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A watchdog for the Temple University

2013 Region One Winner: Best All-Around Non-Daily student newspaper

community since 1921.

temple-news.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

VOL. 93 ISS. 7

Deceased student honored by hundreds A student on medical leave was found dead in New York after going missing last week. GRACE HOLLERAN The Temple News Early last week, Miles Applebaum, a Temple student on medical leave, left his family home in Armonk, New York to go to work. “He said, ‘Goodbye, I’m going to work. I love you,’” his father, Ed Applebaum, told the

He didn’t return that night for dinner. His distraught family conducted a search for its missing son. On Oct. 3, the Westchester County Medical Examiner’s

in New Castle, New York was Miles’. While the cause of his death has yet to be determined, Westchester County police told

the Inquirer there were no signs of foul play. Miles, 21, suffered from clinical depression and suicidal thoughts, his father said. Miles was a junior jazz studies major with a guitar concentration at the Boyer College of Music. His funeral was held on Sunday at Congregation B’nai Yisrael in Armonk, New York. A jazz combo played some of Miles’ favorite tunes as more gogue.

Family and friends shared condolences, but they also shared Miles’ poems, music and laughter. Miles’ family said he had been creatively inclined his whole life. “Music is the cure,” Stanley Applebaum, Miles’ grandfather, read at the funeral. The line came from one of Miles’ original poems. Miles studied at the Lagond Music School in Elmsford, New York prior to his arrival at

APPLEBAUM PAGE 6

IN NEW CLASS, A TRIP THROUGH TIME The Wagner Free Institute of Science expanded its reach by offering a history class to students this fall.

VIA FACEBOOK

Miles Applebaum was a junior jazz studies major at Temple.

Sexual assault to be addressed with new committee The new group is set to create a final list of recommendations by the end of this year. MARCUS MCCARTHY News Editor On Friday, the university announced a committee aimed to address sexual misconduct at mittee on Campus Sexual Misconduct, which began meeting last month, will explore three parts of the issue: students’ perceptions of the issue, a review of current policies and procedures, along with exploring best practices from other institutions. A university spokesman term “sexual misconducts” encompasses a broad scope, sexual assaults will be included in the discussion. When asked what crimes fall under the term, Dean of Stu-

KARA MILSTEIN TTN

A student enrolled in Museum Studies: Curating Authenticity takes notes while exploring the Wagner Museum.

ANGELA GERVASI The Temple News

dents and committee member Stephanie Ives cited sections of the Student Conduct Code that include policies on sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. The policy was reviewed last week. The committee currently consists of nine administrators and professors, three students and an additional three administrative assistants from various colleges and departments in the university. Laura Siminoff, dean of sions and Social Work and chair of the new committee, said she was approached for the position in late August and began meeting with members last month. Ives said the committee’s

COMMITTEE PAGE 6

City marijuana law creates legal limbo

T

With universities receiving federal funding, marijuana enforcement remains ambiguous.

museum is now a Temple classroom.

regarding marijuana possession take effect Oct. 20. Last month, City Council voted to downgrade possession of 30 grams of the drug or less to a summary offense, which essentially acts

he Wagner Free Institute of Science does not possess

or the colossal presence of The Franklin Institute. Instead, the museum is tucked quietly away between the apartments at 17th and Montgomery streets – just a few blocks away from the center of Main Campus. This semester, The Wagner and Temple came together in a

BOB STEWART The Temple News

a combination of undergraduate and graduate courses that focus art and culture. KARA MILSTEIN TTN

WAGNER PAGE 14

The Wagner is home to hundreds of historical artifacts.

Athletic scholarships extend into summer This year’s sports cuts freed funding for the expansion of student-athlete scholarships. EJ SMITH Sports Editor Temple administration has extended one-year athletic scholarships into the summer, allowing student athletes to take classes while training in the summer. The move was made in attempt to bol-

ster the amount of student athletes capable of graduating in four years in line with the university’s “Fly in 4” program. In response to the money freed after December’s sports cuts, the athletic budget now has the space to provide the extended scholarships. The summer school possibilities add to the already advantageous academic opportunities for Temple athletes, who have already been granted prioritized scheduling as well as exclusive advisors. “Our goal is to make sure our kids

NEWS - PAGES 2-3, 6

LIFESTYLE - PAGES 7-8, 14-16

A year after the school closures

A passion for business and art

Following increased enrollment at the nearby Tanner Duckrey School, staff and students have settled into their “new home.” PAGE 2

Art of Business, Business of Art brings students with similar passions together. PAGE 7

OPINION - PAGES 4-5 Shredding the patriarchy

said. “If we can do it in a four-year bundle, that’s good for everybody.” The full-year scholarships are also exsituation for athletes who participate in fall sports. Many fall athletes spend summers on Main Campus training for the upcoming seasons, and with the new scholarships they can now take classes while training. Women’s soccer coach Seamus

SCHOLARSHIPS PAGE 6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT - PAGES 9-13 The Battle of the Badges was held in Philadelphia in honor of Moses Walker Jr. PAGE 9

violation. On Sept. 18, the day the council passed the

added to the employee manual. The update brought the university into compliance with the Safe and Drug-Free School and Communities Act. But before it passed, one trustee asked if the language would need to be amended due to the city’s new stance. After a friendly back-and-forth between the committee members, Chair-

“...On the

O’Connor pointed out the city had not actually legalized of the leganything, islation, the they just Executive changed the Committee penalty. The of Temple’s Committee Board of James Kenney / city councilman approved the Trustees met. update unanimously. One order of business was to Colleges receiving federal update the existing drug and funding are treading lightly due alcohol policy, which needed

Philadelphia end, we won’t follow through if they bring someone to us [for this issue].

additional language on health risks and criminal penalties

MARIJUANA PAGE 3

SPORTS - PAGES 17-20


NEWS

PAGE 2

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

After closures, school adjusts The staff at Tanner G. Duckrey saw the school’s student body size double. MARIAM DEMBELE The Temple News

A

fter the move from the M. Hall Stanton school to Tanner G. Duckrey school, noontime aide Theresa Addison helped her students make their new school their own. “There’s no place like home, but this is our new home,” Addison reminded them. Hundreds of students from Stanton, a K-8 school near 16th and Cumhalls of Duckrey last September after their school was set to be closed. Addison said that initially, the Stanton students’ behavior was somethey could be sent back to their previous school. “They thought in a sense it was temporary,” Addison said. “They didn’t After the closing, her future fell into uncertainty. “At that point I didn’t have a job,” Addison said. “It was up in the air, we had got laid off and everything, then we had the option to pick in August.” She chose to follow her students to Duckrey, to serve as a constant for them during the transition. As someone who was going through the same process herself, Addison said she was able to understand what they were experiencing and provide guidance. After students from other neighborhood schools also joined the student body, Duckrey’s enrollment increased to 590 students. A little more than a year ago, the K-8 school on Diamond Street served 281 students.

-

and started at new schools this year. Now, a year after the merge, students and staff are adjusting to the change. year, it was a little hard,” said Veronica Cronin, dean of students at Duckrey and former teacher at Stanton. “This year has started off much better because we looked at things that maybe we should have done last year; we have a new principal, we do have new staff members, so things are starting out on a very positive step.” Originally, Stanton was to remain open and Duckrey was scheduled to for some students. “It was a battle, like, ‘It should have been here instead of there,’” Addison said. Now, Addison and Cronin said attitudes have improved and the divide between the students from different schools has faded. “They used to every now and then [ask], ‘Do you want to go back?’” Addison said. “They don’t ask that anymore. They know we’re here. Questions have ended. They’re adapting.” “I think last year some people were just resistant to the change,” Cronin said. “But this year we’re all one family, we’re all Duckrey, we all go to the same school, we all support each other.” Overall, Cronin and Addison said they believed the change was for the better. “I think [the merging of the schools] was a good thing and I think now, the second year, we’re actually starting to see all the good that came out of the change,” Cronin said.

ALISA MILLER TTN

Alana Buckner (top) waits outside of the Tanner Duckrey Elementary School with her daughter. Parents pick up their children from Tanner G. Duckrey after the school day on Wednesday.

As for resources and staff, Cronin said as with all the schools in the district, they could use more. “We only have a nurse two days a week which is horrible,” Cronin said. With many of the lower-grade-level classrooms at almost maximum casaid she would like to see additional classroom assistance for students who need more individualized teaching. “That’s everybody in the district, that’s straight across the board,” Cronin said, referring to the district’s budget problems.

after the school closings. On Sept. 24, a $2 cigarette tax was passed to generate revenue for the school district and avoid further staff layoffs. Takia Mainor, a parent and employee at Brightside Academy, said she feared the quality of education might suffer with the increases in enrollment. She also worried about the safety of students as they walked to schools which were farther away. “I feel bad for the students having to walk so far with the streets not being

so good,” Mainor said. Mainor said her concern arose from the safety issues within the area and the possibility of overcrowding in the school. Marvadien Buckner, a parent who has two children attending Duckrey, said although there are many students at the school, she believes her children are receiving a good education there. “They amaze me,” Buckner said of her children.

T

mariam.dembele@temple.edu @MariamDembele

Sexual assault prevention stressed in new Clery report The annual report showed a rise in sexual offenses and a drop in burglaries. CINDY STANSBURY The Temple News al Security and Fire Safety Report was released to students, faculty and staff. The report, which is sent out each year via email, is a requirement of the federal Jeanne Clery Act, which regulates crime reporting for higher education institutions. Inside the 49-page report, univer-

safety information and resources for students. Last year, there were eight sex

offenses on Main Campus, all in residence halls. Two more took place off campus, and one was on public property. In 2012, there was one sex offense listed: a forcible rape which took place in a residence hall. In the past two years included in the report, there were no hate crimes reported, but two hate crimes based on sexual orientation were reported in There was also a decline in burglaries from 2012, when there were 27. Executive Director of Campus Safety Services Charlie Leone said this year’s report contained new sections regarding policies geared toward awareness for and prevention of sexual violence as a result of new regulations laid out in the Violence Against Women also added statistics related to stalking, domestic violence and dating violence.

VAWA was signed into law by and under its Campus Sexual Violence Act provision imposes new regulations for universities and colleges regarding their policies on sexual violence. “So, there is a whole section in there about preventing sexual assault and domestic violence, dating violence, our policy statement, the resources that are out there as well as more importantly how to report it – whether you want to do formal or informal reporting,” Leone said. “So we have it broken down pretty nicely in there.” VAWA also added additional hate report including gender identity and national origin. Senior psychology major Stacy Finnegan expressed a belief that these new additions brought on by VAWA will open up a more truthful conversation about sexual violence as well as

relationship violence. “I would not put my faith in the school based on ways I’ve seen situations [involving sexual assault] handled,” Finnegan said. “All that being said, I do believe that them making sure this information is available to everyone is a good step.” Morgan Baker, a senior advertising major, also acknowledged the need for the VAWA requirements. “I guess it’s not always easy to know what to do when [a sexual assault] happens,” she said. Both Baker and Finnegan said report and were previously unaware of its existence. “I saw that I got it,” Baker said. “But, then I deleted the email and didn’t read it.” “It seemed like it would only say

tion,” said Finnegan, who added she is now more inclined to read the report after hearing of the VAWA additions. Anticipating the needs of the students, Leone explained CSS is consistently working to break down the information found in the report into formats that are easier for the campus community to digest, like brochures or pamphlets. “I think the spirit of the law is good and you want to get the information out to everyone,” Leone said. “But I think what we try to do is take some of the salient points, so to speak.” The Fire and Safety Report can be found on the university’s CSS website. cindy.stansbury@temple.edu Joe Brandt contributed reporting.

I had no idea it include crime informa-

New restaurants welcomed by administration as part of plan University officials said they want to add more businesses to the area.

The number of businesses has recently increased in the Temple area, with the additions of a Chipotle Mexican Grill at the base of The View at Montgomery, Tropical Smoothie Cafe

the university to build a framework for future growth and renovations. “They’re services that haven’t been there before,” Rich Rumer, associate vice president for Business Services, said of the new businesses. “We work closely with City Council and the community to try and do anything that enhances the campus and, at the same time, enhances the community in which we live.” struction, Facilities and Operations Jim Creedon said Visualize Temple is

Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Adding businesses to the Main Campus area is one small part of Visualize Temple, a university-wide initiative which outlines the “master plan” for Temple’s campuses. This long-term plan is a comprehensive overview for

campus.” New businesses like Chipotle create “a certain dynamic at street level,” Creedon said. “[They help] with safety and [make] campus more vibrant,” he added.

LIAN PARSONS The Temple News

NEWS DESK 215-204-7419

Gonigle Halls is a product of Visualize Temple. There are also two retail spaces in Montgomery Avenue Garage on 11th Street. One of the two is leased to a private company and will become a Sage Cafe. Creedon said there are plans to add a sportswear store to the second retail space. Rumer said he was one of the senior administrators responsible for bringing retail locations like Barnes & Noble, Saxbys Coffee and 7-Eleven to campus. “I think it’s important that we have certain amenities that both our students, faculty, staff, visitors, and folks from the community can expect,” Rumer said. Rumer also said during the past 20 years, Temple has shifted from being a

commuter school to a more residential campus. “What that’s done is created a need for a lot of these types of amenities,” Rumer said. With increased retail options on Main Campus comes greater variety. Ray Smeriglio, student body president, said more options will be attractive to prospective students as well as current students. “[It will] create more of a town atmosphere around campus and encourage students to stay on campus throughout the weekend,” Smeriglio said. A Chipotle representative could not be reached for comment on the expansion of businesses on or near campus, but Rumer said a goal is to employ people mostly from near Main Campus.

NEWS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

“We’ve had an emphasis on trying areas around the campus for quite some time,” Rumer said. “We’re trying to continue that endeavor.” New businesses in the Temple area will also be part of and in close proximity to the surrounding communities. However, Smeriglio believes infringing on the community is not a potential issue. “Where the businesses are going, they’re already in areas where Temple has a strong hold,” Smeriglio said. “I don’t see businesses … taking away space from the community – rather, here.”

T

lian.parsons@temple.edu @Lian_Parsons


NEWS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

PAGE 3

After complaints, new direction for offices The task force focused on customer service in six offices. JOE BRANDT Assistant News Editor Temple announced last week the implementation of a plan for enhanced customer

Student Financial Services and Facilities Management. Launching the plan includes more user-friendly websites, a set of customer service guidelines for Temple employees to follow and a call

questions. formed a task force of 20 faculty and staff members to change customer service after hearing complaints about it. The task force hired a team of MBA students from the Fox School of Business’ Enterprise Management Conproblem areas. “The goal was really to identify systemic issues,” said Ken Kaiser, a co-chair of the task force and the university’s surer. Though the plan focuses ser said administrators were already seeking better customer service for SFS and the Bursar’s plemented. “That was an area that we pretty much focused on the individual departments,” he said, adding that with the customer service initiative the two projects “just happened to dovetail nicely.” The two departments received numerous complaints from parents about calling one

AARON WINDHORST TTN

Students wait

being answered. Tammy Dinh, a sophomore kinesiology major, said when she had a question about her tuition balance, she tried reaching SFS by phone after leaving going to waste my entire day in there,” she said. Dinh said she called once and was placed on hold for 20 minutes before giving up, but dealt with the same problem the next day. Bursar David Glezerman said many parents and students who don’t get an answer call again or send an email instead,

MARIJUANA comment directly, but issued a statement through a spokesman. Temple’s statement pointed out the student policy, which mirrors the employee policy, has not changed. “Temple University students will have the same level of responsibility for their behavior under the Student Conduct Code, including the existing minimum mandatory sanctions if students are found responsible for alcohol and drug violations,” the spokesman said. -

putting more pressure on the employees. Many had simple questions, and those answers were already available online. “Even if you have online access, you might still have questions,” Glezerman said. Staff in the call center will dents and parents and will free up the specialists working in the “During peak hours, I’d have to put two or three people on phones, but now they’re free,” Glezerman said. Glezerman said only about 8 percent of the calls handled

and intends to follow the lead of the ing and protocol to enforce the new law as best as possible.” plans to adjust its enforcement policy when the law takes effect. cently made it clear it will still enforce a marijuana ban on their campus for students, regardless of changes to local laws. Its administration cited federal funding issues. City Councilman James Kenney, who sponsored the decriminalization legislation, said the old law disproportionately affected African Americans and younger people. This was often the case in areas surrounding Temple and

of a request. In the past, faculty would submit maintenance requests and then submit additional requests because they

“Something you work into a process, it does a lot for a customer,” he said. Reiter, who is also an adjunct accounting professor, said he plans to discuss the policy with his students.

T

jbrandt@temple.edu 215.204.1020 @JBrandt_TU

as black. “Technically [university police] have the authority to arrest people,”

A doctor at Fox Chase Cancer Center recently presented his findings.

end, we won’t follow through if they bring someone to us [for this issue].” He said this will free up law en-

possession of marijuana they need to process that substance right away,” said “They can’t keep it in their pocket until the end of their shift. So it will still take the same amount of time.” Councilman Kenney has advice for

new regulations go into effect. “The key for students is to have your ID and show it when requested,” Kenney said. “[The police] have a right Beyond that, demeanor may go a long way. “Be polite in your interaction with anything, but they have a job to do.” Ultimately though, it may be more about not tempting fate. “Keep it in your dorm room or apartment,” Kenney said. “Nobody bothers you indoors.” robert.stewart@temple.edu

The 22nd district, which includes Main Campus, had 108 arrests for mari-

struction, Facilities and Operations who served on the EMC team, said a systemic issue was

were not sure if the original went through. Reiter said there is now an automated email response that

For some throat cancer patients, neck surgery may not be needed

time saving.

reduce penalties for some marijuanarelated offenses is a complicated issue involving differences in local, state and federal laws,” the spokesman said.

lobby was as high as three hours two years ago, but wait times

now average an hour. Last year, he said, documents submitted in August might not be looked over until November. “This year we are nearly caught up and are addressing documents as they are submitted,” Fennell said.

recorded 70 arrests. Each district covers between roughly 44,000 to 48,0000 thousand people under the age of 44, according to data from the US Census Bureau. The majority of people arrested were black males with the median age being 25. Eleven of the arrests in the 22nd district were females, all black. Six

caught smoking marijuana in a public ject to community service. The offender when they are cited. If not, they can be arrested.

by the call center are complex enough that his staff need to take over, and most calls are between three and four minutes long. One of the most common questions, “How much is Temple tuition?” can now also be answered online with a tuition calculator that shows the variations between schools. Craig Fennell, the directablished a call center last year that is staffed by 25 students working part time. Fennell said

KAYLA OATNEAL The Temple News A study conducted by researchers from Temple’s Fox Chase Cancer Center found that patients with ynx, a part of the throat, are easier to treat than those with cancer in the Findings were presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 56th Annual Meeting on Sept. 17. Dr. Thomas Galloway, the attending physician and director of Clinical Research at FCCC, became the lead author of the study, and further investigated how many patients received neck surgeries after being treated for throat cancer, and whether or not these surgeries were necessary. “What my study showed was cant prognostic variable for patients with oropharynx cancer,” Galloway said. “When you develop cancer from it, it seems to be very curable. It’s interesting, we do much better treating it than we do treating traditional oropharynx cancer.” The study was a second analysis of a larger national trial, called RTOG129, conducted between 2002 and 2005, which sought various ways to treat head and neck cancers.

“What I did was analysis of something that wasn’t analyzed in the primary endpoint,” Galloway said. He said he wanted to answer the question, “How many of the patients after the treatment received neck surgery?” During analysis, Galloway and his colleagues reviewed the medical records of throat cancer patients. Head and neck cancer patients who have swollen lymph nodes are often treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy for between six and seven weeks, rather than undergoing extensive surgery. If a lymph node persists in swelling after treatment, a patient can undergo a neck dissection surgery to have the “lump” removed. Following radiation and chemotherapy treatments, only one-third of these patients underwent neck surgery to remove any persistent lumps. “The reason we want to limit surgeries is because we know that, of those surgeries we perform, the bump that is there is actually dead to cancer,” Galloway said. ing cervical cancer in females, is increasingly listed as the cause of throat cancers, which in the past were often associated with excessive use of alcohol and tobacco. According to the Center for Dis70 percent of throat cancers were study demonstrated higher levels of pathological complete response in

pharyngeal cancers. Although studies are emerg-

tion is not currently a factor when making the decision on whether or not to proceed with a neck surgery. as a factor, which contributes to the effectiveness of treatment, Galby future studies, will lead to fewer unnecessary neck surgeries. In addition, he hopes to one day provide less toxic treatments when treating ciated oropharyngeal cancers. “If you’re curing most patients relatively well, we ask ourselves, ‘Are we treating it too much?’” Galloway said. “‘Could we still be curing it 100 percent with giving it 15 percent less dosages?’ If you get less, your side effects are less. The worry is side effects, but we still have to cure the cancer.” Galloway also revealed that FCCC has already opened trials examining less toxic and extensive ways to treat these forms of cancer, which include surgery and “de-in-

kayla.oatneal@temple.edu


NEWS

PAGE 2

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

After closures, school adjusts The staff at Tanner G. Duckrey saw the school’s student body size double. MARIAM DEMBELE The Temple News

A

fter the move from the M. Hall Stanton school to Tanner G. Duckrey school, noontime aide Theresa Addison helped her students make their new school their own. “There’s no place like home, but this is our new home,” Addison reminded them. Hundreds of students from Stanton, a K-8 school near 16th and Cumhalls of Duckrey last September after their school was set to be closed. Addison said that initially, the Stanton students’ behavior was somethey could be sent back to their previous school. “They thought in a sense it was temporary,” Addison said. “They didn’t After the closing, her future fell into uncertainty. “At that point I didn’t have a job,” Addison said. “It was up in the air, we had got laid off and everything, then we had the option to pick in August.” She chose to follow her students to Duckrey, to serve as a constant for them during the transition. As someone who was going through the same process herself, Addison said she was able to understand what they were experiencing and provide guidance. After students from other neighborhood schools also joined the student body, Duckrey’s enrollment increased to 590 students. A little more than a year ago, the K-8 school on Diamond Street served 281 students.

-

and started at new schools this year. Now, a year after the merge, students and staff are adjusting to the change. year, it was a little hard,” said Veronica Cronin, dean of students at Duckrey and former teacher at Stanton. “This year has started off much better because we looked at things that maybe we should have done last year; we have a new principal, we do have new staff members, so things are starting out on a very positive step.” Originally, Stanton was to remain open and Duckrey was scheduled to for some students. “It was a battle, like, ‘It should have been here instead of there,’” Addison said. Now, Addison and Cronin said attitudes have improved and the divide between the students from different schools has faded. “They used to every now and then [ask], ‘Do you want to go back?’” Addison said. “They don’t ask that anymore. They know we’re here. Questions have ended. They’re adapting.” “I think last year some people were just resistant to the change,” Cronin said. “But this year we’re all one family, we’re all Duckrey, we all go to the same school, we all support each other.” Overall, Cronin and Addison said they believed the change was for the better. “I think [the merging of the schools] was a good thing and I think now, the second year, we’re actually starting to see all the good that came out of the change,” Cronin said.

ALISA MILLER TTN

Alana Buckner (top) waits outside of the Tanner Duckrey Elementary School with her daughter. Parents pick up their children from Tanner G. Duckrey after the school day on Wednesday.

As for resources and staff, Cronin said as with all the schools in the district, they could use more. “We only have a nurse two days a week which is horrible,” Cronin said. With many of the lower-grade-level classrooms at almost maximum casaid she would like to see additional classroom assistance for students who need more individualized teaching. “That’s everybody in the district, that’s straight across the board,” Cronin said, referring to the district’s budget problems.

after the school closings. On Sept. 24, a $2 cigarette tax was passed to generate revenue for the school district and avoid further staff layoffs. Takia Mainor, a parent and employee at Brightside Academy, said she feared the quality of education might suffer with the increases in enrollment. She also worried about the safety of students as they walked to schools which were farther away. “I feel bad for the students having to walk so far with the streets not being

so good,” Mainor said. Mainor said her concern arose from the safety issues within the area and the possibility of overcrowding in the school. Marvadien Buckner, a parent who has two children attending Duckrey, said although there are many students at the school, she believes her children are receiving a good education there. “They amaze me,” Buckner said of her children.

T

mariam.dembele@temple.edu @MariamDembele

Sexual assault prevention stressed in new Clery report The annual report showed a rise in sexual offenses and a drop in burglaries. CINDY STANSBURY The Temple News al Security and Fire Safety Report was released to students, faculty and staff. The report, which is sent out each year via email, is a requirement of the federal Jeanne Clery Act, which regulates crime reporting for higher education institutions. Inside the 49-page report, univer-

safety information and resources for students. Last year, there were eight sex

offenses on Main Campus, all in residence halls. Two more took place off campus, and one was on public property. In 2012, there was one sex offense listed: a forcible rape which took place in a residence hall. In the past two years included in the report, there were no hate crimes reported, but two hate crimes based on sexual orientation were reported in There was also a decline in burglaries from 2012, when there were 27. Executive Director of Campus Safety Services Charlie Leone said this year’s report contained new sections regarding policies geared toward awareness for and prevention of sexual violence as a result of new regulations laid out in the Violence Against Women also added statistics related to stalking, domestic violence and dating violence.

VAWA was signed into law by and under its Campus Sexual Violence Act provision imposes new regulations for universities and colleges regarding their policies on sexual violence. “So, there is a whole section in there about preventing sexual assault and domestic violence, dating violence, our policy statement, the resources that are out there as well as more importantly how to report it – whether you want to do formal or informal reporting,” Leone said. “So we have it broken down pretty nicely in there.” VAWA also added additional hate report including gender identity and national origin. Senior psychology major Stacy Finnegan expressed a belief that these new additions brought on by VAWA will open up a more truthful conversation about sexual violence as well as

relationship violence. “I would not put my faith in the school based on ways I’ve seen situations [involving sexual assault] handled,” Finnegan said. “All that being said, I do believe that them making sure this information is available to everyone is a good step.” Morgan Baker, a senior advertising major, also acknowledged the need for the VAWA requirements. “I guess it’s not always easy to know what to do when [a sexual assault] happens,” she said. Both Baker and Finnegan said report and were previously unaware of its existence. “I saw that I got it,” Baker said. “But, then I deleted the email and didn’t read it.” “It seemed like it would only say

tion,” said Finnegan, who added she is now more inclined to read the report after hearing of the VAWA additions. Anticipating the needs of the students, Leone explained CSS is consistently working to break down the information found in the report into formats that are easier for the campus community to digest, like brochures or pamphlets. “I think the spirit of the law is good and you want to get the information out to everyone,” Leone said. “But I think what we try to do is take some of the salient points, so to speak.” The Fire and Safety Report can be found on the university’s CSS website. cindy.stansbury@temple.edu Joe Brandt contributed reporting.

I had no idea it include crime informa-

New restaurants welcomed by administration as part of plan University officials said they want to add more businesses to the area.

The number of businesses has recently increased in the Temple area, with the additions of a Chipotle Mexican Grill at the base of The View at Montgomery, Tropical Smoothie Cafe

the university to build a framework for future growth and renovations. “They’re services that haven’t been there before,” Rich Rumer, associate vice president for Business Services, said of the new businesses. “We work closely with City Council and the community to try and do anything that enhances the campus and, at the same time, enhances the community in which we live.” struction, Facilities and Operations Jim Creedon said Visualize Temple is

Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Adding businesses to the Main Campus area is one small part of Visualize Temple, a university-wide initiative which outlines the “master plan” for Temple’s campuses. This long-term plan is a comprehensive overview for

campus.” New businesses like Chipotle create “a certain dynamic at street level,” Creedon said. “[They help] with safety and [make] campus more vibrant,” he added.

LIAN PARSONS The Temple News

NEWS DESK 215-204-7419

Gonigle Halls is a product of Visualize Temple. There are also two retail spaces in Montgomery Avenue Garage on 11th Street. One of the two is leased to a private company and will become a Sage Cafe. Creedon said there are plans to add a sportswear store to the second retail space. Rumer said he was one of the senior administrators responsible for bringing retail locations like Barnes & Noble, Saxbys Coffee and 7-Eleven to campus. “I think it’s important that we have certain amenities that both our students, faculty, staff, visitors, and folks from the community can expect,” Rumer said. Rumer also said during the past 20 years, Temple has shifted from being a

commuter school to a more residential campus. “What that’s done is created a need for a lot of these types of amenities,” Rumer said. With increased retail options on Main Campus comes greater variety. Ray Smeriglio, student body president, said more options will be attractive to prospective students as well as current students. “[It will] create more of a town atmosphere around campus and encourage students to stay on campus throughout the weekend,” Smeriglio said. A Chipotle representative could not be reached for comment on the expansion of businesses on or near campus, but Rumer said a goal is to employ people mostly from near Main Campus.

NEWS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

“We’ve had an emphasis on trying areas around the campus for quite some time,” Rumer said. “We’re trying to continue that endeavor.” New businesses in the Temple area will also be part of and in close proximity to the surrounding communities. However, Smeriglio believes infringing on the community is not a potential issue. “Where the businesses are going, they’re already in areas where Temple has a strong hold,” Smeriglio said. “I don’t see businesses … taking away space from the community – rather, here.”

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lian.parsons@temple.edu @Lian_Parsons


NEWS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

PAGE 3

After complaints, new direction for offices The task force focused on customer service in six offices. JOE BRANDT Assistant News Editor Temple announced last week the implementation of a plan for enhanced customer

Student Financial Services and Facilities Management. Launching the plan includes more user-friendly websites, a set of customer service guidelines for Temple employees to follow and a call

questions. formed a task force of 20 faculty and staff members to change customer service after hearing complaints about it. The task force hired a team of MBA students from the Fox School of Business’ Enterprise Management Conproblem areas. “The goal was really to identify systemic issues,” said Ken Kaiser, a co-chair of the task force and the university’s surer. Though the plan focuses ser said administrators were already seeking better customer service for SFS and the Bursar’s plemented. “That was an area that we pretty much focused on the individual departments,” he said, adding that with the customer service initiative the two projects “just happened to dovetail nicely.” The two departments received numerous complaints from parents about calling one

AARON WINDHORST TTN

Students wait

being answered. Tammy Dinh, a sophomore kinesiology major, said when she had a question about her tuition balance, she tried reaching SFS by phone after leaving going to waste my entire day in there,” she said. Dinh said she called once and was placed on hold for 20 minutes before giving up, but dealt with the same problem the next day. Bursar David Glezerman said many parents and students who don’t get an answer call again or send an email instead,

MARIJUANA comment directly, but issued a statement through a spokesman. Temple’s statement pointed out the student policy, which mirrors the employee policy, has not changed. “Temple University students will have the same level of responsibility for their behavior under the Student Conduct Code, including the existing minimum mandatory sanctions if students are found responsible for alcohol and drug violations,” the spokesman said. -

putting more pressure on the employees. Many had simple questions, and those answers were already available online. “Even if you have online access, you might still have questions,” Glezerman said. Staff in the call center will dents and parents and will free up the specialists working in the “During peak hours, I’d have to put two or three people on phones, but now they’re free,” Glezerman said. Glezerman said only about 8 percent of the calls handled

and intends to follow the lead of the ing and protocol to enforce the new law as best as possible.” plans to adjust its enforcement policy when the law takes effect. cently made it clear it will still enforce a marijuana ban on their campus for students, regardless of changes to local laws. Its administration cited federal funding issues. City Councilman James Kenney, who sponsored the decriminalization legislation, said the old law disproportionately affected African Americans and younger people. This was often the case in areas surrounding Temple and

of a request. In the past, faculty would submit maintenance requests and then submit additional requests because they

“Something you work into a process, it does a lot for a customer,” he said. Reiter, who is also an adjunct accounting professor, said he plans to discuss the policy with his students.

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jbrandt@temple.edu 215.204.1020 @JBrandt_TU

as black. “Technically [university police] have the authority to arrest people,”

A doctor at Fox Chase Cancer Center recently presented his findings.

end, we won’t follow through if they bring someone to us [for this issue].” He said this will free up law en-

possession of marijuana they need to process that substance right away,” said “They can’t keep it in their pocket until the end of their shift. So it will still take the same amount of time.” Councilman Kenney has advice for

new regulations go into effect. “The key for students is to have your ID and show it when requested,” Kenney said. “[The police] have a right Beyond that, demeanor may go a long way. “Be polite in your interaction with anything, but they have a job to do.” Ultimately though, it may be more about not tempting fate. “Keep it in your dorm room or apartment,” Kenney said. “Nobody bothers you indoors.” robert.stewart@temple.edu

The 22nd district, which includes Main Campus, had 108 arrests for mari-

struction, Facilities and Operations who served on the EMC team, said a systemic issue was

were not sure if the original went through. Reiter said there is now an automated email response that

For some throat cancer patients, neck surgery may not be needed

time saving.

reduce penalties for some marijuanarelated offenses is a complicated issue involving differences in local, state and federal laws,” the spokesman said.

lobby was as high as three hours two years ago, but wait times

now average an hour. Last year, he said, documents submitted in August might not be looked over until November. “This year we are nearly caught up and are addressing documents as they are submitted,” Fennell said.

recorded 70 arrests. Each district covers between roughly 44,000 to 48,0000 thousand people under the age of 44, according to data from the US Census Bureau. The majority of people arrested were black males with the median age being 25. Eleven of the arrests in the 22nd district were females, all black. Six

caught smoking marijuana in a public ject to community service. The offender when they are cited. If not, they can be arrested.

by the call center are complex enough that his staff need to take over, and most calls are between three and four minutes long. One of the most common questions, “How much is Temple tuition?” can now also be answered online with a tuition calculator that shows the variations between schools. Craig Fennell, the directablished a call center last year that is staffed by 25 students working part time. Fennell said

KAYLA OATNEAL The Temple News A study conducted by researchers from Temple’s Fox Chase Cancer Center found that patients with ynx, a part of the throat, are easier to treat than those with cancer in the Findings were presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 56th Annual Meeting on Sept. 17. Dr. Thomas Galloway, the attending physician and director of Clinical Research at FCCC, became the lead author of the study, and further investigated how many patients received neck surgeries after being treated for throat cancer, and whether or not these surgeries were necessary. “What my study showed was cant prognostic variable for patients with oropharynx cancer,” Galloway said. “When you develop cancer from it, it seems to be very curable. It’s interesting, we do much better treating it than we do treating traditional oropharynx cancer.” The study was a second analysis of a larger national trial, called RTOG129, conducted between 2002 and 2005, which sought various ways to treat head and neck cancers.

“What I did was analysis of something that wasn’t analyzed in the primary endpoint,” Galloway said. He said he wanted to answer the question, “How many of the patients after the treatment received neck surgery?” During analysis, Galloway and his colleagues reviewed the medical records of throat cancer patients. Head and neck cancer patients who have swollen lymph nodes are often treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy for between six and seven weeks, rather than undergoing extensive surgery. If a lymph node persists in swelling after treatment, a patient can undergo a neck dissection surgery to have the “lump” removed. Following radiation and chemotherapy treatments, only one-third of these patients underwent neck surgery to remove any persistent lumps. “The reason we want to limit surgeries is because we know that, of those surgeries we perform, the bump that is there is actually dead to cancer,” Galloway said. ing cervical cancer in females, is increasingly listed as the cause of throat cancers, which in the past were often associated with excessive use of alcohol and tobacco. According to the Center for Dis70 percent of throat cancers were study demonstrated higher levels of pathological complete response in

pharyngeal cancers. Although studies are emerg-

tion is not currently a factor when making the decision on whether or not to proceed with a neck surgery. as a factor, which contributes to the effectiveness of treatment, Galby future studies, will lead to fewer unnecessary neck surgeries. In addition, he hopes to one day provide less toxic treatments when treating ciated oropharyngeal cancers. “If you’re curing most patients relatively well, we ask ourselves, ‘Are we treating it too much?’” Galloway said. “‘Could we still be curing it 100 percent with giving it 15 percent less dosages?’ If you get less, your side effects are less. The worry is side effects, but we still have to cure the cancer.” Galloway also revealed that FCCC has already opened trials examining less toxic and extensive ways to treat these forms of cancer, which include surgery and “de-in-

kayla.oatneal@temple.edu


PAGE 4

EDITORIAL/OP-ED

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. , Editor-in-Chief Patricia Madej, Managing Editor Erin Edinger-Turoff, Chief Copy Editor Marcus McCarthy, News Editor Grace Holleran, Opinion Editor Claire Sasko, Lifestyle Editor Emily Rolen, Arts & Entertainment Editor EJ Smith, Sports Editor Joe Brandt, Asst. News Editor , Asst. Sports Editor Asst. Lifestyle Editor Paige Gross, Asst. Arts & Entertainment Editor Multimedia Editor Patrick McCarthy, Multimedia Editor

Harsh Patel, Web Editor Kate Reilly, Asst. Web Editor Photography Editor Kara Milstein, Asst. Photography Editor Design Editor Donna Fanelle, Asst. Designer Zachary Campbell, Advertising Manager Grayson Holladay, Business Manager Dustin Wingate, Marketing Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content

Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St.

EDITORIAL

Puff, puff, pass new policy

KATIE KALUPSON TTN

On Oct. 20, a bill that tionally violate campus polidecriminalizes the possescy. During college, most stusion of less than one ounce dents are learning how to be of marijuana in the city, independent adults – leaving passed by the Philadelphia them without clear instrucCity Council in September tions for personal conduct and signed by Mayor Nutnot only hinders this growth ter last week, will take efperiod, but is also potentially fect. The bill damaging to In light of the city’s was strongly their academdecriminalization of supported by ic achieveCity Coun- marijuana, the university ment during cil Democrat should reform its Student higher educaJames Kention and fuCode of Conduct. ney, who ture success. openly stated that limiting a The dry campus policy does not stop students from nancial security “over three drinking every weekend. joints in their pocket” was ridiculous. aware of this reality, and take Temple’s Student Code appropriate response meaof Conduct prohibits the sures to help students make possession of marijuana on better choices and stay safe Main Campus and the conon Main Campus. Medical sequences of violating this amnesty for students allows regulation are strict. For them to handle a potentially dangerous situation safely is placed on probation for and without serious conse15-20 weeks and receives a quences to their educational career, but there is a lack of similar policy for marijuana potentially removal from their residence hall, while his or her stomach pumped a third offense leads to recafter consuming excessive ommendation for expulsion amounts of alcohol can from the university. claim amnesty, but a stuStudents can also risk dent caught smoking a joint

FROM THE ARCHIVES...

and scholarships if they are caught with an inconsequential amount of marijuana, intended for personal use, not unlawful sale. If the city of Philadelphia is ready to accept that the widespread use of marijuana is not limited to delinquents and criminals, Temple should also adopt that mindset. The passing

It seems unreasonable that the university can openly address the issue of underage drinking with policy that protects students, but continues to address marijuana use with harsh repercussions even when the amount in question does not indicate criminal intent. This inconsistency is a glaring issue in safety policy. Students will always

Snapchat promoting ineffective

whether it is in a safe or unsafe environment. Marijuana use is a common recreational activity that, like underage drinking, will continue to be prevalent on Main Campus whether or not university policy forbids it. While Temple certainly should not condone abuse of drugs or criminal activity, in 13 days minimal marijuana possession will no longer be criminal activity in Philadelphia. Temple students are citizens of Philadelphia and should experience the same rights and privileges as their offcampus neighbors.

In an attempt to reach a broader audience and keep in better contact, some student organizations on Main Campus have turned to a different social network: Snapchat. Students can now add Temple Student Government and the Main Campus Program Board as their “friends” on Snapchat and receive periodic updates. While this seems like a good call, automatically leaping on board the JASON PEPPER current bandwagon without determining if it’s tion. Successful use of social media depends on correct use. For student organizations, a strong social media presence is already a necessity. TSG currently has a website, a Facebook page, a Twitter account, a Foursquare account, a Youtube account and an Instagram account. Of these, their most popular accounts spectively. However, at a university of more than 30,000 students,

attitudes toward marijuana use across the country and in Philadelphia. Now that laws regarding marijuana use vary state-by-state and regulations less strict in nature are becoming accepted, students will look for a change in the Student Code of Conduct – and rightly so. Contradicting city law will not serve to keep Main Campus safer, it will only lead to students engaging in unsafe behavior to avoid penalization by the university. If there is confusion among students about what regulations do and do not apply to them, they will be more likely to uninten-

CORRECTIONS In a story published on Sept. 30, an article written about the university’s formation of new clubs incorrectly stated that two new staff members were hired to join the Campus Recreation Department and that one of the new sports was track as the assistant director of the sports clubs – which includes In another story published on Sept. 30, an article about Red Bull Curates incorrectly stated that the event is in its fourth year. The contest is in its third year. The Temple News strives to be a newspaper of record by is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it editor@temple-news.com or 215.204.6737.

FILE PHOTO TTN

Oct. 17, 1974: Columnist Brad Allen warns students against the adverse effects of marijuana, which he said include female-like breasts in men. Nearly 30 years later, marijuana is steadily being legalized in cities across the country, including in Philadelphia.

Using Snapchat as a form of advertisement does little to help student organizations.

F

or the past few years, social networking has been a core component of the way organizations get news to their current and potential participants. Companies interested in connecting with their audience will typically have Facebook and Twitter pages, as well as other networks like Tum-

To increase outreach and participation, it makes sense that the organization would delve into a new and widespread platform like Snapchat. This begs the question though, why is Snapchat popular? Is it the kind of service that TSG and other student organizations need, or is it just another unnecessary fad that’s used by people who just want to share doodles and pictures of their friends doing funny things? Snapchat seems, to me, like it isn’t even a social networking service. It’s more closely related to a texting service. It allows interaction between generally two people: the sender and receiver friends, or add it to his or her “story” so anyone that they are friends with on Snapchat can see it. While this is great for amusing distractions or individual moments, it doesn’t seem ideal for sharing actual information. Like Twitter, Snapchat is limiting. However, while Twitter’s 140 characters are enough for a brief explanation and a link or a photo, Snapchat is even more restrictive with 10 seconds of maximum viewing time and at most 31 characters. So far, the extent of TSG’s activity does seem to be posting snippets of activity to the story feed. Their snaps feature images of sponsored events like TSGLive and images of members of the organization. While it’s

a good way to show what they’re doing, it’s hard to imagine that a series of brief images will help tremendously with spreading the word about campus events. Many students, it seems, share this confusion. “Why do they even need one?” said sophomore Science and Technology student Dana Russell. “I guess they can send out Snapchats to everyone, but that would require people manually adding them.” Russell raises an interesting point – being friends with TSG on Snapchat already shows a level of involvement that indicates a student would likely be aware of events, whether or not Snapchat reminds them.

seconds, which wasn’t nearly enough time to read the details of the event, such as what it’s about and what groups will be there. To see the image again, you need to wade through half a min-

chat account’s launch. While this informs students that there is an article to be read, it really doesn’t help convey information beyond that. One of the reasons for the account is also communication between students and the group, not just for the group to broadcast out information about campus events. This seems like a good idea in theory, but is again limited by Snapchat’s restrictions. In the brief 10 seconds an image is shown, a student trying to raise awareness about something would need to convey a lot of inforto do it on a cell phone. “I think having a social media presence can make it easier to major. “But I don’t know that Snapchat makes sense as a medium for what they’re doing.” Social media platforms are excellent ways to get messages out to a lot of people. In some areas, the TSG Snapchat succeeds by showing what happens at campus events and what students are doing. In other areas, like spreading the word about events and While there is a possibility that this could change, it seems that organizations trying to reach out to more students may have misstepped here. While there’s nothing wrong with Snapchat as a service or a medium, it’s not exactly what these organizations should be looking for in a social media outlet. pepper.jason.a@temple.edu @pepperjasona


OPINION

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

Animal empire strikes back Main Campus’ wildlife is seeking to form a revolution.

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ast into the shadows of North Philadelphia, thousands each day try to reclaim the land currently occupied by Temple that was once theirs. They eat fallen food scraps on Liacouras Walk while they plot their revenge. They have inhabited North Philadelphia long before North Philadelphia even existed. They pre-date the neighborhood’s earliest residents by centuries and Temple students by even more. They are Temple’s wildlife – an energetic community MICHAEL CARNEY of animals losing the unwin-

of race, diversity of interests, diversity of backgrounds and, unintentionally, a diverse assortment of animals that considers Temple its home. Dozens of squirrels, birds, cats and smaller creatures move around Temple and the surrounding area every day alongside thousands of students. Temple students have a strange obsession with the animals that occupy Main Campus. Temple’s cats and squirrels have been the inspiration for various Facebook and Twitter accounts in their honor. Last year, students in Johnson & Hardwick converted a large cardboard box into a home for whichever cats desired to use it. Some students have even made members of North Philadelphia’s wildlife their pets – either cats that stumbled upon a student’s doorstep or turtles acquired through Temple’s turtle market of questionable legality. Freshmen are frequently der to pass their room inspections. Perhaps our obsession is rooted in the stresses of college and

THE ESSAYIST...

PAGE 5

Fighting Against Tradition

Writing for her high school paper, a student learned of the impact student journalism can have. By Emily Scott

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atch out … here come the Redskins!” a booming voice shouted from the speakers at Harry E. Franks Stadium in Bucks County. Underneath the bright stadium lights, there is the student section, which calls itself “Skins Nation,” a group of seniors who paint out “Redskins” on their stomachs and wear Native I was in the marching band in high school. I attended every football game and participated in my fair share of school spirit, but I never really saw myself as a member of Skins Nation. On the Friday nights in autumn, I watched as members of my senior class experienced inebriated football games as they “honored” their mascot. I was also involved with my high school newspaper, the Playwickian, where I debated more than just the oxford comma. What I learned my senior year at Neshaminy

ban the use of the word “Redskin” from the high school newspaper. We didn’t even expect people to notice. We were convinced not many people read the high school paper, anyway. But once our administration tried to prevent our ban and to compel speech, the entire school let their voice be heard. They believed it infringed on the rights of other students who would want to use the word in the

my desk with the latest issue of the Playwickian crumpled up inside. Disapproval as apparent as this was something that I didn’t expect as an the beginning. The next thing I knew, our editorial was being featured in The New York Times, outlets. The Neshaminy Redskins own my hometown. When you take a trip to the local Modell’s sports shop, Redskins T-shirts and hoodies are placed meticulously at the front of the store. When you look around Neshaminy High School,

journalists should. And I think that’s what I learned most about this experience.

decided to take a stance against our school mastown of Langhorne, Pennsylvania issued a formal complaint at the state level against our high school’s use of the mascot. It brought up a diseditorial board came to a two-thirds decision to

debate over it in one of the world’s most beautiful languages. The fact that I could be a part of something that caused enough students to start voicing their opinions was inspiring. However, with conversation comes discouragement. We could’ve just given in and decided to publish the word again. Everything would have blown over and Neshaminy would have returned to a peaceful state. But we stuck to our guns, just

I remember walking into my math class one

“We stuck to our guns, just as

school spirit and the defamation of a group of people.

over my Facebook News Feed, which in 2014

The football program receives the most funding of any school activity. So when a group of student journalists decided to take a stance against that, it didn’t settle well. Twitter became an outlet for students to say, “No one reads the Playwickian anyway” or to get in social media wars with ESPN newscaster Keith Olbermann. My high school became a sitcom. But despite the controversy, our story sparked something – a conversation. It was all

learned most about this experience. Since I’ve graduated, I have little involvement in the matter. But I’ve watched these high school journalists mature and learn to handle new experiences with the highest degree of character. It’s taught me that not everyone is going to agree with you and to take every criticism with a grain of salt. I’ve learned a lot more about myself through a high school publication than any other heartbreak, class or experience in my teenage life. When I look back at high school, I don’t recall the drama class that I took freshman year or the ongoing contract battle of the teachers, but I do remember the Playwickian newspaper and the impact the student editorial board left on the school. The editors were and still are my best friends. It was a conglomeration of every personality. There was a sports editor who was infatuated with rock and roll, Hunter S. Thompson and ham Lincoln enthusiast and who will probably be president one day and a redheaded leader who is going to take the journalism world by storm. Through the Playwickian mascot debacle, it showcases the importance of student journalism. We weren’t students writing a persuasive piece, but journalists who might one day make a difference. emily.ivy.scott@temple.edu @emilyscott315

students to escape the fast pace of life in Philadelphia. presence of Temple’s wildlife are not always re-

by Temple to replicate a suburban oasis, this attempt to reintroduce nature to North Philadelphia doesn’t fool the community’s wildlife. to venture around buildings, across large sections of concrete and between cars in order to move from one small group of trees to another. Birds lives, many who have fallen victim to the ultra-

trees that stand before them, many birds fail to

A community for female skaters

Both city- and campus-wide organizations are creating a place for women in skate culture.

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ith their dexterous tricks lifting them just off the ground

hard not to notice the presence of skateboarders on Main Campus. It’s also hard not to notice that this community is predominantly male. Overrepresentation of males in the skating world is, unfortunately, not news. The physical nature of the sport scares many girls away from the start, and the overall lack of female skaters doesn’t provide many role models for girls to imitate either.

directly into it and dying almost immediately. provide a more hospitable environment for animals than the rest of North Philadelphia, Temple’s wildlife is generally unhappy with its living situproblems through Temple’s Board of Trustees. However, Temple’s wildlife soon realized that the Board was reluctant to listen to humans’ problems, let alone those of animals. Unable to voice their concerns through words, Temple’s wildlife decided to express its dissatisfaction through protest in an effort to slowly deteriorate Temple as a whole. On two occasions over the past two months, squirrels were successful in disabling Blackboard – a website containing academic material essential to a Temple student’s success. Wishing to keep the actions of the squirrels secret, the university “maintenance” and the crash on Sept. 21 was a data overload. Some students couldn’t complete homework assignments and at least one professor couldn’t conduct his class without Blackboard. Then, the crafty squirrels managed to chew on the correct wires behind the TECH Center to prevent students from using Diamond Dollars and from accessing critical class information. turned away from Diamond-Dollar-accepting establishments like 7-Eleven and Richie’s. We can’t say for sure whether squirrels, or any other animals at Temple, will attempt another act of retaliation before winter forces them to take shelter. However, their passion for reclaiming their land is greater now than ever. Outraged by loud construction all hours of the day and cost-conscious students throwing less food on the ground for them to eat, Temple’s wildlife has had native land. impact on North Philadelphia’s human residents, they take little consideration into the impact of major university decisions on Philadelphia’s true natives. michael.carney@temple.edu

OPINION DESK 215-204-7416

the chance of battle scars from skating, when society puts so much value on the appearance of the feminine exterior.

know male skaters are critiquing their every move, it can be intimidating. “Of course some male skaters think they’re superior to female skaters,” said Diana Nguyen, a freshman longJENNY ROBERTS boarder and political science major. “But that is a problem outside of skating anyway.” Women skaters aren’t held to the same standards when it comes to their skill set. There are fewer women’s divisions at competitions too, and the prize money for these divisions is far less than for male divisions. This trend continues at the professional level. Not as many people come out to see women skate as they do for men. Everyone knows Tony Hawk, but it’s safe to say fewer people have heard of Elissa Steamer. It’s hard to be praised for your accomplishments when you’re being ignored. It’s also hard to be taken seriously in a society that sexualizes and excludes women. naked women on them and skating shoes for women aren’t even carried by some lines. For example, Diamond Supply Co. only sells footwear in

mention the sequins. What I don’t see is just as important. I don’t see a thick sole to withstand the impact of landing. I also don’t see a material more durable than canvas, so that women can pop ollies without breaking through the tops of their shoes. To combat the obstacles that female skaters and skating hopefuls may face, a group of women in the Philadelphia area have banded together to form Shred the Patriarchy. “Shred The Patriarchy is an all inclusive group for women and girls of all ages and ability levels to come together, skateboard, learn new things and have fun,” said Shannon Sexton, a member of the group. She added that the group is also open to members of the LGBTQ community. Shred the Patriarchy helps create a sense of female community within the skating world. Women now can show up at Paine’s Park on a Sunday afternoon and know that there will be other female skaters there too. Shred the Patriarchy has already helped foster new female skaters. Justice Thomas said she has only just summoned the courage to pick up skateboarding. She recently joined Shred the Patriarchy. Thomas attributes her newfound courage to the sense of community built within Shred the Patriarchy. She knows her skill set won’t constantly be judged and feels free to really polish her tricks. “I eat concrete, but it’s not a big deal,” she said.

LETTERS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

Organized skating communities seem to be the answer to ending intimidation and including women in the skating world. The Temple University Longboarder’s Club opens its arms to female skaters as well, with the number of female members hovering around 10 girls or a third of the club this year. Small communities of skaters allow for women and newcomers in general to feel comfortable practicing their skills. With groups like Shred the Patriarchy working to include women in the skating community, the number of female skaters should continue to increase. Sexton said she is optimistic about the community and the sport she has come to love. “The amount of girls skating has been growing steadily for the last respected by the industry is growing as well.” Of course, sexism will only diminish in the skating world on par with its decrease in society as a whole. sexism isn’t limited just to the skating in- dustry.

Hopefully, though, girls will feel more encouraged to pick up skating, knowing they are welcome to do so, and the skating industry will grow and develop to meet this demand.

IO

IER

SR

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JES

jennifer.roberts@temple.edu @jennyroberts511

TTN


PAGE 4

EDITORIAL/OP-ED

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Avery Maehrer, Editor-in-Chief Patricia Madej, Managing Editor Erin Edinger-Turoff, Chief Copy Editor Marcus McCarthy, News Editor Grace Holleran, Opinion Editor Claire Sasko, Lifestyle Editor Emily Rolen, Arts & Entertainment Editor EJ Smith, Sports Editor Joe Brandt, Asst. News Editor Andrew Parent, Asst. Sports Editor Alexa Bricker, Asst. Lifestyle Editor Paige Gross, Asst. Arts & Entertainment Editor Alexandra Snell, Multimedia Editor Patrick McCarthy, Multimedia Editor

Harsh Patel, Web Editor Kate Reilly, Asst. Web Editor Andrew Thayer, Photography Editor Kara Milstein, Asst. Photography Editor Addy Peterson, Design Editor Donna Fanelle, Asst. Designer Zachary Campbell, Advertising Manager Grayson Holladay, Business Manager Dustin Wingate, Marketing Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

EDITORIAL

Puff, puff, pass new policy On Oct. 20, a bill that tionally violate campus polidecriminalizes the possescy. During college, most stusion of less than one ounce dents are learning how to be of marijuana in the city, independent adults – leaving passed by the Philadelphia them without clear instrucCity Council in September tions for personal conduct and signed by Mayor Nutnot only hinders this growth ter last week, will take efperiod, but is also potentially fect. The bill damaging to In light of the city’s was strongly their academdecriminalization of supported by ic achieveCity Coun- marijuana, the university ment during cil Democrat should reform its Student higher educaJames Kention and fuCode of Conduct. ney, who ture success. openly stated that limiting a The dry campus policy person’s job prospects or fidoes not stop students from nancial security “over three drinking every weekend. joints in their pocket” was University officials are well ridiculous. aware of this reality, and take Temple’s Student Code appropriate response meaof Conduct prohibits the sures to help students make possession of marijuana on better choices and stay safe Main Campus and the conon Main Campus. Medical sequences of violating this amnesty for students allows regulation are strict. For them to handle a potentially the first offense, a student dangerous situation safely is placed on probation for and without serious conse15-20 weeks and receives a quences to their educational $250 fine. A second offense career, but there is a lack of earns them a $500 fine and similar policy for marijuana potentially removal from use. A student who needs their residence hall, while his or her stomach pumped a third offense leads to recafter consuming excessive ommendation for expulsion amounts of alcohol can from the university. claim amnesty, but a stuStudents can also risk dent caught smoking a joint losing their financial aid could lose their financial aid. and scholarships if they are It seems unreasonable that caught with an inconsequenthe university can openly tial amount of marijuana, inaddress the issue of undertended for personal use, not age drinking with policy that unlawful sale. protects students, but conIf the city of Philatinues to address marijuana delphia is ready to accept use with harsh repercussions that the widespread use of even when the amount in marijuana is not limited to question does not indicate delinquents and criminals, criminal intent. This inconTemple should also adopt sistency is a glaring issue in that mindset. The passing safety policy. of the bill reflects changing Students will always attitudes toward marijuana find a way to experiment, use across the country and in whether it is in a safe or unPhiladelphia. Now that laws safe environment. Marijuana regarding marijuana use vary use is a common recreational state-by-state and regulaactivity that, like underage tions less strict in nature are drinking, will continue to becoming accepted, students be prevalent on Main Camwill look for a change in the pus whether or not univerStudent Code of Conduct – sity policy forbids it. While and rightly so. ContradictTemple certainly should not ing city law will not serve condone abuse of drugs or to keep Main Campus safer, criminal activity, in 13 days it will only lead to students minimal marijuana possesengaging in unsafe behavior sion will no longer be crimito avoid penalization by the nal activity in Philadelphia. university. If there is confuTemple students are citizens sion among students about of Philadelphia and should what regulations do and do experience the same rights not apply to them, they will and privileges as their offbe more likely to unintencampus neighbors.

CORRECTIONS In a story published on Sept. 30, an article written about the university’s formation of new clubs incorrectly stated that two new staff members were hired to join the Campus Recreation Department and that one of the new sports was track & field. One new staff member, Sarah Shouvlin, was hired as the assistant director of the sports clubs – which includes track, without field events. In another story published on Sept. 30, an article about Red Bull Curates incorrectly stated that the event is in its fourth year. The contest is in its third year. The Temple News strives to be a newspaper of record by printing factually correct and balanced articles. Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor-in-Chief Avery Maehrer at editor@temple-news.com or 215.204.6737.

KATIE KALUPSON TTN

FROM THE ARCHIVES...

FILE PHOTO TTN

Oct. 17, 1974: Columnist Brad Allen warns students against the adverse effects of marijuana, which he said include female-like breasts in men. Nearly 30 years later, marijuana is steadily being legalized in cities across the country, including in Philadelphia.

Commentary: CAmpus Affairs

Snapchat promoting ineffective Using Snapchat as a form of advertisement does little to help student organizations.

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or the past few years, social networking has been a core component of the way organizations get news to their current and potential participants. Companies interested in connecting with their audience will typically have Facebook and Twitter pages, as well as other networks like Tumblr, Instagram, and LinkedIn, specifically for their brand. In an attempt to reach a broader audience and keep in better contact, some student organizations on Main Campus have turned to a different social network: Snapchat. Students can now add Temple Student Government and the Main Campus Program Board as their “friends” on Snapchat and receive periodic updates. While this seems like a good call, automatically leaping on board the JASON PEPPER current bandwagon without determining if it’s a good fit might not be the best course of action for an organization. Successful use of social media depends on correct use. For student organizations, a strong social media presence is already a necessity. TSG currently has a website, a Facebook page, a Twitter account, a Foursquare account, a Youtube account and an Instagram account. Of these, their most popular accounts are Twitter and Instagram, with 3,412 and 1,198 followers, respectively. However, at a university of more than 30,000 students, these numbers could definitely be better. To increase outreach and participation, it makes sense that the organization would delve into a new and widespread platform like Snapchat. This begs the question though, why is Snapchat popular? Is it the kind of service that TSG and other student organizations need, or is it just another unnecessary fad that’s used by people who just want to share doodles and pictures of their friends doing funny things? Snapchat seems, to me, like it isn’t even a social networking service. It’s more closely related to a texting service. It allows interaction between generally two people: the sender and receiver of the “snap.” At most, the sender can send a photo to multiple friends, or add it to his or her “story” so anyone that they are friends with on Snapchat can see it. While this is great for amusing distractions or individual moments, it doesn’t seem ideal for sharing actual information. Like Twitter, Snapchat is limiting. However, while Twitter’s 140 characters are enough for a brief explanation and a link or a photo, Snapchat is even more restrictive with 10 seconds of maximum viewing time and at most 31 characters. So far, the extent of TSG’s activity does seem to be posting snippets of activity to the story feed. Their snaps feature images of sponsored events like TSGLive and images of members of the organization. While it’s

a good way to show what they’re doing, it’s hard to imagine that a series of brief images will help tremendously with spreading the word about campus events. Many students, it seems, share this confusion. “Why do they even need one?” said sophomore Science and Technology student Dana Russell. “I guess they can send out Snapchats to everyone, but that would require people manually adding them.” Russell raises an interesting point – being friends with TSG on Snapchat already shows a level of involvement that indicates a student would likely be aware of events, whether or not Snapchat reminds them. TSG shared a picture of one of the fliers for an on-campus event at Morgan Hall. The picture stayed on-screen for about five seconds, which wasn’t nearly enough time to read the details of the event, such as what it’s about and what groups will be there. To see the image again, you need to wade through half a minute of other images. While that doesn’t seem like a significant amount of time, it’s not nearly as efficient as checking just TSG’s Twitter or just looking at one of the fliers in person. Another snap features a Temple News article about the Snapchat account’s launch. While this informs students that there is an article to be read, it really doesn’t help convey information beyond that. One of the reasons for the account is also communication between students and the group, not just for the group to broadcast out information about campus events. This seems like a good idea in theory, but is again limited by Snapchat’s restrictions. In the brief 10 seconds an image is shown, a student trying to raise awareness about something would need to convey a lot of information in a simple way, which is difficult enough without trying to do it on a cell phone. “I think having a social media presence can make it easier to spread information,” said Aaron Gross, a sophomore engineering major. “But I don’t know that Snapchat makes sense as a medium for what they’re doing.” Social media platforms are excellent ways to get messages out to a lot of people. In some areas, the TSG Snapchat succeeds by showing what happens at campus events and what students are doing. In other areas, like spreading the word about events and increasing communication, the plan is a little bit flawed. While there is a possibility that this could change, it seems that organizations trying to reach out to more students may have misstepped here. While there’s nothing wrong with Snapchat as a service or a medium, it’s not exactly what these organizations should be looking for in a social media outlet. * pepper.jason.a@temple.edu T @pepperjasona


OPINION

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

Commentary: satire

Animal empire strikes back Main Campus’ wildlife is seeking to form a revolution.

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ast into the shadows of North Philadelphia, thousands each day try to reclaim the land currently occupied by Temple that was once theirs. They eat fallen food scraps on Liacouras Walk while they plot their revenge. They have inhabited North Philadelphia long before North Philadelphia even existed. They pre-date the neighborhood’s earliest residents by centuries and Temple students by even more. They are Temple’s wildlife – an energetic community MICHAEL CARNEY of animals losing the unwinnable fight against urbanization. Temple prides itself on its diversity; diversity of race, diversity of interests, diversity of backgrounds and, unintentionally, a diverse assortment of animals that considers Temple its home. Dozens of squirrels, birds, cats and smaller creatures move around Temple and the surrounding area every day alongside thousands of students. Temple students have a strange obsession with the animals that occupy Main Campus. Temple’s cats and squirrels have been the inspiration for various Facebook and Twitter accounts in their honor. Last year, students in Johnson & Hardwick converted a large cardboard box into a home for whichever cats desired to use it. Some students have even made members of North Philadelphia’s wildlife their pets – either cats that stumbled upon a student’s doorstep or turtles acquired through Temple’s turtle market of questionable legality. Freshmen are frequently heard fretting over how to hide a pet fish in order to pass their room inspections. Perhaps our obsession is rooted in the stresses of college and urban life. Appreciating Temple’s wildlife allows students to escape the fast pace of life in Philadelphia. However, the benefits we receive from the presence of Temple’s wildlife are not always reciprocated. Although squirrels and birds benefit from the trees and grass artificially positioned by Temple to replicate a suburban oasis, this attempt to reintroduce nature to North Philadelphia doesn’t fool the community’s wildlife. Squirrels constantly find themselves having to venture around buildings, across large sections of concrete and between cars in order to move from one small group of trees to another. Birds face an equal degree of difficulty in their daily lives, many who have fallen victim to the ultrareflective windows of the TECH Center along 12th Street. Because these windows reflect the trees that stand before them, many birds fail to notice the existence of the building until flying directly into it and dying almost immediately. Although Temple’s installed nature elements provide a more hospitable environment for animals than the rest of North Philadelphia, Temple’s wildlife is generally unhappy with its living situation. The animals’ first idea was to settle their problems through Temple’s Board of Trustees. However, Temple’s wildlife soon realized that the Board was reluctant to listen to humans’ problems, let alone those of animals. Unable to voice their concerns through words, Temple’s wildlife decided to express its dissatisfaction through protest in an effort to slowly deteriorate Temple as a whole. On two occasions over the past two months, squirrels were successful in disabling Blackboard – a website containing academic material essential to a Temple student’s success. Wishing to keep the actions of the squirrels secret, the university announced that the outage on Aug. 8 was merely “maintenance” and the crash on Sept. 21 was a data overload. Some students couldn’t complete homework assignments and at least one professor couldn’t conduct his class without Blackboard. Then, the crafty squirrels managed to chew on the correct wires behind the TECH Center to prevent students from using Diamond Dollars and from accessing critical class information. As a result, hundreds of cashless students were turned away from Diamond-Dollar-accepting establishments like 7-Eleven and Richie’s. We can’t say for sure whether squirrels, or any other animals at Temple, will attempt another act of retaliation before winter forces them to take shelter. However, their passion for reclaiming their land is greater now than ever. Outraged by loud construction all hours of the day and cost-conscious students throwing less food on the ground for them to eat, Temple’s wildlife has had enough with the university’s influence on their native land. Although Temple attempts to minimize its impact on North Philadelphia’s human residents, they take little consideration into the impact of major university decisions on Philadelphia’s true natives. * michael.carney@temple.edu

OPINION DESK 215-204-7416

THE ESSAYIST...

Fighting Against Tradition

Writing for her high school paper, a student learned of the impact student journalism can have.

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By Emily Scott

atch out … here come the Redskins!” a booming voice shouted from the speakers at Harry E. Franks Stadium in Bucks County. Underneath the bright stadium lights, there is the student section, which calls itself “Skins Nation,” a group of seniors who paint out “Redskins” on their stomachs and wear Native American headdresses. I was in the marching band in high school. I attended every football game and participated in my fair share of school spirit, but I never really saw myself as a member of Skins Nation. On the Friday nights in autumn, I watched as members of my senior class experienced inebriated football games as they “honored” their mascot. I was also involved with my high school newspaper, the Playwickian, where I debated more than just the oxford comma. What I learned my senior year at Neshaminy High School is that there is a fine line between school spirit and the defamation of a group of people. In our first issue during my senior year, we decided to take a stance against our school mascot. A Native-American woman from my hometown of Langhorne, Pennsylvania issued a formal complaint at the state level against our high school’s use of the mascot. It brought up a discussion in the Playwickian’s school office. The editorial board came to a two-thirds decision to

ban the use of the word “Redskin” from the high school newspaper. We didn’t even expect people to notice. We were convinced not many people read the high school paper, anyway. But once our administration tried to prevent our ban and to compel speech, the entire school let their voice be heard. They believed it infringed on the rights of other students who would want to use the word in the paper. Interestingly, the First Amendment began to fight against itself. I remember walking into my math class one morning in November to find a recycling bin on my desk with the latest issue of the Playwickian crumpled up inside. Disapproval as apparent as this was something that I didn’t expect as an 18-year-old high school student, but that was just the beginning. The next thing I knew, our editorial was being featured in The New York Times, The Huffington Post and on several other news outlets. The Neshaminy Redskins own my hometown. When you take a trip to the local Modell’s sports shop, Redskins T-shirts and hoodies are placed meticulously at the front of the store. When you look around Neshaminy High School, it’s glorified with posters supporting the team. The football program receives the most funding of any school activity. So when a group of student journalists decided to take a stance against that, it didn’t settle well. Twitter became an outlet for students to say, “No one reads the Playwickian anyway” or to get in social media wars with ESPN newscaster Keith Olbermann. My high school became a sitcom. But despite the controversy, our story sparked something – a conversation. It was all

“We stuck to our guns, just as

journalists should. And I think that’s what I learned most about this experience.

over my Facebook News Feed, which in 2014 signifies a big deal. In my French class, we had a debate over it in one of the world’s most beautiful languages. The fact that I could be a part of something that caused enough students to start voicing their opinions was inspiring. However, with conversation comes discouragement. We could’ve just given in and decided to publish the word again. Everything would have blown over and Neshaminy would have returned to a peaceful state. But we stuck to our guns, just as journalists should. And I think that’s what I learned most about this experience. Since I’ve graduated, I have little involvement in the matter. But I’ve watched these high school journalists mature and learn to handle new experiences with the highest degree of character. It’s taught me that not everyone is going to agree with you and to take every criticism with a grain of salt. I’ve learned a lot more about myself through a high school publication than any other heartbreak, class or experience in my teenage life. When I look back at high school, I don’t recall the drama class that I took freshman year or the ongoing contract battle of the teachers, but I do remember the Playwickian newspaper and the impact the student editorial board left on the school. The editors were and still are my best friends. It was a conglomeration of every personality. There was a sports editor who was infatuated with rock and roll, Hunter S. Thompson and cowboy boots, my co-editor, who was an Abraham Lincoln enthusiast and who will probably be president one day and a redheaded leader who is going to take the journalism world by storm. Through the Playwickian mascot debacle, it showcases the importance of student journalism. We weren’t students writing a persuasive piece, but journalists who might one day make a difference. * emily.ivy.scott@temple.edu T @emilyscott315

Commentary: women’s Issues

A community for female skaters Both city- and campus-wide organizations are creating a place for women in skate culture.

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ith their dexterous tricks lifting them just off the ground and their speed building as they fly down the sidewalk, it’s hard not to notice the presence of skateboarders on Main Campus. It’s also hard not to notice that this community is predominantly male. Overrepresentation of males in the skating world is, unfortunately, not news. The physical nature of the sport scares many girls away from the start, and the overall lack of female skaters doesn’t provide many role models for girls to imitate either. The truth is that girls definitely find it harder to risk the chance of battle scars from skating, when society puts so much value on the appearance of the feminine exterior. Girls also find it harder just to even enter a skate park; their presence will definitely be noticed. When girls know male skaters are critiquing their every move, it can be intimidating. “Of course some male skaters think they’re superior to female skaters,” said Diana Nguyen, a freshman longJENNY ROBERTS boarder and political science major. “But that is a problem outside of skating anyway.” Women skaters aren’t held to the same standards when it comes to their skill set. There are fewer women’s divisions at competitions too, and the prize money for these divisions is far less than for male divisions. This trend continues at the professional level. Not as many people come out to see women skate as they do for men. Everyone knows Tony Hawk, but it’s safe to say fewer people have heard of Elissa Steamer. It’s hard to be praised for your accomplishments when you’re being ignored. It’s also hard to be taken seriously in a society that sexualizes and excludes women. Skateboard merchandise exemplifies this. Decks have pictures of naked women on them and skating shoes for women aren’t even carried by some lines. For example, Diamond Supply Co. only sells footwear in men’s sizes. And the lines that do carry women’s shoes are more about fashion than actual use. As I browse through the women’s skate section of DC Shoes’ website, all I see are floral patterns and cheetah prints, not to mention the sequins. What I don’t see is just as important. I don’t see a thick sole to withstand the impact of landing. I also don’t see a material more durable than canvas, so that women can pop ollies without breaking through the tops of their shoes. To combat the obstacles that female skaters and skating hopefuls may face, a group of women in the Philadelphia area have banded together to form Shred the Patriarchy. “Shred The Patriarchy is an all inclusive group for women and girls of all ages and ability levels to come together, skateboard, learn new things and have fun,” said Shannon Sexton, a member of the group. She added that the group is also open to members of the LGBTQ community. Shred the Patriarchy helps create a sense of female community within the skating world. Women now can show up at Paine’s Park on a Sunday afternoon and know that there will be other female skaters there too. Shred the Patriarchy has already helped foster new female skaters. Justice Thomas said she has only just summoned the courage to pick up skateboarding. She recently joined Shred the Patriarchy. Thomas attributes her newfound courage to the sense of community built within Shred the Patriarchy. She knows her skill set won’t constantly be judged and feels free to really polish her tricks. “I eat concrete, but it’s not a big deal,” she said.

LETTERS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

Organized skating communities seem to be the answer to ending intimidation and including women in the skating world. The Temple University Longboarder’s Club opens its arms to female skaters as well, with the number of female members hovering around 10 girls or a third of the club this year. Small communities of skaters allow for women and newcomers in general to feel comfortable practicing their skills. With groups like Shred the Patriarchy working to include women in the skating community, the number of female skaters should continue to increase. Sexton said she is optimistic about the community and the sport she has come to love. “The amount of girls skating has been growing steadily for the last 10-15 years,” she said. “And the amount of girls being recognized and respected by the industry is growing as well.” Of course, sexism will only diminish in the skating world on par with its decrease in society as a whole. As Nguyen implied, sexism isn’t limited just to the skating in- dustry.

Hopefully, though, girls will feel more encouraged to pick up skating, knowing they are welcome to do so, and the skating industry will grow and develop to meet this demand.

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* jennifer.roberts@temple.edu T @jennyroberts511

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NEWS

PAGE 6

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

ON CAMPUS

Continued from page 1

APPLEBAUM

TEMPLE FEST CASE COMES TO AGREEMENT

Abdel Aziz Jalil, the student who was accused of striking senior management information systems major and Jewish student Daniel Vessal at Temple Fest in August, was admitted into a six month Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition program, among other penalties on Oct. 1. The Commonwealth-run ARD program is intended to help first offenders who are charged with minor crimes. Aziz Jalil was also given 10 hours of community service, enrolled in anger management counseling and required to pay numerous fees. Aziz Jalil was charged with simple assault and recklessly endangering another person. Despite accusations of the incident being driven by anti-Semitic views, Aziz Jalil was not charged with a hate crime. The Commonwealth proposed the penalties on Oct. 1 in a Municipal Court status hearing, which Aziz Jalil attended with his defense attorney, Raymond C. Geary. The judge overseeing the hearing, Nazario Jimenez Jr., accepted the agreement between the parties and urged Aziz Jalil to complete the program and “stay out of trouble.” Geary said that Aziz Jalil has already given Vessal a formal letter of apology and the two will shake hands at Geary’s office at a later date. Aziz Jalil is still listed as a student in the university’s directory. If Aziz Jalil completes all of the required programs, the Commonwealth will expunge the incident from his record as part of the agreement. -Marcus McCarthy

GROUP OF EVANGELISTS DRAWS A CROWD

A group of six evangelical self-titled Christian missionaries arrived on Main Campus around 11 a.m. last Thursday. Stationed at the Bell Tower, they spoke about their beliefs to a growing crowd of students. The men were from different churches around the country, including Poquoson Baptist Church in Poquoson, Virginia and Lighthouse Bible Fellowship in Fremont, California. They were organized by Robert Parker of Christians from Bread of Life Fellowship in New Jersey. “We travel to college campuses because we want to make [the Gospel] known to this current generation,” Virginia retiree Don Karns said. At its peak, there were approximately 100 people gathered around the Bell Tower. Most in the crowd were students, with some faculty members interspersed. Temple Police also arrived to monitor the situation. The evangelists and students engaged in heated discourse about topics like evolution, premarital sex and same-sex marriage. There was no reported physical violence but several students came close to the evangelists and several of them were shouting. Students held up handwritten signs saying, “On behalf of the Christian people, I apologize” and “Coexist” to counter the evangelists’“Evolution is a lie” posters. “It’s a complete waste of time on both sides,” Eddie Ntuk, a junior biology major said. “People are just spitting opinions. They come close-minded.” Several students spoke individually with the evangelists. Other students gathered into smaller discussion groups. The evangelists visit Temple approximately two times a year. -Lian Parsons

SECURITY HEIGHTENED AT TASB

After a survey by security staff, Temple’s Administrative Services Building on the 2400 block of Hunting Park Avenue will enact new security policies, effective immediately. The new policy was emailed Friday afternoon to employees who work in the building. Many doors in TASB can be opened by swiping Temple ID cards, which are activated at the security desk. According to the email, these doors would now only be accessible via ID swipe. New requirements for employees include showing identification at the front desk and wearing ID at all times. Visitors to the building will need to be escorted by an employee after checking in with the security desk. The email also included reminders to not leave doors propped open or let anyone enter a building behind a staff member. -Joe Brandt

TSG DISCUSSES TUnity STATEMENT

Temple Student Government gathered feedback for the TUnity Statement at the General Assembly meeting Monday night. The statement encourages understanding between all members of the university by emphasizing collaboration with people of different ethnicities, religions, sexual orientation and gender identity. “[The TUnity Statement] is a plan of action and a catalyst for what will happen in the future,” said Jalen Blot, director of campus life and diversity. Committee leaders led discussions and answered questions about the TUnity Statement. Attendees explained why they agreed or disagreed with the statement and proposed suggestions to improve the document. The TUnity Statement can be found at TSG’s website. A TUnity Statement Response Form is available to the public and can be filled out anonymously. TSG hopes to debut the TUnity Statement within the next month in an upcoming event. The meeting also provided details about the Homecoming activities for this week. All of the upcoming events can be found on Temple’s website. -Lian Parsons

Amelia Caglia.

COURTESY OF FAMILY

‘Lucky to be friends’ A recent alumna is remembered by her close friends and family. PATRICIA MADEJ The Temple News Amelia Caglia, a 2014 Temple graduate with a bachelor’s degree in Tourism and Hospitality management, died Sept. 26 after being struck by an Inquirer and Daily News delivery truck on Interstate 476. According to philly.com, Caglia, 22, was driving her car northbound in Plymouth Township when she made a U-turn, driving southbound in the center northbound lane and was hit head-on. Caglia was described by friends and family as loving, honest and beautiful. “We created such a great friendship. Literally every person that knew her loved her,” said Amber Curtis, one of Caglia’s best friends and a 2014 graduate. “She was fun.” Caglia was very hard-working, but when she wasn’t spending time at multiple jobs or volunteering, she’d enjoy spending time with her friends watching television and playing with her new puppy Chase, named after Phillies second-baseman Chase Utley. Curtis said one of her fondest memories with Caglia happened shortly before her passing. Returning to Philadelphia after moving to Florida for a new job, the two met up for drinks. It was there that Caglia told Curtis “she wanted us to be best friends the rest of [our] lives.” “We’re really lucky to be friends and have stayed friends,” Curtis said. Amelia Caglia is survived by her father and mother, Dennis and Deborah [nee Robertson] Caglia and her brothers David and Bradley Caglia. * patricia.madej@temple.edu

Continued from page 1

SCHOLARSHIPS O’Connor, whose team was given the option of giving full-year scholarships last year, noted how the changes impacted the squad’s success. The team’s seven-game winning streak set a record for its program. In its first three conference games this season, the team has also posted more conference wins than all of last year. O’Connor said his team’s ability to utilize the scholarships as means to increase training opportunities has made a noticeable impact. “A lot of the success we’re having this year is based off of the work done over the summer,” O’Connor said. “It gives us a chance to spend more time together and for [the players] to just be here on campus and work with the strength and conditioning staff. It gives us the chance to let them Continued from page 1

COMMITTEE

Siminoff said the three sections of the committee will be meeting roughly every week and has aimed to be finished by the end of the semester, with recommendations for President Theobald to be finalized for early next year. Theobald wrote in an email sent to the university community on Friday that he will review the findings, and then report them to the Board of Trustees and the public. Theobald’s email announcing the new committee cited the national focus on the issue of sexual misconduct on college campuses as the cause for its creation, calling the topic “one of the most significant issues facing colleges and universities.” “I want to ensure that Temple is providing the most effective services for the university community, following exemplary procedures for handling reports of sexual assault and related offenses, and promoting ongoing awareness of the university’s policies and prevention efforts,” Theobald

Temple. Charlie Lagond, the music director at the school, described Miles as one of the most dedicated and passionate students the school had seen. During his leave of absence, Miles worked at the Lagond studio. At Temple, Miles continued to grow musically. He was involved in several Boyer jazz ensembles and combos. In addition, he played gigs around the city, sometimes solo, sometimes accompanying friends and sometimes with his funk group, Radioactive Zebra. During his final semester at Temple, Fall 2013, Miles studied abroad at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam. Family members said Miles dreamed of being a successful musician and playing the same venues as the artists he admired, which ranged from jazz musicians of the 1940s and ‘50s to modern rock outfits like The Strokes. But he was already successful in his own right – his aunt, Eve Applebaum-Dominick, said his friends and family deeply appreciated the music Miles brought into their lives. “Not many people have a loved one who can play some sweet music for them at home at any time,” she said. His friends and family recollected fond moments of spontaneous creativity with Miles, both musically and otherwise. “[When going for a run], he’d run around cars and make funny animal noises,” said his friend Kathryn Marshall, a senior vocal performance major. She said when they ran, he always went at her pace, despite her frequent bouts of runners’ asthma. “He was a fierce friend,” Marshall said.

A graduate of Byram Hills High School, Miles was an avid runner and athlete. He ran on the varsity track team, eventually making it to state finals. His mother, Shari Applebaum, recalled Miles encouraging a student with special needs to continue running in high school. Max Applebaum, Miles’ brother, said Miles motivated him to try running when he struggled with his weight. Emily Waldman, a senior music education major, also shared a love for running and music with Miles. “At first I was terrible, but Miles taught me how to run,” Waldman said. Once, the two ran from Temple to Walnut Street to attend a seminar on John Coltrane. “His passion for life came out in running,” Marshall said. “He could run any time of day – in hurricanes, at two in the morning. He was game for any adventure.” Miles’ parents, grandparents, siblings, teachers and friends summarized his gentle, caring spirit with a simple phrase: “Smiles for Miles.” “Miles was just too sensitive for this world,” his aunt Eve said. “He struggled with finding his place … and feeling as if he fit. He did fit. We all loved him so dearly.” Donations in Miles’ name can be made to the Lagond Music School, the National Alliance on Mental Illness and Spring Lake Ranch. * holleran@temple.edu T @coupsdegrace Patricia Madej contributed reporting.

Miles Applebaum wrote in a poem that “music is the cure.”

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concentrate on the individual facets of their game and give us the opportunity to work with them over the summer.” The opportunity for summer classes also has helped O’Connor’s team in-season. “I think the summer school will take a lot of that stress off,” O’Connor said. “Now we can do credits over the summer and give them the opportunity to lighten their course load [before] the season because it’s such a hard grind during the season.” The move for the athletic administration comes as a response to what other schools in the American Athletic Conference have started to do. “That’s something that our competitors and our peers do with regularity,” Senior Assistant Athletic Director Mark Ingram said. “It’s big for our ability to graduate.” For the athletic administration, the decision came in part as an attempt to remain competitive and increase the quality of the fall sports teams, which make up most of Temple’s sports.

“That’s their peak training time right before their season start,” Ingram said. “In the past, those kids would go home … Is the training that they’re receiving [at home] as good as the training that we provide them? Well, of course it’s not.” The athletic administration has also prioritized improving academic facilities for student athletes by enhancing the Nancy and Donald Resnick Academic Support Center. The center, located on the ground floor of McGonigle Hall, features peer mentoring, private study and tutoring for studentathletes. The spending for renovations has come in a year where Temple has spent roughly $1.5 million on new facilities for the athletic department, from locker rooms and training facilities to the full-year scholarships.

wrote. In May, it was announced that the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights was investigating Temple, along with 55 other higher education institutions, for possible Title IX violations over the handling of sexual violence and harassment complaints. A university spokesman said the investigation is still open as of Friday and Temple will continue to cooperate in the investigation. However, when asked if the Title IX investigation prompted the creation of the committee, Siminoff said, “to my knowledge, no.” “Obviously it’s been a big issue nationally,” Siminoff said. “The time was a good one to look at this issue.” Ives said when reviewing current policies and procedures that no specific cases are being identified. Instead, patterns will be discussed to explore how policies, practices and procedures have been tested in the past. Theobald’s announcement email referenced a White House report from April as reason for a general survey of students to gauge their perceptions of safety at the uni-

versity. Siminoff said the exact format for the student survey has yet to be determined but she hopes to have it posted to the university’s website later this month. According to the university’s latest Fire and Safety Report, there were 17 reported sexual offenses on or near Main Campus in 2013, five in 2012 and nine in 2011. Temple Police has reported no sexual assaults since Sept. 23, according to the CSS crime logs. Nationally, around one in five women who attend an institution of higher education were sexually assaulted, according to this spring’s White House report. “After looking at national statistics, I can tell you as a woman and a mother, I was shocked,” Siminoff said. “That to me is an epidemic … all universities have to do better.”

* esmith@temple.edu ( 215.204.9537 T @ejsmitty17

* marcus.mccarthy@temple.edu ( 215.204.1020 T @MarcusMcCarthy6


lifestyle

owlery.temple-news.com

FEMINISM FILM

COMEDIC HEALING

Film and media arts professor LeAnn Erickson produced a movie about strong female computer technicians during World War II. PAGE 8

The GIs of Comedy came to Temple on Oct. 4. Comprised of several veterans, the group aims to heal through comedy. PAGE 15

temple-news.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

FREEMAN FOUNDATION

The Freeman Foundation provides scholarships that allow students to study abroad in East Asia. PAGE 14 PAGE 7

Organization brings art, business together Art of Business, Business of Art unites Fox and Tyler students. ALEXA BRICKER Assistant Lifestyle Editor In high school, Caroline Caster was so interested in ceramics that she would wake up at 5 a.m. and sneak through an unlocked door to help her teacher unload a kiln and set up for class. Now Caster, a freshman studying entrepreneurship. hopes to open her own bakery. Though business and art may seem like polar opposites, Caster and other members of the student organization Art of Business, Business of Art said they know better. In Spring 2014, business professor Laurie Fitzpatrick came up with the idea for the group after many of her business writing students approached her, confessing their love of art. “Every semester, one or two students, sometimes more, would come to me during office hours,” the 1989 Tyler alumna said. “They would say, ‘Professor, I’m an artist,’ or ‘My father’s an artist,’ or there was some kind of connection.” Since the club’s founding last semester, students from Fox and Tyler have joined the group to

connect and share their passions and to learn from one another. “I just like being around people who like art,” Caster said. “I’m not really around art much in college, so it’s a nice way to be involved.” To ensure all members get what they are looking for from the organization, Fitzpatrick said students generate their own ideas and collaborate on their own projects as well as events outside of Temple. “The best way to learn that we have common values, we share values and have common interests, [to understand] that there are no barriers, is to work together on a project,” Fitzpatrick said. The group is currently pursuing a number of projects, like an art show members are looking to present both at Temple and at another gallery in the city sometime next semester. In addition, AB/BA will be participating in the Punk Rock Flea Market, to be held on Dec. 14 on 9th Street. President Laura Harris said the event is an opportunity for student artists to show their work and build valuable business skills at the same time. Member Rachael Mecholsky said the flea market is exactly the type of experience she is hoping to get from the group. Both Harris and Mecholsky said they origi-

GREG FRANGIPANI TTN

Members of Art of Business, Business of Art met on Oct. 3 to discuss plans for the semester.

nally wanted to double major in either business or marketing and fine art, but were told that it would take at least six years to complete the programs. “At Tyler they go over more your junior andsenior year the business aspect, but I don’t know

anything right now, and I want to start early,” the sophomore fine arts major said. “I want to be able to market my work, show stuff like that

AB/BA PAGE 16

Students saddle up in the city really find out about it entirely until I went to a Temple festival.” Jett and Troxell said although many people on Main Campus are not aware of the equestrian team, the club tries SIENNA VANCE to reach students through The Temple News bake sales and its Facebook page. Rachael Troxell and Kel“We’re always wearing sie Jett didn’t want to join just our equestrian gear – so if any club their freshman year. someone wants to ask quesThey wanted to be a part of an tions they can feel free to,” organization that encompassed Troxell said. their love for horses. “We don’t have try “I started horseback rid- outs, which is an imporing when I was four at summer tant thing to note,” Jett said. camp,” Jett said. “I don’t ever “We kind of take everyone remember being scared when I as long as there’s enough car started.” space.” Now a senior psychology It’s not necessary to be an major and president of Tem- expert equestrian to join the ple’s Equestrian Club, Jett said team, they said. she is thankful that one of her “My roommate even defriends introduced her to the cided to try the club and rode a club her freshman year. horse for the first time,” Trox“I had been doing it ell said. “Everyone gets lesthroughout my life, and I just sons in English and Western didn’t want no matter what to stop when level they’re at.” I got to colEnglish and lege,” Jett Western are the said. “I feel two styles of like a lot of horseback ridhorseback riding the team ers who come competes in. Jett to Temple described Westfrom the subern as more of urbs feel like a cowboy-type they have to style of riding stop because Kelsie Jett / club president that one would we’re in the see during a rocity. Because deo. Troxell said of this team, they don’t have to the English style is mostly dedo that.” picted in popular TV shows Troxell, a senior psy- and the Olympics. chology major and the team’s “I like English, because vice president, is responsible there are a lot of jumps so it for show entries and ordering gives off more of a thrill,” enough gear for the team mem- Troxell said. “But just doing bers. She said she discovered horseback riding, in general, horseback riding when she was is very calming and relaxin middle school. ing.” Her dad also rode when he Troxell and Jett both said was a child, since her grand- horseback riding helps release parents lived next to an estate stress during rough school with a stable. weeks. “I wanted to continue “It’s good to have the balwith horseback riding so I re- ance,” Jett said. “Sometimes member Googling ‘Temple living in the city gets hectic.” Equestrian team’ before I came HORSES PAGE 14 here,” Troxell said. “I didn’t

Student equestrians bond over passion for horseback riding through

Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo premiered at the Adrienne Theater in Center City Sept. 17.

COURTESY LUIS FERNANDO RODRIGUEZ

A Center City debut for student director An MFA student directed a play that debuted at the Adrienne Theater. LORA STRUM The Temple News What David Girard said he loves about the aesthetic of Philadelphia theater is that it is “sweatier, bloodier and more visceral” than other theater scenes.

Girard, a senior Master of Fine Arts student, has taken center stage as director of the Temple Theaters FringeArts Festival hit, “Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo.” “This idea of how to be a successful citizen-artist, I’m more interested in that than becoming famous as a director – I don’t care to head there,” Girard said. Girard, an equity actor who worked in New York theater before joining the Philadelphia arts community, remembers his experience with “Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo” as more than just his Center City

directorial debut, but as the night he premiered a six-page monologue with fewer hours’ worth of stage preparation. “I did five shows in 72 hours – I’m exhausted. I want to go to bed,” Girard said. When one of Girard’s actors attended to an urgent family matter just hours before the show’s Sept. 17 opening, Girard assumed his place, he said. Working without a script, Girard found a way to be both the director and the directed.

THEATER PAGE 16

Jazz group to release first record Chelsea Reed and the Fair Weather Five will release its debut album Oct. 16. TIM MULHERN The Temple News Chelsea Reed discovered her passion for jazz through an elementary school homework assignment. “In fourth grade, I was given an assignment to do a biography project, so I decided to do [the assignment] on Ella Fitzgerald,” Reed, a senior studying jazz vocal performance, said. “I was going through the

small, 40-page books to do the assignment and I picked her. Then, I started getting hungry for all the other jazz knowledge I could gain, so I listened to the music. I listened to a Billie Holiday CD I had, and my love for American history and jazz sort of intertwined and developed together.” Members of Chelsea Reed and the Fair Weather Five are set to celebrate the release of the group’s self-titled debut LP on Oct. 16 with a show at Time Restaurant, Whiskey Bar & Taproom on 13th and Sansom streets. The singer and her bandmates – Noah Hocker on trumpet, Chris Oatts on saxophone, Jake Kelberman on guitar, Joe Plowman on bass and Austin Wagner on

LIFESTYLE DESK 215-204-7416

drums – drew heavily on jazz standards as material for the album. “All but one of the songs [on the album] are actually old jazz standards, so we didn’t write most of the tunes,” Reed said. “We got a list of songs that were in the public domain from Bell Tower Music. They were all written before 1924, so anybody can record them. We just happened to make our own original arrangements of those tunes. It was a pretty collaborative process.” The singer said while on tour in 2013, the band spent time listening to recordings of the old standards and figuring out ways to

JAZZ PAGE 8

LIFESTYLE@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

“I had been

doing it throughout my life, and I just didn’t want to stop.


LIFESTYLE

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

First EP for student jazz musicians JAZZ PAGE 7

KARA MILSTEIN TTN

LeAnn Erickson, a film and media arts professor, produced “Top Secret Rosies: The Female Computers of WWII.”

Professor brings feminism to film A film and media arts professor produced a film about empowered women during WWII. EMILY SCOTT The Temple News Filmmaking, feminism and World War II military calculations have something in common: LeAnn Erickson. Erickson is an associate professor in the film and media arts department with more than 25 years of filmmaking experience and has created several documentaries, experimental videos and animations since the mid-1990s. Her most recent film, “Top Secret Rosies: The Female Computers of WWII,” was a story she accidentally discovered. The award-winning filmmaker was working on another project, “Neighbor Ladies,” which included a group of women in the Mount Airy neighborhood of Philadelphia who were fighting “blockbusting.” Erickson said the process of “blockbusting” occurs when real estate agents sell property to African Americans in a primarily white neighborhood and then suggest to the white neighbors that they should move. Erickson said this process can cause the demographic of a neighborhood to totally change over a month or two. The women involved in the piece were interested in living in integrated neighborhoods. Two of the women, who are twin sisters, started a real estate agency in the 1960s, something practically unheard of at the time. “I was at their house scanning photographs for the documentary and they were reminiscing over old photos,” Erickson said. Erickson said she saw a photo that was taken while the sisters were working for the army during the war.

Erickson then discovered that these sisters were recruited out of high school to perform math calculations for the military. Many people believe the women’s work was instrumental in the allies winning the war, Erickson said. “I realized I had discovered an unknown story,” Erickson said. She told the sisters once she finished “Neighbor Ladies,” she would fundraise and return to start another film on their military work. It took seven years, but Erickson was able to finish “Top Secret Rosies” in 2010. Since then the film has been screened for Google, Apple and various other film festivals. It has left an impact on the technology world, Erickson said, which surprised her. The film professor assumed her primary audience would include World War II history buffs. Her biggest audience ended up being those in the technology realm – particularly women. “It was a lost story of women and computer history, so it has this resonance,” Erickson said. She said she views “Top Secret Rosies” as a historical documentary and thinks of her newly released interactive book app, “The Computer Wore Heels,” as a form of documentary too. Erickson also visited several high schools and colleges while on tour for her film and met numerous women who are studying computer engineering or mathematics. “Lots of [the students] approached me and said, ‘I wish I would’ve known about this story when I was a kid,’” Erickson said. Erickson, inspired by the women she had met, decided to create an interactive book application for the iPad. For the app, she decided to focus on the three women involved with “math wizardry,” or three women who had a passion for math and were teenagers at the time of the war. She wanted to gear the app to-

ward young girls who often lose interest in math and science once they hit junior high, she said. Erickson hopes young girls will become inspired after discovering that the first original programmers of the first electronic computer were women. The app, Erickson said, is aimed toward late elementary, early middle school children. She said her parents instilled in her a sense of fairness and that they pushed the “American Dream.” “The reality is that’s not how it is … and these stories won’t be told otherwise,” Erickson said of her

strong interest in women’s history. Erickson calls it her “mission” to tell these unknown stories. Her audience for the app also includes librarians and teachers in the hopes that they will place it the hands of young adults. “Role models are important, and I hope the women in this story can serve as [role models] to young girls,” Erickson said. * emily.ivy.scott@temple.edu T @emilyscott315

add a personal touch to many of its favorites. The members of the band said they feel a strong connection to the city and the music scene they are a part of. “I definitely identify a lot with Philadelphia,” Reed said. “This is where I got my start as a musician and it’s my musical home. We all live in Philadelphia and people know us as a band from Philly. We are supported by dancers and other musicians in Philadelphia, so I feel that being a part of Philly’s music scene and just the city itself is a big part of our identity as a band.” Produced by Bell Tower Music’s Aaron Levinson and Jack Klotz, a media studies and production professor, the album covers jazz standards by the likes of Spencer Williams, Porter Grainger and Everett Robbins. “Working with Bell Tower Music was awesome because they found us and set up all these shows [for the band],” Reed said. “They recorded our album and have done all the marketing for the album at absolutely no cost to us – and we are not the only band on the label.” Bell Tower Music has most recently supported fellow Temple students Mo Lowda and the Humble. Reed said she is grateful for the opportunities the Temple-based record label has given the band. “[The label] is student-run, but I have to give a big shout out to Aaron Levinson and Jack Klotz,” Reed said. “They are the teachers and main producers at Bell Tower. They have given a lot of advice and free professional help with Chelsea Reed / group member managing the band.” Reed and her bandmates handpicked the lineup for the Oct. 16 show at Time and called upon friends and bands they have previously shared a stage with to help celebrate the album release. “For the show, we have Ginger Coyle, who is a friend of mine and an amazing singer-songwriter, and Midwestern Exposure,” Reed said. “[Midwestern Exposure] was on the same bill as us for a show at Connie’s Ric-Rac in South Philadelphia. We grabbed that show because we had only been a band for about six weeks. Midwestern Exposure played before us, and I remember thinking ‘Oh, that fits really nicely.’ When I was looking for bands [for the record release show], they agreed to do it.” Reed, a full-time student, said she must find time every day to balance her commitments to both school and music. “I feel overworked and overwhelmed all the time,” Reed said. “I love it so much, so I still have the energy to push forward. I’m stressed and burned out a lot, but when I get to perform I am really happy. I get stressed out about little things like dealing with venue managers, printing out charts for the band or making sure everyone is on time.” Still, Reed stays positive about her busy schedule. “When you think about it, my job is not hard and really awesome,” Reed said. “I have to keep thinking about that when I am onstage. I make music with my best friends. We hang out everyday, and we are happy people.”

“This is where

I got my start as a musician, and it’s my musical home.

* timothy.mulhern@temple.edu

LeAnne Erickson aims to tell unknown stories in her films.

KARA MILSTEIN TTN

Classic musicians unite to form ‘The Hit Men’ Five musicians came together to play the hits that made them famous. ALEXA ZIZZI The Temple News Four years ago, Lee Shapiro, former member of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, called up his bandmate Gerry Polci with what Shapiro called “the offer of a lifetime.” The former stars got together with a few other big names in the music business whom they’ve known for more than 40 years to form a new music group and relive their glory days of rock ‘n’ roll. “The Hit Men,” a group of five musical experts, take its audience on a trip down memory lane, performing original hit music from the ‘60s, ‘70s

and ‘80s. This group of musicians, producers, composers, arrangers and more has reunited to bring back classic hits the members have performed for decades. “As I look across the stage, I think about how I’m doing the same things I was in my 20s,” Shapiro said. “To be doing those same things now with some of the best guys I know, it’s truly amazing.” The group was originally scheduled to perform at the Temple Performing Arts Center on Oct. 9, but the show has been postponed until a later date. Unlike most cover bands, many of the songs that the group performs are original songs that members made famous decades prior. Polci, drummer and vocalist, was the original lead singer of the classic '70s hit, “Oh What a Night” by Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, and Shap-

iro was the original arranger. Other members of the band have also worked with some of the biggest names in music. Larry Gates, vocalist, composer and lyricist, has worked with Desmond Child, who made music for Bon Jovi, Aerosmith, Kiss and Cher. Gates, a studio musician and vocalist, has also been featured on many national television commercials. Jimmy Ryan, vocalist, guitarist and composer and Russ Velazquez, vocalist, composer, arranger and producer, also worked with well-known names. Ryan was formerly a lead guitarist for groups like The Critters and singer Carly Simon, and his music is still currently playing on the air for CNBC. The Hit Men transports its audience through time by projecting images in the background as the band

performs. “We show snippets of our history and legacy from back in the day,” Shapiro said. “We like to call them our baby pictures. We are the only group that does that. Because we were actually there, we can talk first person, whereas tribute and cover bands are talking third person. “We don’t do any songs someone in the band didn’t have something to do with. If we do Elton John, it’s because Jimmy Ryan was involved in that Elton John song and so on,” he said. Shapiro highlighted the connection between different eras of music and said all generations can relate to the songs, whether people grew up in the ‘60s, ‘70s, ‘80s, or have grown up listening to their parent's music. “Original oldies are classic tunes that everyone sings along with – the melody and lyrics are so memorable,

they stay with you,” Shapiro said. “Today’s performers are great, but I don’t really hear a record. Besides the occasional song like ‘Happy’ by Pharrell, you don’t really walk around singing it all the time. It’s not profound, it’s still pertinent. If you play Iggy Azalea, it’s good and all, but if you play it without the record, you can’t truly sing along to it.” The Hit Men tour all over the country and perform various television specials and holiday shows in New York. They have also released two CDs, live and recorded, and have a holiday album on the way. Shapiro sums up the experience of The Hit Men’s live performance with one expression: “I guarantee that you leave the concert happier and younger than when you got there,” he said. * alexa.zizzi@temple.edu


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT NONPROFIT DANCE COMPANY STAYS SHARP

ILLUSTRATIONS STAY ORGANIC

SHARP Dance Company is celebrating its ninth anniversary with a reunion show from Oct. 9-17. PAGE 10

The Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators study, observe and recreate plant life with their art. PAGE 10

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Costume design gets spooky for Halloween Local workspace NextFab hosted a Halloween costume workshop.

BRIANNA SPAUSE TTN

Wayne Lipscomb (right) became emotional during a local tournament held in honor of her late son, who was an officer with the Philadelphia Police.

Hoops for Walker The Battle of the Badges basketball tournament was held in honor of late Philadelphia police officer Moses Walker Jr.

T

BRIANNA SPAUSE | The Temple News

he court buzzed

BRIANNA SPAUSE TTN

Jerome Hall gives Wayne Lipscomb a plaque in memory of her son, and fallen officer Moses Walker Jr.

with the distinct sounds of crowd approval and blips of police radio. Missing the prompt 7 p.m. start time meant standing room only in the packed gym, as approximately 100 guests sat in on the Battle of the Badges basketball tournament at Gustine Recreation Center on Oct. 3. The charitable tournament landed for the first time in Philadelphia from Oct. 3-5 to honor late officer Moses Walker Jr., who was shot and killed off-duty in August 2012 on Cecil B. Moore Ave. Walker Jr. served 19 years in the 22nd police district, which monitors North Philadelphia and the area surrounding Temple. Officer Jerome Hall began Battle of the

Badges in Baltimore in 2000. Hall organized what he planned to be a one-time fundraiser in honor of his mentor and fallen officer, Maryland State Trooper Edward M. Toatley. “I had been playing law enforcement basketball for a few years, and I just wanted to raise money for [Toatley’s] son to go to college,” Hall said. “I gave him $2,000 to go to [the University of Connecticut].” Word spread rapidly when the New York Police Department’s team won the $2,000 tournament, Hall said. Calls came in from Ohio, Nevada, and other distant states that wanted to be a part of the tournament. Hall recruited the help of retired Lieutenant Melody Smith, and was able to launch a nation-wide program.

HOOPS PAGE 13

Southern-inspired burger takes first

Ten people sit around a table, surrounded by 3D printers, vacuum formers and sewing machines to make a costume. Their deadline is Oct. 31. The 10 designers attended the first in a series of Halloween costume design courses at NextFab, a local collaborative, high-tech workspace. Two instructors at NextFab, James Brown, manager of metal processes, and Kaitlyn DeBiasse, technical supervisor of metal processes, are prepared to help them in coming up with and making their very own costumes. This is NextFab’s first ever costume design ALBERT HONG course which was a result Geeking Out of Brown and DeBiasse’s enthusiasm with the idea of dressing up in something they make with their own hands. Brown’s expertise with props has yielded items such as ray guns and steampunkinspired goggles which were seen in an episode of ABC’s “Castle.” DeBiasse’s love for costume-making shows with her excitement in taking it beyond Halloween with creations like a terrifyingly disfigured Gizmo from “Gremlins.” Besides that, the two are really passionate about making and teaching people how to do what they do, and thought a Halloween course seemed like a good entryway. “I think it’s exciting, all the capabilities in terms of making that go on in NextFab,” DeBiasse said. “To open people up to trying different processes or using materials and methods they wouldn’t normally use and experiment with making.” “We wanted to promote that through this,” DeBiasse added. The guests for last Wednesday’s class arrived with various ideas for their costumes, including a strawberry, Radiohead, Roger Rabbit and Jack Skellington. I hadn’t even given it much thought, but when I was asked about what costume I would like to make, I blurted out my choice of Locust from the Gears of War game series. It turned out that Brown knew exactly what would constitute that costume and how

COSTUMES PAGE 13

Justin Swain, the executive chef at South Street restaurant Rex 1516, won this year’s Battle of the Burger for his pimento cheeseburger. EAMON DREISBACH The Temple News After all the patties had been flipped and as the aroma of sizzling beef lingered in the air, Rex 1516’s pimento burger rose from the charcoal to be declared the winner of Philadelphia Magazine’s Battle of the Burgers on Sept.10. A culinary creation of Rex 1516’s executive chef, Justin Swain, the burger took down 19 other restaurants during the final round of the competition. The pimento burger’s blend of pimento cheese, bacon, red onions and crisp lettuce allowed it to rise to victory over more than 50 other Philadelphia eateries competing in the competition. Swain, a 27-year-old graduate of the Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College, attributed his burger’s success at the event to the swift but steady hands of himself and his fellow chefs. “We come in with our heads down ready to work,” Swain said. “Our goal is to never have a line. It’s probably the key to our success. We take pride in our food and our work.” Swain has worked at Rex 1516 since its opening just over two years ago, and has been in the restaurant business for four years. The idea for the pimento burger sprung from Swain’s experimentation with pimento cheese on a burger for his own enjoyment, and later became a part of the restaurant’s menu. Unlike conventional

A&E DESK 215-204-7416

MEAGHAN POGUE TTN

Philadelphia native Justin Swain beat 19 other local chef’s with his pimento cheeseburger in this year’s Battle of the Burger.

burgers, the pimento burger’s cheese is scooped and placed onto the patty rather than thrown on as a slice. For Swain and the rest of the staff of Rex 1516, there was no hesitation in deciding to enter the competition. “We wanted to be part of it because we are proud of our burg-

er,” Swain said. “We knew we could get to the final together.” This year’s Battle of The Burgers, held at The Piazza at Schmidt’s on North 2nd Street, kicked off with a preliminary round of voting where the public was asked to vote on their favorite Phila-

ARTSandENTERTAINMENT@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

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Organic illustrations shown at local arboretum A local group dedicates its time to producing and showcasing botanical art. ANGELA GERVASI The Temple News Philadelphia is often portrayed artistically through illustrations of a sweeping skyline, but Sarah Maxwell believes the Philadelphia area contains a subtler brand of art: one that stems straight from the soil. Maxwell, a former college professor and vice president of marketing at the international company Aramark, said she hadn’t planned on being a botanical illustrator. “I had no interest in botanical art,” Maxwell said. “Until I saw it.” Maxwell is one of many artists involved in the Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators, an association less than 20 years old of about 75 illustrators who are dedicated to exchanging ideas about, studying and showcasing botanical art. The society also intends to educate college students about the foundations and fine-tunings of botanical art through a unique partnership with Arcadia University. A concentrated, highly-focused education on botany is required to learn and master botanical illustration, Maxwell said. “Botanical artists want to show a plant very accurately and they’re very concerned about the accuracy,” Maxwell said. “It’s very different than other kinds of arts because the emphasis really is on nature, and it’s celebrating

nature as opposed to celebrating the painter.” Brenda Aiken, a prominent member of PSBI, does not hesitate to disclose the difficulties, rewards, trials and tribulations of a botanical artist. Aiken had always been an artist, but, like Maxwell, botanical art was not initially part of the plan. “I didn’t really know what I wanted to concentrate on and I had always been afraid of watercolor,” Aiken said, referencing watercolor as the primary painting tool for botanical illustrators. Aiken got over her fear one day with the help of her friend. “I sort of wandered around with the watercolors myself, and my husband saw that I was doing this and he read in the Inquirer that the Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators was celebrating its 10th anniversary,” Aiken said. “It was an article about what PSBI was all about and some of the members and so forth and it gave a list of teachers and he said, ‘I think this is what you need.’” Aiken said she quickly fell in love with the practice. Only two of the Society’s members – including Maxwell- live within the city limits. “I think botanical artists generally love plants so they generally love to have a garden and it’s difficult to have a garden in the city,” Maxwell said. However, Maxwell said she found a few community gardens that make perfect spots to paint flowers in the city. Although many of the artists live just outside Philadelphia, many of them come into the city for the annual

Philadelphia Flower Show, where their illustrations can be displayed alongside the plethora of flowers. Each botanical artist can submit two paintings, and three jurors must approve each of those paintings in order to be displayed at the show. “We’ve kept some of the comments that people write down, and they just love it,” Maxwell said. “And at the flower show we have people who come to our booth every year. Last year it was rather hard to find us. But some die-hards did find us.” Aside from the Philadelphia Flower Show, the botanical artists meet when their pieces are showcased at the Jenkins Arboretum. “I think anyone who goes to an arboretum or knows of one is a plant person and so people tend to react to the paintings for their realism,” Aiken said. “They look at them and say, ‘Oh yes, that is the way that grows.’ And I think they appreciate that.” What sets botanical art apart from so many different art forms it not only its specificity, but, Aiken said, its high prioritization of realism. The botanical painter must paint as accurately as possible, by showing each and every detail of the plant. Aiken said making a flower look like a “pretty picture” is not the goal of a botanical artist. “It’s very detailed,” she said. “You must paint plants and vegetation as they grow…You can’t decide ‘my composition is unbalanced, I’m going to stick a leaf over here.’ Unless the leaf actually grows organically from that particular point you can’t add it.

COURTESY CAROL HABIG

Carol Habig is a botanical illustrator and member of the group.

It’s very exact. You must do what the plant dictates and I like that. I like that order of it. I guess I’m kind of nitpicky: I like details.” Often these illustrations are used in publications that teach the anatomy and growth of flowers, giving botanical

art an almost scientific aspect. “Quite often a plant will grab you and say ‘paint me’ because it’s something you find interesting,” Aiken said. “Once you take that plant into your world, the world of the artists and paint it as it is, it becomes part of you.”

Festival fosters the vision for Philadelphia design DesignPhiladelphia is one of the nation’s largest and oldest design events. JARED WHALEN The Temple News Bryan Satalino sits at a table with three Tyler students. Pencils make adjustments to sketches as the creative minds critique one another’s thoughts. On the table are simple hand drawn blueprints of designs that only exist in his and the young designers’ minds. For this year’s 10th anniversary of the DesignPhiladelphia Festival, it is Satalino’s intention to change that and make these products available to the public. Satalino, a master’s of fine arts candidate at Tyler, and his students, are just a few of the designers presenting at this year’s DesignPhiladelphia Festival, running from Oct. 9-17. Showcas-

ing more than 400 practicing architects, designers and creative professionals, it is one of the nation’s oldest and largest design events. For the last decade, the DesignPhiladelphia Festival has brought together designers from various fields – graphic design, fashion, urban design, interior, architecture and many more – to demonstrate Philadelphia’s comeback as a modern city influenced by technology and design. The festival is a signature event of the Center for Architecture. “We really hoped to make it clear that there was so much more going on Philadelphia than anyone could imagine in the creative area,” said Hilary Jay, cofounder and director of DesignPhiladelphia. “We have so much going on and we just don’t recognize it. We see New York, we see L.A., we see [San Francisco], we see Paris, we see London, but we don’t see what’s going on in our own backyard.” Philadelphia, a growing leader in

the design community, boasts seven universities with quality design programs. Over the course of the nine days, attendees can learn about the world of design by visiting any of the more than 120 exhibits, workshops, demonstrations, tours, lectures and events. Guests can also purchase locally designed and produced products at several boutiques and pop-ups throughout the city. Most of the events are free to enter. A few of these events include the first Old City Fest, StylePOP at Dilworth Park and the AIA Bookstore Makers Market. The event draws a wide demographic of people of all ages and professions and has had more than 235,000 guests attend in previous years. “We get all sorts of people that are interested in how design changes lives,” Jay said. “Design is a thread that runs through everything and it affects everything we do everyday, from how we get dressed in the morning to the path that we take on our bicycles or

on the train or bus or car. I think that it’s an awakening for people to realize that really everything we do is influenced by design.” Among these presentations will be Satalino and his three students. Part of a collaborative independent study program called, “The Hatchery,” these design students, or “hatchlings,” are given the opportunity to create a product from start to finish and put it up for sale. This year, the hatchlings will be selling their products at the Hatchery Pop-Up Market from Oct. 10-11 and 16-17. In its third semester, the Hatchery has created various types of products, including iPhone cases, a fashion clothing line and a chicken shaped clock called a cluck. Satalino hopes that the art market will be a good opportunity for the students that plays into the vision of the program. “My dream would be that these students go on and start their own companies,” Satalino said. “[That] they be-

come successful graphic designers obviously, but they go on and have these amazing companies; that they’re able to produce really great goods and solve problems that people didn’t even know existed.” This vision of the power of design is fostered by DesignPhiladelphia, stating on its website that its events are “instrumental in incubating start-ups, instigating neighborhood change, assembling thought leaders and fostering positive community growth.” “I want my students to feel like they have the ability to make change,” Satalino said. In addition to the Hatchery PopUp Market, Temple will be presenting a lecture from graphic designer Paula Scher on Oct. 16 and the Art Market at Tyler on Oct. 10 and 11. * jared.whalen@temple.edu

Nonprofit dance company celebrates ninth year SHARP Dance Company was formed after dancer Diane SharpNachsin had to retire in 2002. VICTORIA MIER The Temple News When Diane Sharp-Nachsin was forced to retire from dancing due to a series of successive injuries at 32 years old, three dancers from her old company, who had become her dear friends, had a question: “When are you going to start your own dance company?” To which Sharp-Nachsin answered, “Are all your old a---s going to dance for me?” They said yes. Three years later, SHARP Dance Company was formed in 2005. As the artistic director of the nonprofit, Sharp-Nachsin is focused on translating raw emotions into modern dance and inviting the audience to partake in what she calls “an experience, not a performance.” Sharp-Nachsin’s life-altering diagnosis – a doctor saying she would never dance again – does not stop her from being heavily involved in the Philadelphia dance world, from taking ballet classes or trying to demonstrate a move during rehearsal, which normally ends in Sharp-Nachsin and the dancers giggling infectiously. She said, however, her body is not what it used to be. “I have to laugh at it,” Sharp-Nachsin said. Caroline Butcher has danced with SHARP for almost two years, and has found the same joy and laughter in working with the company. “We laugh a lot,” Butcher said. “It helps me laugh at myself, and take myself a little less seriously.” And that is so integral to what the company

does, Sharp-Nachsin said. “I can train you to be a better dancer, but I can’t teach you to be a better person,” SharpNachsin said, one side of her mouth curving up into a smile. Everyone who dances at SHARP shares a similar mindset, and therefore become very close, according to Sharp-Nachsin. When the company tours, all members pile into a van and rent a house together, allowing them to “wake up and have coffee and laugh. And drink a lot of wine,” SharpNachsin said. It is those tight-knit relationships that both Sharp and Butcher said they think make SHARP Dance so different from other companies. “I believe SHARP is about the relationships between dancers, almost more than the dance itself,” Butcher said. “There’s something deeper because we care so much about each other. And I’ve learned lot – dance can be a very self-centered world, but there are dancers who don’t think that way, who put the art before themselves.” Sharp-Nachsin said that she has loved seeing the way her dancers’ real lives intertwined with each other, how they became fast friends, some even moving in together. The company will be running a reunion show from Oct. 10-12 featuring past company members as well as current ones, meshing the old with the new. Originally, Sharp-Nachsin wanted to do a reunion performance at the 10-year mark. But, she recently met a painter from Detroit named Kristin Beaver, and immediately knew she wanted to do a large collaboration with her. “So I was like, ‘You know what? It’s going to be our nine-year anniversary show, because I’m in charge!’” Sharp-Nachsin said. Sharp-Nachsin asked some retired dancers and some who have gone on to other opportuni-

COURTESY SHARP DANCE COMPANY

Artistic director Diane Sharp-Nachsin said her company’s performances are all about emotion.

ties in the dance world to be a part of the performance, creating what she sees as an interesting mix. With 15 dancers involved, Sharp-Nachsin has a lot of talent to work with. Butcher said she is excited at the prospect of dancing with alumni of SHARP. Butcher said she thinks that it will bring a “whole new energy” to see dancers do their old parts – an almost spiritual quality. “A lot of the people I chose to bring back are the ones who say they’re part of the SHARP family,” Sharp-Nachsin said. “The crazy SHARP family. We rope you in for life.” Sharp-Nachsin likes to say that the company’s work is technically driven, but story-based.

She finds that a lot of the dance pieces have a strong narrative behind them, particularly ones surrounding social issues. SHARP has done performances based on pollution, mental illness and domestic abuse. Though the topics vary, Sharp-Nachsin believes everyone who walks through the theater doors is there for an experience, not necessarily a performance. “I just want people to really get something out of it, to have an emotional response,” SharpNachsin said. “That’s why our work tends to be story-driven. I want you to feel something.” * victoria.mier@temple.edu


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

PAGE 11

Graduate photographer hits the road Danielle Parsons has already been on tour three times with bands. VICTORIA MIER The Temple News The worst photograph Danielle Parsons ever took in her life appeared on a Jones Soda bottle for the world to see. Granted, she was only 13 years old at the time, and had just won a photography contest with the company. Now, Parsons said seeing her work broadcast at such a young age made her realize she wanted to be a photographer. “I was never the star of anything, or I was always the weird one,” Parsons, 23, said. “So it just didn’t feel real. My mom still talks about it. Sometimes I’ll completely forget and she’ll find the bottle and ask me if I remember.” The 2014 Temple graduate started her career in photography early, picking up her mom’s old 35mm film camera when she was 12 years old. Parsons credits learning on film as a huge reason for her success. “I was pretty much hooked once I picked it up,” Parsons said. “And I think that learning on film forces you to actually understand how the camera works.” Parsons said she enhanced her knowledge further with film photography classes in high school. She enjoyed the medium so much because it did not allow for what she calls the “trial and error” of digital photography. The other largely influential factor in Parsons’ life as a child and young adult was music. Parsons started going to live shows in the Doylestown

area when she was 14 years old, where she met some of her closest friends. That early love of music opened up a natural career path for Parsons – music photography. Parsons said she grew up in the local music scene, always with her camera by her side. Parsons has been on tour three times. The first time, she hit the road with Pennsylvania pop-punk band Tigers Jaw in January of 2010 to Canada for a smaller tour, lasting about a week and a half. “The second time, I went on Tigers Jaw’s full U.S. tour in July of 2010, and that was crazy,” Parsons said. “None of us had been away on a tour for three weeks before. We traveled from Wilkes-Barre to California – and back, in a van.” Parsons said it was exciting to wake up in a different state each day and get a chance to visit so many venues she had heard about growing up – an amazing experience for the then-college freshman. Parsons was invited back on tour with Tigers Jaw when the band supported Touché Amoré this past July. “I think I approached it differently, being a little older,” Parsons said. “I think I was more appreciative and took it in a little bit more. It was way too short!” Parsons said while on tour she ran into issues in the music world – just because she’s a female. “All the time,” Parsons said. “All the time. Last summer, I was trying to get my photo pass, and one of the security guards kept asking me if I was a groupie.” Though she said she has not faced this issue quite as much since becoming an established photographer, Par-

Continued from page 9

BURGER

delphia burger through Philadelphia Magazine’s website. The top 20 restaurants from that round were then selected and competed in an all day, buffet-style cookout, where attendees were able to sample every eatery’s different burger and cast a vote for its favorite. For the victory, Rex 1516’s staff members won a vacation trip to Miami. ADVERTISEMENT

sons said that starting out, it was much worse. People accused her of only getting press passes to shoot shows so she could, “have sex with band guys.” “I grew up with these guys,” Parsons said. “If I wanted to do it, I would’ve done it by now.” Just being a female involved in music, Parsons said, can lead to a lot of problems – people always seem to be questioning her motives, she said. She felt as though it is best to “stick up for yourself.” Parsons said she’s found that her female friends, who are band members, tour managers and “merch-girls,” often run into issues. “Things seem like they’re getting a little better, though,” Parsons said. Parsons said she is grateful for being able to shoot what she calls “so many insane shows” in Philadelphia, an

COURTESY DANIELLE PARSONS PHOTOGRAPHY

Danielle Parsons toured with Tigers Jaw and Touché Amoré (above) this past July.

area she considers to have a number of bands that people are both invested in and wildly excited to see live, and being

For Swain, the first taste of absolute victory came with a platter of positive emotions. “[I just thought] we finally did it,” Swain said. “We had done competitions in the past and almost made it, so we were relieved to finally win one.” Although Rex1516 has had success with various other culinary competitions, including the Philadelphia Burger Brawl, this year’s Battle of the Burger marks the restaurant’s only first-place win. During the fury of the competition, the only

in the middle of all the energy is an incredible experience for her. “It’s an amazing feeling,”

problem Swain said he was having to leave his grill to be interviewed by the press. Since the pimento burger’s success at the burger showdown, business has been booming at Rex 1516, according to Swain. “People come in all the time now to try the different burgers,” Swain said. While it was Rex’s 1516’s burger that earned them a first place prize, the eatery specializes in far more than just burgers. When he’s not preparing his signature sandwich, Swain enjoys cooking beef brisket. Rex 1516 also plans on participating

Parsons said. “I don’t think I would want to do this anywhere else.” * victoria.mier@temple.edu

in the High Steaks Great Philly Cheesesteak Challenge on 16th and 17th streets Oct. 12. Despite the fact that it was his own burger that won his home-restaurant the competition, Swain makes it very clear that victories like these are not an individual effort. “We have a lot of great staff here,” Swain said. “It took the entire kitchen, servers and everyone in between to make this possible.” * eamon.dreisbach@temple.edu


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

ALLAN BARNES TTN

Beach Fossil played at Boot & Saddle Sept. 28. Doors opened at 8 p.m. last Sunday and the event was 21 and over. Heavenly Beat and Axxa/Abraxas also played.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

Event held in honor of fallen officer HOOPS PAGE 9 “It was supposed to be a one-time thing to send Antoine to college,” Smith said. “[Hall] got all kinds of praise and people said that we couldn’t do this just once. This is his calling. He can do anything he puts his mind to, and has been a blessing to a lot of families.” Fourteen years later, Hall has traveled across the United States hosting several basketball tournaments every year in honor of law enforcement officials. The Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Tournament takes place in January and Battle of the Badges is held in October. For the past five summers, Hall has also hosted a Battle of the Badges I-95 tournament in July, but plans to cut down to the main two tournaments in the future. After 22 tournaments, Hall said the organization has raised more than $12,000. The Philadelphia pit stop marks the first tournament of its kind in the city, and extended the motto to brotherly and sisterly love. The first game of the evening was a historical match-up between two women’s teams – Philly’s Finest and the Department of Corrections All-Stars from BRIANNA SPAUSE TTN Maryland. With a final score of 42-38 in over- This year’s basketball tournament was the only law enforcement event with Battle of the Badges on time, the home team took the win in the only law the East Coast that included women. The funds will directly benefit the Moses Walker Jr. Foundation. enforcement basketball tournament to include Battle of the Badges will direct all of the money forgotten,” Johnson-Speight said. “They are ofwomen on the East Coast. raised from the tournament to the Moses Walker ten times lost in the line of duty, and that’s quite “It’s history in the making,” Hall said. “I just Jr. Foundation. a sacrifice for a family to have someone taken want these families to know that their loss is our “It was so unexpected,” Lipscomb said. “It when they’re trying to protect against violence loss. When their family member put their right was amazing to know that people cared about my when he lived to prevent just that. To have his hand up and took an oath, it was to protect and Moses in Philadelphia. Interest from outside of mom lose him in that way, this says to her, ‘We serve their city but it was also to protect and serve the city says a lot about the organization and the appreciate you and we care that you gave your their brothers and sisters. It’s something I just people who are dedicated to it.” son, in a sense, to the community.’” have to do.” Hall describes law enforceThe celebration of this brotherhood is illusThe funds from the 2014 ment as a brotherhood that will trated in different ways, and what Hall has done tournament will directly benefit uplift the downtrodden and al- has universalized that bond by honoring different the Moses Walker Jr. Foundation, ways extend a hand. These fun- officers in different cities, all under the name of which Wayne Lipscomb, Walker damental principals are essential the same game. Jr.’s mother, created in the days to law enforcement professions, The boys in blue swiftly navigated the courts following his death. Each year, and easily noticed. - in nine different shades of blue that is. In their the foundation awards a $1,000 “My heart is so full,” Lip- strikingly similar basketball uniforms, their devoscholarship to a single parent with scomb said. “I’ll run into police tion to an honorable cause and a healthy, heata GPA of 3.0 or above, and can be officers and they will say to me, ed banter between teams, these public servants applied to financial aid for higher ‘Ms. Wayne, I’m your son now showed their unity. education, or to pay the recipient’s – you’re family.’ Everyone has Only one stood apart however, as New York rent. been so kind and supportive. If I Department of Corrections Rikers Island Gunners “[Walker Jr.] was my hero,” need anything I know I can pick took the title of 2014 Battle of the Badge champiJerome Hall / officer, event Lipscomb said. “I learned so much ons. The team was bestowed with bragging rights organizer up the phone and call.” from him about being a good perDorothy Johnson-Speight, for one year, until the tournament returns in Ocson and I just wanted to do somean attendant and founder and CEO of Mothers tober 2015 to an undetermined location in either thing to pay it forward.” in Charge, an organization focused on education Houston, Miami, or Virginia Beach. In the three years that the scholarship has and prevention of homicides, said that in law enbeen awarded, Lipscomb has been the sole source forcement, there is a sense of brotherhood. * brianna.spause@temple.edu of funding. In recognition of Lipscomb’s gen“It’s important that they support the families erosity and positive impact on the community, of the fallen and let them know that they are not

“I just want

these families to know that their loss is our loss... It’s just something I have to do.

NextFab high-tech design space hosts Halloween costume workshop class COSTUMES PAGE 9 it would come to be using lightweight foam. The afraid to try any material,” DeBiasse said. “I want main point in this introductory course was mak- to open people up to having some spirit about ing your costume cheap, fast and good. making stuff fearlessly.” While this may be a common Mark D. Kuhn IV, a mechantheme in other instructional deical engineer who co-founded his signing classes, NextFab sets itself own collective of engineers, Oat apart with the materials and proFoundry, was one of the people cesses it has available that are not present for the class. As a relaas readily accessible to the comtively new member of NextFab, mon maker. he sees the location and its com“It’s nice to show people that Mark D. Kuhn IV / class member munity as an integral source of they do have access to it because aid and inspiration for his line of we have all the facilities here that they can use,” work. Brown said. “Here, we have a sandbox so there’s “The machines are great and phenomenal a lot more choices. Our job here is to really help but being around all the people, it’s substantial,” them have a focus.” Kuhn said. “So it’s really valuable for me to inDeBiasse’s background in industrial design crease my skill set by coming down here and motivated her to reach out to the community in these are skills I can carry on for the rest of my this way. life.” “Industrial design involves so much creative “It’s cool to be in this group,” Kuhn added. problem solving in a very open way, not being “It’s electrifying.”

“It’s cool to be

in this group. It’s electrifying.”

On Oct. 8, the class will go through the sewing of the costume. On Oct. 15, the class will be about making a mask using a vacuum former and the last class on Oct. 22 will be a “catch-all” class where people will be able to get help finishing up their costumes for the big day. For the future, Brown and DeBiasse hope that this course will turn into a bigger, annual event where they would be able to dive into other aspects of the costume like KED lights and special effects makeup. “It was a great kickoff to something that will hopefully be a standard course,” DeBiasse said. “It would be pretty cool if it built up more and more every year into a really crazy NextFab Halloween party,” she added.

PAGE 13

OUT & ABOUT IOLANTA PLAYS AT THE CURTIS OPERA THEATRE THIS WEEKEND The romantic fairytale opera “Iolanta” will be playing at the Curtis Opera Theater this weekend. The event will take place from Thursday until Sunday, with multiple showings each day. The opera, which is performed in Russian with English supertitles, will be in accompaniment with the Curtis Symphony Orchestra. The story involves a protected princess, unaware of her royalty and beauty due to being blind. All of that changes when a knight finds her secret garden opens up her world to light and color. The one act lyric opera by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky shows the triumph of love over prejudice. Admission is free. -Regina Davey

BOAT HOUSE ROW HOSTS LARGEST ROWING COMPETITION IN WORLD The largest one-day rowing competition in the world will return at the end of the month. On Oct. 25 and 26, 75 high school crews, elite rowers and previous world champions will compete on the Schuylkill River for two days. Spectators of the competition are encouraged to bring chairs, blankets, binoculars and picnic along the banks of the river. The Head of the Schuylkill Regatta will not only feature competition on the water, but Kelly Drive will boast a festival at The Three Angels Statues located one mile north of Boathouse Row. A shuttle will run from Lloyd Hall to the festival area. -Emily Rolen

YOUTUBE GROUP HITS TLA The Janoskians will come to The Theatre of Living Arts Oct. 9. The group, whose name derives from “Just Another Name of Silly Kids in Another Nation”, are Australian natives and currently reside in Los Angeles. The five members claimed their fame from posting prank videos on YouTube. Their stop at the TLA is just one of their many stops on their US “Got Cake” Tour, which will include hit songs like “Set this World on Fire” and “This Freaking Song.” -Regina Davey

OUTFEST RETURNS TO THE CITY Outfest will return to the Gayborhood for its 24th year this Sunday from noon to 7 p.m. Philadelphia’s LGBTQ celebration is one of the largest national Coming Out Day festivals in the world, with more than 150 vendors. The block party will feature more than 100 organizations, vendors, bars, restaurants and entertainment. Some of the featured events are karaoke outside Knock, a dance party outside Tabu, Woody’s Outside Cafe and an outside woman’s party on Chancellor St. The main stage is located on 13th and Locust streets, on 13th and Spruce streets there will be a flea market and on 12th streets Pride Central will host vendors selling pride-centric goods. -Emily Rolen

* albert.hong@temple.edu

TRENDING IN PHILLY What’s happening this week in Philly – from news and event coverage, to shows and restaurant openings. Based on Philly area: food, music, stores, etc. For breaking news and daily updates, follow The Temple News on Twitter @TheTempleNews.

NUTTER ADDRESSES NEW MARIJUANA POLICY

PHILADELPHIA EASTER PICKS BEST BRUNCH IN THE CITY

@phillymag tweeted on Oct. 5 that Mayor Michael Nutter wants to remind everyone that although he signed Philadelphia’s new Marijuana policy into effect, smoking is already prohibited in all Philadelphia parks.

@EaterPhilly tweeted on Oct. 4 13 of the best places to eat brunch in the city. Philadelphia Eater’s updated top picks for brunch includes classic coffee shops with locally brewed coffees, anti-brunch brunch, BYOB diner brunch, vegan brunch and Cajun and Creole brunch.

GIRL CODE AND GUY CODE AT TEMPLE

SCHUYLKILL BOARDWALK OPENED OCT. 2 TO THOUSANDS

@templecenter tweeted on Sept. 30 about a chance to see the stars of MTV shows “Girl Code” and “Guy Code” at Temple’s Performing Arts Center on Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m. The evening will include stand-up and a Q&A with the cast members.

@PhiladelphiaGov tweeted on Oct. 2 that large crowds turned out for the opening of the Schuylkill Boardwalk last Thursday. The bridge, which parallels the river’s east bank, was christened by thousands of joggers, bikers and walkers after its unveiling.


LIFESTYLE

PAGE 14

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

Wagner hosts a new history class WAGNER PAGE 1 “The Wagner is a great example of where it all comes together at one site,” Finkel said. The upper gallery of the museum is similar to what Lea Stephenson, a senior art history major who is a member of the class, describes as a “walk through time.” The Wagner building is somewhat a museum in itself. The layout and content of the inside of the building have not been changed since the late 19th century, allowing a glimpse of Victorian-era architecture. The upper gallery of the museum is crowded with a myriad of items ranging from pristinely preserved wild birds, to stuffed sloths and wombats, to coral from Japan and sulphur from Sicily, to the world’s first discovered saber-tooth tiger. William Wagner originally collected these items in the 1840s and 1850s so that he could use them to teach classes on natural history. “Over the last several years, thousands of students from Temple have been assigned to go to the Wagner or have wandered in on their own,” Finkel said. “After all, it’s free. It’s wonderful. These people go there, they realize, ‘What have I been missing? I have to go back.’” In 1855, William Wagner moved his collection of artifacts to its current location in a building designed by the same architect who would go on to construct Philadelphia’s City Hall. Less than three decades later, Temple was founded nearby. The museum and the university have not had any sort of connection, despite their close proximity. Finkel calls the lack of acknowledgement between the two institutions a “900 pound gorilla in the room,” a reference to the numerous exotic animal skeletons that inhabit the museum. “Ken Finkel’s course, we have never offered one like it before,” Susan Glassman, the executive director of the museum, said. Now, the Wagner museum will be not only a place where Temple students can “wander,” but also one where they can take a college class. Finkel will be teaching an American Studies class in the spacious lecture hall and the gallery of the museum. “I think everyone realizes how

special this is, because usually we’re confined to classrooms and lecture halls and digital images projected,” Finkel said. “Here we have the actual place, the actual stuff. Thousands and thousands of artifacts and the experience is wonderful.” In the course, Museum Studies: Curating Authenticity, students will not only specifically study the artifacts of the Wagner Museum, but how and why they came about. Adam Knapp, a sophomore geology major who is in the class, said the Wagner is not new to him. “My first time visiting the Wagner was when I was 7 years old and it was overwhelming,” Knapp said. “I was deeply interested by natural history and it felt like being a kid in a candy store.” “The Wagner will form a framework for understanding museums and other cultural institutions, how they’ve developed and evolved and what their role is,” Glassman said. The class is small and heavily focused upon deep and pungent questions the students formulate in hope they will eventually pursue and research them. “The lecture hall hasn’t been changed significantly since the 19th century, so it’s an experience in and of itself,” Finkel said. “But I try not to use the traditional teaching methods of slides.” The class starts in the museum’s gallery of artifacts, where Finkel writes questions about the setting in different students’ journals. After allowing a half-hour of what he calls “beautiful silence,” the questions are shared and discussed with peers and with staff. “I’m able to discover a new detail about the specimens each week,” sophomore English major Shannon McDevitt said. Students will also study William Wagner, the founder of the museum, and the North Philadelphia setting that existed when he was alive – one comprised of farmland, countryside and villages. Finkel, who is also a Temple alumnus, stresses the importance of knowing about the rich history of North Philadelphia. McDevitt and other students are able to handle and analyze the journal in which William Wagner wrote his own thoughts and questions.

“When I was transferring out of my last college, I only applied to schools that had equestrian teams,” Williams said. “Temple competes through the “Even if I’m just grooming the horse Intercollegiate Horse Show Associathe whole time at my lesson, I am still tion and competes against eight other less stressed by the end of the day,” colleges that are also in the region.” Williams, like Jett and Troxell, has Troxell said. The Equestrian Club utilizes Jentri also been horseback riding since her Stables in Furlong to lease horses for parents enrolled her in lessons when their lessons, which take place once a she was very young. “I already loved Temple because week. Jett said the stable is “beautiful” and provides a lot of property for the I love the academics here, and I love Philadelphia,” Williams said. “But to team to practice riding. “We were the first group of fresh- find out that it also had an equestrian man to be relocated,” Jett said. “We’re team helped me make the decision that very lucky to have this space, because I wanted to go here.” Jett said the team the barn that the team attends horse races, used to use wasn’t as pumpkin picking and good. There’s a bunch went to Terror Behind of horses – some small, the Walls at Eastern some big, some lovely State Penitentiary last and some grumpy – but year as an effort to it’s great overall.” The Equestrian Club Zelina Williams / club member help members bond. Williams already had its first show of the year on Sept. 27. Troxell said all of the feels a close relationship between her riders walked away with a ribbon and teammates. “Your horse is your number one did a fantastic job. Zelina Williams, a sophomore psy- teammate,” Williams said. “But you chology major and new rider on the always have to remember that your team, said she had a great experience team is always behind you no matter what.” and placed sixth in her overall class. Williams said she hopes to one day pursue a career in therapeutic horse- *sienna.vance@temple.edu back riding – a profession that in volves counseling individuals through the recreational activity. Continued from page 7

HORSES

“Your horse is

your number one teammate.

VOICE OF THE PEOPLE

“How will the cigarette tax hike affect your smoking habits?

BRIANNA SPAUSE TTN

I’m going to just switch to a cheaper brand. I smoke Newports, but I’ll probably just switch to Mavericks.

JORDAN LE

SOPHOMORE | BIOLOGY

A student writes notes while standing beside artifacts located at the Wagner Free Institute of Science.

History professor Ken Finkel lectures during a new class offered at The Wagner this fall.

“Reading the founder’s thoughts out of his own journal makes the Wagner’s history seem so much more real and personal,” McDevitt said. “It’s a unique way to study cultural history.” “People live here, they want to understand this place and North Philadelphia has been getting short shrift compared to other neighborhoods,” Finkel

said. “This neighborhood is as historical and interesting and dynamic as any other in the city.” The Wagner Museum also speaks volumes not only about natural history, but about the evolution of urban cultures and museum studies. “This is the most authentic, original place that anyone probably has ever

KARA MILSTEIN TTN

KARA MILSTEIN TTN

been in – more authentic than most museums that have been created,” Finkel said. * angela.gervasi@temple.edu

Scholarship opens door to East The Freeman Foundation Scholarship is allowing students to study in Asia. JASMINE JOHNSON The Temple News Study abroad students that have the desire to participate in creditoffered internships while studying at Temple University, Japan Campus are now able to apply for additional scholarship funding. The Freeman Foundation is a private and philanthropic foundation dedicated to augmenting international understanding between the United States and the nations of East Asia. The foundation recently provided Temple with a grant that will fund scholarships for selected study abroad Japan participants. Students that are interested in participating for fall or spring semesters may apply for the scholarship, which is valued at up to $4,000. Students that are interested in summer internships can apply for scholarships up to $5,000. In conjunction with receiving additional funding, students named Freeman Scholars are each matched with a professional mentor in Tokyo that will guide students through Japanese cul-

ture, life in Tokyo and general career advice. Fall 2013 Freeman Scholar Jordan Sievers said, “It’s not just money, it’s about this package deal of support financially and what the mentor can do for you.” Sievers, a film and media arts major who graduated this past spring, had the opportunity to complete an internship with The Japan Times, in the life and culture section. He said one of his favorite opportunities was getting to interview famous Spanish guitarist Juan Manuel Cañizares. Sievers said he was shocked at the positive comments he received from Cañizares at the end of the interview, who said Sievers’ interview was the best of many interviews he had experienced that day. Sievers said he studied with people from all over the world, including a surprising amount of Americans that he said go to Temple University Japan for their full four-year degree. Sievers said he also loved the fact that the class sizes at TUJ are small. “There are no big lecture halls, which was good because the teachers can get to know everyone, opposed to [the] few classes that I have [on Main Campus], where some lecture halls are big and makes it hard for teachers to notice you,” Sievers said.

Sievers had an opportunity to take on a project writing his own short film. He described the film as a “Japanese centric” and in Spring 2014, he was awarded for his project at the TUJ Film Festival. Sievers said he will be returning to Japan as an English teacher next year in the spring. He said he is willing to become fluent in Japanese and will eventually work in the Japanese television or entertainment marketing industry. Manager of Outreach and Communication for Education Abroad Suzanne Willever said the internship program is a great opportunity for study abroad students to get outside of their comfort zone. “There are definitely some growing pains, but it’s a good thing,” Willever said. “You see how much you grow and change from the experience; you’re grateful for all of the challenges that came with that.” * jasmine.johnson@temple.edu

“I live in New Jersey, so I will just buy cigarettes at home. It used to be that they were much cheaper in Philly.”

“I’m trying to quit now. It’s a bad message for kids.”

SALLY BURTNICK

MAXWELL MINKA

SENIOR | MSP

JUNIOR | FILM AND MEDIA ARTS


LIFESTYLE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

PAGE 15

GIs of Comedy group heals veterans through power of humor A group of veterans and comedians visited Main Campus. ANMOL HEGDE The Temple News 26.

Thom Tran had a heart attack when he was

When his doctor asked him the last time he relaxed, he said he hadn’t felt relaxed since he was 21. Now the 35-year-old Iraq War veteran is a stand up comedian. “My buddy owned a comedy club and started feeding me jokes, and I started getting good,” Tran said. “I was doing it because it was my therapy.” Tran is a member of the GIs of Comedy, a group of veterans with a mission to “help heal their fellow soldiers with their comedy.” The group performed at Temple on Oct. 4 in Mitten Hall. Tran saw live combat in Iraq in 2003. He said joining the armed forces was something he

always wanted to do. finally started performing material of his own. “My father fought for his country,” Tran said. Tran got involved with The Laugh Factory “My grandfather fought in a war. As an adult, I and other noteworthy comedy clubs in the Los realized a lot of people died for Angeles area. After a few years, America for people to live in the his therapy became his job. suburbs – people who grow up “I literally tell d--- and fart and watch the f---ing Kardashians jokes for a living,” he said. don’t understand why they get to After years of solo work, do that. I wanted to go there and Tran eventually decided to create experience the bloodshed. It was the GIs of Comedy. He said flythe least I could do.” ing four war veterans around the After getting wounded in entire country isn’t cheap. 2003, Tran worked as a recruiter “An airline isn’t going to for a year before retiring. Because take my good will as payment, the adjustment from military to cibut the GIs of Comedy wasn’t Thom Tran / comedian vilian life has not been easy, Tran something I did for the money,” said he relies on comedy. Tran said. “The reason I created “If I don’t do comedy for two the GIs of Comedy is that there weeks, I am a raging prick,” he said. “It’s my way are people like me – people who are depressed to relax and get the demons down.” and angry and drink all the time. Nobody knows Around the time of his heart attack, Tran where they are coming from. Now there’s a guy worked at a radio station. After attending his with a microphone who understands.” friend’s comedy shows, hanging around comeComedy helped Tran integrate back into cidians and getting to know the community, Tran vilian life. He felt it was his duty to give back to

“But people

don’t want to offend anyone, but I’ve been to war. I can make jokes about it.

COURTESY DOORKICKER ENTERTAINMENT AND THE GIS OF COMEDY

The GIs of Comedy tour across the United States. The group performed at Temple on Oct.4.

people who fought and risked their life for their country, he said. “When I tell a joke about me s--ing myself in a gun fight, they get to see that there’s a small group of people like them.” “We don’t like to laugh at war,” Tran said. “But I say, have you seen war? It’s f---ing hysterical. But people don’t want to offend anyone, but I’ve been to war. I can make jokes about it.” Tran said he sees the GIs of Comedy as a form of group therapy and hopes the program can serve as a role model for veterans. “We’re saying, ‘We’re vets,’” he said. “We’re making something. I’ve created a business. I’ve created a brand, and I want to show other veterans of the Greater Philadelphia area that they can do it too.” * anmol.kiran.hegde@temple.edu

COURTESY DOORKICKER ENTERTAINMENT AND THE GIS OF COMEDY

Thom Tran performs his standup for the GIs of Comedy.

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BEGIN THE NEXT CHAPTER IN YOUR SUCCESS STORY. CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE GRADUATE INFORMATION SESSION Saturday, October 11, 2014 — 2 PM — St. Joseph Hall Chestnut Hill College School of Graduate Studies offers Graduate Degrees, Post-Graduate Certificates, Licensure and Certification Programs in the following areas: • Administration of Human Services • Clinical and Counseling Psychology (5 Concentrations) • Education: Montessori, Early (PreK-4), Middle-Level (4th-8th), Secondary, Educational Leadership, Special Education, Reading Specialist • Instructional Technology, including E-Learning and ITS Certification • APA-Accredited Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.)

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LIFESTYLE

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

CLIPPINGS

AROUND CAMPUS DANCE AND VOICE WORKSHOP Dancer and musician Tatyana Tennenbaum will offer a dance and voice workshop tonight from 6-8 p.m. in the Conwell Dance Theater located on the fifth floor of Conwell Hall. Using all senses, she will guide the group through exercises that “encourage the voice and body to exist as the same organism.” No prior experience with dance or voice is necessary, but registration is required. This event is sponsored by the Boyer College of Music and Dance and is open to all students. -Jessica Smith

CRITICAL LANGUAGE LECTURES

The Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Languages & Studies is continuing their presentation of noon-hour talks with “Graffiti and the Current Arab Uprisings: Street Talk or Talk of the Street?” tomorrow in Room 821 in Anderson Hall. The discussion will be led by Alexa Firat. This event is free and open to all. Students are encouraged to bring lunch.

-Jessica Smith

KARA MILSTEIN TTN

Bridget Fitzgerald, a senior communications and greek roman classics major, in the history class offered at the Wagner Free Institute of Science.

Art, business share common values

AFRICAN STUDIES DISCUSSION

AB/BA PAGE 7 and eventually own my own business. I think this would [allow] good relationships with people in the business school to collaborate.” The organization is also not restricted to Fox and Tyler students exclusively. Fitzpatrick said one of the most important aspects of the group is that it is very open. Members of the group range from communications majors to music majors. “A lot of people, especially Tyler students, think [Fox] is all suits, and some of it is, and it will always be that way,” Harris, a sophomore marketing major said. “But I think both schools, and even other schools, need to see that they’re not isolated. There’s isolation in each one because we’re not encouraged to know each other and work with each other. So a big thing is just to

make people from different areas feel welcome.” As a Tyler grad, Fitzpatrick said she understands how difficult it can be to balance a heavy workload while exploring other opportunities. However, she encourages students to take their time and find what other fields interest them. “It’s a lot of pressure,” she said. “Just absorb. As you advance in your degree work, start thinking about things that are right for you and experiment and try things on. The good news is there’s a lot of opportunity. You get to taste it all.” Fitzpatrick said she is amazed at how positively students have responded to the organization, comparing it to a “hot air balloon that has become giant and gone right up into the air.” “I’m really looking forward to students becoming more engaged to make this a sustainable

organization that brings new cultural offerings to Temple,” Fitzpatrick said. “Instead of pushing us out and saying, ‘That’s a weirdo artist,’ no, it’s your neighbor, it’s your brother, your sister, your mom, it’s your family, and the work that they do matters to you, and is relevant to you. It’s not just decoration on the wall.” * abricke1@temple.edu *Editor’s note: Kara Milstein, the assistant photography editor of The Temple News, is also the vice president of AB/BA. She played no role in the editing process of this article.

Student director produces show about Iraq War THEATER PAGE 7

“Five years from now, when I talk about city is great to experience the real creative side of this show, that will be one of the first things that Philadelphia.” comes up,” Girard said, laughing. The Los Angeles Times hailed “Bengal TiGirard graduated summa cum laude from ger at a Baghdad Zoo” as the “most original play Russell Sage College, an all-girls school, where about the Iraq War,” using elements of mystical he was a male apprentice majoring in theater and realism and humor to become a universal study English. Studying as a male apprentice allowed of feuding cultures and heroes on a journey. Gifor him to attend the school that traditionally rard said he believes that the play’s mythological only accepted women. Finding acting and direct- aspects, like the talking tiger, allow audiences to ing to be “wildly different” and establishing that connect personally. he didn’t enjoy doing both simultaneously if the “The tiger goes through an existential joursituation didn’t demand it, Girard didn’t focus on ney – how can you not make a parallel to man?” directing until 2004, when he diGirard said. rected the Saratoga Shakespeare The play drew a diverse Institute’s contemporary play, the crowd and encouraged people to “Ghost of Shakespeare,” before explore emotions surrounding moving on to direct the more claslife, death, regret and love dursical “Macbeth.” ing wartimes. Though there is no Girard, who admits to not happy ending, Girard said it gives understanding the “function” of audiences the opportunity to anaa director, enrolled at Temple in lyze our human experience. pursuit of a Master of Fine Arts “As a nation, anyone who rein directing. “Bengal Tiger at members Sept. 11, there’s some the Baghdad Zoo,” which closed [Post Traumatic Stress Disorder] Sept. 28, was his thesis project – there,” Girard said. “It had a psybut the story hasn’t stopped there, chologically damaging effect that he said. we haven’t dealt with as a soci“[Temple had] the faith in ety and this play is talking about me to direct a show downtown,” that.” David Girard / director Girard said, “A show that hasn’t To convey such a large topic been produced in Philadelphia bein a nuanced way, Girard worked fore.” carefully with the production Part of the experience’s charm for Girard was crew and the actors. He collaborated with lightthat the play premiered in Center City – nowhere ing, sound and video professionals to make the near Main Campus. The ability to bring talented Adrienne Theater, a small space, into the vast Temple students to the heart of Philadelphia’s arts gardens the play demanded. Using visual projecscene was, for Girard, very important. tion and sound, Girard found his desired aesthetic “There’s tendency not to leave this campus without overwhelming the space. – we’ve got all those food trucks – that’s all you His first steps with the actors involved creneed,” Girard said, jokingly. “Anytime we can ating an “intuitive headspace” that inspired get students off that campus and get them into the risk-taking. The play, demanding a humorous

“Anytime we

can get students off that campus and get them into the city is great to experience the real creative side of Philadelphia.

element staged within an impossibility – a dead talking tiger – needed the actors to not only focus on making their delivery comical, crisp and clear, but also to explore the depth the play offered. “[The play] was constantly changing and growing … the actors were surprised at how deep [it] went,” Girard said. “It exceeded any and all of their expectations.” Part of the play’s growth began when Girard cast Alice Gatling as the Tiger. Gatling performed a role originated by the late Robin Williams. Girard cast Gatling because she “just worked” within the role, and she has since become his muse. Girard said he was prepared to “work hard and work fast” and “lived with the script.” Researching and intuiting the play’s needs, Girard’s preparation allowed him to guide his actors while leaving room for collaboration. “Theater is ritual,” he said. “Human beings need to tell stories – that’s who we are. If I can connect to the audience through some shared experience, then it gives me a greater responsibility as an artist [to do so].” Girard holds that the play is open to interpretation, but that communication, or lack thereof, is an overarching theme. “There’s something very prescient about this play, because we have a bit of a mess [in the Middle East],” Girard said. “Invading a country without a social and cultural plan creates a failure to communicate. We are a world lost in translation.” Though Girard expects to graduate in Spring 2015, he said he wants to direct Gatling in a onewoman show. After that, he said he has three choices: stay in Philly, return to New York City or “live out of a suitcase.” * lora.strum@temple.edu

MSNBC contributor and Lehigh University associate professor James Braxton Peterson will lead a discussion tomorrow from 4-6 p.m. in the Presidential Suite of 1810 Liacouras Walk. Peterson will facilitate “Looking Back, Looking Forward: Commemorating Milestones and Charting a Future for Black Studies” based on his background as the Director of Africana Studies at Lehigh University and his expertise on race, politics and popular culture. This event is open to all, but registration is required.

-Jessica Smith

KOHN LECTURE SERIES Chief Justice Leo E. Strine Jr., the eighth Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme Court, will lead the 2014 Harold E. Kohn Lecture series from 4-5 p.m. on Thursday in the Duane Morris LLP Moot Court Room of Klein Hall. The discussion, “Regular (Judicial) Order As Equity: The Enduring Value of the Distinct Judicial Role,” is free and open to all.

-Jessica Smith

TYLER ART MARKET This Friday and Saturday the Tyler School of Art will be holding its annual Art Market, beginning at noon. In conjunction with the Design Philadelphia Festival and Temple’s Homecoming, fine artists and designers will be displaying their work for judgment by Tyler alumnae Erin Waxman and Megan Brewster. The event is free, but a portion of all proceeds from art that is purchased will go toward scholarships for Tyler students.

-Alexa Bricker


SPORTS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

PAGE 17

SPORTS BRIEFS

Dunphy lands second verbal commit WOMEN’S BASKETBALL -EJ Smith

ALSTON COMMITS TO TEMPLE

with four, 13 less than the Owls’ total.

Temple picked up a second four-star recruit via verbal commit last Tuesday morning. Donning one of his father’s old Owls jerseys, local product Levan Alston announced his verbal commitment to the university in a press conference, marking coach Fran Dunphy’s second such commitment for the 2015 recruiting class. The 6-foot-4-inch Haverford School product garnered All-State honors after posting 16.5 points per game as a junior last season. He’ll join fellow shooting guard and AAU teammate Trey Lowe (Ewing, New Jersey) at Temple in Fall 2015, as Lowe verbally committed to the Owls as a four-star shooting guard in August. In committing to Temple, Alston will be joining the alma mater of his father, Levan, who played for the Owls under former coach John Chaney in the mid-1990s. –Andrew Parent

FOOTBALL HARDIN TO BE ENSHRINED

Former football coach Wayne Hardin will be enshrined into the College Football Hall of Fame Tuesday, after he was inducted at the National Football Foundation’s Annual Awards Dinner on Dec. 10, 2013. He will be the third Temple coach to have a place in the hall, joining Glenn “Pop” Warner (1933-38) and Ray Morrison (1940-48). Hardin compiled 80 wins while at the helm for Temple from 1970 to 1982, and helped bring national attention to the team in 1979, a season in which the Owls won 10 games, finished at a No. 17 ranking in NCAA Division I-A and knocked off the University of California in the Garden State Bowl. Temple quarterback Steve Joachim, a local product of Haverford, won the Maxwell Trophy in 1974 under Hardin’s watch and would play

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2014-15 TV SCHEDULE RELEASED

Six Temple women’s basketball games will be broadcast on the American Athletic Conference’s American Digital Network, the conference announced Wednesday, bringing the Owls’ total of nationally televised games to 15, two more than the team’s 13 games aired nationally last season. Both of Temple’s games against the University of Houston will be broadcast on ADM, along with games against the University of Central Florida on Jan. 27, Memphis on Feb. 4, Tulane University on Feb. 7 and Southern Methodist on Feb. 25. Temple’s contest with Connecticut on Feb. 1 at McGonigle Hall will be aired on ESPN2, while six games will be aired on ESPNU and ESPN3. –Andrew Parent

WOMEN’S SOCCER ANDREW THAYER TTN

Tonya Cardoza’s team will play 15 games on national television, with six on ESPN networks.

one season with the NFL’s New York Jets in 1976. Hardin retired from coaching after the 1982 season, having compiled a 111-715 coaching record on the collegiate level. –Andrew Parent

HOMECOMING AWAITS OWLS

The football team approaches its homecoming game Saturday against Tulsa at noon. The Owls enter the game with a 3-1 record, with their most recent game being a win at Connecticut on Sept. 27. The conference match-up will be the Owls’ second game against a team in The American, where they are currently slated at 1-0. The Golden Eagles have stumbled out of the gate, going 1-4 in their first five games, most re-

cently losing to Colorado State by a score of 42-17. Despite their record, Tulsa’s passing offense, led by sophomore quarterback Dane Evans, ranks No. 30 among Division I Football Bowl Subdivision teams. The strong passing game will b combatted by Temple’s secondary, which ranks fourth in passing yards allowed among all Division I FBS teams. Junior linebacker and defensive captain Tyler Matakevich said the defense has anticipated a strong offensive attack from the Golden Eagles. “They’ve got a really good quarterback,” Matakevich said. “They’ve got some good skill players and up front, they’re big and they’re fast.” The Owls defense enters the game ranked in the Top 5 in passing defense, defensive touchdowns and forced turnovers among Division I FBS teams while Tulsa is tied for No. 117 in turnovers gained Continued from page 20

FOOTBALL

go out there and execute and work hard.” Walker also noted that the offense as a whole hasn’t been clicking early in games. “We came out flat [against UConn],” Walker said. “We have to overcome that as a team and as an offense.” Gilmore rises to occasion Jamie Gilmore knew he’d see the field, he just wasn’t sure how. The junior running back entered camp behind starter Kenny Harper and splitting repetitions with sophomore Zaire Williams. However, following a promising performance during training camp, Gilmore solidified his spot in the Owls’ committee of running backs. “I know I’ll be on the field,” Gilmore said during camp. “I just have to be sure to bring something else to the team.” Gilmore now leads the ADVERTISEMENT

INJURIES ACCUMULATE FOR OWLS

The Owls had sustained three injuries in the week prior to their Sunday match against Memphis. Junior defender Paula Jurewicz, out of Holland, Pa, was knocked down 12 minutes into Sunday’s match, and wouldn’t return. They are awaiting the injury report to find out the extent of the problem and how it will affect her upcoming play. Sophomore Morgan Elliot and Senior Alyssa Kirk both went down last Sunday at East Carolina. A senior defender out of Langhorne, Alyssa Kirk suffered a lower leg injury during the match. Junior midfielder Gina DiTaranto was taken out of practice last week after a stress injury proved too much to play with. The injury was the result of prolonged close play and continuous contact rather than a sudden incident. –Colton Shaw

team in rushing yards with 144, homecoming match-up against as well as all running backs with Tulsa. 29 carries, one shy of Walker. The Golden Eagles, who The Owls have also fea- run an up-tempo offense, look tured senior running back to challenge the conditioning of Kenny Harper as well as sopho- the Temple defense. more tailback Jahad Thomas in “[Tulsa] is going to be our the backfield, both with more first real challenge I think,” than 20 carries Matakevich UP NEXT apiece. The said. “We have Owls vs. Tulsa backfield has to be ready for Oct. 11 at Noon also featured their tempo too. shifty freshman running back They’re a very fast-paced ofDavid Hood, who has 11 carries fense.” for 62 yards thus far. After a week off, MatakevHood’s carries, all of which ich is eager to get back on the took place during the fourth field. quarter in Temple’s 59-0 win on “I know these guys can’t Sept. 20 against Delaware State wait,” Matakevich said. “We with the second-team offense, were itching at it this whole past have proven to be the most pro- weekend. The whole week we ductive. were getting ready for Tulsa.” While mainly against secTulsa enters the game with ond-team defenses, Hood has a 1-4 record but ranks No. 30 averaged a team-high 5.6 yards in passing offense among all per carry in the two games he’s Division I Football Bowl Subseen action against Delaware division teams – 54 spots better State and UConn. than Temple. Owls shift focus to Tulane Coming off the heels of their bye week, the Owls have set their sights on their Saturday

* esmith@temple.edu ( 215.204. 9537 T @ejsmitty17


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

women’s soccer

O’Connor schedules road-heavy season The squad went more than a month without enjoying a home game. OWEN MCCUE The Temple News More than a month had elapsed since Temple had last played a regulation contest on its home field. The Owls’ two games at the Ambler Sports Complex this past weekend – in which they won one game and tied another – was their first taste of home action since a 3-0 win against Mount St. Mary’s on Aug. 24. Between the Mount St. Mary’s win and the home match against the University of Tulsa on Thursday, the Owls set a school record with a sevengame winning streak and won their first conference game, all on the road. The team has thrived away from Ambler this year. Along with an overall mark of 9-3-1, it has a 7-3 record on PAUL KLEIN TTN opposing ground. Shauni Kerkhoff covers the ball during the team’s 3-2 win against Tulsa Thursday. Kerkhoff had five saves in the win. Coach Seamus O’Connor said he In addition, three of the road ence.” home opener, welcomed the return is stunned at what his team has been games were against city schools in St. He believes his team is a tighter home. able to accomplish so far. Joseph’s, La Salle and Drexel, which knit group because of the time they “It was nice to finally be back at “Being on the road and having the members of the team said are like spent together. our home field and not have to worry start we had, it just doesn’t make sense home games, as they “They’re ridiculously close this about all the disadvantages that come to me,” O’Connor UP NEXT sit closer than the year,” O’Connor said. “They would do with traveling,” Lafferty said. said. Owls at Southern Methodist Ambler Campus to anything for the program and for each Junior goalkeeper Shauni KerkBy the end of Oct. 9 at 8 p.m. Main Campus. other. I think that comes from being on hoff said she liked the road trips with the season, Temple The road the road.” her teammates, but like Lafferty she will have played 13 road games and match-ups were scheduled, in part, in Despite the benefits it has brought, acknowledged there are disadvantages only six home contests. an effort to bring the team closer to- traveling every week has presented of playing away from home. O’Connor said this was by design gether. O’Connor wanted his team to challenges for O’Connor’s team. “I enjoy getting the chance to as he was “looking for the correct bal“develop that, ‘Us against the world Junior defender Erin Lafferty, who spend time with my teammates on the ance of teams to play.” mentality,’ you need in the confer- scored a goal in the Owls’ conference road and I love getting the opportunity Continued from page 20

BERG

try programs two months earlier, in February 2012. He moved to Temple that fall, winning the University of Miami’s Hurricane Alumni Invitational in the hammer throw in Spring 2013, along with a fourth-place finish at the Atlantic 10 Championships. “When I went to Temple, the team was a great fit,” Berg said. “The first day I got there, we had a physical done and I made friends right away. … Going from D-II, the Atlantic 10 was comparable. It was slightly better. We had more training at Temple, but it wasn’t too big of a deal.” While he said he liked his time at Temple, the mathematics major said his collegiate experience consists of class and throwing. When Clark gave his announcement to the assortment of 150 student-athletes seated in Temple’s Student Pavilion, Berg’s mind was racing. “It was worse because you’re worried about what’s going to happen,” Berg said, comparing that announcement to his Millersville experience. “I knew fully more how it goes transitioning from one school to another.” The Phoenixville, Pennsylvania native took a redshirt for the indoor and outdoor seasons last year, and penned emails to coaches at the University of Texas, the University of Pittsburgh, Ohio State and Penn State. His visit during the winter break to Penn State introduced Berg to the school’s track team and its plethora of facilities, including standardized indoor and outdoor track & field facilities on campus. Berg, along with his soonto-be throwing coach, was sold. “I came down for the Blue-White meet [last year],” Berg said. “I came down then and once I got here and started seeing guys throwing at the meet, in my head I knew I was coming here. This is the best throws program in the area and I’m a math major, they have a fantastic program. So, it was the best school and the best athletic program I could get in to.” “He’s thrown in college before, so he’s proven himself,” Patrick Ebel, Berg’s

throwing coach at Penn State, said. “Coming in the [Big 10 Conference], it’s going to be a tough conference for him, but I liked his demeanor and approach of the events. He’s a student of the sport and I was impressed by his knowledge and what he brought to the table.” After his departure from Temple following the cuts, Berg enrolled at Penn State in a summer session. While he said he’s beginning to settle in at his new school, his third collegiate transition took time. He enrolled as a transfer in the summer, and needed to find an off-campus apartment, as Berg said he found out on-campus housing was not guaranteed to transfers. Still, in the midst of a balmy October at State College, Pennsylvania, Berg said he’s fitting in nicely. “It’s been interesting,” he said. “I’m meeting new people … and I found a roommate from the first day I got here. It’s been cool.” Ebel said Berg has a clear mindset for what he wants to accomplish during his two upcoming seasons at Penn State – if he doesn’t jinx the program first. “We talked about what happened at [Millersville and Temple] and I said to him, ‘I‘m getting a little nervous. Every program you come into gets cut,’” Ebel said, in a joking manner. “He knows what he wants to accomplish and he doesn’t waste a lot of his energy on campus life,” Ebel added. “He’s very driven about his degree and his major. … At the end of the day he’s a quiet kid and goes about his business. He’s very well liked and has fit in real nice.” Embarking on his first season of competitive track & field in two years, Berg will take part in Penn State’s intrasquad Blue-White meet on Dec. 14, before the team’s regulation schedule kicks off on Jan. 11 with the Penn State Relays. Berg said he’s going about his routine the way he always has. Go to class, throw, repeat. “I haven’t even been to a football game yet,” he said. * andrew.parent@temple.edu ( 215.204. 9537 T @Andrew_Parent23

to travel,” Kerkhoff said. “That being said, being on the road for a month straight is difficult because you miss a lot of class.” In the American Athletic Conference, schools are spread out all over the country. Having visited Cincinnati and East Carolina already this year, the Owls will take a trip to Texas to play Southern Methodist and Houston next week. The long travel can be especially draining and difficult as the Owls saw last week in a 2-0 loss to East Carolina, Kerkhoff said. “I think all the travel kind of zapped our energy and we didn’t play to our full potential,” she said of the game. Kerkhoff added that the fan bases of the schools in The American can also play a factor in the games. “The teams in The American have huge fan bases that show up to the games,” Kerkhoff said. “These crowds can get a bit rowdy and at times they you a bit, so it’s just a matter of tuning them out and focusing on the game in front of you.” While his players were happy to be back home, O’Connor said he felt uneasy about how his team would adjust to a new routine and schedule. “I’m scared, to be honest,” O’Connor said. “When you’re on the road you have complete control over your players. When you’re at home you have no control.” * owen.mccue@temple.edu

ice hockey

Power play struggles persist The ice hockey club has struggled on the power play early. STEPHEN GODWIN The Temple News Despite its winning record, the men’s ice hockey team has fallen short in a significant area. Temple (3-4) is 10 for 30 on the power play through five games and has struggled to set up the man-advantage at times. One example of the team’s struggles was when they went 1-for-5 on the power play during the City 6 championship game against Drexel on Sept. 28. “I think sometimes they are rushing a little bit,” coach Ryan Frain said. “When they get the puck they are kind of going right to the net instead of putting on the breaks and waiting for everyone else from the power play unit to enter the zone and get in position.” During last Wednesday’s

practice, two of the main focus- ing down near the goal crease. es were puck retrieval and get- Freshman Ryan Dumbach takes ting bodies in front of the net. over at center and fellow unFrain let his players know derclassman Devon Thomas that he did not care about them joins Malinowski in front of the scoring as much as he cared crease. about his power play guys outThe line shakeup is due to numbering the penalty killers vacant spots left by forwards in the corners. Once they did Joe Pisko, Phillip Vassilev and have possession of the puck, he defenseman John Anthony after stressed the fact that bodies had last season. to be in front of the goalie. “We have a couple rookies Forward Dave Brewer on our power play and we are agrees with Frain and refer- lacking a little chemistry, but we enced a play in are kind of like a UP NEXT the Drexel game new group,” when Malinowsforward Dave Owls at Montclair ki scored the Brewer said. Oct. 10 at 9:10 p.m. team’s only goal “Everyone is when screening the Dragons’ trying to get accustomed to their net minder. position and get used to work“I think that is what we ing with each other right now.” need to focus on,” Brewer said. The team’s first line of for“Getting traffic in front so we wards Stephen Kennedy, Cody can give the guys up top a shot Vassa, Brady O’Donnell, along on net and have the guy in front with defensemen Jason Lombe able to get the rebound and bardi and Patrick Hanrahan put it in.” have played together for a year. Brewer has shifted to the Six of the team’s seven top of the key in addition to power play goals belong to the forward Greg Malinowski mov- group, with Kennedy leading

them with three goals, but Vassa notes there is always room for improvement. “We hope to help the team as much as possible when given the chances to produce on the power play,” Vassa said. Even with the team’s woes in front of the net on the power play, Frain is still encouraged by the 24 opportunities the team has forced. “I am willing to bet that 99 percent of the time, the team that drew the penalty was the one that was working harder than the other,” Frain said. “That’s always a good thing when you can draw a penalty from hard work. I totally believe that in this league special teams win hockey games. That is at every level.” * stephen.godwinl@temple.edu T @StephenGodwinJr

Continued from page 20

MILLEN

want her to know that she is one of the best goalkeepers out there.” However, stats don’t matter much to the rest of the team, either. “Our coaches bring it up in general,” senior midfielder and co-captain Nicole Kroener said. “Like, ‘We have the best keepers, and so we should be risk-taking.’ We never really mention stats in general. It’s just not the way our team works.” “Obviously, if someone does something good, someone steps up, we’ll congratulate them and give them a pat on the back,” Kroener added. “But it’s usually just about having fun for us. We’re not really paying attention. It’s the team effort and wins.” Millen has said in the past that she ANDREW THAYER TTN wasn’t happy with the way last year, TemLizzy Millen said her redshirt season was pivotal for the development of her career. ple’s inaugural year in the Big East, ended. The Owls were eliminated in the semifinals large challenge. I don’t know if we were in the Atlantic 10 Conference, added. “So of the conference tournament by way of a fully mentally prepared for the situation. as we’ve been progressively getting bet3-0 shutout from Connecticut, the eventual But now that we finally got our feet wet, ter each year, it just seems like it’s more in national champion and a I think that this year we’ll grasp of something that we can do.” UP NEXT team they were beat 7-0 by be even stronger in tournaShe said she will leave it all on the field Owls vs. Villanova a week before to close out ment play, and I hope that in order to do so. After all, it is her senior Oct. 10 at 3 p.m. the regular season. we can come home with a year. “I think a lot of that ring.” came just from being in the Big East our “I mean, every year we hope to win *nick.tricome@temple.edu first year,” Millen said. “Nobody knew the Big East or whatever conference we’re T @itssnick215 what to expect or how much more challeng- in, then make it to [the NCAA Tournaing it would be, and it was a significantly ment],” Millen, referring to the team’s time


SPORTS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

PAGE 19 Continued from page 20

player spotlight | kirsten overton

STARTERS

Sophomore Kirsten Overton is currently posting a career high in hitting percentage with 40.9 percent, almost 17 percent higher than the team’s average.

DONALD OTTO TTN

Overton off to promising start The sophomore middle blocker is hitting 40.9 percent. GREG FRANK The Temple News Kirsten Overton had no idea where she ranked. The sophomore middle blocker entered the team’s weekend at Central Florida and South Florida ranked second in the American Athletic Conference in hitting percentage. Through 14 matches and two matches in The American, Overton was hitting at 41.3 percent, and she didn’t know it. “No way,” Overton said in an excited tone. “That’s awesome.” Overton got off to a hot start this season, being named to the All-Tournament team at the Syracuse Invitational. In all three matches at the invitational, Overton posted a hitting percentage of 50 percent or higher. Temple left Florida hitting 24.2 percent as a team, with Overton leading the way at 40.9

percent. For a squad that saw Gabriella Matautia and Elyse Burkert graduate, two of its big hitters from last season, production from the hitters has been a sign of growth. “A lot of people were concerned with losing [Burkert] and [Matautia],” Overton said. “While they were really great players I feel like the underclassmen stepped up.” The team’s hitting percentage has been boosted by junior

setter Sandra Sydlik who entered the weekend fourth in The American in assists averaging 10.24 assists per set. Sydlik was named Big 5 Tournament MVP earlier this season and has noticed improvements in chemistry with the hitters. “I think it’s getting better and better,” Sydlik said. “We’re trying to talk a lot on the court and in practice.” As well as racking up the assists, Sydlik entered the weekend third in the conference

BY THE NUMBERS

40.9

KIRSTEN OVERTON’S HITTING PERCENTAGE

24.2

TEAM HITTING PERCENTAGE

10.24

SANDRA SYDLIK’S ASSISTS PER SET

in service aces. As a setter, Syd- balls we can convert into highlik is limited in terms of scoring percentage kills,” Ganes said. points for Temple, and so an imGanes said he has also proved serve has Sydlik feeling noticed all of the hitters comgood about her ing together UP NEXT contributions. and making Owls vs. Cincinnati “To be honTemple a very Oct. 10 at 7 p.m. est, I’m workversatile team ing really hard on my serve,” offensively. Sydlik said. “We do have different Coach Bakeer Ganes said weapons,” Ganes said. “Last he has noticed Sydlik’s hard year we were a little bit heavywork and acknowledged she is handed with [Matautia] and an integral part of the team’s [Burkert] but this year we have success. Ganes felt that his set- multiple options and it kind of ter gained valuable exposure spreads out the offense.” playing at a high level in GerHowever, with a relatively many on the junior national inexperienced roster, growing team. pains are still part of the pro“She gives us a lot of expe- cess. Ganes wants his team to rience and a lot of control over keep learning. the game,” Ganes said. “Her “In every match we learn technique is excellent. That’s something that we use in order one of the reasons she is con- to get better,” Ganes said. “Losverting a lot of her serves and ing is part of it. Before you sucserving aces.” ceed you have to experience Ganes noted that the team’s failure.” high hitting percentage is a result of accurate serving and ex- * greg.frank@temple.edu T @G_Frank6 ecuting the team’s strategy. “With our serves we take a lot of the opposing teams out system so they’re giving us

women’s tennis | notebook

Mauro holds underclassmen to high standards Steve Mauro cites his young team’s talent for his high expectations this year. DALTON BALTHASER The Temple News Despite his team’s youth, Steve Mauro’s goals remain the same. The coach said the women’s tennis team’s inexperience has been accommodated for by its work ethic. “We have a very talented team, everyone’s been working hard,” Mauro said. “I have very high expectations for this team.” Since there are three upperclassmen on the Owls’ roster, Mauro said mixing players like freshmen Monet StuckeyWillis and Yana Khon with the team’s veteran core could make for a competitive rest of 2014. “With the younger players we brought in this year, and the older players that are on the team we should have a strong team this year,” Mauro said. This showed at the St. Joseph’s Invitational Sept. 26-28, at which the team had a few top finishers.

Senior Rebecca Breland led the off that. When the younger players see team with a runner-up finish in the fourth her working hard at practice and during flight of singles play. the matches it speaks well to her leader“It boosts my confidence a lot be- ship abilities.” cause when you first get back you play a lot of matches to begin the season,” Freshman earning her keep Breland said of the performance. “It’s reEver since Mauro saw Stuckey-Wilally great, it helps push me forward and lis compete as a junior player, he said he makes me look forward to future tourna- knew she could be a valuable asset to his ments.” women’s program in the near future. As the lone senior on the squad, “[Stuckey-Willis] had extensive Breland said she understands what the training as a junior player, and had younger players mean to the program. played in a lot of matches,” Mauro said. “I feel like the new players on the “We knew from the beginning that she team bring a lot to the table this season, would come in and contribute to the that itself is important in team. ... She has a really UP NEXT building a strong team,” good work ethic, and Breland said. Owls vs. ITA Regionals we are working on Alongside her singles some skills to make Oct. 17 run, Breland teamed up her a more rounded with Khon in doubles play, in which they player. She is very talented and we are made it to the semifinals of the second expecting really good play out of her this flight before falling to Delaware, 8-1. year.” Breland’s efforts on the court have Stuckey-Willis understands that she caught the attention of Mauro, who said is a freshman, but said she’s looking past he’s impressed with both her work ethic, that label and concentrating her focus and the play through which she leads. on where it needs to be. She turned in “[Breland] works very hard on the a fourth-place finish at the St. Joe’s Incourt,” Mauro said. “She leads more by vitational. example, and the younger players feed “Just putting the fact that I’m a

freshman behind, and actually focusing on competing is important,” StuckeyWillis said. “I feel that it is key to show that I have something to bring to the table.” Tiebreakers After Mauro said his team looked fatigued during the end of its spring season, he was sure to count conditioning as a priority amid the team’s preseason training for the fall. With further emphasis on fitness in training, Mauro feels that his players will be able to endure long matches and be able to come out on top. “One thing that stood out last year was that we needed to be in better shape,” Mauro said. “So, we have emphasized on fitness more in the preseason and I think it is really going to pay off in the future.” Next, the Owls will travel to St. John’s to compete in the Intercollegiate Tennis Association Regional Championships, which begin on Oct. 17 and conclude Oct. 20. * dalton.balthaser@temple.edu

hurt his squad, especially in the past couple of matches. Players who have missed time due to leg injuries include freshmen forwards Joonas Jokinen and Olli Tynkkynen, both of whom were recruited to provide the offensive spark Temple has lacked throughout much of the fall. Freshman midfielder Felipe Liborio, who started all eight match-ups he participated in, has also missed a game. When players miss time and the Owls struggle to win games, MacWilliams has looked to numerous options to fill various holes. Two members of MacWilliams’ squad have seen a considerable bump in playing time from last year – sophomore attacking midfielder Dan White and junior defending midfielder Josh Tagland. White, who appeared in four matches last fall, has seen action in seven thus far this season, starting in two of them. He’s also played 241 minutes this season, a considerable jump from the 36 he tallied in all of 2013. The product out of Wilmington, Delaware said a lot of what goes into making an impact at his position, especially when coming off the bench, is having the right mindset. “It’s a mental thing,” White said. “When you come off the bench, you have to be ready to go, whenever [MacWilliams] calls on you.” Tagland appeared in two match-ups last season, accumulating 16 minutes of play. This year, he’s already played in seven games, starting one and racking up 300 minutes of gametime. The Norristown native said although he’s seen more time, the transition isn’t something he really thinks about. “It’s not really a big transition at all,” Tagland said. “You still have to come to practice every day, still have to work hard, and that’s what coach [MacWilliams] preaches. ‘You work hard, you play.’” As a defensive midfielder, Tagland’s primary responsibilities include keeping possession and defending at a high level. Although it’s a tough job to jump in to, he said it’s something everyone at his position just has to do. In fact, it’s something Tagland said the American Athletic Conference requires his position to accomplish, if his team is to have success when he plays. “Different teams are different levels of play,” Tagland said. “In our conference, you just have to get sucked into a tackle, and you’re right back in there.” Tagland added that intensity is needed for everyone who comes off the bench to play midfield. But even with all the variation and changes MacWilliams has made so far this season, some of his players have fit well into the system he’s trying to develop. Sophomore defenders Robert Sagel and Matt Mahoney have started every match this fall, while Chalfant and senior goalie Dan Scheck have missed two games and one game, respectively. MacWilliams said the reason he keeps sending these individuals out onto the field is a combination of their hard work and skills. Without a “bluecollar” work ethic, he feels talent can easily be wasted. “You can have as much talent as you want,” MacWilliams said. “But if you don’t work at it, and don’t bring it every day, you’re not going to get the same results. I think those guys bring it every day.” * steve.bohnel@temple.edu T @SteveSportsGuy1


SPORTS WELL-TRAVELED

The women’s soccer team played more than a month’s worth of road games before returning home this past week. PAGE 18

Our sports blog

thecherry.temple-news.com

LEADING THE PACK

MEN’S BASKETBALL SNAGS RECRUIT

Sophomore middle blocker Kirsten Overton leads the women’s volleyball team with a 40.9 hitting percentage. PAGE 19

Levan Alston verbally commits to the men’s basketball team, women’s basketball releases its schedule, other news and notes. PAGE 17

temple-news.com

PAGE 20

‘Itching’ for a fight The Owls come off their bye week focused on Tulsa. EJ SMITH Sports Editor

S

harif Finch has gained 30 pounds, but he’s still fast. Moving from inside linebacker to defensive end in the offseason, the sophomore has joined a group that many defensive players cited as the biggest change from 2013 to this fall. “We’re really fast off the edge,” Finch said. “Having the speed to get past offensive tackles helped me a lot with my transition to linebacker. Once you get past them, you flip your hips and get to the quarterback, it’s been a lot easier.” “Sharif has a nose for the ball,” junior defensive captain Tyler Matakevich said. “He’s tremendous off the edge, his athletic ability has been really key to our success.” The unit, comprised of returning contributors in redshirt-

junior defensive tackle Hershey Walton and junior defensive tackle Matt Ioannidis, welcomed the additions of Finch and redshirt-junior defensive lineman Praise Martin-Oguike, who was not on the roster last season due to a sexual assault investigation, the charges from which were dropped in October 2013. For defensive coordinator Phil Snow, the defensive front’s youth is the most exciting part of the new year. “The beauty of all of this is that we only have one senior that’s playing,” Snow said. “We’ve got a lot of these guys back and it’s been a lot of fun.” Snow, who has coached at the NFL and collegiate levels, said he is optimistic about the time he will have to work with his defensive line. “In college football you can take an 18-year-old and if you can get him for four years of coaching, it’s amazing what you can do with them,” Snow said. “[The key is] to be detailed and coach them hard.” Snow’s defense entered its bye week ranked in the Top 5 in

ANDREW THAYER TTN

Nate D. Smith jumps in celebration during Temple’s 36-10 win over Connecticut. Smith has 22 overall tackles, 13 of them solo tackles.

defensive scoring and in the Top 20 in total defense. Walker gains ground Despite a promising performance in 2013, sophomore quarterback P.J. Walker had appeared to regress early in 2014. Prior to last Saturday’s

‘Something to keep fighting for’ Justin Berg has fled from two cut track & field programs. ANDREW PARENT Assistant Sports Editor He knew he couldn’t stay. The everyday routine of a Division I thrower, and the competition it harvests are what Justin Berg said keeps him going. He had already jumped universities once in his collegiate career in order to HUA ZONG TTN keep his career alive. And once Justin Berg transferred to Penn State following the athletic cuts. Temple Athletic Director Kevin “I had to find something to II school, out of Spring-Ford Clark delivered an announcement on a rainy afternoon last keep fighting for,” Berg said. High School in Royersford, “Continuing on Pennsylvania. His 2011-12 December that and compet- freshman season culminated seemed all too Where Are They Now? ing was what in a seventh-place finish in the familiar – the The fourth of a series examining how that was. I had hammer throw at the Pennsylcutting of seven the athletic cuts have affected the to continue to vania State Athletics Confervarsity sports, lives of student-athletes and coaches. compete, and ence Championships. including men’s that wasn’t goBerg decided to play out indoor and outthat season, as Millersville had door track & field – Berg knew ing to happen to Temple.” The well-traveled redshirt announced its intention to cut the next step. After all, he’d done it be- junior first attended Millers- its men’s track and cross counville University, a Division fore. BERG PAGE 18

men’s soccer

Lineup changes continue David MacWilliams has shifted starters six times this year. STEVE BOHNEL The Temple News This fall, David MacWilliams has had to keep his options open. The men’s soccer coach has sent out six different starting lineups through nine matches this fall, and has used all but six players on his 30-man roster. It’s a big difference from last season, when he used just three starting lineups and 22

men out of a 27-man roster in that. … When you’re not playthe same amount of matches. ing well, you try to find the MacWilliams said that un- answers and try to mix it up to like last year, find the right he hasn’t had balance and much of a choice chemistry … when deciding so that’s why on his lineups we’ve been and substitutions using a lot of throughout the people.” opening month M a c Wi l of the season. liams added “We’ve that depth is been forced to one of the key David MacWilliams / coach reasons he has use different combinations,” been able to try MacWilliams said. “Last year, I varying lineups and substituput out the same lineup most of tions, but also said injuries have the time, and most good teams STARTERS PAGE 19 when they’re playing well do

SPORTS DESK 215-204-9537

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2014

“When you’re

not playing well, you try to find the answer and try to mix it up.

game against Connecticut, Walker averaged 191.3 yards per game through Temple’s first three contests, roughly 40 yards fewer than his 2013 average. Behind Walker, the offense has struggled to get in rhythm early, managing an average of two offensive touchdowns in

the first half. Despite the struggles to get an early advantage on the offensive side of the ball, Walker managed to bounce back against UConn, as he was responsible for two touchdowns while completing a season-high 69 percent of his passes by the end of the

game. Walker said he believes the change in production is a result of playing with less anxiety. “I’ve been playing tense for the past few games,” Walker said. “I felt like I needed to just

FOOTBALL PAGE 17

field hockey

In senior year, Millen ranks among nation’s elite goalies Lizzy Millen’s save percentage ranks fifth in the country. NICK TRICOME The Temple News When she was a redshirt freshman, Lizzy Millen was uncertain of her future in field hockey. “It was definitely a huge period of growth for me,” Millen said. “Coming in freshman year, I was redshirted due to injury. I had a lot of issues with running tests and just meeting standards. At one point, it was almost like field hockey could have been taken off the table for me.” But the redshirt senior’s fortunes have taken a turn since, as she has been among the nation’s best goalkeepers for the past two seasons. Temple is 8-4 through its first 12 games, with Millen posting a 81.3 percent save percentage that ranks fifth among Division I teams, a 1.53 goals against average and 74 saves. The co-captain, who has started all of Temple’s games, has also won Big East Conference Defensive Player of the Week honors three times this season. Being listed as one of the Top 20 goalkeepers isn’t new territory however, as Millen finished No. 19 in the NCAA with a 76.6 save percentage last season, which also included a 1.58 GAA, 105 saves and five shutouts. The Whitehall, Pennsylvania native’s save percentage reached as high as second in the nation during the Owls’ 2013 run, following a 6-0 shutout of Monmouth back on Sept. 14 of last year, a performance that

SPORTS@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

DONALD OTTO TTN

Lizzy Millen protects the net against Drexel on Sept. 21.

contributed to a defense that allowed 1.60 goals per game for that season. Her save percentage stood at a 81.7 percent average by Sept. 24 last season, good for third in the nation at the time, with a 7.25 saves per game average that was 16th best. By comparison, Millen has accrued an average of 6.16 saves per game this season. But then again, she doesn’t pay attention to the numbers all that much. Someone else usually has to let her know.

“People are really supportive for our team and just the sports teams here in general,” Millen said. “It’s really nice seeing random people just saying, ‘Hey you’re doing well.’ But it’s always posted online, and our coaches make us aware as a team, so I find out eventually.” “We’ll use the stats that she is nationally ranked and that she is Top 10 in the nation to help her with her confidence,” coach Amanda Janney said. “You

MILLEN PAGE 18

Volume 93, Issue 7  

October 7, 2017

Volume 93, Issue 7  

October 7, 2017

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