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Poultry Times PERIODICALS

Since 1954, the nation’s only poultry industry newspaper

February 18, 2013

A preview of the Midwest Poultry Federation’s Annual Convention and Trade Show Includes: Directory of All Exhibitors

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Poultry Times

February 18, 2013 Volume 60, Number 4 www.poultrytimes.net

MPF Convention gearing up for 42nd annual event ST. PAUL, Minn. — The nation’s largest regional poultry convention — the 42nd annual Midwest Poultry Federation (MPF) Convention — will be held March 12-14, 2013, at the Saint Paul RiverCentre in Saint Paul, Minn. “The MPF Convention will feature an exceptional education and trade show, along with several preshow events,” said MPF President Allen Behl, Behl Turkey Farm, Watertown, Wis. Behl represents the Wisconsin Poultry and Egg Industries Association on the MPF Board. “We are also thrilled to offer two exhibit halls that will offer plenty

of opportunity for attendees to visit one-on-one with vendors.” Approximately 40 speakers will cover a variety of topics for the turkey, egg layer, broiler and organic/ specialty poultry industries. MPF also is excited to report the expansion of its second Exhibit Hall, which debuted last year. The hall, conveniently adjacent to the main Exhibit Hall, will include even more booths and opens the door for more companies to participate in the event. “With over 20 percent growth in

our Exhibit Halls over the past six years, we think attendees will be very pleased when they visit the exhibit floor in March,” said Behl. The convention kicks off on March 12 with a Pre-Show Nutrition and Poultry Health Symposium, which will be coordinated jointly by MPF and the North Central Avian Disease Conference (NCADC), and the annual MPF Welcome Reception. “The Welcome Reception is one of our most popular events, and is a great opportunity to do some networking before the busy rush of the convention begins,” said Behl. Also bringing attendees in early will be the North Central Avian Disease Conference (NCADC) and the third annual Organic Egg Farmers of America Symposium. (Separate registration fees apply for these events.) The two exhibit halls and education workshops will run March 13-14. All events will be held at the Saint Paul RiverCentre in downtown St. Paul, Minn. New this year, on Thursday afternoon and Friday morning, March 14-15, the American Egg Board will hold a special speaker training for egg farmers. Details can be found at www.midwestpoultry.com/attendees/aeb/. Details on all MPF Convention events as well as online registration are available at www.midwestpoultry.com. The MPF is also on Facebook (www.facebook.com/MPFConvention) and Twitter (www.twitter. com/MPFConvention). The Twitter hashtag for the show is #mpf13. MPF’s primary purpose is to host an annual regional convention emphasizing on-farm poultry production. The convention’s goal is to offer innovative and compelling

See Convention, Page 8

Special

Midwest 2013: The Midwest Poultry Federation is getting ready for its 42nd Annual Convention in St. Paul, Minn., March 12-14. This premier regional event will feature more than 390 exhibits and approximately 40 speakers in its educational program.

Pittman Family Farms set to buy Zacky FRESNO, Calif. — The fate of poultry processor Zacky Farms is back up in the air after a Zacky family trust backed out of its bid to buy the troubled company in a bankruptcy auction. Pitman Family Farms in Sanger appears poised to take over Zacky — which could signal big changes for one of the nation’s largest turkey producers. Those changes could include how the birds are raised and processed and how many workers are needed to do the job. In court records filed Jan. 24 with the U.S. District Bankruptcy Court in Sacramento, attorneys for the

company reported that the Robert based Pitman Family Farms. The D. and Lillian D. Zacky Trust “de- Pitman company originally bid cided it would not go forward with more than $22 million at the bankthe sale at the present time.” ruptcy auction, and after the auction With its bid of $31.6 million, the increased its offer to $32.1 million, Zacky Trust was deemed the win- according to court documents. ning bidder for the company at a Attorneys for Zacky Farms rebankruptcy auction held recently ported that “the Zacky Trust’s unin San Francisco. The Zacky Trust willingness to go forward and close bid included provisions that nearly the sale . . . requires the debtor to all of Zacky Farms’ 1,000 or more proceed with the Pitman backup employees would keep their jobs, bid.” The company accepted the and would have kept the company Pitman bid on Jan. 23, court docuin the hands of its founder’s descen- ments state. The Zacky Trust has provided dants. Zacky Farms is now turning its attention to a second bidder, Sanger- See Zacky, Page 8


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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

MPF announces 2013 education program schedule ST. PAUL, Minn. — The 2013 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention has announced a comprehensive education program, featuring nearly 40 speakers from across the country covering the latest information and research at a variety of workshops for the turkey, egg, broiler and organic/specialty poultry industries. All workshops will be held at the 42nd annual 2013 MPF Convention, March 12-14, at the Saint Paul RiverCentre, St. Paul, Minn. “The MPF Convention has a long-standing reputation for excellence in education,” said MPF President Allen Behl, Behl Turkey Farm in Watertown, Wis., who represents the Wisconsin Poultry and Egg Industries on the MPF Board. “We aim to provide our attendees with

only the best speakers and topics that provide meaningful and useful learning tools for their farms and businesses.” Among the topics to be presented include egg layer housing performance and environmental impact, Newcastle disease, light turkey syndrome, salmonella, coccidiosis, poultry barn ventilation, poultry litter topics and much more. The full education schedule of 11 workshops — coordinated by Dr. Ken Koelkebeck of the University of Illinois, Dr. Darrin Karcher of Michigan State University, and several workshop chairpersons, will include: Tuesday, March 12  MPF & NCADC Joint Poultry Nutrition and Health Symposium

Dr. Sheila E. Purdum, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, chairperson. “Implications of Changing Immune Function Through Nutrition in Poultry,” Dr. Doug Korver, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. “Dietary Influence on Vaccination,” Dr. David Caldwell, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. “Influence of Diet on Digestive Microflora and Gut Health of the Chicken,” Dr. Mahmoud Masadeh, Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Milwaukee, Wis. “Low Oil DDGS in Turkey and Laying Hen Rations,” Dr. Sally Noll, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn.; and Dr. Sheila Purdum, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. Wednesday, March 13  Turkey Grower Workshop Ron Kean, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., chairperson. “Dissecting Light Turkey Syndrome to Improve Flock Performance,” Dr. Sally Noll, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn.

Special

“Top 5 Turkey Trends,” Dr. Steven Clark, Pfizer Animal Health Global Poultry, West Jefferson, N.C. “A 2020 View of the Turkey,” Paige Glover, Aviagen Turkeys Inc., Lewisburg, W.Va.  Egg Production Workshop Brent Swanson, Lohmann Animal Health, Dassel, Minn., chairperson. “Salmonella: Create the Most Undesirable Environment,” Dr. Angela Shaw, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.

Speaker and topic TBD, Centurian Poultry Inc. “Overcoming Problems with Non-Confined Egg Production Flocks,” Dr. Simon Shane, professor and poultry consultant, Durham, N.C.  Broiler Production Workshop Kelsey Campbell, GNP Co., St. Cloud, Minn., chairperson. “Air Velocity Management for

See Program, Page 9

MPF exhibit halls continue to expand ST. PAUL, Minn. — The Midwest Poultry Federation continues to expand the number of booths in its second Exhibit Hall at the 2013 MPF Convention. The hall — known as Roy Wilkins Hall — is conveniently adjacent to the main Exhibit Hall and the expansion opens the door for more companies to participate in the convention. “Over the last five years MPF has increased the number of booths in the Exhibit Hall by well over 20 percent,” said MPF President Allen Behl, Behl Turkey Farm, Watertown, Wis. “We continue that expansion this year, adding even more booth space in our second Exhibit Hall. It’s exciting to see that growth and know that MPF offers a positive experience for both exhibitors and

attendees.” Attendees at this year’s 2013 MPF Convention can expect approximately 392 booths in the main Exhibit Hall and the adjacent Roy Wilkins Exhibit Hall. Both the main Exhibit Hall and Roy Wilkins Exhibit Hall will be open March 13-14 at the Saint Paul RiverCentre in Saint Paul, Minn. Show floor hours will be 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on March 13 and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on March 14. A current list of exhibiting companies is available at www.midwestpoultry.com, as well as in this issue of Poultry Times on page 12. More information can be obtained at the MPF website or at 763-6822171, or by e-mail at ldurben@midwestpoultry.com.

INDEX AEB Hotline...........................23 Business.............................6--7 Calendar...............................11 Classified..............................20 Nuggets................................10 Viewpoint................................4 A directory of Poultry Times advertisers appears on Page 23

To subscribe call 770-536-2476 or www.poultrytimes.net


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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Poultry Hall of Fame announces five inductees COLLEGE PARK, Md. — The American Poultry Historical Society has inducted five individuals into the American Poultry Industry Hall of Fame. They are Dr. Louis C. Arrington, Dr. S. Allen Edgar, Dr. Hardy M. Edwards Jr., Jack Ray England and Dr. Bruce Glick. The APHS bestows the honor on a maximum of five individuals at three-year intervals. A bronze plaque bearing the image of each inductee will be on permanent display in the National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, Md.

Louis C. Arrington Arrington served as Extension poultry specialist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for 32 years and continued his service in 14 years of retirement. He helped to organize the Midwest Poultry Federation and served as secretarytreasurer and president and continues as a director of the organization. Arrington He also participated in the organization of the Midwest Poultry Consortium and currently serves as director to provide college level training in poultry science for students from the Midwest states. He is the current APHS treasurer. Awards include the National FFA Degree Award in 1955 and being named a Fellow in the Poultry Science Association in 1998. S. Allen Edgar Edgar (1916-2000) served as a medical officer in the South Pacific Theater during and following World War II. He joined the Department of Poultry Science faculty at Auburn

University in 1947, retiring as professor emeritus in 1986. He was a pioneer of poultry disease research. While at Auburn he developed several vaccines including the first vaccine against infectious bursal disease in chickens and the first vaccine against coccidiosis of chickens and turkeys. Edgar also discovered and named a new species of coccidia in chickens Edgar and was instrumental in development and commercialization of anticoccidial drugs and vaccines. His awards include Fellow of the Poultry Science Association, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fellow of the New York Academy of Science, member of the Alabama Poultry Industry Hall of Fame and member of the Auburn University College of Agriculture Alumni Association Hall of Fame.

Hardy M. Edwards Edwards (1929-2007), at age 23, gained his doctorate in animal nutrition and biochemistry from Cornell University. After serving two years in the U.S. Army, he returned to work as senior research biochemist at International Minerals and Chemical Corp. in Chicago. In 1957 he joined the Poultry Science faculty at the University of Georgia, starting a career that would span the next 50 years. He served as dean of the UGA Edwards

Graduate School from 1972 to 1979. Over his career he authored or co-authored more than 200 research papers, journal articles and conference proceedings. His work on tibial dyschondroplasia was significant in understanding the causes of and preventing the skeletal problem in broiler chickens. Awards included the American Feed Manufacturers Award, College of Agriculture Agriculture Alumni Society Faculty Award, National Broiler Research Award and the Ton Newman Memorial International Award. He was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 1971 and a Distinguished Professor at the University of Georgia in 1988.

Jack England England, founder of England Farms Inc. in Rison, Ark., pioneered the brokerage hatching egg business in the U.S. He created and standardized a business model to connect widely dispersed suppliers of broiler hatchEngland ing eggs with

markets in different regions of the country having a shortage of eggs. England’s company expanded this model globally and became an international exporter of broiler hatching eggs. In recognition of its success, the company was awarded the Presidential “E” Award for excellence in exporting by the U.S.Department of Commerce and President George H.W. Bush in 1989. He entered the poultry industry in 1955 with four chicken houses and a large flock of turkeys. During the next decades, England’s poultry companies owned and operated houses,a feed mill, a truck fleet and processing plants. His companies went on to establish markets in at least 17 other countries and regions including Canada, North Africa, South America, Europe, Mexico, the Philippines and the Caribbean.

Bruce Glick Glick (1927-2009) joined the Mississippi State University faculty in 1955 and rose to Full Professor rank and ultimately was named Giles Distinguished Professor, that institution’s highest faculty honor. In 1986 he became head of the Clemson University Poultry Science Department, where he served until 1995. His doctorate research at Ohio

State University focused on the bursa of Fabricius, an organ unique to birds. Glick and fellow graduate student Timothy S. Chang discovered that Glick by removing the bursa at an early age significantly impaired a chicken’s ability to produce antibody. This discovery fueled additional research on the bursa of Fabricius’ immunological function advancing agricultural and biomedical science. His research expanded knowledge of poultry across physiology, endocrinology, genetics, behavior and anatomy as well as immunology. First Mississippi Corp., Mississippi Academy of Sciences, MSU Alumni Association and Gamma Sigma Delta bestowed awards for his research. He was active in professional societies and received the 1978 Merck Award for Achievement in Poultry Science. He was chosen a Fellow of both the Poultry Science Association and the American Association for the Advanced of Science. He served on the Scientific Advisory Board of Embrex Inc.

Stay in touch with MPF via social media ST. PAUL, Minn. — Attendees, exhibitors and even those who won’t be able to attend the Midwest Poultry Federation (MPF) Convention in person can join in the conversation using these social media platforms: Facebook — www.facebook. com/MPFConvention Twitter — @MPFConvention (or www.twitter.com/MPFConvention) with Twitter hashtag #mpf13. If you are on Twitter, MPF encourages you to Tweet about your

MPF Convention experience using the hashtag #mpf13. This is a great way to get the conversation rolling about the show — before, during and even after the event, the federation notes. “MPF will also have at least one live Twitter feed displayed at the show in March, so people can watch and read what others are saying about the 2013 MPF Convention,” said MPF President Allen Behl, Behl Turkey Farm, Watertown, Wis.

 New mobile app Coming in February, MPF will debut a brand new MPF Convention app for smartphone and tablet devices — including Apple and Android phones. Find the show schedule, show floor maps, exhibit list and more all in one convenient place. Watch the MPF website for further details in February. Details on all MPF Convention events are available at www.midwestpoultry.com or 763-682-2171.


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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Viewpoint Compiled by Barbara Olejnik, Associate Editor 770-718-3440 bolejnik@poultrytimes.net

Program would certify agricultural water quality By Steve Olson

Special to Poultry Times

BUFFALO, Minn. — I just returned from an awesome IPPE. Now my attention shifts to the home stretch for the 42nd annual MPF (Midwest Poultry Federation) trade show and convention. We have a great slate of presenters for our educational program and have a full-complement of exOlson hibitors for our expanded trade show floor. For information on exhibiting companies and the educational program check out our website at www.midwestpoultry. com. Also follow us on Twitter (@ MPFConvention) and use hashtag #mpf13; and on Facebook — www. facebook.com/MPFConvention.

Restoring trust One of the long-standing signature events at MPF is our Fellowship Breakfast. The title “Fellowship Breakfast” is nostalgic and continues to accurately reflect the Steve Olson is executive director of the Midwest Poultry Federation, Minnesota Turkey Growers Association, Chicken & Egg Association of Minnesota, and Minnesota Turkey Research & Promotion Council, with offices in Buffalo, Minn.

positive and inspiring messages of our keynote speakers. We have had nationally recognized speakers such as Trent Loos, Matt Lahr and Renae Rongen; on March 14th we continue that tradition with David Horsager and his talk entitled “The Trust Edge,” based on his recent book of the same title. In researching for his book, he identified Eight Pillars of Trust: Clarity, Compassion, Character, Competency, Commitment, Connection, Contribution and Consistency. The significance of this topic has become more relevant to agriculture today as activist groups vigorously challenge modern agriculture. Their tactics of misinformation to consumers erodes consumers’ trust in our food production system. Mr. Horsager brings a perspective that we need to apply to our farm businesses. Farmers should incorporate a public outreach component to their business plan that includes shoring, and if necessary, restoring trust among their neighbors and the broader community, local and urban, about how and why we produce food the way we do. Unfortunately space is limited at the Fellowship Breakfast so register early at www.midwestpoultry.com. David’s book “The Trust Edge: How Top Leaders Gain Faster Results, Deeper Relationships, and a Stronger Bottom Line” is available on Amazon.com and major bookstores including those in airports across the country.

Update: Water quality In January of 2012, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton entered

into a Memorandum of Understanding with Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson and USDA Secretary Vilsack to develop an Ag Waters Certification Program in Minnesota. A committee was created and met from June through November. Their recommendations for the program were released in December. The report can be found at: http://www. mda.state.mn.us/~/media/Files/ protecting/waterprotection/mawqcpadcomrecs2012.ashx In short the report includes six recommendation areas: Pilot Projects — The com1. missioner (of agriculture) will select projects to be conducted in three regions of Minnesota. The duration of each project will be three years and should be representative of agriculture diversity in the region. Certification Program 2. Operations — The certification will include all components of a farm operation — crops and livestock and allowances for differentiation between rented and owned land. Certification Program 3. Measurement Tool — Endorses, with modifications, the Natural Resources Conservation Service Water Quality Index tool and the Conservation Measurement Tool used for the Conservation Stewardship Program. Certification Program 4. Certainty — Recommend that “certainty” be provided to certified farmers for a 10 year term with an optional review at three-year intervals (voluntary). If a farmer chooses to incorporate approved updates the “certainty” term is extended for 10 years. Certainty Program Data 5. Management — Recommendation that some farmer and agricultural operation data be private (business practices, financial records, personal data). Aggregate conservation management not be identified by specific farm or farmer, but be publicly reported for program analysis and assessment. Certification Program In6. centives — Possible incentives to include property tax credit; conser-

vation funding/technical assistance priority; participant recognition; streamlining processes for administration, record keeping and review; promoting demonstration of measurement tools to farmers and the public; promoting partnerships; crop insurance and liability insurance discounts; and access to government funding programs (Legacy, NGO, state and federal). These recommendations will be dscussed at the Minnesota legislature.

What’s certainty? The committee agrees that certainty:  Is offered by the executive

branch of Minnesota state government;  Is not an exemption from any existing rules or statutes, but certification constitutes compliance with all applicable existing rules or statutes at time of certification;  Applies to a certified operation’s land; Requires that the implementation of recommended practices and certification be maintained, but will provide sufficient grace period if extreme weather or other causes beyond the control of the producer temporarily prevent maintaining practices and management for cer-

See Olson, Page 5

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Poultry Times  (USPS 217-480) ISSN 0885-3371 is published every other Monday, 345 Green Street, N.W., Gainesville, Georgia 30501. Telephone 770-536-2476; Fax 770-532-4894. Postage paid at Gainesville, Georgia 30501. Poultry Times assumes responsibliity for error in first run of an in-house designed ad only. Advertisers have ten (10) days from publication date to dispute such an advertisement. After ten (10) days, ad will be deemed correct and advertiser will be charged accordingly. Proofs approved by advertiser will always be regarded as correct. Subscriptions: Surface mail in U.S., $18.00 for one year, $29 for two years and $40 for three years. Business or occupation information must accompany each subscription order. Change of Address: Postmaster, report change of address to Poultry Times, P.O. Box 1338, Gainesville, GA 30503. Companion Poultry Publications: A Guide to Poultry Associations; Poultry Resource Guide; Georgia Ag News. The opinions expressed in this publication by authors other than Poultry Times staff are those of the respective author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Poultry Times. Advertisement content is the sole responsibility of the advertiser. Poultry Times assumes no liability for any statements, claims or assertions appearing in any advertisement.


5

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

NCADC continues partnership with MPF Convention ST. PAUL, Minn. — For the nineth straight year, the 64th annual North Central Avian Disease Conference (NCADC) will precede the Midwest Poultry Federation (MPF) Convention on March 11-12, 2013, at the Saint Paul RiverCentre, St. Paul, Minn. There is a separate registration fee to attend this event. NCADC attendees may register through MPF, either online or using the pre-registration form via fax/mail. “We’re proud of our partnership with NCADC, which always offers an excellent program of speakers and topics. NCADC offers provides our attendees further educational and networking opportunities, conveniently located in the same facility as the MPF Convention,” said MPF President Allen Behl, Behl Turkey Farm, Watertown, Wis.

New this year is a joint NCADC and MPF Pre-Show Nutrition and Poultry Health Symposium, to be held the afternoon of March 12. Full schedule is as follows: Monday, March 11 7-7:50 a.m. — Registration & Continental Breakfast 7:50-8 a.m. — Welcome Scientific Presentations 8-8:45 a.m. — Holly Sellers, Keynote presentation, Enteric Virus Research: Past & Present 8:45 a.m.-2:15 p.m. — Student and other short scientific presentations 2:15-2:45 p.m. — Break Symposium on Current Animal Health Issues 2:45-3:15 p.m. — Mohamed El Gazzar, Mycoplasma updates 3:15-3:45 p.m. — Bruce Charl-

ton, IBDV situation in California 3:45-4:15 p.m. — Jan Pederson, Update on Avian Influenza and Newcastle Disease 4:15-4:45 p.m. — Chang-Won Lee, Swine influenza: Influence on Human and Turkey Health 4:45-5:15 p.m. — Mo Saif, Roundtable discussion 5:15-5:45 p.m. — Business Meeting 6-8 p.m. — Awards Banquet Tuesday, March 12 — Symposium continues 8-8:30 a.m — Laszlo Zsak, Research on Enteric Disease at USDAARS-SEPRL 8:30-9 a.m. — Sagar M. Goyal, Enteric Viruses and Light Turkey Syndrome 9-9:30 a.m. — Timothy Johnson, E. coli Pathogenesis

•Olson (Continued from page 4)

tification;  Applies only to agricultural or land management practices that could affect water quality; and,  Does not apply to new requirements resulting from new statutes or court judgments. Subject to these limitations, certainty means the following: For Farmers: (1) No new state rules originating from the executive branch pertaining to water quality protection will be applied to certified farms during the period of certification; (2) Certified farms will be considered to be meeting their contributions to any targeted reductions of pollutants during the period of certification; and (3) Certified farmers are recognized as responsible protective stewards of their land and water quality. For the Public: (1) Assurance that farmers are

meeting or exceeding all applicable water quality rules and regulations; (2) Assurance that farmers are committed to achieving water quality goals and standards; (3) Assurance that we will see measurable progress over time; and (4) Guarantees of a public / private partnership to enhance water quality Further, the committee recommends that the commissioner could pursue legislation to develop a statutory standing for certainty, and seek endorsement of MAWQCP (Minnesota Agricultural Water Quality Certification Program) by townships and counties.

Connect with us Engaging in social media is a way of business today. Coordinating, connecting and communicating is the heart of successful social media programs. I encourage you to connect with Minnesota’s poultry industry through our social media. We are

very active and want to extend our messaging to consumers through you. Check out Minnesota poultry industry on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube: Facebook: www.facebook.com/MinnesotaTurkey www.facebook.com/MinnesotaChicken www.facebook.com/MPFConvention Twitter: @MinnesotaTurkey, @ MNChicken and @MPFConvention (hashtag #mpf13) Websites: www.minnesotaturkey.com, www.mnchicken.org and www.midwestpoultry.com YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com/minnesotaturkey and www.youtube.com/midwestpoultry Parts of this column are reprinted by permission from Gobbles magazine, the monthly publication of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association.

9:30-10 a.m. — Ching Ching Wu, Alternative to Antibiotics 10-10:30 a.m. — Break 10:30-11 a.m. — Gorica Spasojevic, Troubleshooting Case Reports from the Field 11-11:30 a.m. — Patty Dunn, Troubleshooting and Other Diagnostically Challenging Conditions 11:30 a.m.-noon — John Brown, Use of Dewormers in Cage-Free Layers Noon-1 p.m. — Steve Collett, Simplifying Intestinal Health Management: Seed, Feed and Weed (Alltech sponsored presentation – Box lunch provided for NCADC registered attendees) NCADC & MPF Joint Symposium on Nutrition and Health 1:30-2:15 p.m. — Dr. Doug Korver, Implications of Changing Immune Function Through Nutrition in Poultry 2:15-3 p.m. — Dr. David Caldwell, Dietary Influence on Vac-

cination 3-3:15 p.m. — Break 3:15-4 P.M. — Dr. Mahmoud Masadeh, Influence of Diet on Digestive Microflora and Gut Health of the Chicken 4-4:45 P.M. — Dr. Sally Noll and Dr. Sheila Purdum, Low Oil DDGS in Turkey and Laying Hen Rations NCADC Registration Fees: All registration fees include the March 11 awards banquet and box lunch on March 12 (unless otherwise noted) Early Registration, $70 (After Feb. 15, fee is $100); Students, $30; Speakers, $50 (no cost for student or symposium speakers); Retiree, $50; Spouse (Awards Banquet Ticket only) $40. More information on this event can be obtained by contacting 2013 NCADC Chairperson Dr. Chang Won Lee at Ohio State University: Ph: 330-263-3750, or e-mail lee.2854@osu.edu.

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6

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Business Compiled by David B. Strickland, Editor 770-718-3442 dstrickland@poultrytimes.net

Perdue purchases Draper Valley Farms assets in Washington SALISBURY, Md. — Perdue Foods announces that it has purchased the leased assets of its Draper Valley Farms operation in Washington state. Perdue acquired Draper Valley Farms — and the leases — as part of its June 2011 purchase of Coleman Natural Foods. This announced purchase of assets includes a processing plant in Mount Vernon, a feed mill in Chehalis and several company-operated poultry farms. Terms of the sale were not disclosed “Purchasing the physical assets of Draper Valley Farms underscores our commitment to supporting and growing our organic and no-antibiotics-ever, free range business through Draper Valley, and to the continued support of the Draper Valley Farms® and Ranger® brands in the Northwest,” said Jim Leighton, president, Perdue Foods. “The purchase of Coleman Natural Foods was a major investment in our future and key to our strategy of elevating our portfolio of brands and products. Coleman Natural is the pioneering company in organic chicken, just as Perdue was the pioneer in branding chicken,” Leighton said. “The purchase of the leased assets is a long-term investment in Draper Valley as Perdue Foods continues to move away from the production-driven model of the majority of the poultry industry. Our future is in focusing on premium products and brands that provide consumers trusted choices.” Since acquiring Coleman Natural Foods, Perdue Foods has become a leading producer of USDA-certified organic chicken and of no-antibiotics-ever poultry, the company said. More information can be obtained at www.perdue.com.

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Other Business News Hormel Foods notes accomplishments AUSTIN, Minn. — During its annual shareholder meeting Hormel Foods Corp. celebrated a number of achievements met during fiscal year 2012, as well as the role of research and development in those accomplishments. Jeffery M. Ettinger, chairman of the board, president and CEO at Hormel Foods, offered insights on the company’s recent growth and shared highlights from the year, including:  The delivered sales growth of 4 percent, ending the year at a record $8.2 billion, with all five segments registering increases, as well as increasing the annual dividend for the 47th consecutive year.  Hormel Foods meeting its “Go for $2B by 2012” goal by achieving $2 billion in total sales from new products created since 2000 by the end of fiscal year 2012.  And showcasing the team finalists of the company’s annual Best of the Best and Sustainability Best of the Best competitions. Dr. Phillip L. Minerich, vice president of Research and Development at Hormel Foods, delivered the meeting’s featured presentation, in which he discussed how science, safety and collaboration are central to the company’s innovation strategy. Minerich provided the audience with an overview of the practices and procedures that allow Hormel Foods to produce great-tasting, safe and innovative products. During fiscal year 2012, Hormel Foods experienced record dollar sales of $8.2 billion, up 4 percent from the previous year; increased net earnings per share by 7 percent over 2011; and registered sales increases in all five operating segments year over year. Grocery Products were up 10 percent; Refrigerated Foods up 1 percent; Jennie-O Turkey Store up 6 percent; Specialty Foods up 11 percent; and All Other (International)

up 7 percent. More information can be obtained at www.hormelfoods.com.

Aviagen notes 60th year at Expo HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — As poultry industry professionals from around the world gathered in Atlanta, Ga., recently for this year’s International Production & Processing Expo, Aviagen celebrated its 60th year of participation at the show. Aviagen’s booth featured its three global broiler breeder brands — Ross, Indian River and Arbor Acres. Under a show theme of “Together We Breed Success,” Aviagen representatives shared with attendees the latest information about best management practices, newest field trials performance, innovative research & development technology and techniques, new products and improvements that will impact poultry performance in the future, the company said. Aviagen also announces the release of new Parent Stock Handbooks for the Arbor Acres, Ross and Indian River brands. These handbooks are available on the Aviagen website. These comprehensive handbooks are designed to provide Aviagen customers with the most up-to-date information to enable them to optimize the health, welfare and performance of their stock, the company said. “IPPE continues to be an important international event for Aviagen and the poultry industry. It presents a unique opportunity to meet and share knowledge with our global customers, suppliers, and partners,” said Ben Thompson, president, Aviagen North America. “Our focus on these relationships is the cornerstone of our presence at the show and is the essence behind our theme of ‘Together We Breed Success.’” More information can be obtained www.aviagen.com.

Alltech survey shows feed increases LEXINGTON, Ky. — The world is producing 959 million tons of feed and has increased its production by at least 4 percent in the last year, according to the 2013 Global Feed Tonnage Survey released by Alltech. Alltech assessed the compound feed production of 134 countries in December 2012, through information obtained in partnership with local feed associations and Alltech’s sales team, who visit more than 26,000 feed mills annually. “The 2013 publication of the annual year-end assessment by Alltech is being released as an industry outlook resource for the new calendar year and will hopefully allow governments, non-governmental organizations and the greater public to appreciate the value that the feed industry is generating globally,” said Aidan Connolly, vice president of Alltech and director of Alltech’s annual Global Feed Tonnage Survey. Among the 134 countries assessed in Alltech’s survey, China was reaffirmed as the chief producer of feed at 191 million tons and an estimated 10,000 feed mills. Consistent with late 2011 assessments, the United States and Brazil followed with 179 million tons produced by 5,251 feed mills and 66 million tons produced by 1,237 feed mills, respectively. Overall, a 26 million ton increase was observed in BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) year to date. Asia continues to be the world’s number one producing region at 350 million tons. However, Africa exceeded Asia in percent growth over 2011 results, increasing its tonnage nearly 15 percent from 47 million in 2011 to 54 million in 2012. Globally, the survey identified 26,240 feed mills, with North America and Europe serving as home to more than half of them. The Middle (Continued on next page)


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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013 (Continued from previous page)

East was estimated to have the largest feed mills, with an average of more than 63,000 tons produced per mill. Sixty percent of feed produced globally is pelleted, with percentages particularly high in Europe. When analyzed by species, the survey showed: ď‚— Poultry continues to dominate with a 43 percent share of the feed market at 411 million tons, likely due to religious and taste preferences as well as cost. It grew by approximately 8 percent over 2011 estimates. Sixty percent of all poultry feed tonnage is dedicated to broilers, with the rest fed to egg layers, turkeys, duck and other fowl. ď‚— The pig feed sector matched poultry’s 8 percent growth, moving to 218 million tons globally. ď‚— The ruminant feed market, comprising dairy, beef and small ruminants, grew more than 13 percent between late 2011 and December 2012, and now requires 254 million tons. ď‚— Equine feed tonnage increased almost 17 percent to 10.8 million tons. ď‚— Aquaculture is the fastest growing species sector by tonnage with growth greater than 55 percent since 2011. ď‚— Pet food represents 20.5 million tons, 40 percent of which are produced in the United States, but Brazil continues to make considerable advances in this sector. “As we look to the demands of the future, chiefly the feeding of 9 billion people by 2050, these survey results should stir optimism and resolve within our feed and food industries,â€? said Dr. Pearse Lyons, president of Alltech. “Our global feed industry is rising to the challenge, and we’re seeing growth across the board. Moreover, we’re seeing it in some particularly key areas- BRIC, Africa and aquaculture.â€? Alltech also noted that global feed production has traditionally been difficult to quantify because many countries lack a national feed association. For this reason, Alltech began in late 2011 to leverage its global presence to obtain a finer es-

timate of the world’s feed tonnage. The results of the annual year-end assessment are announced in January as an industry outlook resource for the new calendar year, the company said.

Cattle & hog prices expected to rise COLUMBIA, Mo. — Cattle prices are expected to set new records in 2013, while hog prices are expected to have their second highest year ever. High feed costs have led to lower numbers of animals, which University of Missouri Extension agricultural economist Ron Plain says is why meat prices will be going up. “The U.S. meat supply per capita has been steadily declining,� Plain said during the 2013 MU Extension Winter AgMarketing Outlook Conference. “It’s expected that 2013 will be the seventh consecutive year with less meat per person, down 22 pounds from 2006 and the lowest per capita supply since 1991.� Slaughter steer, yearling and slaughter cow prices all reached record highs in 2012. It was the third straight year for steers to set record prices and the second consecutive year for both yearlings and slaughter cows. “The expectation is that all three will set new price records again in 2013,� Plain said. “We are not yet to the peak in cattle prices.� Hogs have also been hit by the high cost of feed. Plain says there is a high correlation between the price of corn and the break-even cost for hog production. Even so, surveys show some producers are looking to expand. “If we look out ahead of us and anticipate good crops and lower feed prices, there is reason to think hog producers will want to expand despite the tough financial year last year,� Plain said. “On average, the typical hog sold for a $12 loss in 2012, but it looks like if you give the hog industry more feed they’ll expand hog numbers.� The number of farrowing sows this spring is forecast to be down 1.9

percent, a modest reduction. “It looks a bit down this year in the number of litters to be farrowed,� Plain said. “But pigs per litter keep going up, so most likely any reduction in the number of sows being farrowed will be covered by more pigs per litter, so we’ll end up with the same to maybe a few more pigs born in 2013 than what we had last year.� The calf crop is expected to be smaller than last year. Plain says that 2012 was the 17th consecutive year with a smaller calf crop. With the shrinking herd and tightening supplies, Plain thinks 2014 prices will be even higher than 2013. “The forecast for the coming year is 4.3 percent less beef than a year ago, 0.2 percent more pork, 0.4 percent less chicken, and 0.3 percent more turkey,� Plain said. “Total meat production is forecast to be down 1.3 percent. The population will grow about 0.9 percent, so it’s about 2.2 percent less meat per person, unless we see a big jump in meat imports.�

Tractor Supply notes new FFA scholarship BRENTWOOD, Tenn. — As an extension of its sponsorship with the National FFA Foundation, Tractor Supply Co. has recently announced a new scholarship program to assist FFA members in their pursuit of a college degree. The Growing Scholars program will be supported nationally by each of the more than 1,150 Tractor Supply stores Feb. 15-24, which includes National FFA Week. Tractor Supply customers can donate $1 at store registers during the checkout process to support local FFA chapters and their members. Ninety percent of funds raised through Tractor Supply’s Growing Scholars program will be utilized to fund scholarships for FFA members. The remaining 10 percent of donations will benefit state FFA organizations. “This program will provide critical funding to FFA members who intend to pursue a college degree and local FFA chapters that enrich the

Business lives of young members by teaching life skills, citizenship and leadership qualities,� said Tractor Supply President and CEO Greg Sandfort. “For us, this is an outstanding way to support our current and future customers and future team members and a way to give back to the 1,100-plus unique communities we serve.� To be eligible for the scholarship, students must be current FFA members and either high school seniors or a freshman, sophomore or junior college student seeking a two- or four-year degree or other specialized training program. Major areas of study will also be considered when determining scholarship recipients. “We are extremely grateful to Tractor Supply and its customers for supporting FFA, student and alumni members and agriculture education in general,� said National FFA Foundation Executive Director Robert K. Cooper. In addition to the Growing Scholars program, Tractor Supply and the National FFA Foundation have many other joint initiatives, including the FFA horse evaluation career development event, National FFA

Week and the annual National Association of Agricultural Educators Conference. At an individual store level, Tractor Supply continually hosts fund-raising events and works closely with local FFA chapters and high school agriculture advisors to provide resources and leverage synergies, the company said. “Local high school agricultural advisors and FFA chapters feel at home in their local Tractor Supply stores,� said John Wendler, senior vice president of marketing at Tractor Supply. “These groups often host fund-raising events at our stores to raise money for community projects, like building a school greenhouse, a new bridge in a public park or an animal care lab. Our stores also work with local FFA members to support specific programs and proficiencies by providing demonstrations from knowledgeable Tractor Supply employees and our vendor partners, which brings significant value to both organizations.� Tractor Supply has been a sponsor of the National FFA Foundation for 27 years. More information can be obtained at www.tractorsupply.com.

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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

MPF convention general information •Convention ST. PAUL, Minn. — The following provides some quick facts and general information about the 2013 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention:  The 42nd annual Midwest Poultry Federation (MPF) Convention will run March 12-14, 2013, at the Saint Paul RiverCentre.  The Pre-Show Nutrition Symposium and Welcome Reception will be held March 12.  Exhibit Hall and education sessions with more than 40 speakers are scheduled for March 13-14.  The 64th Annual North Central Avian Disease Conference will precede the MPF Convention on March 11-12. (Separate registration fee applies.)  The Organic Egg Farmers of America will hold its 3rd annual symposium at the Saint Paul RiverCentre on March 12. (Separate registration fee may apply.)  During the last five years MPF has increased the number of booths in the Exhibit Hall by more than 20 percent, opening the door for more companies to participate. In 2013, exhibit space continues to expand into a second hall, conveniently adjacent to the main Exhibit Hall.  Details on all events are available at www.midwestpoultry.com.  Registration for the MPF Convention is available for the following cateogries:

— Farmer/Processor Attendees: $25 (prior to Feb. 15) and $35 onsite. Farmer/Processor attendees include owners, managers or employees of a turkey, egg, broiler or gamebird company or farm. — Allied Individuals (non-exhibitors) $150/person (prior to Feb. 15) and $160 onsite. Allied Individuals are those companies who will do business at the show but do not lease booth . — Government personnel, university personnel and poultry nonprofit/association personnel - $25 (prior to Feb. 15) and $35 onsite. — Complimentary for university students, spouses and children under 18 attending with a paid registrant. (All complimentary registrants must show proper I.D.)  All registration fees include the Pre-Show Nutrition Symposium, Welcome Reception, and two days of exhibits and workshops. Fees are separate to attend the North Central Avian Disease Conference and the Organic Egg Farmers of America Symposium.  For the latest hotel availability, visit www.midwestpoultry.com/hotels.  For more information or to receive registration and hotel reservation information, visit www.midwestpoultry.com; Ph: 763-682-2171; Fax: 763-6825546; or e-mail: ldurben@midwestpoultry.com.

(Continued from page 1)

information to attendees through a balanced offering of exhibits and educational workshops. MPF’s mission is to conduct and support those educational, promotional and policy advocacy issues that will enhance the viability and growth of the poultry industry. Revenue generated by the convention goes back to MPF’s members and to support various poultry programs, the federation noted.

Proceedings MPF has also announced that the 2013 Proceedings will be available during the upcoming MPF Convention. The MPF Proceedings is an excellent way to review all the edu-

cational materials presented at the 2013 MPF Convention, the federation notes. This year the Proceedings will be offered on a USB flash drive, which easily connects to any computer with a USB port. “Featuring over 40 speakers in 11 workshops, the MPF Proceedings is a great take-home piece to refer back to long after the convention ends,” Behl said. The MPF Proceedings is available on USB flash drive only (sorry, no books or CD-ROMs). Preregistration for a copy can be made online at www.midwestpoultry.com or by fax/mail. Note: The Proceedings will be available for pick-up onsite at the Registration Desk. More information can be obtained at www.midwestpoultry.com.

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•Zacky (Continued from page 1)

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up to $71 million in financing to keep the company operating through the bankruptcy until it could be sold. A court hearing to finalize a sale of the company was set for Jan. 28, but Pitman Family Farms has requested until Feb. 15 to close the purchase. Court records indicate that the Zacky Trust would be required to continue to finance the company’s operation until the sale is confirmed. Pitman Family Farms produces and sells chickens, turkeys, ducks and geese under the Mary’s Free Range brand. The company is known for its free-range and organic poultry and supplies birds to the Whole Foods Market chain and local shops including Kristina’s Natural Ranch

Market in Fresno. In 2010, the company became the first major poultry producer in California to begin using a more humane method of knocking chickens out with gas instead of a jolt of electricity before slaughter. If the Pitman purchase is approved by the bankruptcy court, it would include virtually all Zacky Farms assets, including turkey processing plants in Fresno and Stockton, corporate offices in Fresno, two Fresno warehouses, a turkey hatchery in Kerman and 16 company-owned ranches in Fresno and Kings counties. David Pitman, of Pitman Family Farms, said he was limited on what he could say about the sale — including whether all of Zacky Farms’ 1,000-plus employees in Fresno, Tulare, Kings, San Joaquin

and Los Angeles counties will get to keep their jobs. “What I can say, is that for the immediate future there are many birds to be processed so a vast majority of the employees will be retained,” Pitman said. “But we need to turn this company around and that will take a lot of work.” Pitman already is a popular niche brand among consumers, and David Pitman said the purchase of Zacky will help the company increase its market share. “We have great support from our customers, and these facilities and farms give us the ability to grow,” he said. The Pitmans’ current line of poultry are organic, not given antibiotics and are free range. And they intend to raise the Zacky birds in a similar way. “There will be many changes in production,” Pitman said.


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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

•Program (Continued from page 2)

Optimum Performance,” Dr. Joseph L. Purswell, USDA Agricultural Research Service Poultry Research Unit, Mississippi State, Miss. “Broiler Lameness,” Dr. Deirde Johnson, GNP Co., St. Cloud, Minn. “Controlling Coccidiosis in Broilers,” Dr. Hector Cervantes, Phibro Animal Health, Athens, Ga.  Organic and Specialty Poultry Production Workshop Dr. Jacqueline Jacob, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., chairperson. “Euthanasia — Why, When and How?” Dr. R.M. Fulton, Michigan State University, Lansing, Mich. “Natural Ventilation in Organic Poultry Houses,” Dr. Morgan Hayes, USDA Agricultural Research Service Meat and Animal Research Center, Clay Center, Neb. “Organic Processing of Poultry,” Dr. Casey M. Owens, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark.  Turkey Breeder Workshop Dr. Mike Lilburn, Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio, chair-

person. “The Challenges of In Ovo Vaccinations in Turkeys,” Christopher J. Williams, Pfizer Animal Health Global Poultry. “How to Inspect What You Expect and Improve Poultry Quality,” Michelle Behl, Willmar Poultry Co./Ag Forte, Willmar, Minn. “Nutrition and Reproduction: A Major Relationship for Breeding Efficiency,” Sylvain Briere, Hybrid Turkeys, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.  Turkey Processing Workshop Dr. Doug Ahn, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, chairperson. “Inactivation of Salmonella and Campylobacter in Turkey Meat,” Christopher Sommers, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Wyndmour, Pa. “Pathogen Interventions on Parts and Ground Turkey Products,” Dr. Shelly McKee, Auburn University, Auburn, Ala. “New USDA Regulations for Safer Meat: Implications for Smalland Medium-Size Processors,” Dr. Aubrey Mendonca, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.  Poultry Litter Management

Workshop Dr. Darrin Karcher, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich., chairperson. “Managing Litter Ammonia with Repeated Applications of Litter Amendment,” Dr. Joseph L. Purswell, USDAAgricultural Research Service Poultry Research Unit, Mississippi State, Miss. “The Use of Bacteria to Control Ammonia and Pathogens in Broiler Litter,” Dr. Kenneth S. Macklin, Auburn University, Auburn, Ala. “Harnessing Heat from Litter: Using Litter as Your Heat Source and Your Fertilizer,” Jim O’Brien, Triea Systems, Frederick, Md. Thursday, March 14  Simmering Issues Workshop Dr Ken Koelkebeck, University of Illinois, Urbana, Ill., chairperson. “Performance of Hens in Three Different Housing Systems,” Dr. Darrin Karcher, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. “Environmental Impact of Three Hen Housing Systems,” Dr. Hongwei Xin, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.

MPF 2013 schedule — at a glance ST. PAUL, Minn. — The following at-a-glance agenda provides a brief overview of the events of this year’s Midwest Poultry Federation Convention here, March 11-15. All events will be at the RiverCentre.

March 11-12 North Central Avian Disease Conference (separate fee applies). Organic Egg Farmers of America Symposium (separate fee and registration process applies). March 12 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: On-site registration, badge pick-up.

1:30-5 p.m.: Joint MPF-NCADC Pre-Show Nutrition & Health Symposium. 5-7 p.m.: Welcome reception.

March 13 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.: On-site registration, badge pick-up. 8:30-10:30 a.m.: Three concurrent workshops — Turkey Growing, Egg Production and Broiler Production. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.: Exhibit Hall open. 3-5 p.m.: Four concurrent workshops — Poultry Litter Management, Turkey Breeder, Turkey Processing and Organic & Specialty Poultry.

March 14 7 a.m.-1 p.m.: On-site registration, badge pick-up. 7:30-9 a.m.: Fellowship Breakfast 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Exhibit Hall open. 9-11 a.m.: Workshop — Simmering Issues. 11 a.m.-noon: MPF Omelet Demo & free omelets (in Roy Wilkins Exhibit Hall). Noon-2 p.m.: Two concurrent workshops — Turkey Health and Pullet/Layer Health. March 14-15 American Egg Board speakers workshop (egg farmers only, separate registration required).

“The Evolution of Newcastle Disease Virus of Low Virulence,” Dr. Patti J. Miller, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Athens, Ga.  Pullet/Layer Health Workshop Dr. Mick Fulton, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich., chairperson. “Current Health Issues Dealing with the New European Housing Systems,” Dr. Atoussa Mazaheri, Lohmann Tierzucht, Cuxhaven, Germany. “Managing Commercial Layers for a Single Lay Cycle,” Dr. Travis Schaal, Hy-Line International, Dallas Center, Iowa. “Current Health Issues in Egg Production,” Dr. Daniel Wilson, Rose Acre Farms, Seymour, Ind. “Smoldering Disease Issues in

Layers — FDN, Cocci and Soft Bones,” Dr. Eric Gingerich, Diamond V, Zionsville, Ind.  Turkey Health Workshop Randy Olsen, Best Veterinary Solutions Inc., Willmar, Minn. “Why HVT Vectored Vaccines Work in Turkeys,” Dr. Joan Schrader, Merck Animal Health. “The Proper Stabilization of Vaccines for the Drinking Water and Spray Vaccination,” Cully Wilson, Animal Science Products Inc., Nacogdoches, Texas. “Proper Preparation and Administration of Vaccines at the Hatchery,” Michelle Behl, Willmar Poultry Co./Ag Forte, Willmar, Minn. More information about the education programs can be obtained from MPF at 763-682-2171 or www.midwestpoultry.com.


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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Nuggets

management. A preconference workshop titled Fall Protection Training will take place on Tuesday, March 19, from 1-5 p.m. The course will cover fall protection regulations, controls, anchorage points and specialized equipment. Registation and more information is available at http://www.meatami.com/ht/a/GetDocumentAction/i/83377

Compiled by Barbara Olejnik, Associate Editor 770-718-3440 bolejnik@poultrytimes.net

D.C. USDA celebrates Bird Health Week WASHINGTON — USDA is celebrating Bird Health Awareness Week on Feb. 24 through March 2, to help promote healthy practices for raising backyard birds. A free webinar — Growing Chicks into Healthy Chickens — will be presented on Feb. 28 by three poultry experts who will share information about buying and raising healthy poultry and how to keep them free from disease and predators. The webinar will take from 2-3 p.m. EST. Hosing the webinare are Andy Schneider, also known as “The Chicken Wisperer,” a national radio personality who serves as the Biosecurity for Birds campaign spokesman; Dr. Claudia Dunkley, a poultry scientist at he University of Georgia; and Dr. Martin Smeltzr, a USDA poultry veterinarian. To register for the webinar, go to htttp://healthychickens.webex.com and enter the password: Chickens. m m m

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AMIF schedules worker safey conf. WASHINGTON — The American Meat Institute Foundation will holds its Conference on Worker Safety, Human Resources and the Environment on March 20-21 at the Westin Crown Center in Kansas City, Mo. Worker safety sessions will focus on plant security and food defense, industrial hygiene for meat plant operators, safe work permit programs, an update on the Occupational Safety & Health Adminstration and regulations, fire safety, contractor safety and limiting liability, and a review of worker safety case studies. Human resources sessions will include topics such as employee retention trends, media training for professionals, health clinic programs, succession planning and an Affordable Healthcare Act update. Environmental issues continue to garner increased attention, with government and consumer focus on sustainability and environmental impact. Workshop sessions will focus on how the industry is dealing with key environmental issues, including resource conservation, greenhouse gas emissions and waste

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GEORGIA Environ. seminar set for New Orleans TUCKER — The 2013 Environmental Management Seminar will focus on emerging developments in environmental management, sustainability initiatives, as well as strategies and alternatives for ensuring federal and local compliance. Sponsored by U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, this year’s conference will be held March 12-13, at the Marriott Hotel in New Orleans, La. The program will include a Regulatory/Legal Update: Washington Review and Legal Cases; Strategies to Address New Stormwater Permits; NESHAP Summary and Greenhouse Gas Compliance; Pretreatment Alternatives; RMP Compliance; Composting Essentials; An NGO’s Perspective of Poultry Environmental Management; Nutrient Standards Development: Florida Overview; Environmental Sustainability Initiatives; Sanitation

GAINESVILLE — The 2013 Annual Spring Meeting of the Georgia Poultry Federation will be held the weekend of April 19-21 at Legacy Lodge, Lake Lanier Islands, Buford. The non-profit Research & Service Exhibits will open at 3 p.m. on Friday, April 19. Regular exhibitors are: AgGeorgia Farm Credit, Georgia Poultry Federation, Georgia Poultry Laboratory Network,

Georgia Tech Research Institute, USDA’s Agricultural Research Service and the University of Georgia Departments of Population Health and Poultry Science. The Annual Business Meeting, with election of officers and directors for 2013-14, will be on Friday evening followed by the popular Family Bingo Game which features prizes from poultry, allied and area companies. Those who donate prizes, value of $25 or more, and notify the federation office by March 22, will be listed in the program and announced during the game. All donors will be recognized. Those who plan to attend the meeting may bring their donated prizes to the federation desk at Legacy Lodge by 6 p.m. on Friday, April 19. Donated prizes may also delivered to the Georgia Poultry Federation, 518 S. Enota Drive, Gainesville, Ga. 30501 by April 12 — include name and address of donor. Saturday sports events include a golf tournament, horseshoes tournament, a 5K race, one-mile fun run and one-mile walk. The day’s activities end with the Saturday Evening Banquet. The meeting concludes with the traditional Poultry Industry Church Service on Sunday at 9 a.m. Registration information may be obtained by emailing claudette@ gapf.org or by calling 770-5320473. Room reservations may be made by calling Legacy Lodge at 800-768-5253 or 770-945-8787 and mentioning attending the federation’s Annual Spring Meeting. For information on the resort and the area, visit www.lakelanierislands.com.

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Chemicals Toxicity Impact; Emerging Technology: Aeration Systems and Wastewater Nutrient Removal; and Clean Water Award Winner Plant Tours. Members of the program committee include chairm James Faison, Marshal Durbin Food Corp.;Art Riddick, Hazen and Sawyer P.C.; Brenda Flick, Sanderson Farms Inc.; Shane Reid, Reid Engineering Co.; Russell Dickson, Wayne Farms LLC; Dr. Jim Britton, OK Foods Inc.; William Knapke, Cooper Farms; Dr. Claudia Dunkley, University of Georgia; Warren Howe, Woodruff & Howe Environmental Engineering; Roger Smith, American Proteins, Inc.; Joseph Miller, Rose Acre Farms; Dr. Brian Kiepper, University of Georgia; Stephen James, Pilgrim’s; Jeff Carroll, Perdue Farms Inc.; and Eric Lindemann, Fieldale Farms Corp. Registration and more information is available at http://www.uspoultry.org/educationprograms/index.cfm#env m m m

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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Calendar Compiled by Barbara Olejnik, Associate Editor 770-718-3440 bolejnik@poultrytimes.net

FEB 20-21 — NPI CONV., Norfolk Lodge & Suites, Divots Conference Center, Norfolk, Neb. Contact: Nebraska Poultry Industries Inc., University of Nebraska, 102 Mussehl Hall, P.O. Box 830721, Lincoln, Neb. 685830721; 402-472-2051; egg-turkey@uni.edu; www.nepoultry.org. FEB 21 — TPA POULTRY SCHOOL, Ellington Agricultural Center, Nashville, Tenn. Contact: Tennessee Poultry Association, P.O. Box 1525, Shelbyville, Tenn. 37162-1525. Ph: 931-225-1123; dbarnett@ tnpoultry.org; www.tnpoultry.org. — AGRICIULTURAL FEB 21-22 OUTLOOK FORUM, Crystal-Gateway Marriott, Arlington, Va. Contact: USDA at www.usda.gov/oce/forum. FEB 24-26 — ANNUAL MEAT CONF., Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Nashville, Tenn. Contact: American Meat Institute, 1150 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20036. Ph: 202-587-4200; www.meatami.com. FEB 25-27 — PEPA ANNUAL CONV., Intercontinental, Monterey, Calif. Contact: Pacific Egg & Poultry Association, 1521 I St., Sacramento, Calif. 95814. Ph: 916-441-0801; dmurdock@cgfa.org; www.pacificegg.org. 17 — HOUSTON FEB 25-March LIVESTOCK SHOW & RODEO, Houston, Texas. Contact: Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, P.O. Box 20070, Houston, Texas 77225-0070. Ph: 832-667-1000; questions@ rodeohouston.com; www.hlrs.com. FEB 28-March 2 — SGFA and GFGA ANNUAL CONV., Doubletree Guest Suites, Charleston, S.C. Contact: Bonnie Holloman, Southeastern Grain & Feed Association (Georgia Feed & Grain Association), P.O. Box 58220, Raleigh, N.C. 27658. Ph: 919-3340098; bonnie.holloman@yahoo.com. MAR 12 — CPF WINTER BOARD MTNG., Piccadilly Inn, Fresno, Calif. Contact: California Poultry Federation, 4640 Spyres Way, Suite 4, Modesto, Calif. 95356. PAh: 209-576-6355; www.cpif.org. MAR 11-15 — AFIA SPRING COMMITTEE MTNGS./PURCHASING & INGREDIENT SUPPLIERS CONF., Omni Fort Worth Hotel, Fort Worth, Texas. Contact: American Feed Industry Association, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 916. Arlington, Va. 22201. Ph: 703-

524-0810; afia@afia.org; www.afia.org. — ENVIRONMENTAL MAR 12-13 MGMNT. SMNR, Marriott Hotel, New Orleans, La. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770-493-9401; seminar@uspoultry. org; www.poultryegginstitute.org. MAR 12-14 — MPF ANNUAL CONV., Saint Paul RiverCentre, St. Paul, Minn. Contact: Midwest Poultry Federation, 108 Marty Drive, Buffalo, Minn. 55313. Ph: 763-682-2171; info@midwestpoultry.com; www.midwestpoultry.com. MAR 13 — CEAM ANNUAL MTNG., Saint Paul RiverCentr, St. Paul, Minn. Contact: Chicken & Egg Association of Minnesota, 108 Marty Drive, Buffalo, Minn. 55313. Ph: 763-682-2171; info@ mnchicken.org; www.mnchicken.org.

Buford, Ga. Contact: Georgia Poultry Federation, P.O. Box 763, Gainesville, Ga. 30503. Ph: 770-532-0473; claudette@gapf.org; www.gapf.org. APR 22-24 — HUMAN RESOURCES SMNR., Sandestin Golf & Beach Resort, Destin, Fla. Mo. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770-493-9401, seminar@uspoultry. org, www.poultryegginstitute.org. APR 23-24 — TPF SPRING SYMPSM, John Q. Hammons Center, Rogers, Ark. Contact: The Poultry Federation, 321 S. Vixtory St., Little Rock, Ark. 72201. Ph: 501-375-8131 MAY 1-2 — STAKEHOLDERS SUMMIT, Westin Arlington Gateway Hotel, Arlington, Va. Contact: Animal Agriculture Alliance, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 916B, Arlington, Va. 22201. Ph: 703-562-1412; kjohnson@animalagalliance.org; www//animalagalliance.org. MAY 2-3 — NATIONAL BREEDERS ROUNDTABLE, Airport Marriott Hotel, St. Louis, Mo. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770-493-9401, seminar@uspoultry. org, www.poultryegginstitute.org. MAY 6-7 — TURKEY & BROILER HEALTH MGMNT. SCHOOL, Kellogg

Hotel & Conference Center, Michigan State University, 219 S. Harrison Road, East Lansing, Mich. 488241022. Contact: Dr. Teresa Morishita at tmorishita@westernu.edu or Sophia Alvarez at salvarez@westernu.edu. MAY 8-9 — LAYER HEALTH MGMNT. SCHOOL, Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center, Michigan State University, 219 S. Harrison Road, East Lansing, Mich. 48824-1022. Contact: Dr. Teresa Morishita at tmorishita@westernu.edu or Sophia Alvarez at salvarez@westernu.edu. MAY 14-15 — AFIA BOARD MTNG., Arlington, Va. Contact: American Feed Industry Association, 2101 Wilson Blvd., Suite 916, Arlington, Va. 22201. Ph: 703524-0810; afia@afia.org, www.afia.org. MAY 15-16 — POULTRY PROCESSORS WKSHP., Embassy Suites Atlanta Centennial Olympic Park, Atlanta, Ga. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770493-9401, seminar@uspoultry. org, www.poultryegginstitute.org. MAY 19-22 — ALLTECH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM, Lexington, Ky. Contact: Alltech International, 3031 Catnip Hill Pike, Nicholasville, Ky.

40356; www.alltech.com/symposium. MAY 20-22 — UEP LEGISLATIVE BOARD MTNG., Washington, D.C. Contact: United Egg Producers, 1720 Windward Concourse, Suite 230, Alpharetta, Ga. 30005. Ph: 770360-9220; www.unitedegg.com. MAY 20-23 — NEQS — Harrisburg, Pa. Contact: National Egg Quality School, Maryland Department of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Pkwy., Annapolis, Md. 21401. Ph: 410-841-5769; Deanna. Baldwin@maryland.gov; www.neqs.org. JUN 7-8 — AP&EA GOLF TOURNAMENT and EVENING OF FUN, Birmingham, Ala. Contact: Alabama Poultry & Egg Association, P.O. Box 240, Montgomery, Ala. 36101. Ph: 334265-2732; www.alabamapoultry.org. JUN 11-13 — ITF SUMMER MTNG., Adventureland Inn, Altoona, Iowa. Contact: Iowa Turkey Federation, 535 E. Lincoln Way, Ames, Iowa 50010. Ph: 51522-7492;gretta@iowaturkey.org; sheila@ iowaturkey.org; www.iowaturkey.org. JUN 14-15 — ANNUAL POULTRY FESTIVAL, Rogers, Ark. Contact: Poultry Federation, P.O. Box 1446, Little Rock, Ark. 72203. Ph: 501-3758131; www.thepoultryfederation.com.

MAR 13 — MTGA ANNUAL MTNG., Saint Paul RiverCentre, St. Paul, Minn. Contact: Minnesota Turkey Growers Association, 108 Marty Drive, Buffalo, Minn. 55313. Ph: 763-682-2171; info@minnesotaturkey.com; www.minnesotaturkey.com.

4

MAR 20-21 — FEED MILL MGMNT. SMNR, Doubletree Hotel, Nashville, Tenn. Contact: U.S. Poultry & Egg Association, 1530 Cooledge Road, Tucker, Ga. 30084-7303, Ph: 770493-9401, seminar@uspoultry. org, www.poultryegginstitute.org. MAR 20-21 — AEB BOARD MTNG., Chicago, Ill. Ga. Contact: American Egg Board, 1460 Renaissance Drive, Park Ridge, Ill. 60068. Ph: 847-2967043; aeb@aeb.org; www.aeb.org. MAR 20-21 — AMIF WORKER, HUMAN RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENT CONF., Westin Crown Center, Kansas City, Mo. Contact: American Meat Institute Foundation, 1150 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20036. Ph: 202587-4200; www.meatami.com. APR 5 — OPA INDUSTRY CELEBRATION BANQUET, Renaissance Columbus Downtown Hotel, Columbus, Ohio. Contact: Ohio Poultry Association, 5930 Sharonb Woods Blvd., Columbus, Ohio 43229. Ph: 614-882-6111; jchakeres@ ohiopoultry.org; www.ohiopoultry.org. APR 17 — DPI BOOSTER BANQUET, Salisbury, Md. Contact: Delmarva Poultry Industry Inc., 16686 County Seat Hwy., Georgetown, Del. 19947-4881; dpi@ dpichicken.com; www.dpichicken.com APR 19-21 — GPF ANNUAL SPRING MTNG., Lake Lanier Islands Resort,

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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

2013 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention Directory of Exhibitors A

D

AEI 304 Aerotech/Munters 161 Agile Mfg. 426 Ag-One Associates 1010 Agricultural Util. Research Inst. 1100 Agri-Plastics Mfg. 1009 Agri-Pro Enterprises 44 AgriSoft/CMC 354 AGRI-TECH 112 Alltech 512 Alternative Design Mfg. 1112 Anderson Chemical Co. 429 Animal Health International 10 Anitox Corp. 437 ARKO Laboratories 360 Aviagen Turkeys 344 Avicorvi 33 Azomite Mineral Products 1000

108 Dandy Dawe’s Laboratories 235 Devenish Nutrition 1005 DI Drive 525 Diamond Moba Americas 355 Diamond V 144 Diversified Imports 416 DPI GLOBAL 255 DRJ Animal Health 337 DSM Nutritional Products 17

B Baer Systems Inc. Baldwin Supply Co. Barron Supply Co. BatchNet Best Veterinary Solutions Big Dutchman USA Bimeda Inc. BinTrac by HerdStar Biomin USA Brown Bear Corp. Bruker Optics Budget Lighting

237 40 167 1206 238 100 252 105 411 335 110 153

C Canadian Bio-Systems Cashton Farm/CFS Specialties CCP Industries CEI Pacer Central Bi-Products Central Life Sciences Centurion Poultry Ceva Biomune Chantland–MHS Charter Eqpt./Sure Products ChemStation of Iowa Chick Master Incubator Chief Buildings Chore Time Equipment, EPS Chr. Hansen Comfort-Zone Insulation Conklin Roofing Sys. Continental Plastic CROPP/Organic Valley Cumberland/Hired-Hand CyberAgra

312 150 1208 214 405 254 138 430 115 527 1104 215 513 122 331 507 310 248 505 244 19

E East Iowa Plastics 455 Easy Automation 510 eCow Products 24 Egg Industry Center 1001 Elanco 316 Endres Processing 326 Energy Panel Structures 427 Enzyme Development 564 Evonik Degussa 251 EW Nutrition 35

Hensley Feed Transp. Eqpt. 1209 Horizon Foods 1106 Huvepharma 504 Hybrid Turkeys 222 Hygieia Biological Laboratories 38 Hy-Line North America 116 I Icynene Corp. 563 ILC Resources 149 IMV Technologies USA 502 Incubator Supply 258 Intech LLC 209 Intercomp 22 Iowa Area Development Group 231 ISA / Hendrix Genetics 224 IVESCO 444

546 42 508 253 338

F K FACCO USA 362 Fairchild JCB 457 Fancom/Can-Neth 431 Farm Alarm 570 Farm Credit Services of America 132 Farm Weigh Systems 566 Farmer Automatic of America 400 Farmer Boy AG 39 FDI Cage Systems 410 Feedlogic 1110 FEEDSTUFFS 250 Fertilizer Dealer Supply 313 Finken Water Solutions 1101 G Gasolec America Genesis Instruments Godfather’s Exterminating Greater Parts Green Gable Contracting Greener World Solutions

439 230 109 62 451 111

H Hamlet Protein Haug Kubota Hawk Alarm Systems Heartland Energy Systems Henning Construction

107 64 348 1108 322

Katolight by MTU Onsite Energy 101 Kemin Industries 14 Kindstrom-Schmoll 407 Koechner Mfg. Co. 26 Kohler Power Systems 1111 Koster Grain Inc. 148 Kunafin “The Insectary” 136 L L.B. White Co. Lallemand Animal Nutrition Life Products/Vit-E-Men Life-Science Innovations Liphatech Inc. Lohmann Animal Health Int’l. Lubing Systems LVI Litter Processors

18 561 165 202 544 351 262 58

500 256 448 449

N NatureForm Hatchery Sys. 311 Neogen 356 New Standard 464 Nioex Systems USA 3 Novartis Animal Health 135 Novel Energy Solutions 1207 Novus 210 Nutriad 260 O OKelley Mfg. Once Innovations Overdrive Lighting

J J & D Manufacturing J.B. Hunt Transport Jackson Wood Shaving Mills Jamesway Incubator Jansen Poultry Eqpt.

Minnesota Farm Insurance Minnesota Sawdust & Shavings Mistral / Mmi Motomco

334 456 1002

P Pacific Vet Group 216 Pactiv 328 PAKSTER 515 Patz Corp. 31 PELBO SpA 529 Pennovo 15 Perkins Lumber Co. 229 Pfizer Animal Health Global Poultry 450 Plasson 519 POET Nutrition 218 Potters Poultry Int’l. 554 Poultry Management Sys. 359 Praxair 1006 Prinova Animal Nutrition 1113 PSD Concepts 154 Purina Animal Nutrition 232 PW Aire Technologies 54 Q QC Supply QualiTech Quality Technology Int’l.

127 549 350

Sanovo Technology 48 Scott Equipment 308 Service Equipment 404 Seven Star Enterprises 1 SFP 1205 Smart Motion Robotics 509 Smithway 113 Star Labs 540 Starlite Mfg. 46 Stenner Pump 226 Sudenga Industries 408 Suncoast Pine Shavings 1011 SunOpta 453 T TCP Water Solutions Tecno Poultry Sys. Terregena Inc. Tetra Americana TEXHA PA Tom-Cin Metals TSS EggQuality

314 68 562 140 1105 157 213

U Ultrapak 1004 Univar USA 1204 University of Minnesota 336 USDA–NRCS 1201 USDA—AMS 1109 V Valley of the Moon 349 Value-Added Science & Tech. 1102 Vencomatic 156 Vi-COR 32

W Walinga USA 460 Warehouse Shell Sales 236 WaterTectonics 1007 WATT 332 WEXCO Environmental 511

R M Manure Safety Solutions Max Johnson Insurance Mendota Agri-Products Merck Animal Health MetaFarms Inc. Meyhen International Meyhen M.G.H. Midwest Laboratories

Y 249 333 228 300 151 422 523 406

Ralco Animal Health 128 Renewable Energy 11 Ridley Feed Ingredients 155 RMS Roller-Grinder 358 Ropapharm Americas 1200 Rotem 517 S Salmet International

438

Ymker Insulation

36

Z Zee Co./Vincit Group 37 Ziggity Systems 327 Zinpro Performance Minerals 413


TOUGH ON SALMONELLA EASY ON YOUR FLOCK

The most effective defense against Salmonella enteritidis in broiler and layer flocks starts with new SE Guard™ from Merck Animal Health. SE Guard is easy on birds, promoting better lifetime production and improved flock uniformity. In addition, you get the peace of mind that comes with knowing you’re protected from the threat of costly production line setbacks. Play it safe: talk to a Merck Animal Health representative or call technical services at 800-211-3573.

THE SCIENCE OF HEALTHIER ANIMALS. Copyright © 2013 Intervet Inc., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., all rights reserved. 1320168 POUT


A Tradition of

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LUBING Systems, LP • 135 Corporate Drive, SW • Cleveland, TN 37311 • tel 423 709.1000 • fax 423 709.1001

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HEALTHY FLOCKS FOR HEALTHY PROFITS The scientifically selected multi-strain probiotic of choice

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Copyright© 2012 DuPont or its affiliates. All rights reserved. The DuPont Oval Logo, DuPont™ and all products denoted with ® or ™ are registered trademarks or trademarks of DuPont or its affiliates.

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Turkey Coops Available at Koechner’s

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We Stand Behind Our Products Now with a 10 year Limited Warranty! Warranty applies to the G-12 infrared emitter

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KOECHNER MFG. CO., INC. Phone: 660-433-2178 Fax:660-433-2706 Tipton, MO 65081 • Mark W. Koechner E-mail: info@turkeycoops.com Website: www.turkeycoops.com

Gasolec America, Inc 5818 S. 129th E. Ave. Tulsa, OK 74134 918-455-4588 www.gasolecusa.com

Shown: G12 42,000 Btu Direct Spark Ignition Infrared Radiant Heater

The patented industry leading electronic indicator for harsh washdown environments

Bench Scales

The WeighTech line of bench scales offers processors the best of both worlds: functionality and durability. Our bench scales feature our industry leading MicroWeigh indicator, and is available in many sizes to fit your processing needs.

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will not only reduce your fuel & electricity consumption, it can add years to the life of your structures!

Specially new formula designed to Combat and Kill the darkling beetle! New 3 or 5 year warranty option with new 2012 formulas! Designed to help combat against beetle, rodent and bird damage Continually working to improve the performance of our product to ensure our customers can achieve the best possible life and returns on their investments

Still on top of the pecking order Since 1954 — Poultry Times is the nation’s only poultry industry newspaper Poultry Times focuses each of its biweekly issues on topical news and informative features to a wide audience, ranging from growers to processors to affiliated industries.

Poultry Times offers full coverage of industry issues, including: l Housing & Equipment l Health l

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With up-to-date news and standing features, Poultry Times provides its readers with the complete picture of the poultry industry — from farm to table. And at an annual subscription price of just $18 for 26 regular issues, as well as other special issues; it is a tremendous value.

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AgSeal products are currently approved and/or specified for New Construction & Retro Fitting existing!

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FPM Inc. Poultry Moving Equipment Pullet Trailer Units Move over 12,000 birds economically per load. Rhino Rail Lift Gate 2000# Capacity

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Peace of mind is now wireless!!

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K SUPPLY CO. Albertville, AL...............256-894-0034 Forest, MS..................877-893-0034 VET SERVICE Fresno, CA....................559-485-7474 POULTRY TECH SERVICE Gainesville, GA..............770-287-7891 AGRAMED Cleveland, GA................800-248-5940

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SMITHWAY, INC.

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The EcodrumTM system is a proven technology, successfully installed on poultry operations throughout North America. The EcodrumTM is perfect for large scale animal production.

Benefits: Clean and simple to operate Low cost operation Reduces odor and pathogens To learn more about how the ecodrum can benefit your operation contact us at:

Maintains composting activity in cold weather

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Produces a high quality compost used as a soil enhancer

Designed specifically for the Poultry Industry! From start to finish, producers using radiant tube brooders have realized higher quality chicks, lower mortality rates, improved animal performance, and reduced fuel consumption.

AV Series Tube Brooders

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Contact us for free consulting, job quoting and design assistance. Detroit Radiant Products Co. Family owned and operated since 1955

21400 Hoover Road, Warren, Michigan 48089 USA Tel: 1-586-756-0950 â—? www.detroitradiant.com


Start Poults Well with Innovative Products for Turkeys ... from Chore-Time IT’S ALL ABOUT A GOOD START FOR POULTS Chore-Time’s QUAdrATHerM® Heaters, AdvAnTi-FLOW® Poult drinkers and LiBerTY® Feeding

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systems work together to get turkey poults started well so they finish well. Chore-Time’s QUADRATHERM® Heater is now available in low-pressure models, too. Provides poults with a broad, even comfort zone.

• Chore-Time’s QUAdrATHerM® Heaters solve typical heating systems problems such as wasted fuel and hot/cold spots. Keep poults distributed more evenly in the house with fewer rings. • With Chore-Time’s AdvAnTi-FLOW® drinkers, poults drink from the unique drinker disc as well as from the litter-saving catch cups with a comfortable, rounded edge. • The unique shape of the LiBerTY® Feeder’s cone helps poults see flowing feed and draws them to the pan’s edge to eat. The cone’s bird-positioning ring helps keep poults out of pan – no more raking out crusty feed. easily adjust the variable flood level in all pans as birds grow. Contact your local Chore-Time distributor today, and grow with us!

The ADVANTI-FLOW® Drinker’s disc holds water to attract poults. Catch cups have a rounded edge.

Tel. 574.658.4101 poultry@choretime.com A Division of CTB, inC.

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Chore-Time’s LIBERTY® Open-Grill Poult Feeder maximizes feed visibility and encourages perimeter eating.

CTB AdverTising Ad no. CT-2528HH/201301 Chore-Time Poultry Production systems Poultry Times


MAXIMIZING IB PROTECTION FOODCRAFT FRONT HALF CUTTING SYSTEM

WHAT IS AN INFECTIOUS BRONCHITIS PROTECTOTYPE? Protectotype is not a product; it’s a fieldproven concept (i.e. management strategy) using existing vaccines to protect poultry against ever-changing IB variants. Studies show when a bird receives two serotypically different IB vaccines, it can gain protection against three or more IB serotypes – two known IB serotypes as well as newly adapted IB ones for which there is no existing vaccine.1

Works on ALL overhead line systems Increase Yield. $$Eliminate Breast Cuttings$$ www.foodcraft.net

Controlling infectious bronchitis virus (IB) remains challenging due to the speed and frequency in which the disease evolves and spreads. However, Protectotype™ maximizes IB protection by combining individual vaccines. No single vaccine can effectively control all IB virus strains, but using available vaccines containing different serotypes provides protection against many different IB variants.

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1

Cook et al. Avian Path. 28:477-485, 1999.

2

Jackwood. Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center – University of Georgia. “Evaluating Protection from Ciliostasis in MA5 and DE07 Vaccinated SPF Chickens Challenged With the GA11 Variant type of IBV,” 2011. 1319152R-POUT

PROVEN PROTECTOTYPE PRODUCTS Data from the Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center – University of Georgia shows a combination of Mildvac-Ma5™ (Massachusetts-type) and Shor-Bron® D (Delaware-type, 072 strain) – both from Merck Animal Health – can provide cross-protection against IB disease. The research proved more than 90 percent protection against additional IB strains, including GA11/GPL90/11, Mass/Mass41/41 and GA98/CWL0470/98. Additionally, trial findings showed a correlation between clinical signs, ciliostasis scores and virus protection.2 To learn more about Protectotype and applicable IB vaccination offerings contact your Merck Animal Health representative by calling technical service at 800-211-3573, or visit www.infectious-bronchitis.com.


13

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Dave Horsager to speak at Fellowship Breakfast ST. PAUL, Minn. — Midwest Poultry Federation has announced that Dave Horsager will be the 2013 MPF Fellowship Breakfast speaker. “The poultry industry — and agriculture in general — knows a thing or two about trust. We have seen consumer trust erode in our farmers, food companies and our products over the past decade, due in part to animal activist groups who constantly bombard consumers with myths, mistruths and outright lies,� said MPF President Allen Behl, Behl Turkey Farm, Watertown, Wis. “Mr. Horsager is an author, business strategist and keynote speaker who

also knows about trust. He will share with us the secrets of using trust to impact the bottom line.� Combining humor, illustrations and memorable stories with research and insight, Horsager sheds light on the confusion and misconceptions surrounding the cornerstone of personal and professional success. Through his master’s research, experience as director of K-Life Inc., and founding partner of Special Delivery Productions, Horsager learned firsthand how the world’s most successful people gain and keep the trust of their customers and colleagues. He’s taken that knowledge and broken it down into tangible steps

that audiences and readers can incorporate into their own lives right away. As a Certified Speaking Professional, Horsager has delivered life-changing presentations on four continents, with audiences ranging from Fortune 500 executives to the armed forces and even professional sports teams. He’s built his reputation on two things — being easy to work with and delivering engaging, high-energy speeches every time. When he’s not speaking or writing, Horsager continues to research and consult through Horsager Leadership. He also serves as an Adjunct Pro-

Organic-Specialty workshop celebrates 10 years at MPF ST. PAUL, Minn. — The 2013 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention announces the 10th annual Organic-Specialty Poultry Production Workshop, to be held Wednesday, March 13, 2013, at the Saint Paul RiverCentre, St. Paul, Minn. This workshop is part of the 42nd annual MPF Convention, which will feature approximately 40 speakers on a variety of topics for the turkey, egg layer, broiler and organic/specialty poultry industries, as well as an expanded Exhibit Hall. Dr. Jacqueline Jacob, University of Kentucky, is the program chairwoman for this workshop. Speakers and

topics will include:  Euthanasia — Why, When and How? Dr. R.M. (Mick) Fulton, Michigan State University, Lansing, Mich.  Natural Ventilation in Organic Poultry Houses — Dr. Morgan Hayes, USDA Agricultural Research Service Meat and Animal Research Center, Clay Center, Neb.  Organic Processing of Poultry — Dr. Casey M. Owens, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. Details on all MPF Convention events are available at www.midwestpoultry.com.

For the latest Market information see page 22

fessor of Organizational Leadership for Bethel University’s graduate program. He lives in St. Paul, Minn., with his wife, Lisa, and their four children. The Fellowship Breakfast is scheduled for March 14, 2013, at the Saint Paul RiverCentre. Tickets are $25 onsite and includes a full breakfast. The Fellowship Breakfast program also includes the recognition of many exhibiting companies as MPF Longevity Honorees. (Exhibitors are recognized every five consecutive years.) More information can be obtained at www.midwest poultry.com or at 763-682-2171.

Dave Horsager

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14

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

‘Make Your Own Omelet’ event back at MPF Convention ST. PAUL, Minn. — The Midwest Poultry Federation is pleased to announce the “Make Your Own Omelet” event is back in Roy Wilkins Exhibit Hall on Thursday, March 14 and includes an “eggcellent” presentation by Iowa Poultry Association Executive Director Kevin Vinchattle and, of course, free omelets. Vinchattle will cook up a fantastic

omelet demonstration in the Roy Wilkins Exhibit Hall floor. Afterwards, attendees can make their own omelets and walk the show floor. This special event is included in the MPF registration fee — there is no cost to attendees to make Vinchattle your own omelet.

The MPF Convention runs March 12-14, 2013, at the Saint Paul RiverCentre in St. Paul, Minn. For more information on the MPF Convention or to receive registration and hotel reservation information, visit www. midwestpoultry.com or 763-682-2171.

Special

Making omelets: Howard Helmer, the “world’s fastest omelet maker,” conducted his famous omelet making demonstration at last year’s Midwest Poultry Federation Convention. A “make your own” omelet event will be held at the convention this year on March 14 at 11 a.m.

Special

Convention registration: The 2012 Midwest Poultry Federation Convention, held at St. Paul RiverCentre, drew approximately 2,100 attendees. More information about the convention can be obtained at 763-682-2171, or www.midwestpoultry.com.

To subscribe to Poultry Times call 770-536-2476


15

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

MPF donated 300 pounds of holiday turkey to food shelf ST. PAUL, Minn. — The Midwest Poultry Federation and the Saint Paul Convention and Visitors Authority in December provided a holiday gift of 20 turkeys, totaling nearly 300 pounds, to families served by Neighborhood House on Saint Paul’s West Side. “We know there are many families in need . . . and through the strength of our partnership with Visit Saint Paul, it has become an annual tradition for our two organizations to join together to give back this time of year,” said Lara Durben, communications director of the Midwest Poultry Federation. “Our members take great pride in producing wholesome, delicious food products for families in the U.S. and all over the world. We want to share our success with the people who rely on the Neigh-

borhood House to assist them in feeding their families during challenging economic times.” Neighborhood House operates the largest single site food shelf in Minnesota and has served as a multicultural, multilingual resource network for Saint Paul’s immigrants, refugees and low-income families since 1897. The gift turkeys recognize a partnership between Visit Saint Paul and MPF, which has been holding its annual conference in Saint Paul since 1997. The conference will bring 2,100 poultry farmers, companies and suppliers to the Saint Paul RiverCentre in March. MPF recently committed to hold the conference at the RiverCentre through 2015.

Welcome Reception Special

Holiday turkey donation: The Midwest Poultry Federation and the Saint Paul Convention and Visitors Authority donated 20 turkeys to families served by Neighborhood House. Shown from left to right are Lorrie Larson, Visit Saint Paul; Amanda Freidrich, Visit Saint Paul; a representative from the Neighborhood House; and Lara Durben, MPF communications director.

Special

Welcome Reception: The 16th annual Pre-Show Nutrition Symposium will be held at the Midwest Poultry Federation Convention on March 12 from 1:30-5 p.m. Immediately following will be the convention’s Welcome Reception. Complimentary appetizers and beverages will be available, as well as a cash bar. Admission to the symposium and reception is free with paid admission to the convention.


16

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Chicken Caucus re-organized for 113th Congress WASHINGTON — Members of the bipartisan Congressional Chicken Caucus for the 113th Congress have been announced by Congressman Rick Crawford (R-Ark.) and Congressman Sanford Bishop (D-Ga.) Crawford and Bishop founded the Chicken Caucus in 2012 and will continue serving as co-chairmen of

the caucus in the 113th Congress. “I want to thank Representatives Crawford and Bishop for their steadfast leadership and for once again taking the lead in organizing the Congressional Chicken Caucus,” said National Chicken Council President Mike Brown. “As it did in the 112th Congress, the caucus will continue to give a united voice to the chicken industry as we navi-

gate many issues in the two years ahead.” The bipartisan caucus will consist of members devoted to the various issues affecting the U.S. chicken industry, and will also provide a platform to discuss the role of government in addressing current and future industry challenges. “Working with caucus members, I plan to be a strong advocate for

the 6,000 Arkansans who work in chicken production,” said Crawford. “I look forward to continue working with the Congressional Chicken Caucus in creating a forum where chicken producers, processors, consumers and retailers can provide members of Congress with their thoughts and suggestions on how to sustain and improve our poultry

industries,” added Bishop. Other members of the Congressional Chicken Caucus are Reid Ribble (R-Wis.), Austin Scott (RGa.), Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), Andy Harris (R-Md.), Tim Griffin (R-Ark.), Jim Costa (D-Calif.), Gregg Harper (R-Miss.), Walter Jones (R-N.C.), Alan Nunnelee (R-Miss.), Bill Cassidy (R-La.) and Scott DesJarlais (R-Tenn.).

Homeland Security investigates at Sparboe egg farm The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — Dozens of federal homeland security agents descended on Sparboe Farms in Litchfield on Jan. 8, as part of what authorities called a “larger criminal investigation,” but details about the nature of the operation were not disclosed. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman Shawn Neudauer said he could not provide details because the investigation is ongoing. There were no criminal arrests, but 10 people were picked up on administrative charges. Neudauer said that as of midday Jan.

8, two of those arrested had been released, but the rest were still in custody and their cases were being reviewed. An administrative charge is a tool ICE uses to apprehend possible illegal immigrants. The Associated Press learned of the operation before authorities released a statement. Sparboe also provided few details. But in a statement, the company said that authorities had executed a warrant at two of its locations in Litchfield, and the company is working with federal officials. Neudauer said agents with ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations

were involved in the operation and a Department of Homeland Security helicopter was on the scene. Minnesota state police were also there to help secure the area. When asked if criminal charges were expected, U.S. Attorney’s Office spokeswoman Jeanne Cooney said prosecutors will have to wait to see how the investigation unfolds, but added if authorities determine that any of those arrested have prior records they could be prosecuted. She also said she could not release the nature of the investigation. Sparboe describes itself as one of the largest shell egg producers and marketers in the United States, and

sells to retail, wholesale and foodservice customers. It is based in Litchfield, which is about 65 miles west of Minneapolis. Sparboe has been in the news before: In 2011, McDonald’s and Target dropped Sparboe as their egg supplier after an animal rights group released undercover video that showed cases of animal cruelty at five of Sparboe’s facilities in Iowa, Minnesota and Colorado. The video shot by Mercy for Animals showed a worker swinging a bird by its feet, hens packed into cramped cages, male chicks being tossed into plastic bags to suffocate and workers cutting off the tips of chicks’ beaks.

At the time, Beth Sparboe Schnell, Sparboe Farms’ president and owner, said the company was “shocked and deeply disturbed” by the video and that four employees involved in the activity were fired after an internal investigation. Sparboe was also warned that it violated federal regulations meant to prevent salmonella. Sparboe Cos. LLC said at the time that it made management changes, took corrective actions sought by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration and was creating a task force to review the company’s food safety and animal care.

Environmental group won’t appeal poultry pollution case The Associated Press

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — A New York-based environmental group that sued Perdue Farms and an Eastern Shore contract grower has said it won’t appeal a federal judge’s ruling in an alleged poultry pollution case. The Waterkeeper Alliance said in a statement that while the group believes it presented compelling evidence, it won’t appeal U.S. District Judge William Nickerson’s ruling in a case that had broad implications for the state’s poultry industry. “Given the high burden appellate

courts impose for reversing a district court’s findings of fact, Waterkeeper Alliance will not appeal Judge Nickerson’s decision,” the group said in a statement. State Sen. Richard Colburn (RDorchester) said he was pleased the legal matter was over. “To have pursued an appeal of Judge Nickerson’s ruling would have only further harmed a family farm already cleared of wrongdoing and would further undermine future cooperation between agriculture and responsible environmental groups,” Colburn said in a statement. Waterkeeper alleged that chicken

litter was being discharged from the Hudson Farm in Berlin into a tributary of the Pocomoke River. The federal lawsuit was filed in 2010, after representatives from Waterkeeper flew over the farm and iden-

tified what they initially believed to be a large uncovered pile of chicken manure. The piles were eventually found not to be chicken manure. Lawyers for Perdue, which owned the chickens, and the Hudson

family said chicken manure wasn’t getting out in great enough amounts to pollute, and farmer Alan Hudson testified that he took steps to avoid pollution and to keep the manure in chicken houses.

For more poultry industry news visit www.poultrytimes.net


17

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Tyson invests $40 million in four plant locations SPRINGDALE, Ark. — Tyson Foods Inc. has announced capital investments of more than $40 million in four of its plants that could create as many as 490 jobs. Expansion projects are under way at plants in Sherman, Texas, and Goodlettsville, Tenn.; an expansion in Glen Allen, Va., was recently completed; and The Bruss Co., a subsidiary of Tyson Foods, recently opened for business in Jacksonville, Fla. Both the Texas and Tennessee plants produce case ready beef and pork, meaning the meats are cut, packaged and made ready for retail grocers to place directly into the meat case. The plant in Virginia makes rotisserie chickens, breast filets, tenders and thighs for national foodservice customers. The Bruss Co. is a manufacturer of portion-controlled steaks and chops for the foodservice industry. “These are major investments we believe will help us maintain our position as a leader in the case ready business at two strategic lo-

cations, and in chicken and steaks with some of our key foodservice customers,” said Donnie Smith, president and CEO of Tyson Foods Inc. “All of these are prime locations because of the existing facilities and access to an excellent workforce.” The Goodlettsville and Sherman locations will involve the installation of new equipment and production lines as part of Tyson’s strategic effort to meet customer demand for case ready beef and pork. Expansions, equipment installations and hiring for the new positions are expected to be complete by the end of April. The Goodlettsville, Tenn., plant, where Tyson anticipates investing $7.7 million and hiring as many as 100 new people, produces pork cuts, ground beef products and beef cuts, including closely trimmed steaks, chops and roasts. The Sherman, Texas, plant produces beef, ground beef and pork products, including

closely trimmed steaks, chops, roasts and spareribs. Tyson anticipates hiring about 70 new workers and investing $5.6 million there. Each of the case ready plants employs about 1,500 people. The Goodlettsville plant had a 2012 payroll of more than $45 million and the Sherman plant had a 2012 payroll of more than $49 million. “Tyson continues the strategy of adding value to our commodity products for retail customers and consumers,” said Gary Sheneman, senior vice president of case ready beef and pork. “We’re pleased to be able to create jobs in both cities. They’ve been great supporters of Tyson Foods throughout the years.” Tyson operates a third case ready plant in Council Bluffs, Iowa, which produces case ready beef and pork; ground pork; ground chicken; beef, pork, and chicken meal kits; vacuum-packed beef; and vacuum-packed retail steaks.

Expansions at the poultry plant in Glen Allen, Va., which were completed in late 2012, involved the installation of new equipment which will increase the ability to produce more food. Tyson spent more than $14 million and is in the process of hiring about 120 additional people. The plant currently employs about 640 and had a payroll of more than $23 million in 2012. “The strategic location, local tax structure and available workforce made the decision to expand in Hanover County, Virginia, an easy choice,” said Tommy Waters, manager of the Glen Allen complex. The Bruss Co., which is based in Chicago, bought a 47,000-square foot processing facility in Jacksonville, Fla., last year. The company spent $13 million on equipment and renovations, and plans to eventually employ as many as 200. The annual payroll, once the facility is running at full capacity, is expected to be approximately $8 million. More than 50 people are employed there now.


18

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Midwest Poultry Federation Convention . . .


19

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

. . . in view


20

Special

St. Paul skyline: St. Paul, Minn., will again be the host city for the Midwest Poultry Federation Convention, in its 42nd year. Among the downtown sites include the Science Museum of Minnesota, the Cathedral of St. Paul, Landmark Center and the State Capitol building.

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POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Corn shortage idles 20 ethanol plants nationwide The Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — The persistent drought is taking a toll on producers of ethanol, with corn becoming so scarce that nearly two dozen ethanol plants have been forced to halt production. The Renewable Fuels Association, an ethanol industry trade group, provided data to the Associated Press showing that 20 of the nation’s 211 ethanol plants have ceased production during the past year, including five in January. Most remain open, with workers spending time performing maintenancetype tasks. But ethanol production won’t likely resume until after 2013 corn is harvested in late August or September. Industry experts don’t expect a shortage — millions of barrels are stockpiled and the remaining 191 plants are still producing. Still, there is growing concern about what happens if the drought lingers through another corn-growing season. “There’s a lot of anxiety in the industry right now about the drought and a lot of folks watching the weather and hoping and praying this drought is going to break,” said Geoff Cooper, vice president for research and analysis for the Renewable Fuels Association. “If we get back to a normal pattern and normal corn crop, then I think the industry is in good shape,” Cooper said. “But if this drought persists and it has the same effect on this coming corn crop, then we’ve got a problem.” America’s ethanol industry has taken off in the past decade. Plants in 28 states produce more than 13 billion gallons of ethanol each year, Cooper said. By comparison, in 2002, the industry produced 2.1 billion gallons. Today, roughly 10 percent of the U.S. gasoline supply is made up of the biofuel. Roughly 95 percent of U.S. ethanol is made from corn. The National Corn Growers Association estimates that 39 percent of the U.S. corn crop

is used in ethanol production. Corn producers had high hopes going into 2012. Record harvests were predicted. Then the weather dried up. The drought began before planting and never stopped. Even though more acres were planted in 2012 compared to 2011, 13 percent less corn was harvested. Availability of locally produced corn is vital for ethanol plants since having it shipped in is too expensive. To make matters worse, the drought hit hardest in many of the top corngrowing states. Six of the 20 ethanol plants that stopped production are in Nebraska, two in Indiana and two in Minnesota. Ten states have seen one plant affected. Cooper said the 20 plants employ roughly 1,000 workers combined, but it wasn’t known how many have been laid off. Valero Energy Corp. idled three plants last year — in North Linden, Ind., and Albion, Neb., in June; and in Bloomingburg, Ohio, in December. Five plants ceased production in January alone — Abengoa plants in the Nebraska towns of York and Ravenna; a White Energy plant in Plainview, Texas; an Aemetis facility in Keyes, Calif.; and POET Biorefining’s mid-Missouri plant in Macon. The production stoppages are cutting into ethanol production. The 770,000 gallons per day produced in the last full week of January were the fewest since the U.S. Energy Information Administration began tracking weekly data in June 2010. That’s not much of an issue for consumers, at least for now, because there are plenty of stockpiles of ethanol. Purdue University agriculture economist Chris Hurt said the nation has more than 20 million barrels of ethanol in stock, slightly more than a year ago, largely because Americans are driving less and driving more fuel-efficient cars. Cooper said, though, that stockpiles are expected to dwindle in the spring

Associated Press/Nati Harnik

Ethanol: This Oct. 4, 2012, file photo shows un-harvested corn in a field near Council Bluffs, Iowa. Corn growers had high hopes going into the 2012 planting season but the drought that began last spring hit the corn crop hard. As a result, corn prices skyrocketed and corn has become scarce in some regions, forcing 20 ethanol plants around the country to halt production. Most are not expected to resume production until after 2013 corn is harvested in late August or September.

and summer as demand picks up and plants remain idled. Hurt said the ethanol industry needs an end to the drought, a strong corn crop and a drop in corn prices. Corn futures were $5.51 a bushel in May, before the drought’s impact took hold. Prices rose to a peak of $8.34 per bushel in August and were $7.46 per bushel in early February. “I cannot see any profitability in this industry until we get lower corn prices, and it’s going to take a reasonable-sized U.S. crop,” Hurt said. Officials at the nation’s leading ethanol makers — Archer Daniels Midland and POET — declined to speculate about whether additional plants will close. POET spokesman Matt Merritt said producing ethanol at Macon became cost-prohibitive because of the lack of available Missouri corn, and shipping it in

was simply too expensive. Cooper said most of the idled plants expect to restart production — just not anytime soon. Corn is expected to remain scarce and expensive at least until the 2013 crop is harvested, starting in late August and into September. Cooper believes ethanol production won’t resume at most plants until then. For now, many of the plants remain open with workers doing maintenance or helping to modernize the facilities while they wait for production to resume, Cooper said. Only one of the closed production facilities, an ADM plant in Wallhalla, N.D., may be closed for good, Cooper said. “Generally the industry is optimistic,” Cooper said. “We’re just going through a rough patch here.” Not everyone associated with the industry is that optimistic.

Brian Baalman farms near Menlo, Kan., typically growing 8,000 acres of corn each year. Last year’s crop was about one-third of that. This year, he may plant only the onethird of his acreage where irrigation is available this summer. Like many growers, Baalman has a direct interest in ethanol. He is on the board of Western Plans Energy in Oakley, Kan., and has stock in seven ethanol plants. He said nearrecord prices for corn, driven up by the drought-fueled shortage, are making ethanol production costs too high. “We are burning up all our excess cash just to stay running at a reduced rate to keep people working and keep the people there, keep the lights on, so to speak,” Baalman said. “It’s very tough right now.” “A lot of these ethanol plants aren’t going to make it,” Baalman said.


22

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

Markets Compiled by David B. Strickland, Editor 770-718-3442 dstrickland@poultrytimes.net

Nat’l. Turkey Market:

frozen hens and 16-24 lb. toms was moderate. Frozen Grade A basted equivalent processor offering prices on a national basis for hens was 92-98¢ f.o.b. and 16-24 lb. toms was 92-98¢ f.o.b. for current shipments. No trading was reported. The

(Feb. 12): The market on 8-16 lb. hens and 16-24 lb. toms was generally steady. Fresh and frozen demand was light to moderate. Offerings of

market on turkey breast meat was steady to weak, tenderloins were steady at best, and white trims were steady. Demand on tom breast meat was very light to light, tenderloins and white trims were light to moderate. Offerings of breast meat were moderate to heavy, tenderloins and white trims were light to moderate. The market on tom drums and tails was steady while tom necks and wings were steady to instances weak, mostly steady. Demand was light to moderate. Offerings of tails were light and the balance of tom bulk parts was moderate. The thigh meat market was steady to weak with offering prices unchanged to lower. Demand was light to moderate. Offerings were moderate. The market on mechanically separated turkey was generally steady.

Demand was light to moderate. Offerings were moderate. Trading was light. Export trading was very light on frozen wing meat with skin. The market is steady to weak on thigh meat, balance of items were steady. Export demand was light to moderate.

F owl: Feb. 8: Live spent heavy fowl

Final prices at Farm Buyer Loading (per pound): range 10-22½¢

P arts: Georgia:

The f.o.b. dock quoted prices on ice-pack parts based on truckload and pool truckload lots for the week of Feb. 11: line run tenders $1.89; skinless/boneless

The following chart provides an annual high and a comparison of recent activity of major poultry company stocks.

USDA Shell Eggs AMS weekly combined region shell egg prices Average prices on sales to volume buyers, Grade A or better, White eggs in cartons, delivered warehouse, cents per dozen.

Annual High

Cal-Maine 47.66 Campbell Soup 38.41 ConAgra 33.53 Hormel 35.85 Pilgrim’s Pride 9.33 Sanderson Farms 55.87 Seaboard 2790.00 Tyson 23.90

Feb. 6

N ational Slaughter: Broiler: Estimated slaughter

for week ending Feb. 9 is 153,312,000. Actual slaughter for the week ending Feb. 2 was 151,750,000. Heavy-type hen: Estimated slaughter for the week ending Feb. 9 is 1,530,000. Actual slaughter for the week ending Feb. 2 was 1,492,000. Light-type hen: Estimated slaughter for the week ending Feb. 9 is 1,569,000. Actual slaughter for the week ending Feb. 2 was 1,743,000. Total: Week of Feb. 9: 156,411,000. Week of Feb. 2: 154,985,000.

Broiler/Fryer Report

Industry Stock Report

Company

breasts $1.64; whole breasts $1.06; boneless/skinless thigh meat $1.36; thighs 74¢; drumsticks 72½¢; leg quarters 54¢; wings $1.99½.

Feb. 12

41.62 41.75 37.09 38.26 33.05 33.30 35.54 35.63 8.90 9.16 51.48 52.02 2737.03 2748.00 23.39 23.51

Feb. 8

Extra Large Regions: Northeast 141.50 Southeast 148.50 Midwest 136.50 South Central 148.50 Combined 143.94

Large

Medium

139.00 146.50 134.50 147.50 142.10

112.00 107.00 104.50 110.50 108.57

Computed from simple weekly averages weighted by regional area populations

Grain Prices

USDA National Composite Weighted Average For week of: Feb. 8 For week of: Feb. 1

Majority (whole body) Feb. 8 Eastern Region: 97¢--$1.05 New York: $1.00--$1.06 Central Region: 89¢--98¢ Chicago: 87¢--97¢ Western Region: 98¢--$1.09 Los Angeles: 98¢--$1.09 Negotiated prices in trucklot and less-than-trucklot quantities of ready-to-cook whole body broiler/fryers delivered to first receivers; prices in cents per pound.

Turkey Markets

OHIO COUNTRY ELEV. Jan. 22 Feb. 5 Feb. 12 No. 2 Yellow Corn/bu. $7.52 $7.56 $7.24 Soybeans/bu. $14.35 $14.95 $14.32 (Courtesy: Prospect Farmers Exchange, Prospect, Ohio)

(Courtesy: A.G. Edwards & Sons Inc.)

100.27¢ 99.43¢

Weighted avg. prices for frozen whole young turkeys Weighted average (cents/lb.) F.O.B. shipper dock

Broiler Eggs Set/Chicks Placed in 19 States Ala Ark

Ca,Tn,Wv

Del Fla Ga Ky La Md Miss Mo. N.C. Okla Pa S.C. Tex Va

19 States Total Prev. year % Prev. yr.

EGGS SET (Thousands)

CHICKS PLACED (Thousands)

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

Jan. 26

Feb. 2

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

Jan. 26

Feb. 2

27,683 21,822 10,240 3,415 1,220 31,606 7,255 3,273 7,215 17,073 7,997 19,941 6,929 4,009 5,264 14,451 6,342

27,754 21,756 10,366 3,414 1,222 32,584 7,766 3,273 7,171 16,908 7,715 19,640 6,514 4,033 5,217 14,426 6,323

27,698 21,660 10,392 3,415 1,224 32,754 7,759 3,273 7,237 16,971 7,966 20,106 6,922 3,728 5,661 14,531 6,388

27,912 21,888 10,029 3,415 1,222 32,869 7,779 3,273 7,191 17,031 8,107 19,984 6,963 3,762 5,554 14,726 6,379

21,034 20,390 10,214 4,566 1,536 26,800 6,296 2,957 6,096 14,519 5,382 15,890 4,051 2,964 4,252 11,919 4,835

21,227 21,231 9,306 3,964 1,325 26,886 5,931 2,972 6,713 14,467 5,342 16,130 3,605 2,986 3,954 11,614 4,420

21,022 20,935 9,707 4,776 1,280 26,675 6,656 2,934 5,456 14,208 5,414 16,250 3,437 3,120 3,765 12,097 5,351

21,020 19,916 9,598 3,419 1,384 25,713 6,347 2,941 6,620 14,598 5,655 15,577 4,196 3,304 4,516 12,205 5,247

195,735 193,079

196,082 193,909

197,685 193,924

198,084 193,162

163,701 162,550

162,073 160,522

163,083 160,698

162,256 160,767

101

101

102

103

101

101

101

101

1/Current week as percent of same week last year.

National Week ending Feb. 8 Hens (8-16 lbs.) 95.00 Toms (16-24 lbs.) 95.00

Last year 98.07 98.12

Week ending Feb. 1 Hens (8-16 lbs.) Toms (16-24 lbs.)

Jan. avg. 96.27 96.27

98.00 94.72

Egg Markets USDA quotations New York cartoned del. store-door: Feb. 6 Extra large, down 17¢ $1.31--$1.35 Large, down 17¢ $1.29--$1.33 Medium, down 9¢ $1.03--$1.07 Southeast Regional del. warehouse: Feb. 6 Extra large, down 26½¢ $1.45½--$1.62 Large, down 25¢ $1.43--$1.61 Medium, down 21¢ $1.04½--$1.22

Feb. 12 $1.14--$1.18 $1.12--$1.16 94¢--98¢ Feb. 12 $1.19--$1.53 $1.18--$1.52 83½¢--$1.17


23

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013 Index of Advertisers

AMERICAN EGG BOARD HOTLINE

Advanced Food Technologies, 11.......................................................................................................... 888-702-7786; www.AdvFoodTech.com Agrifan, 2........................................................................................................................................................ 800-236-7080; www.envirofan.com Agri Pro, 12E.....................................................................................................................................................800-648-4696; www.agri-pro.com AgSeal, 12D.......................................................................................................................................................................................870-741-9269 American Proteins, Cover IV, 12G............................................................................................................................ www.americanproteins.com Aviagen North America, Cover L................................................................................................................................................www.aviagen.com Big Dutchman, Cover B.......................................................................................................................... 616-392-5981; www.bigdutchman.com

AEB Hotline appears regularly in Poultry Times and provides an update on programs and services provided for egg producers by the American Egg Board. Details on any item mentioned may be obtained by contacting AEB at 1460 Renaissance Dr., Park Ridge, Ill. 60068. Phone: 847-296-7043.  The Egg Nutrition Center has been actively visiting with researchers to get updates on their findings and to build stronger relationships with the researchers and their institutions. During the last six months, the following ENC staff has performed a site visit with a current ENC research grantee: Drs. Don Layman and Mitch Kanter visited Dr. Sam Klein at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Don Layman visited Drs. Lynn Moore at Boston University and Liz Johnson at Tuft University. Dr. Mitch Kanter visited Dr. Wayne Campbell at Purdue University.  Earlier phases of this research with American Institute of Baking have indicated that Near Infrared (NIR) analysis could be a good predictor of the quality performance of dried egg whites in angel food cake applications. To further test this hypothesis and build on the number of data points used to develop the NIR calibration, AEB decided additional dry egg white samples should be evalu-

ated. Phase 3 will encompass an evaluation from all dried egg white suppliers to help develop a robust calibration. This research will help egg product suppliers deliver egg ingredients that meet food formulators specifications and performance expectations.  While breakfast is the most important meal of the day for consumers who want to start their days off right with the highquality protein of eggs, breakfast has also been the most important meal for restaurant chains. In foodservice, breakfast has outperformed lunch and dinner and remains the bright spot in terms of traffic and sales. There are millions of more egg sales this year versus last with no sign that this trend will abate. Much of those sales have come from newer chains that have adopted breakfast as well as long-time breakfast marketers that have introduced new products . . . everything from Jack in the Box’s Waffle Breakfast Sandwich to Dunkin’ Donuts Egg Sandwich with Hillshire Farm Sausage and its Big and Toasted with two eggs, bacon and cheese. By AEB’s account, there have been more new products during the last 18 months than there were during the three years prior. Breakfast growth and eggs will be a major contributor to those trends.

Binkley & Hurst, 12F.......................................................................................................................................... 888-414-7518; binkleyhurst.com Biomin, 12E...........................................................................................................................................................210-342-9555; www.biomin.net Brown Bear, 12D................................................................................................................................................................................641-322-4220 Chore-Time, Cover G.........................................................................................................................574-658-4101; www.choretimepoultry.com CID Lines, 12F............................................................................................................................................................................www.cidlines.com Continental Agra Equipment, 24...........................................................................................................316-283-9602; www.continentalagra.com Creek View, 14....................................................................................................................................................................................717-445-4922 Cumberland, Cover J.......................................................................................................................217-226-4401; www.cumberlandpoultry.com Danisco, 12B...................................................................................................................314-771-7766; www.danisco.com/animalnutrition.com Detroit Radiant, 12H................................................................................................................................586-756-0950; www.detroitradiant.com Diversified Imports, Cover K......................................................................................................... 800-348-6663; www.dicversifiedimports.com Ecodrum, 12H.................................................................................................................................701-446-6139; 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www.turkeycoops.com Lubing, 12A........................................................................................................................................................................................423-709-1000 Manta-Ray, 9......................................................................................................................................800-252-0276; www.manta-ray-valves.com McNeeley Plastics, 13........................................................................................................................................................................800-433-8407 Merck Animal Health, Covers F, H, & I................................................................................................................................ www.ihc-poultry.com Motomco, Cover III........................................................................................................................................ 800-237-6843; www.motomco.com National Incinerator of Boaz, 12G.................................................................................................. 205-589-6720; www.nationalincinerator.com Once Innovations, Cover J.................................................................................................................. 763-381-5621; www.onceinnovations.com Pakster, 12H ...................................................................................................................................................... 800-367-6549; www.pakster.com Pro Tech, 5................................................................................................................................................... 800-438-1707; www.pro-techinc.com Reeves, Cover II........................................................................................................................................888-854-5221; www.reevessupply.com S&I Pump, 12G..................................................................................................................................................................................610-273-3993 Smithway, 12F....................................................................................................................................................................................828-628-1756 Southwest Agriplastics, Cover E.......................................................................................................................800-288-9748; www.swapinc.com Space-Ray, 10 .................................................................................................................................................. 800-849-7311; www.spaceray.com Star Labs, 12H..................................................................................................................................................800-894-5396; www.primalac.com Taylor Power, 15.........................................................................................................................................800-367-7639; www.taylor power.com United Soybean, Cover A.................................................................................................................................................. www.unitedsoybean.org Weigh Tech, 12C...................................................................................................................................... 800-457-3720; www.weightechinc.com Wells Fargo, Cover C.........................................................................................................................................................................312-781-0726


24

POULTRY TIMES, February 18, 2013

After disasters, Okla. county still struggles against drought The Associated Press

BINGER, Okla. — In the gently rolling hills of Oklahoma ranch country is a place that has seen more than its share of destructive weather — tornadoes, ice storms and floods, year after year, for half of the last decade. In fact, Caddo County has been declared a federal disaster area nine times since 2007, making it one of the nation’s most ill-fated locations. But even here, farmers and ranchers say, no one has endured anything as crippling as the ongoing drought, which has dried out ponds, withered crops in the field and decimated the water table. “It makes you become humble,” said Charlie Optiz, who began his farming career selling peanut seeds in 1959 and grew his operation to more than 2,500 acres near the small town of Binger, about 60 miles west of Oklahoma City. “You realize there’s something out there much greater than you are.” Oklahomans know better than most Americans about the perils of bad weather. Their state practically blew away during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and they live in the heart of tornado alley — a wide corridor in the central United States where twisters are common.

Caddo County has endured all that and more. Its recent history reads like a storm chaser’s logbook or some punishment inflicted by a vengeful god. The area was hit by no fewer than five federal disasters in 2007 alone, including ice storms, violent winds, tornadoes and flooding. Then the county suffered a disaster each year for the next four, including more tornadoes and flooding in 2008, a blizzard in 2009, another ice storm in 2010 and tornadoes and flooding again in 2011. By comparison, the county suffered only five federal disasters during the entire decade of the 1990s. Now comes the drought, a ceaseless dry spell that began last summer and could persist through much of 2013. Rainfall totals for 2012 were more than 10 inches below normal, and the two-year total of 51 inches is the fourth-lowest since record keeping began in 1895, according to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. A few scattered showers have brought much-needed rain to the region recently, but the entire county remains locked in extreme drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, a government service. Karen Krehbiel, who raises sheep

AP Photo/Sean Murphy

Oklahoma drought: Caddo County, Okla., farmer Karen Krehbiel is seen in this Dec. 11, 2012, photo examining unharvested milo on her family’s farm near Hydro, Okla. Not all of the farm’s milo fields were irrigated because of an ongoing drought, the latest natural disaster to strike the county, which also has been beset in recent years by floods, tornadoes, ice storms and hail.

and grows wheat and milo near Hinton, said her farm’s utility expenses more than doubled from about $15,000 in 2010 to $33,000 in 2012, mostly because of increased costs to irrigate parched fields. Sheep that traditionally would graze on pasture land must be fed hay, making the operation still more expensive. “Because it was so hot and dry, even running irrigation all day, you couldn’t produce enough water,” said Krehbiel, who had to let 30 acres of alfalfa die in the field because she couldn’t afford to irrigate it. A pond on Krehbiel’s property still hasn’t returned to normal since the 2007 flood burst a dam and sent the pond gushing downstream. And an apple, pear and peach orchard near her in-law’s home still bears the scars of an ice storm that took out dozens of trees.

Cattle rancher Scott Brower said the drought is easily the worst natural disaster he’s experienced. Even during the ice storm, his ranch was calving 100 heifers. But the drought “gets old in a hurry,” he said, citing the challenge of hauling a thousand gallons of water at a time out to pasture. Opitz said much of the land that he and his sons work is still recovering from the 2007 flood that sent the nearby Sugar Creek out of its banks. “This whole valley was underwater, from hill to hill,” said Opitz, whose grandfather started a grain elevator in Binger in 1903. The family had to buy a bulldozer to repair all the ponds that were washed away, and the fields where they grow wheat and other crops still have deep gulleys carved into

them as a result of the flooding. If the drought doesn’t break soon, valuable grazing grass could die. “It will put several producers out of business,” Opitz said. “That’s not just speculation. That’s a fact.” Across Oklahoma, the costs for various types of insurance — homeowners, automobile and crop — are going up because of the state’s proclivity for disasters. The higher rates are “the result of the exposures that exist here,” said John Wiscaver, a spokesman for Oklahoma Farm Bureau Insurance. As for Brower, he tries to stay upbeat and wait for relief that’s bound to come, eventually. “You just do the best you can do every day and hope it gets better,” he said. “We’ll get some moisture sooner or later. It will be our turn.”


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Randall Smith


Poultry Times February 18 2013 Edition