapahoe County. SECTION II. DEFINITIONS Unless otherwise specified or the context otherwise requires, any terms used in this Ordinance shall have the same meanings as provided in the Colorado Constitution, Article XVIII, Section 16. These terms and definitions include, but are not limited to: A. CMC CMC shall mean the Colorado Marijuana Code, C.R.S. Section 44-10-101 et seq., as amended. B. Marijuana All parts of the plant of the genus cannabis whether growing or not, the seeds thereof, the resin extracted from any part of the plant, and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant, its seeds, or its resin, including marijuana concentrate. Marijuana shall not mean industrial hemp. Marijuana includes marijuana as defined in Article XVIII, Section 16 of the Colorado Constitution, Article XVIII, Section 14 of the Colorado Constitution, and the CMC. C. Medical Marijuana Store A person or entity licensed by a state agency to sell medical marijuana and medical marijuana prod-

ucts to patients or primary caregivers, but is not a primary caregiver as defined by Article XVIII, Section 14 of the Colorado Constitution or the CMC, and includes, but is not limited to, a “medical marijuana store” as defined. D. Retail Marijuana Business Retail marijuana business shall mean a retail marijuana store, a retail marijuana cultivation facility, a retail marijuana products manufacturer, a marijuana hospitality business, a retail marijuana hospitality and sales business, a retail marijuana testing facility, a retail marijuana business operator, or a retail marijuana transporter licensed pursuant to the CMC. E. Retail Marijuana Store Retail marijuana store shall mean an entity licensed to purchase marijuana from marijuana cultivation facilities and marijuana products from marijuana product manufacturing facilities and to sell marijuana and marijuana products to consumers, as defined by Article XVIII, Section 16 of the Colorado Constitution and the CMC. SECTION III. MARIJUANA ESTABLISHMENTS The licensed premises of the medical marijuana stores existing as of July 14, 2020 and located at 1842 South Parker Road, Unit 18, Denver, Colorado 80231, 2280 South Quebec Street #G, Denver, Colorado 80231, 3431 South Federal Boulevard, Unit G, Englewood, Colorado 80110, and 6200 East Yale Avenue, Unit B, Denver, Colorado 80222, and no others, are allowed to be used for a retail marijuana store and/or a medical marijuana store upon such terms

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Celebrate Colorado’s 16th Annual Law Enforcement Appreciation Day

The Children’s Art School is a DPS Community Resources arts organization based on the belief that creating art is essential to every child’s development. We are celebrating thirteen years of providing art education for interested and talented young artists. Our classes are small to encourage individual learning and exploration. All art materials are provided. 2290 S. Clayton Street, Denver. We register our students by phone at 303-369-7956 or by email at hello@artcreates.org.

July 19. Join Denver County Republican candidates for a family friendly gathering with guest speakers, music and food as the community rallies in support of those who put their lives on the line every day to keep us safe. 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm. Civic Center Park. For information call 720-787-7691.

Children’s Art School Joy of Art Classes tfn

Mall Hours: Daily 11:00 am – 7:00 pm. 8401 Park Meadows Center Drive, Lone Tree. For information call 303-792-2999

The John Denver Experience June 22 – August 16. The History Colorado Center’s opening exhibit features more than 12,000 square feet of rejuvenating whimsy. It is a handcrafted ode to the boundless joy and creative spirit of the immortal songwriter, performer, environmentalist and humanitarian. 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. 1200 Broadway, Denver. For information on ticket reservations visit historycolorado.org/welcome or call 303-447-8679

Best of Show Artists May 22 – July 19. These artists and their works were winners of the 2019 Eye of the Camera Exhibit sponsored by the Littleton Fine Arts Board. If the Littleton Museum of Art is still closed, the exhibit will open virtually on the museum website social media. For information go to littletongov.org/covid-19

EVENTS

Back-to-School Telephone Town Hall July 16. Officials from Arapahoe County school districts and the Tri-County Health Department will answer questions about the latest plans for the Fall term. 7:00 pm. Listen in by calling 855-436-3656 (hit *3 to ask a question) or visit arapahoegov.com/townhall.

and conditions as provided in Arapahoe County Land Development Code Sec. 3-3.5 Marijuana Land Uses, as amended. The establishment of all other retail marijuana businesses within unincorporated Arapahoe County is prohibited. SECTION IV. APPLICABILITY This Ordinance shall apply to all portions of unincorporated Arapahoe County, including public lands. SECTION V. ENFORCEMENT The Arapahoe County Sheriff shall enforce the provisions of this Ordinance. SECTION VI. PENALTY FOR VIOLATIONS The County may seek such criminal and/or civil penalties against any person violating this Ordinance as are provided by law. SECTION VII. DISPOSITION OF FINES Any and all penalties, fines, costs, and/or assessments for violations of this Ordinance shall be paid into the General Fund of Arapahoe County. SECTION VIII. SEVERABILITY If any one or more of the provisions of this Ordinance is determined by a competent court of law to be invalid, such determination shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this Ordinance. SECTION IX. EFFECTIVE DATE This Ordinance shall take effect upon thirty (30) days after notice of its adoption has been published.

Englewood Chamber After Hours Network July 24. Join us for an evening of live music, food & drinks. A great opportunity to market your business in a fun, casual environment. Non-members $10. 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm. In the garden at Grow & Gather, 900 E. Hampden Avenue. For tickets or information call 303789-4473 or visit info@myenglewood chamber.com

SMDRA Drive-Thru Food Drive You don’t even have to get out of your car. We’ll collect your donations and use them to make sure that our neighbors in need have the provisions necessary to feed their families during this tough period in our history. Donations should be non-perishable items. Also consider donating personal hygiene items such as travel-size shampoo, shower gel, deodorant and toothbrushes. 11:00am – 2:00pm. South Metro Realtor Association parking lot at 6436 S. Racine Circle, Centennial. For information call 303-797-3700

Colorado Renaissance Festival Opening Postponed The new date for this year’s festival will be August 1 for eight weekends through Sunday, September 20. For updates and further information call 303-688-6010

Joan Lopez, Clerk to the Board Published in The Villager Published: July 16, 2020 Legal # 9775 ___________________________

COURTS

DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO 7325 South Potomac Street Centennial, Colorado 80112 (303) 649-6355 Telephone PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, Petitioner, IN THE INTEREST OF: ERIN LEDGER AND ELIZABETH PATTERSON, Children, and concerning JILLIAN PATTERSON, CHRISTOPHER LEDGER, GORDON JOHNSON AND JOHN DOE, Respondents. Tamra Joanne White, Esq., Reg. #22049 Senior Assistant County Attorney Attorney for Petitioner 14980 East Alameda Drive Aurora, CO 80012 Tel: (303) 636-1884 Fax: (303) 636-1889 Case No: 20JV197 Division: 22 NOTICE OF ADJUDICATORY HEARING AND DEFAULT JUDGMENT PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that an Adjudicatory Hearing regarding JILLIAN PATTERSON AND JOHN

Cherry Creek Shopping Center Mall Hours: Monday – Saturday 11:00 am – 7:00 pm. Sunday 11:00 am – 6:00 pm. 3000 E. First Avenue, Denver. For information call 303-270-9519

Denver Botanic Gardens The Denver Botanic Gardens 1007 York Street location has opened with limited attendance numbers, timed tickets and strict social distancing guidelines. Admissions are capped at 250 people in two-hour increments. Make a reservation online for a specific date at botanicgardens.org. Tickets will not be available onsite. For information call 720-865-3500

Denver Zoo All tickets must be purchased/reserved online at DenverZoo.org/Visit. The zoo will limit the number of visitors per day with staggered 15-minute entry windows to limit the number of guests at any one time. A one-way path around the entire campus has been created to allow guests to view a majority of its animal habitats and gardens. All guests ages 3 and over will be required to wear face masks. For further information call 720-337-1644

FUNDRAISERS

Birdies Eagles & Heroes Charity Golf Tournament August 5. The Remount Foundation which provides active-duty military, veterans, first responders and their families with free equine-assisted therapeutic activities will host an enjoyable day of golf, entertainment and fellowship for 120 golfers at the world-class Sanctuary Golf Course in Sedalia, CO. Team Remount is looking for foursomes of golfers and a limited number of sponsors to cover the costs of the tournament and meet our fundraising goals. Contact info@remount foundation.org or call 719-766-8567.

DOE is set for July 30, 2020 at 10:00 A.M. in Division 22 at the Arapahoe County District Court, 7325 South Potomac Street, Centennial, Colorado 80112. You have the right to be represented by an attorney during these proceedings; if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to represent you. In the event you fail to appear for said hearing at the date and time indicated, the Petitioner, the People of the State of Colorado, will request that the Court enter a default judgment against you and adjudicate the child (ren) dependent and neglected in accordance with the Colorado Children’s Code. Due to COVID 19, the Arapahoe County District Court is holding some hearings via Cisco WebEx Meetings to allow for audiovisual and/or audio participation. Participants may use any computer, tablet or smart phone equipped with a camera and microphone for audiovisual participation. Parties should use the following link: •https://judicial.webex.com/meet/ natalie.chase •Enter your name and email address (so we know who you are). You will then be in the virtual courtroom. •Select your audio setting. If the audio on your computer or tablet does not work, please use the alternate audio option of calling in to the number below. If you do not have a device that will support a video connection, you may still participate by audio only by calling 720-650-7664 OR 1-415655-0001. When prompted enter code 926 560 922.

If you elect to appear in person, you must be at the Courthouse a half hour before the hearing is scheduled to begin. Dated: July 8, 2020 Tamra Joanne White, Reg. #22049 Senior Assistant County Attorney Attorney for the People 14980 E. Alameda Drive Aurora, CO 80012 303-636-1884 303-636-1889 FAX Published in The Villager Published: July 16, 2020 Legal # 9776 ___________________________

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Susan G. Shank a/k/a Susan Gertrude Shank, Susan Shank and Susie Shank, Deceased Case Number 2020 PR 30647 All persons having claims against the above named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to District Court of Arapahoe, County, Colorado on or before November 23, 2020, or the claims may be forever barred. Michael L. Shank, Personal Representative 4600 Preserve Parkway North Greenwood Village, CO 801213940 Published in The Villager First Publication: July 16, 2020 Last Publication: July 30, 2020 Legal # 9777

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Be safe. Stay Strong.

PAGE 16 | THE VILLAGER • July 16, 2020

Veterans writing workshops online in July Veterans Writing Workshops offer a safe place for veterans, their family members (18+), and caregivers to write and talk about their experiences and connect with each other statewide. Colorado Humanities offers online writing workshops in July. The Lunch & Learn workshops provide participants the opportunity to A

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create, share, and receive feedback on their writing while they learn about ways to improve their writing. Expressive writing each Sunday afternoon provides support for a deeply private journaling process proven to reduce stress. All workshops are led by veterans who are professional writers. Thanks to partners and

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sponsors Colorado State University-Pueblo Department of English & Foreign Languages, Arts in Society, Steamboat Creates, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, all workshops are free and offered via the online platform Discord. • Expressive Writing with Cindy Skaggs Sundays from F

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3 to 4:30 p.m. • Lunch and Learn with Cindy Skaggs Wednesdays 12 to 1 p.m. • July 1 - Journaling Prompts for creative writers • July 8 - Nonfiction Writing about trauma • July 15 - Fiction Narrative structure and plot • July 22 - Business Writing: N

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the synopsis • July 29 - Writing Themes and Symbols To register for Expressive Writing or Lunch and Learn workshops, email Cindy Skaggs at cindy@cskaggs. com. To learn more about all the workshops, visit colorado humanities.org.

Scott Yeoman, First American State Bank, Jay Davidson, First American State Bank, Ralph Klomp, Trice Jewelers, and Justin Klomp, Trice Jewelers

6885 S. University Blvd. • Centennial, CO 80122 303.759.9661

“Bright input and brilliant solutions with dazzling results. Our kind of people! First American State Bank partnering with Trice Jewelers.” ~ Ralph Klomp, Trice Jewelers

TWENTY FIVE YEARS

Let’s keep our tax dollars in our www.fasbank.com • 303.694.6464

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7-16-20 Edition  

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