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Pius Wong

Angela Schroeder

Sandra S. West, Ph.D.

Student-Centered Decisions

Wagging the Dog

Science Education The Math-Chemistry Con& Engi12 Teachers 42 48 in Texas: The Tail nection: Using Data to Make neers Need To Talk

The

S TATe l l i te 2016 Fall Issue

Volume 60 Issue 3

Claudia V. Turcios

Exploring ELL Strategies:

Rearranging Gas Law Equations through Graphic Organizers p. 16

George Hademenos

PD Opportunity #1:

School of Rock Aboard the JOIDES Resolution p. 31

CAST 2016 Preview p. 20

The Official Publication of the Science Teachers Association of Texas


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SEPTEMBER 2016 The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Upcoming Events 2016

IEN

Teachers & Engineers Need to Talk...............12 Exploring ELL Strategies: Rearranging Gas Law Equations through Graphic Organizers..16 STAT Officer Nominations..............................19 CAST 2016 Schedule......................................20 Technology Applications for Assessment in the Science Classroom...................................22 Affiliate Updates.............................................26 PD Opportunity #1: School of Rock Aboard the JOIDES Resolution...................................31 Streamline the TEKS!.....................................42 The Math-Chemistry Connection...................45 Science Education in Texas: The Tail Wagging the Dog...........................................48 Summary of Results from STAT TEKS Streamlining & Lost Instructional Time Survey............................................................55 Live On an Active Volcano in Hawaii and Erupt Your Earth Science Enthusiasm...........58 STAT Contacts................................................62

publications@statweb.org

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Students With Inquiring Minds Are Scientists (S.W.I.M.A.S.)...................................................8

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President’s Column..........................................5

STAT

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ASSOCIATION

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10

CAST 2016: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants San Antonio, TX THURSDAY, March 30

NSTA Annual Convention Los Angeles, CA

For more information and events visit us online at: www.statweb.org


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

President’s Column

H

owdy everyone,

I hope that your summer vacation was a restful one and gave you a chance to recharge the batteries in preparation for another school year. Now that the start of the school year has begun, your students are engaged in the learning process and lesson planning is in full swing, there are three items of importance and of benefit to STAT members I would like to let you know about. 1) Science TEKS Streamlining Survey The Texas Education Agency (TEA) Science TEKS Streamlining Survey is now available and will remain open until September 19, 2016. As part of the TEKS streamlining process, the TEA on behalf of the State Board of Education (SBOE) will collect information from educators regarding the scope of student expectations for each grade level/ course to inform the work of SBOE-appointed streamlining committees. The survey will remain open until September 19, 2016 which can be accessed at: https:// www.surveymonkey.com/r/ sci_teks_streamline. Speaking of surveys, as

many of you know and perhaps some may have participated in, STAT conducted its own TEKS Streamlining Survey earlier this year which was designed to gather and assess feedback with regard to issues experienced by practicing science teachers related to the substance, wording, and practical implementation of the TEKS. We received input from teachers representing 17 of the 20 regional centers, with an equal number of responses (51) from elementary and middle school teachers and a slightly larger number (61) from high school teachers. Lost instructional time attributed to Testing was 7.1% of 180 days or 13 lost instructional days whereas lost instructional time attributed to Other (nontesting-related activities) was 5.5% of 180 days or 10 lost instructional days for a total 13 days. Approximately 23 or 12.6% Total days of instructional time was lost due to Test related and Other activities. For a complete analysis and discussion of the STAT TEKS Streamlining Survey, please refer to the article in this issue authored by Dr. Sandra West.

publications@statweb.org

George Hademenos STAT President

2) CAST 2016 The premiere science professional development event for Texas science teachers is just around the corner - CAST 2016 with the theme, “If I have seen further, it is by Standing on the Shoulders of Giants.” It will be held November 10 – 12, 2016 in San Antonio at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. Hopefully, you either have already registered or are making plans to attend. To help you with this process, please visit http:// www.statweb.org and from there you can access all of the pertinent information regarding CAST. Speaking of CAST, the meeting is a monumental event which requires a lot of preparation and planning. CAST 2017, to be held in Houston at the George R. Brown Convention Center, will begin the process with a Kick-off Meeting in Houston on September 24, from 9:00 am – 12 Noon. If you live in the Houston area and would like to volunteer your time and efforts


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

President’s Column (continued)

toward CAST 2017, please register on the STAT website. As Chair of the Planning Committee for CAST 2017, I would welcome and appreciate your efforts toward making CAST 2017 a successful event. 3) Professional Development Opportunities STAT prides itself on offering high quality, unique and substantive professional development (PD) opportunities for its members, with CAST being an excellent

publications@statweb.org

example. I know that many STAT members/teachers engage in PD workshops that I am sure others would like to hear about as well as possibly participate in. Sharing of best practices is a model for true professional development benefitting both the experienced teacher as well as the novice teacher. This is an issue I feel is important to STAT membership and, as a result, would like to initiate the process through targeted articles in STATellite which describe experi-

ence in such offerings. This summer, I was able to attend three unique PD experiences that I would like to share with STAT members and, if interested, provide information on how interested teachers could apply for next year. In this issue, the first installment of this series involves my experience as a member of the School of Rock. Have a great school year and I look forward to seeing you in San Antonio for CAST 2016!


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Students With Inquiring Minds Are Scientists (S.W.I.M.A.S.) By Malachi R. Ewbank with Linda A. Cook, Ph.D.

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t was four years ago when I finally decided to step up to the plate and stare into the proverbial teacher’s mirror. I was failing my class when it came to how I taught science, and it didn’t feel good at all. I wanted to change science education in my classroom to reflect the way that scientists study the world’s complex systems. In many ways, my methodologies for teaching science mirrored exactly the way I was taught as a young scientist. Four years ago, though, that old paradigm took a dramatic shift and immeasurably altered who I am as a science educator. “I’m not teaching children the importance of inquiry in their science education, and they are increasingly bored in the science classroom.” It wasn’t easy to admit, but it was true. And so S.W.I.M.A.S. (Students With Inquiring Minds Are Scientists) was developed. My first step was to find a thought partner so I asked

publications@statweb.org

our district’s K-12 director of science. Together we built a framework where inquiry would promote student choice, true scientific investigation, and in-depth scientific processing. As with any journey, our first attempts were not very effective. Our original idea involved open inquiry of unit topics. Dr. Cook and I went back to the drawing board and decided to narrow the scope of the S.W.I.M.A.S. model in order to focus the learners’ questioning on the specific unit curriculum. Together we created guided inquiry investigations through which students developed their own questions aligned to a specific set of knowledge and skills within the scope of the unit standards. The revision was definitely an improvement to the model, but it wasn’t until our third revision that we cemented a replicable process. We set the expectation that learners would participate in guided inquiry investigations, develop questions of inquiry that could be inves-

tigated and/or researched, and then tied back to the broader scientific principle expressed as an essential question or enduring understanding for the unit of study. The S.W.I.M.A.S. model promotes rigorous thinking through questioning and assessment and is inherently organic because it is driven by student-developed questions. There are five distinct facets built into the S.W.I.M.A.S. model: Pre-Assessment, Guided Inquiry, S.W.I.M.A.S. Menu, Journaling/Scientific Vocabulary, and Post-Assessment. Pre-Assessment is essential to the S.W.I.M.A.S. model because it gives learners a starting point. I purposely design preassessments with a “constructed response” where learners describe and define their background knowledge. This makes it much easier to explain and record the evolution in thinking they experience,


Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Students With Inquiring Minds Are Scientists (S.W.I.M.A.S.) (continued)

something that would not occur with multiple-choice questions. I circle, mark, and comment on all answers on the pre-assessment in order to give learners a broad picture of what their background knowledge looks like. Learners are then responsible for assessing their own background knowledge in order to create a pathway for themselves to address their own learning needs within the content area. Guided Inquiry Investigations are experiences created to give learners a chance to build scientific knowledge and explore their natural world within the context of the unitaligned standards. These investigations promote deep questioning by learners to expand their thinking beyond the single task they are facing. Student questions are recorded on Post-itÂŽ notes and posted to a common question board in the room. Learners also use these investigations to make careful observations and collect data that may be used to help support or challenge future scientific claims or models. Learners analyze their own pre-assessment and guid-

ed inquiry questions to create their own S.W.I.M.A.S. menu consisting of 3-4 relevant questions they created from the investigations that will help broaden and deepen their understanding of the particular curricular targets. Learner-led conferences ensue, and then children spend one-to-two weeks investigating and researching each question. This is where science comes alive for children because they not only have a vested interest in the process, but they are actively changing and shaping schema which inevitably prompts deeper questioning and thinking.

learners focus on four core areas: question, prediction, evidence, and claim. I encourage learners to collect as much data as they can and record everything in their notebooks. Learners learn the process of analyzing and synthesizing data in order to speak to its validity as evidence. This is where scientific thinking takes shape in the S.W.I.M.A.S. model. My experience at the beginning of this process was that learners collected pages of data and then tried to defend the notion that all of it was evidence; actually, in some cases, less than half of the data actually sup-

Students engaged in guided inquiry investigations

Science journaling is an art, and I help learners master the process of creating artifacts that speak to the nature of their new learning. The process is simple and requires that

ported any claims made by the student-scientists. As Dr. Cook and I reworked the model and incorporated a stronger vocabulary component, learners were directed to focus on

www.statweb.org

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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Students With Inquiring Minds Are Scientists (S.W.I.M.A.S.) (continued)

the core question and how specific evidence aligned with a claim. Post-Assessments are designed in two different ways in the S.W.I.M.A.S. model. Some post-assessments have learners revisit their own pre-assessments as tools to show mastery of concepts by explaining, drawing, and defending how their answers have changed over the course of the S.W.I.M.A.S. unit. Other post-assessments are more traditional where questions are asked and learners “show” their thinking through reflective writing and defend any

publications@statweb.org

claims they make. When I started this journey it began with a simple question, “How can I become a better science educator for my learners?” The S.W.I.M.A.S. model was my answer. The model focuses on the inquiry process and not a set of discrete science facts. As with any model, S.W.I.M.A.S. will continue to evolve based on learners’ needs. One of those needs has led to the development of our S.W.I.M.A.S. rubric. The rubric guides learner development of several scientific practices. When used as a self-reflective

tool, the rubric provides a clear path for future growth as scientific thinkers and practitioners. Watching children grow in their scientific thinking and questioning has not only given me more confidence in inquiry-based teaching through the S.W.I.M.A.S. model, but has led me to believe that all educators can implement studentdriven inquiry into the science classroom. I am confident that the S.W.I.M.A.S. model, in the hands of any educator, will help transform science education.


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Teachers & Engineers Need to Talk By Pius Wong, Producer - The K12 Engineering Education Podcast

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elationships are powerful tools for education. They made my job possible in my former position developing engineering curricula for high schools. My team accomplished much more when we collaborated with teachers, administrators, professors, researchers, engineers in industry, and businesspeople. Now I have a new role producing a digital show called The K12 Engineering Education Podcast, and from it I have spoken with even more of these professionals and have recorded the conversations for proof. Their thoughts have confirmed for me that relationships are crucial. Educators in K-12 today must collaborate more with professional engineers if they want to improve engineering education. Communication between engineers and non-engineers can help clarify how engineering learning compares to other fields. As the acronym “STEM” implies, engineering distinctly differs from science, technology, and math, even if it is definitely related and overlapping. Two recent guests on the podcast depublications@statweb.org

engineering teacher and former structural engineer, said, “For an engineer, mathematics is a tool. It’s not the end-all-be-all.” The content in an engineering class should respect these nuances.

Melanie Kong

tail this issue. Melanie Kong is a teacher, software developer, and former practicing chemical engineer. She described the experience of her colleague, who was a science teacher, when he taught engineering for the first time. “He didn’t realize how science was so different from engineering,” she explained. “What really struck him was when he was looking at that list of standards, and he never realized that in engineering the content that you’re learning is how to solve a problem.” The content is the process of solving problems more than formulas and phenomena. Frequently these problems are more open-ended and project-based. Natalie Wyll, a math and

How do districts acquire teachers who understand actual engineering practice, and how to teach it, as well? Kong and Wyll both practiced engineering professionally, but not all schools have the luxury of finding and hiring teachers like this. In the recording session of another recent episode, I conversed with six other teachers who professionally practiced engineering before, and the discussion suggested at least four approaches to dealing with this challenge.

Natalie Wyll


Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Teachers & Engineers Need to Talk (continued)

Jack Hwang and Amy Colburn, who have experience in electrical and chemical engineering, agreed that professional engineers can be coaxed into education through volunteer opportunities at schools. Colburn actually employed that process, herself. While she was an engineer in the oil industry, she volunteered to help out at a school in various grade levels, and “it reaffirmed my thought process of going into teaching,” she says. Several of these teachers’ stories showed a common theme: schools can appeal to professional engineers’ desires to help their communities more directly. Colburn cited the stark gender imbalance in her professional engineering career as one reason to try to educate more women in engineering, herself.

Teacher Donald Jones, an industrial engineer by training, was especially interested in educating minorities and the underprivileged in urban communities, and so became a teacher. CJ Salzman, who worked in engineering management, wanted a second career, and he thought to himself, “OK, go into ministry, or teaching?” Schools could tap into these deeper needs of some engineers. Salzman and Hwang’s stories suggest another strategy for recruiting engineers to teach. Districts could focus on older engineers seeking a second career, or “second life”, as Hwang puts it. Both had decades of experience in industry, and as Salzman describes it, his “season of life” changed as his adult kids moved out of the house. Districts might communicate with local firms whose engineers might be retiring. These teachers all strongly agreed on a final solution to getting appropriate teachers of engineering: developing the teachers you already have. When asked about teachers who

were not engineers but still want to teach engineering, teacher and former chemical engineer Rita Loughrin said, “I suggest they get to meet engineers in their field. Colburn added that many professional development programs are available that can put them in contact with practicing engineers and the latest engineering pedagogy. Furthermore, local engineering companies often are happy to build relationships with teachers, through specific outreach and education departments. In recent podcast discussions, guests have mentioned Boeing, National Instruments, and NASA as example engineering institutions that work with local K-12 teachers directly. Not only do teachers learn from the engineers when they join the classroom, but students learn, too. “When [engineers] actually come in the room and talk about their experiences, the students really listen,” explained engineering teacher Jerry Moldenhauer in another podcast discussion, and he is not a former engineer. “They get into it, and they will ask questions

www.statweb.org

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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Teachers & Engineers Need to Talk (continued)

they would never ask me. I think that’s huge.” Unfortunately the burden of finding engineering “mentors” often lies on the teacher alone, as several teachers explained to me. Research, making phone calls, writing emails, and vetting people can take up a lot of time. School can build better engineering programs if administrators helped their teachers more to form relationships with professional engineers. If local in-person networking is a challenge, schools can try digital networking methods, too. For example, the National Academy of Engineers produced the website LinkEngineering. org, a kind of social network for K-12 educators and engineering experts. It mixes communication features seen in Facebook and Quora, among other websites. Educators could try using sites like this to make connections. As another example, NASA’s Digital Learning Network online also allows schools to hold videoconferences with NASA designed to meet educational standards. As of summer 2016 my publications@statweb.org

podcast project is, to my knowledge, the only podcast out there focusing in engineering education before college. By all means, please listen to those recorded conversations with teachers, engineers, entrepreneurs, and other people with ideas. I hope they inspire strategies for teaching engineering thinking and inspiring future engineers. However, even more strongly, I hope they trigger more conversations in your own communities. Author Bio:

sations about engineering at younger ages. Formerly he developed engineering curricula at The University of Texas at Austin, and now he provides consulting services and develops educational games in an independent studio. Twitter: @piuswong Email: pius@pioslabs.com Podcast website: http:// www.k12engineering.net/ Listen on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/ piuswong Listen on iTunes: https://itunes.apple. com/us/podcast/k12engineering-education/ id1119404863?mt=2

Pius Wong is an engineer and the producer of The K12 Engineering Education Podcast, a new digital show that features conver-


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Exploring ELL Strategies: Rearranging Gas Law Equations through Graphic Organizers By Claudia V. Turcios, University of Houston-Downtown

braically. Algebraic manipulation requires scaffolding in the science content areas such as chemistry and physics where general equations are given. Teachers have startFigure 1. Back of Gas Laws Graphic Organizer. The back of the graphic organizer displays the combined ed to implement gas law equation that students receive on a formula scaffolds, such as chart. Graphic Organizs a science educator, ers (GOs) and Admany students are vanced Organizers (AOs) faced with an ample in the science classroom amount of word problems to aid students’ learning that need to be solved us- (Rivera & Baker, 2013). ing a stem equation that The combined gas law (see comes from memorization Figure 1) can be taught or a reference chart. Many through a GO (see Figure students know what needs 2) for any student poputo be solved but cannot lation to algebraically masolve for the final answer nipulate the gas law equabecause of the unknown tion. variable. Furthermore, they fail to properly ma- Algebra in Science nipulate an equation alge- Algebraic manipulation is

A

considered a complicated math skill in the general curriculum (Rivera & Baker, 2013). Many students, including English Language Learners (ELLs) are often faced with difficulties of learning the general curriculum in algebra (Rivera & Baker, 2013). Rivera and Baker (2013) found that teaching methods using GOs enabled students’ math retention. Chemistry in the Classroom In any given unit, a teacher must always pre-assess students to determine prerequisite material. Unfortunately, time spans do not allow for algebra remediation. In order for students to learn material and feel comfortable with it scaffolding must take place. Özmen (2011) indicated that the construction of the GO helps students recall information previously learned. GOs assist in providing teachers with a user friendly instructional strategy (Rivera & Baker, 2013) and save repetition time by allowing students to look at their GO (see Figure 3). In the Classroom

Figure 2. Front of Gas Laws Graphic Organizer. The front of the graphic organizer displays the combined gas law equation without the fraction and how to solve for each variable.

publications@statweb.org

ELL students were provided with a teacher mod-


Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Exploring ELL Strategies: Rearranging Gas Law Equations through Graphic Organizers (continued)

Future Research

Figure 3. Inside of the Gas Laws Graphic Organizer. The inside of the graphic organizer allows students to remediate how to solve for the unknown variable.

eled GO using 1.5 sheets of paper (to create a stair step) to aid in the retention of algebraic manipulation. The class has an idea of what the gas laws variables stand for, but repetition is essential. The combined gas law equation is written on the back of the GO through my document camera. I rearrange the equation by taking away the fraction and write each variable onto a stair step flap. I write how to solve for each variable, starting with the combined gas law equation. I also start to be extremely consistent with math verbiage, “If I see it at the top and bottom, it cancels out.” Eventually the students see the repetition and patterns. Reflections Chemistry

is

a

subject

that entails that students must go home and practice. Teachers with a high population of ELLs need to give students ample practice time within the classroom time to ensure the students show substantial effort in understanding the concepts being learned. As a teacher, I believe that chemistry is a subject that cannot be read and understood: it requires practice. Yet, there is an unforeseen disconnect in between the mathematical concepts of chemistry as it relates to algebra to students. Typically in gas laws, we are solving for an unknown variable. Students are only given a formula chart with the combined gas law equation on it. They must be able to solve for the unknown variables on their own.

As a result of this study, GOs and AOs are a tool to aid the learning of new concepts. It was often thought that providing a scaffold ensured that all students were to be successful. Understanding scaffolds that do not ensure success, gives an insight into a new method for teaching the gas laws equation. A future idea would be to determine if the variable x was integrated instead of P1, P2, T1, T2, V1, or V2. The students have a thorough background of mathematical proportions and x seems to be a starting point that could scaffold their learning into new variables that are often used in chemistry. References: Özmen, R. G. (2011). Comparison of two different presentations of graphic organizers in recalling information in expository texts with intellectually disabled students. Educational Sciences: Theory & Practice, 11(2), 785-793. Rivera, C. J., & Baker, J. N. (2013). Teaching students with intellectual disability to solve for x. Teaching Exceptional Children, 46(2), 14-21.

www.statweb.org

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Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

STAT Officer Nominations Open October 1st The STAT Nominating Committee is seeking the help of STAT members and other Texas science educators to identify potential candidates for its slate of officers for 2017-2018, opening October 1st, 2016. Each officer serves as a voting member of the STAT Board of Directors and Executive Committee. Serving on the STAT Executive Committee takes commitment and dedication. With over 6,500 members, STAT truly represents all science teachers in the state of Texas, and advocates for its members on the local, state and national level. We are looking for officers from diverse backgrounds with strong leadership skills, scientific knowledge and confidence to speak about issues in their area. STAT officers must be willing and able to attend four regularly scheduled board meetings as well as other meetings as necessary. Visit www.statweb.org for nomination forms and more details.

Help TMA Reward Outstanding Science Teachers! Winning teachers and their schools receive generous cash prizes! Do YOU know an outstanding teacher to nominate for the 2016-17 school year? Make sure your community is represented by nominating a teacher from your area today.

Visit the program website at www.texmed.org/teachers to nominate a teacher by Nov. 18, 2016, and donate to the program! For more information, call TMA at (800) 880-1300, ext. 1600.

Ernest and Sarah Butler Awards for Excellence in Science Teaching

This program is supported by the TMA Foundation, the philanthropic arm of TMA.

www.statweb.org

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CAST 2016 Schedule

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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Conference for the Advancement of Science Teaching

REGISTRATION

Wednesday, November 9 Thursday, November 10 Friday, November 11 Saturday, November 12

4:00 7:00 7:30 7:30

pm - 9:00 pm am - 5:00 pm am - 4:00 pm am - 10:30 am

WORKSHOPS

Thursday, November 10

Session Session Session Session Session

1: 2: 3: 4: 5:

8:00 9:30 1:00 2:30 4:00

Session Session Session Session Session Session

6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11:

8:30 am - 9:30 am 10:00 am - 11:00 am 11:30 am - 12:30 pm 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Session Session Session Session

12: 13: 14: 15:

8:30 am - 9:30 am 10:00 am - 11:00 am 11:30 am - 12:30 pm 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Friday, November 11

am - 9:00 am am - 11:00 am pm - 2:00 pm pm - 3:30 pm pm - 5:00 pm

Saturday, November 12

EXHIBITS

Thursday, November 10 Friday, November 11 Saturday, November 12

SHORT COURSES Thursday, November 10

Session 1:

12:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Session 2: Session 3:

9:00 am - 12:00 pm 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 4:

9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Friday, November 11

Saturday, November 12

SPECIAL EVENTS First Timers’ Coffee

New teachers or first timers attending CAST are invited to join us on Thursday morning to learn tips and tricks and discover valuable resources saving you time and money! Light refreshments will be provided.

Sponsored by Ward’s Science

Thursday, November 10: 7:00 am - 7:45 am

Location: Marriott Riverwalk Hotel

Opening Session with Jason Latimer “The only thing that separates the impossible from the possible is the individual that is wondering about the right question. . .And that next question could come from any of us.” Jason Latimer the Curator of Impossible Science will speak to everyone on Thursday morning. This is an event you will not want to miss!

11:00 am - 6:00 pm 9:00 am - 6:00 pm 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

EDUCATIONAL EXCURSIONS

Three free educational excursion locations to enjoy - including the San Antonio Botanical Gardens, the San Antonio Zoo, and the Witte Museum.

Thursday, November 10 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm Friday, November 11 9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Location: Marriott Rivercenter Hotel - Commerce Street

ONLINE REGISTRATION Visit the STAT website for full details:

http://www.statweb.org/CAST2016

Thursday, November 10: 9:30 am - 11:00 am

Location: Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center:

Stars At Night Ballroom

CAST 2016 Social Before wandering through the Riverwalk, join us in the Stars At Night Ballroom located on the third floor of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. Enjoy Chef prepared hors d’ deuvres, live music, and wonder at the aerial act while visiting with your peers. A relaxed reception - no speeches - just a fun time planned for you.

Friday, November 11:

Location: Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center:

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Stars At Night Ballroom

Early Bird Registration (Full Conference):.............................$135.00 - payment received 8/15/16 - 10/14/16 Regular Registration (Full Conference):................................$185.00 - payment received after 10/14/16 Saturday Only:......................................................................$65.00 Retired or Student Registration (Full Conference):...............$35.00 Guest (Spouse / Child only, requires a primary registrant): $55.00

HOTELS

Visit the STAT website for full housing locations, rates and parking:

http://www.statweb.org/CASTHousing

publications@statweb.org


THANK YOU TO OUR

CAST 2016 Sponsors

Conference for the Advancement of Science Teaching

Come check out booth 529! The National Energy Education Development Project (NEED) is dedicated to a “Kids Teaching Kids” philosophy – encouraging students to explore, experiment, and engage, and encouraging teachers to embrace student leadership in the classroom. We work hard to help teachers meet the requirements of state standards, Common Core, and the Next Generation Science Standards.

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The first 6 people to mention this ad at the booth get a free energy transformation activity!


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Technology Applications for Assessment in the Science Classroom By Dr. Jaime Coyne, Dr. Mae Lane & Dr. Tori Hollas - Assistant Professors - Sam Houston State University

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s teacher educators, we are continually searching for the most current and effective technology tools to show our teacher candidates they can successfully incorporate these tools in their classrooms with confidence. In this article, we would like to share technology applications that are both student-friendly and teacher-friendly which can be incorporated in the Science classroom for the purposes of assessment. We have also included a helpful chart including the application websites using QR codes as well as different ways to incorporate the application in the Science classroom.

provide immediate feedback, assisting teachers with instructional planning and decision-making. Socrative Socrative (http://www. socrative.com) is a sure way to get your students engaged and excited about learning! Socrative allows you to create multi-

Kahoot

Assessment No one can argue that assessment is a strong component of the Science classroom. In addition, student involvement in the assessment process is critical and powerful (Chappuis, Stiggins, Chappuis, & Arter, 2012). The following are five technology applications your students will not only love to use but will actively engage them in the assessment process. These applications also publications@statweb.org

table providing immediate feedback! As teachers, we love this feature because it provides a snapshot of our students’ progress in the Science curriculum. One of our fellow teachers uses Socrative when reviewing for district benchmark tests. She also loves that Socrative, along with Kahoot and Quizzis, stores her assessments for future use.

ple-choice, true/false and short answer quizzes and exit tickets. Students can use their mobile devices independently or in teams. Each teacher has his or her own “room number.” Students log in using the room number and immediately have access to the quiz or exit ticket. Socrative offers a new feature that compiles students’ results in a data

Similar to Socrative, Kahoot (https://getkahoot. com) provides a gaming environment your students will enjoy. With this application, you can quiz, pose a question for discussion or survey your students on a variety of Science topics. Each question has a time limit for responses; after time is up, Kahoot displays the results, showing the number of correct responses as well as which student responded the fastest, engaging them in the content. In addition, there are “public kahoots” you can access. Each game is given a unique game pin, which students can access through their mobile devices, tablets or laptops. One of our alum teachers


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shares, “Students love Kahoot. They love working together in teams which helps build a positive classroom environment.” Quizizz Quizizz (http://quizizz. com/admin) is another assessment tool sure to engage your students. With Quizizz, you can create a multiple-choice quiz. This application provides a numerical code for your stu-

dents to access the quiz. As educators, we love the “homework” feature, which allows students to complete their quizzes at home. You can even set the due date! All students’ results are compiled in a data table for easy access and instant feedback at your fingertips! One teacher shares, “I love to use Quizizz to reinforce what was taught. It is a great activity Parents can work with their children.”

Plickers Need a technology tool that does not require student mobile devices? Take a look at Plickers (https:// plickers.com). Simply download the application on your mobile device, as well as the answer cards for your students to use to answer questions. After entering questions in your Plicker’s library, students use the cards to answer. Using the app, scan the

Name of Technology Website Application

Description Ideas to Integrate in Science

Socrative

http://www.socrative.com

Interactive Great use for “exit tickets”; Starting Learning Game a class discussion with a question; Formative assessment tool

Kahoot

http://www.getkahoot.com

Interactive Great tool for review for tests; ForLearning Game mative assessment tool

Quizziz

http://www.quizizz.com/admin Interactive Great tool for review for tests; ForLearning Game mative assessment tool

Plickers

http://www.plickers.com

Assessment Tool

Assessment tool without using student mobile devices; Formative assessment tool

Powtoon

http://www.powtoon.com

Animated Presentation Tool

Students can create presentations and animated videos with their science writing; Great Science report presentation tool

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students’ cards, and you instantly have real time assessment data. Powtoons Spark some assessment creativity in the Science classroom by integrating digital storytelling presentation tools such as Powtoons. Students, and you, will love this tool as a great alternative to Powerpoint and poster boards! In addition, no more lugging around milk crates

full of projects! Powtoons (https://www.powtoon. com/home) provides a variety of templates with graphics from which students can choose, or they can create their own Powtoon. This is a great, as well as popular, option for students to use when presenting science reports! In this article, we share technology applications that are both studentfriendly and teacherfriendly which pre-service and in-service teachers can

incorporate in the Science classroom for purposes of assessment. As teachers and teacher educators, we are continually searching for the most current and effective technology tools to show our teacher candidates they can successfully incorporate these tools in their classrooms with confidence while meeting the needs of our 21st century learners. References: Chappuis, J., Stiggins, R., Chappius, S., & Arter, J. (2012). Classroom Assessment for Learning. Boston: Pearson.

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7/13/16 12:11 PM


Biology Bootcamp Boost your biology lab skills with our FREE San Antonio workshops. Join us for hands-on training with micropipettors, electrophoresis equipment, and microbiology techniques. Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center Meeting Room 007D Visit us in booth #425

Bio-Rad Workshop Schedule: Please see the daily conference schedule for complete workshop descriptions. Thursday — November 10 8:00-9:00 AM Biomolecules: Got Protein? (TEKS 112.34.C.1-3, 5, and 9) This lab integrates the physical, chemical, and biological properties of proteins. 9:30-10:30 AM Investigate Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration with Algae Beads (TEKS 112.34.C.1-4 and 7-12) Use algae beads in a colorimetric assay to study both photosynthesis and cellular respiration in inquiry investigations. 1:00-2:00 PM Effortlessly Integrate Inquiry with Glowing Bacteria (TEKS 112.34.C.1-6, 9, and 11) From generating scientifically reasonable questions to developing the procedure to interpreting the data, the glowing bacteria from pGLO™ will lead the way. 2:30-3:30 PM Texas Biotechnology Pathway: Open Doors to Opportunity Join Austin Community College experts to learn how their statewide grant can support you with free curriculum and teacher PD, and your students with an Advanced Science credit, plus options for internships, dual credit, and a Biotech Level 1 certificate.

Friday — November 11 8:30-9:30 AM Identify Patient Zero of a Zombie Apocalypse! (TEKS 112.34.C.1-5, 9, and 11) Explore the spread of a zombie virus with this hands-on lab using the power of an ELISA assay. 10:00-11:00 AM DNA Detectives — Who Killed Jose? (TEKS 112.34.C.1-3, 5, 6, and 9) Solve a theatrical crime scene using biotechnology skills such as DNA gel electrophoresis, restriction digestion and pipetting. 1:00-2:00 PM Explore Molecular Evolution using Fast Protein Electrophoresis (TEKS 112.34.C.1-3, 5, and 7-9) Learn about proteomics and explore the central dogma of biology: DNA>RNA>Protein>Trait. 2:30-3:30 PM How Do You Know What Fish Species You Are Eating? DNA Barcoding! (TEKS 112.34.C.1-10 and 12) How many aquatic species are there in the world? Can you be certain the sushi you are eating really is what you think it is? Learn more about this fascinating topic and how you can apply it in your classroom. 4:00-5:00 PM Enzymes: Technology Inspired by Nature (TEKS 112.34.C.1-4, 9, 10, and 12) Use the inquiry-based approach to extract enzyme, test activity and design experiments to study how pH, temperature, and concentrations affect reaction rates. Saturday — November 12 8:30-9:30 AM Investigate Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration with Algae Beads (TEKS 112.34.C.1-4 and 7-12) Use algae beads in a colorimetric assay to study both photosynthesis and cellular respiration in authentic inquiry investigations.

4:00-5:00 PM Improve Student Engagement using Pop-Culture in your Life Science Class (TEKS 112.34.C.1-3) Learn how to use a fun hands-on electrophoresis lab to increase student involvement and understanding.

10:00-11:00 AM The GMO Debate Rages On! (TEKS 112.34.C.1-7, 9, 10, and 12) Learn more about GMOs and how to test for the presence of GM content in foods. Join a debate and learn how to bring this experience to your classroom.

TEKS science standards can be found at www.tea.state.tx.us/teks/

1:00-2:00 PM Contagion! Track the Progress of Dangerous Viruses that are Spreading Throughout the Country (TEKS 112.34.C.1-5, 9, and 11) Disease can spread like wildfire through populations. Become an epidemiologist and see if you can track down patient zero.

Visit us on the web at explorer.bio-rad.com for additional workshops and product information.

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Environmental educators from schools, nature centers, zoos and museums are forming partnerships to increase the effectiveness of all teaching.

Environmental Literacy - Success through Partnerships October 7-9, 2016 Northwood University Cedar Hill, Texas in southwest Dallas County Click here for conference information and registration or go to www.taee.org

You are invited to attend the informative sessions and exciting field trips and network with other educators from around the state. Professional development hours are available. Keynote speaker is Cal Martin from Ottawa, Canada, National Chair of Interpretation Canada.

“Hearts First, Then Minds: Using Emotion to Connect People and Places” Join the network of Texas Environmental Educators and receive news bulletins by subscribing to TAEE through www.taee.org and like “Texas Association for Environmental Education” on Facebook. The Texas Association for Environmental Education (TAEE) is a professional organization that supports a community of Environmental Educators in the state of Texas by providing

  

content

connections certification communication

Thanks to the TAEE Board members serving Texas Educators. Misty Bowie -- Texas Forestry Association, Education Coordinator Marti Copeland -- Dallas Zoo Kiki Corry -- Texas Parks and Wildlife, Project WILD Coordinator Linda Dunn -- John Bunker Sands Wetlands Center, Education Director Melissa Paschke -- Dogwood Canyon Audubon Center, Senior Education Manager Lisa Brown --Sam Houston State University Tammie Hyde--Science Chair at Seabrook Intermediate School Shelby Gull Laird-- Stephan F. Austin State University Wendy Resitle--Environmental Institute of Houston TAEE Officers Linda Bartley - President Nicki Sohn - Vice President -- Texas A&M Corpus Christi Greg Wukasch - Secretary -- San Antonio Water System Chris Lowe - Treasurer -- Seabrook Intermediate School


The Texas Association of Biology Teachers would like to invite you to join us at CAST 2016! Congratulations to our 2016 award winners: The NABT Outstanding Biology Teacher Award Karla Dean of Anahuac High School The Alton L. Biggs Teaching Excellence Award Caren Lawrence of Austin Middle School Erin Myers of Cypress Lakes High School

The 2016 TABT strand sessions include: MEETING ROOM

DATE

BEGIN TIME

GRADE

SESSION TITLE

Ballroom Level Room 303A

11/10

8:00:00 AM

High School

TABT Presents: The Eye of the Beholder: Using Photography and Video to Explore the Life Sciences

Meeting Room Level Room 213B Ballroom Level Room 304C

11/10

12:30:00 PM

High School

TABT Presents: Manipulative Mania in 3D

11/10

1:00:00 PM

Middle School, High School

TABT Presents: Evolution: Natural Selection Amongst Hominids

Ballroom Level Room 304C

11/10

2:30:00 PM

Middle School

TABT Presents: Evolution: Natural Selection Amongst Hominids

Ballroom Level Room 304B Meeting Room Level Room 221B

11/11

8:30:00 AM

High School

TABT Presents: Biology Manipulatives (v3)

11/11

10:00:00 AM

TABT Presents: Using Case Studies to Promote Active Learning in the Biology Classroom

Meeting Room Level Room 217B Meeting Room Level Room 208 Ballroom Level Room 301A

11/11

10:00:00 AM

11/11

11:30:00 AM

Middle School, High School, College Middle School, High School

11/11

2:30:00 PM

TABT Presents: Reviewing Biology with Games

11/11

2:30:00 PM

11/12

9:00:00 AM

Middle, High School, College Middle School, High School High School

Meeting Room Level Room 216A Meeting Room Level Room 223

TABT Presents: Inquiry: Creating Interest with Discovery TABT Meeting & Luncheon

TABT Presents: Writing Like a Scientist using Claim Evidence and Reasoning TABT Presents: Gamification for Biology

Join us! Become a TABT member at http://tabt.us.


Texas Earth Science Teachers Association (TESTA) Plans are underway for another fantastic CAST in San Antonio this November. TESTA has put together a strand of presentations that consists of five short courses and five workshops, along with our annual Rock Raffle and Share-a-Thon during the conference. Everyone is invited to attend all of the TESTA offerings during the conference – you DO NOT have to be a member of TESTA. We will be sending out a list of all of the workshops and short courses in the TESTA Tailings later this month. A few items to make a special note about – 

The Charles Swift Memorial Rock Raffle - will be held from 3 to 5 PM on Friday, November 11th in the Exhibit Hall Food Court! This will make the action close to the exhibit hall and will also give everyone a place to sit and relax as the raffle takes place. The raffle should end around 5 PM and the exhibit hall closes at 6 PM so plan your day accordingly. If you have not attended the Rock Raffle before you need to this year. At this event TESTA members bring in not only different rock samples, but minerals, fossils, crystals, books, videos, and other items that will be beneficial to your classroom. Most items are raffled off for .25 cents per chance while a few of extra special and valuable items will be on the $1.00 table. This is a great way for new teachers to get those cool items that the students will love to look at, handle, and ask questions about without investing a lot of money. All of the items in the raffle are donated to TESTA by members and business supporters. If you have items to donate, please bring them by the TESTA booth on Thursday and Friday morning.

TESTA Annual Dinner and Meeting – Friday night at 8 PM at Tomatillos Café y’ Cantina, located at 3210 Broadway St, San Antonio, TX 78209. This is about 3 miles from the convention center. The restaurant is known for its selection of 20 different Margaritas so have a designated driver (cab or Uber) so you can stay safe! Dinner will be a buffet featuring chips and salsas, Queso, Beef and Chicken Fajitas with all of the fixings, and Cheese Enchiladas. Sopapillas with honey for desert along with soft drinks and tea. In addition to dinner we will have a guest speaker and will also recognize our Teacher of the Year and Friend of TESTA awardees. Dinner is $28.00 (alcohol on your own) which includes the tax and tip. Reservations must be made by November 8th and seating is limited. To reserve your spot, please email me at – kathrynbarclay65@aol.com. By the way, the River walk will be extremely crowded on Friday night since the San Antonio Auto Show will also be going on at the convention center during CAST. So plan to join TESTA for dinner in our private room instead of waiting forever for a table elsewhere!

The TESTA Share-a-Thon - will be held Saturday morning at 10 AM in 301 A – Ballroom Level. This activity is like attending 15 to 20 mini-workshops in one hour. TESTA members will be presenting and you just need to come and circulate around the room and take home many new lessons, activities and labs to enjoy.

Remember to renew your TESTA membership during CAST at the booth!


TSELA • TSELA provides leadership for the improvement of science instruction. • TSELA provides communication among science education leaders. • TSELA provides professional growth opportunities. • TSELA is an affiliate of NSELA, the Science Teachers Association of Texas, and the National Science Teachers Association.

Science Leaders from all over the state convene to discuss issues that matter to science educators. We inform policy and provide direction to shape science instruction.

TSELA is THE place to be for all Science Leaders Our TSELA Fall Meeting takes place November 9th, 2016 at the Noris Conference Center in San Antonio, Texas Go to https://tsela.wildapricot.org to register


Try our science resources in your classroom for FREE! We’re so convinced you’ll love our products that we’re giving you the chance to test them in your classroom for free! Download one of our awesome sample packets which will give you a print-ready PDF.

CLAIM MY RESOURCES www.theBIOZONE.com/freesample


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PD Opportunity #1: School of Rock Aboard the JOIDES Resolution By George Hademenos, Physics Teacher - Richardson High School

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s I alluded to in the President’s Column, my summer was filled with exceptional professional development (PD) opportunities that I would like to inform STAT members about and encourage participation in subsequent offerings. The first PD opportunity involves a week I spent at the School of Rock (SOR) aboard the JOIDES Resolution (JR) – an exploration vessel dedicated to drilling and collecting core samples below the ocean floor – which was docked in Cape Town, South Africa. This sounds wonderful but I am not a geology teacher. Why should I be interested?

The SOR is not exclusive to those who only teach geology or Earth and Space

participants was as diverse as any one class could ever be. It consisted of both

Science. It is open to all science teachers looking for instructional ideas to integrate geology into their science curriculum. In fact, the 2016 SOR class of 16

novice and veteran, formal and informal educators from the United States, Europe and Africa; science teachers and technology teachers; teachers who teach elementary and secondary students, college students, and the general public, coming from California, Florida, Tennessee, New Jersey, Texas, Illinois, North Carolina, Maryland, and Ohio, as well as France, Italy and South Africa. The “principal” of the School of Rock was Sharon Cooper with the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and staffed with two outstanding faculty members: Dr. Larry Krissek from Ohio State University and Dr. Sandy

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Turner from University of California at Riverside. The SOR was in session for 9 days with each day’s activities described in a blog contributed by selected participants and summarized below.

Day 1 (05/29/2016): Are we there yet? For many, the ride to school is a 5-minute car ride or perhaps 30 minutes in a school bus. The ride to this school was more involved. The JR was docked in Cape Town, South Africa. The trip involved 21 hours of flight time with an eight-hour layover sandwiched in between. Upon arrival at Cape Town International Airport and a bus ride to the port where the JR was docked, we signed in with security dockside and came aboard to find our room assignments, get pictures taken for our ship publications@statweb.org

ID’s, eat lunch and unpack. The first day concluded with an introduction to coring and an activity that represents the challenges confronted by JR to obtain core sampling of the ocean floor. A challenge of ocean coring is guiding a drilling process through rage depth of 3,800 meters of ocean and into the floor without visibly observing the process. One activity that embodied the challenges in ocean drilling involved a straw and multilayered cake. Who knew that geology could be so informative…and tasty too?

Day 2 (05/30/2016): Ocean sediment cores are an open book During an expedition, the

JR collects core samples 9.5 meters at a time using a 10-meter steel core barrel. Once it is brought onboard, the core sample is measured and marked in sections of 1.5 meters which are then used for various analyses by geophysical scientists. The scientists are challenged to compare and contrast the features of cores extracted from different drilling sites. Color was likely an obvious difference you noted. Is there a relationship between color and the composition of the core? Scientists investigate this question using smear slides and a petrographic microscope. A small amount of core sediment is analyzed for the presence of biogenic material. Cores lighter in color (white, off-white, light beige or greenish yellow) likely have a biogenic origin. If over 50% of the sample is composed of biological remnants, then the core is an ooze; the presence of diatoms is a key indicator that the ooze is siliceous while coccoliths and forams (short for foraminiferans) are indicative of calcareous ooze. Darker cores (perhaps greenish


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gray or reddish brown) will likely have considerably less biogenic material. In addition to core color, other characteristics such as geographic location and ocean depth can also reveal information regarding core composition. Terrigenous sediment (terrestrial in origin with relatively less biogenic material) is found relatively near the coasts. So how did that sediment get there? Erosion by water (rivers, streams, runoff, glaciers) deposits relatively large amounts of sediment on continental shelves and slopes. Eolian or wind erosion can carry small particles further distances from coastlines. Calcereous ooze is typical of sediment in offshore, yet shallow (<4000 meters) water. And being in offshore sediment in both high latitudes and near the equator, we would say siliceous ooze has a bimodal distribution. But what about the sediments in the deepest waters? Terrigenous material is unlikely considering the far distances from the coast, and organisms in the oozes would not be viable in sediment under publications@statweb.org

more than 4000 meters of water. That leaves the fine clay particles and pieces of iron oxide that result in the red clay in cores drilled in the deepest parts of the ocean.

Day 3 (05/31/2016): Field Trip Today was an exciting day for the SOR participants

because it involved the two words that every student (in this case, teacher) lives for during a school year: FIELD TRIP. Yes, we were stepping out of the classroom and into the field for a

day of hiking and exploring the geology of Cape Town. Our planned itinerary for the day included several hikes, arranged and narrated by two local geology experts: Professors John Compton and John Rogers. We were very fortunate to benefit from the extensive knowledge and wisdom of two individuals in their chosen profession. They provided us with a lecture combined with an extensive hands-on field experience which made for the most ideal learning opportunity for SOR teachers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; many of whom had never had formal training


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or coursework in geology. Knowledge aside, Professors Compton and Rogers were personable, approachable, very eager to respond to questions, and at times, downright funny. HIKE 1: Three Anchor Bay to Sea Point Contact During this stop, we ventured onto a beach site where we noted general displays of quartz, siltstone and granite. Of course, the shores of a beach are strewn with unique sea shells of all types, shapes and sizes, but the most fascinating observation (especially to the biology teachers) was the enormous-sized kelp that was stretched out along the shore.

As we continued on this hike, we ended at Sea Point Contact - the point where Charles Darwin ended his journey on Voyage of the Beagle in 1836. Most people, particularly scientists,

correlate Darwin with biology, but many do not know that Darwin had a passion for geology and was actively investigating rocks and noting his observations. HIKE 2: Signal Hill and Tafelberg Road

for political crimes against apartheid. As we were listening to Professors Rogers and Compton speak about the geology of the area, a very loud explosion startled us. It turns out that the explosion was the discharge of a cannon (without ammunition) con-

The second hike of the day was atop of Signal Hill where we were able to see a view of the harbor, Cape Town, the newly built soccer stadium for the 2010 World Cup of Soccer, and the surrounding mountains. One site in particular that captured my interest was Robben Island which was also visible from our vantage point. This was where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for many years

ducted by the local observatory to coordinate with the time of 12:00 noon.

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HIKE 3: Table Mountain Aerial Cableway (lunch stop) This hike was at the top of a magnificent geological formation known as Table Mountain, often referred to as one of the new 7 wonders of the world. It is referred to as Table Mountain because the peak does not culminate into a convergent point but rather it is a flattened surface resembling a table top. Although it is possible to hike to the peak of Table Mountain, we chose the alternative form of transportation – aerial cableway. We all loaded into a cable car – capable of housing 65 individuals, and proceeded to the top of the mountain. The views were breathtaking and, because the floor of the cable car rotated – each passenger was able to enjoy the ride from different perspectives. We got to the top and, following lunch, proceeded to a hike of the Table Mountain publications@statweb.org

National Park. At the end of the day, we were all exhausted as it felt that we had hiked all around Cape Town. And judging from the Google Earth image tracking our expedition, it certainly looks like we did!

Day 4 (06/01/2016): Hands-on Lab Techniques /”Pachyderma Proxy” On the agenda for today were several learning objectives including: learning the techniques needed to collect and properly wash a sediment sample from a core, how to take prepared sample and create a smear slide, a microscope activity involving prepared slides of protists, and an activity entitled, “Pachyderma Proxy.”

In order to create a smear slide, the first step is to collect and prep a sample. Samples were collected every 10 cm along a core, and then washed so that only the larger particles such as forams were retained. Forams are a group of calcareous protists that can be used to determine the age of the sediments as well as environmental conditions at the time they formed. These “bugs” as Dr. Krissek called them are an important tool that scientists use to help piece together the Earth’s geologic and climatologic past. While the washed samples were drying in the drying oven, we were given prepared samples to create our own smear slides. We collected a small sample of sediment and smeared it around on a slide after adding a few drops of water, as shown in the accompanying figure. The next step was to dry the sample by placing it on a hot plate for a few minutes. After drying, a few drops of opti-


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cal adhesive was added to the slide followed by the placement of a cover slip. The last step is to place the slide under UV light to allow the adhesive to cure.

to employ structural features of foram microfossils to indirectly determine the climate conditions in the Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past at that location.

After lunch, we were given prepared slides of diatoms, radiolarians, and forams. Under the microscope, we identified the different types of radiolarians and diatoms, and learned how to distinguish between benthic (organisms found on the seafloor) and planktic (drifting organisms usually found near the surface of the ocean) forams.

Day 5 (06/02/2016): Splicing, Dicing, and a Trip to the Aquarium

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pachyderma Proxyâ&#x20AC;? was an activity that allowed us

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After dividing into two groups, we set off for the core lab. Our group learned how hard it is to splice cores to make a complete sediment record for a given sediment. Dr. Turner gave us three cores from two holes from the same site. Two cores from Hole B were sequential and the one core from Hole A

was from the same general depth. We were told to make observations to try to find was of matching the Hole A core to the two Hole B cores in order to make one complete core from the three sample cores. The cores are taken close enough to each other that this is theoretically possible and, in fact, works most of the time. To assist in this task, we were given access to an instrument that uses color to determine the ages of a core. Before lunch, we switched with the other group and joined Dr. Krissek to learn how to determine an age range for a particular point on a core using a microscope and smear slides that we created the day before. Our task was to use a nannofossil called discoasters that are found in the core sediment to determine age range. This is possible because discoasters evolved over time in shape. We had a key that showed which time periods in which they each existed. We used the smear slides we made the day before and determined that one sample was from the Eocene epoch making it the oldest and a second


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a computer-aided design challenge to create a replica of an ocean core. Day 7 (06/04/2016): Exploring Climate Cyclesâ&#x20AC;Ś and the Bridge

sample from the same site was slightly younger in the Oligocene epoch. The other two samples were much younger and came from the Miocene-Pliocene epochs. After lunch, we stayed as one group and learned how to use Excel to graph data that helps find the points where cores can be spliced. Later that evening, it was off to the Two Oceans Aquarium which had phenomenal displays of ocean wildlife. We were treated to a Behind the Scenes tour of what it takes to maintain such an important facility. Day 6 (06/03/2016): Studying Climate Change The day started with the information provided by

ocean core samples to determine climate changes in the past. We also explored a variety of other physical data such as ice core samples and other more complex computer and numerical data that pulls from multiple sources to better understand climate changes. We are also excitedly planning out the student activities and other ways we will bring back our learnings about the ocean core, life at sea and more to our home institutions. Numerous ideas have been proposed, including an engineering design challenge involving students making their own ocean driller that must land on a precise piece of â&#x20AC;&#x153;ocean bedâ&#x20AC;?, and

Drs. Krissek and Turner co-taught the morning session, with a focus on climate cycles. The morning activity explored cyclic climate change from the geologic record. Working in small groups, we discussed the data sets provided and studied methods used to analyze cycles. These methods included core data, carbon and oxygen isotopes, and the relationship between the Sun and Earth. This activity helped us to make connections to lab work we had done earlier in the week, giving us a greater understanding of the scientific research performed aboard the JR. After lunch, we gathered our hard hats, safety glasses, and cameras for a tour of the Bridge. Mike Storms, Operations Superintendent, led the tour that started in the Engine room, where we learned about the operations that provide the ship with po-

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PD Opportunity #1: School of Rock Aboard the JOIDES Resolution (continued)

table water, heating and cooling, and the waste systems. We then made our way to the Bridge, where Mike explained the dynamic positioning system, which keeps the ship stable during drilling. Next, the captain joined us on the Bridge and answered questions about navigating the JR. Following the tour, we reconvened in the conference room to continue instruction from Drs. Krissek and Turner. The afternoon’s agenda included discussion about the PETM (Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) event. We analyzed more tables, graphs, proxy data, graphics, and text, followed by smallgroup work and wholegroup discussions and explanations. Day 8 (06/05/2016): Studying the Sands of Time On our last full day aboard the ship, we began with a drive up the coast to Boulder’s Beach. Although we came to examine the physical processes representing the geological environment, we were instantly publications@statweb.org

charmed with the local residents of this National Park, African penguins. Hundreds of penguins covered the beach and dune system, running in and out of the water, back to their nests to protect their chicks. Within the dune system, we examined sand grains from the beach. Derived from local granite, wind brought these grains to the beach, where they were weathered and sorted through the back and forth motion of the waves. Once back aboard the ship, we got to watch the crew in action during a fire drill. Hard hats in hand, we made our way to the dock, following protocols to make sure everyone was safe and sound. Back in the core lab, we examined sediment data collected by ANDRILL from the Ross Ice Shelf near East Antarctica. These samples provided an excellent opportunity to apply what we had learned this week. Using our observational skills and newly learned terminology, we identified siliceous and terrigenous sediments from the Antarctic region.

By taking a closer look at the presence of clasts within the matrix, we could come to new conclusions about the sediment. Smear slides revealed the presence of volcanic glass, in addition to biological materials. Applying Walther’s Law, we were able to explain layering patterns of clast-rich diamictite, wellsorted sands and gravels, clast-poor mudstone, and diatomite. These patterns help scientists to evaluate hypotheses about the history of ice sheets in the Antarctic. Day 9 (06/06/2016): Homeward Bound As the last day neared and we bid a fond farewell to new-found friends, colleagues and the JR, I walked away extremely appreciative of such an exceptional instructional experience. For those interested in learning more about the IODP, upcoming SOR offerings, or the vast array of instructional activities and opportunities available for educators, please visit the website: http://www.joidesresolution.org


42

The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Streamline the TEKS! By W. Patrick Cunningham with Carly Busarello, Eric Garcia Huitron, Jun Heo and Angel Hernandez - C. T. Johnson High School, San Antonio, TX

E

very Texas public school educator, from administrators to teacher aides, is almost daily confronted with the TEKS. However it is pronounced (Tex or Teeks), this acronym for the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills seems to make its way into the majority of conversations that teachers conduct about curriculum and instruction. Under public and legislative pressure, mostly revolving around dissatisfaction with graduates’ readiness for college and career, and with high-stakes testing, the State Board of Education (SBOE) in January 2016 “approved a process that will be used to streamline the science TEKS.” At the first general meeting in late July, 2016, the science streamlining committee learned from TEA leaders that science would be the first candidate for the process. It would, it was thought, be less trouble and cause less controversy than social studies. Science teachers from K through 12 applied for the various committees, and began work in the following summer. TEA leaders made it clear that the charge for each committee

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was to shorten or condense the TEKS in each grade or subject area, not to add new skills or objectives. The much more complex process of actually rewriting the TEKS or moving skills around would be delayed into the next decade, because that would create a need to radically revise curriculum resources. The entire science streamlining task force consists of about five dozen educators from across the state of Texas. Most of these attended the first three-day session in late July. I was one of three who represented SBOE district 5, and served on the sevenmember streamlining committee for chemistry. The process was quite straightforward: look at each of the skills and concepts and decide whether it was critical to a basic understanding of the subject, or a crucial part of the scaffolding for future grades or courses. The primary resource tool cited would be the College and Career Readiness Standards. The College Board’s AP curriculum, the Next Generation Science Standards, American Chemical Society recommendations and–above all–Common Core were

avoided in reasoning and documentation. The chemistry team, in my opinion, was well represented geographically, each with many years of teaching and leadership experience. The conversations were cordial, if occasionally warm, and well-focused. From time to time the frustrations classroom teachers face percolated to the surface and colored the discussion. A few ideas were put on a “wait list” for consideration when a true TEKS revision is planned. In chemistry, for instance, it is a continual irritation that nuclear change, which is physics, not chemistry, and can’t be safely the subject of experiment, is part of the TEKS. On the other hand, reaction rates, true and essential parts of chemistry with many lab investigations at the high school level, are not. Those kinds of changes would have to wait, but the “trimming” would give teachers more flexibility and the students more time to learn the really critical topics. The process continued over the three days and a final product was delivered to the TEA for review and ini-


Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Streamline the TEKS! (continued)

tial oversight by the State Board. At this writing, the committees are waiting for the next step to be outlined so that committees, meeting in late September, can massage and edit their final recommendations. Trimming Avogadro Calculations The process of streamlining reminds one of the old saw about not wanting to know how laws or sausage is made. But a look at a small part of the process could be instructive. One irritation that I and other practitioners have frequently complained about is the inclusion of calculations using Avogadro’s number, 6.02 x 1023 particles per mole. This huge number, named after one of the “fathers” of chemistry, Amadeo Avogadro, “provides the connection between the number of moles in a pure sample of a substance and the number of constituent particles (or units) of that substance” as the AP chemistry guidelines state. The TEKS (ch 112c8b) require the chemistry student to be proficient in “[using] the mole concept to calculate the number of atoms, ions, or molecules in a sample of material.”

Ironically, Avogadro never knew the value of the constant named for him, although he did demonstrate that equal volumes of gases at the same temperature and pressure contain the same number of particles. Avogadro’s number was only calculated in 1909; its namesake died in 1856. The calculation using Avogadro’s number leads nowhere in the rest of the first-year chemistry curriculum. It stands alone in the quantifying of changes that “occur during chemical reactions.” So I suggested to the committee that the TEKS be trimmed by eliminating the requirement. There was significant push-back (although cordial) from the other members of the chemistry committee, so we left it in the TEKS with a strong comment that some want it eliminated. On returning to school, I asked some of my seniors, who are in the Scientific Research and Design class, to do some quick checking of the college texts and a number of college professors in local universities. They found, in general, that “Avogadro’s number is not used outside basic

calculations from moles to molecules in class.” A researcher reported using it to calculate the surface density of molecules in a small space. A senior lecturer at UTSA reminded us that Avogadro’s number is used in the calculation of atomic volume in crystalline solids, especially metals. I acknowledge these four students as coauthors of this paper. The argument over Avogadro’s number calculations will continue when we resume, and I have to be prepared to lose this one. That’s what trying to reach consensus is about, when working with professional colleagues. Nonetheless, as the TEKS continue to evolve past this “streamlining,” we should constantly have to ask ourselves whether the basic concepts and skills we require of all science students should be those that help them prepare for life, for being good citizens ready for many avenues of study. Alternately, we may be preparing them chiefly for becoming a college student in our own disciplines.

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45

The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

The Math-Chemistry Connection: Using Data to Make Student-Centered Decisions By Angela Schroeder - South Belton Middle School

T

his article is a summary of research conducted at a Texas high school to show the relationship between academic performance in Algebra I and Chemistry, including a comparison of Chemistry and concurrent math course success. This research was conducted to encourage parents, counselors, and educators to consider IPC placement for students struggling in Algebra I, in order to prevent high failure rates and perpetuate dropout rates for this population. High school is the place where students begin making choices regarding their academic futures. Secondary students enjoy perusing course catalogues and making decisions about which classes will fill their schedules during the upcoming year. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to be exciting! Some classes will be based on their interests, although graduation requirements must be met and core classes take precedence. Therefore, we as educators are committed to helping secondary students build schedules that include their interests, meet graduation requirements, and consider their academic readiness. These

three parameters create conditions for success, and the most difficult parameter to determine is academic readiness. This is where student data plays a key role. The extant protocol to enroll exiting ninth grade students into Chemistry after successful completion of Biology may not translate to Chemistry success causing students to fall behind in credit requirements. Math achievement is a better indicator of chemistry readiness. Students that have failing averages or do not meet standards on the Algebra I STAAR are typically enrolled in MMA, a math course that offers review of Algebra I concepts during the fall semester, and introduces Geometry concepts in the spring semester. For these students it may be more appropriate for them to take Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) during their tenth grade year. IPC can serve as a bridge course, similar to MMA, or provide a stand-alone science course for students not seeking a STEM endorsement in fulfillment of their graduation requirements. While Algebra I proficiency should be sufficient for most chemi-

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cal quantitative analysis problems, many students struggle to translate algorithmic functions to situational chemistry word problems. In order, to streamline enrollment for students of all skill levels, a recalibration of the prerequisites for Chemistry should be considered in a manner that takes into account their Algebra I performance and subsequent math course. The participants in this study were 128 tenth grade students currently enrolled in grade level Chemistry at a 6A high school in Texas. The classes reflect the overall demographic makeup of the district which is 51% Hispanic, 42% Anglo, and 6% African American. The study sample consisted of 62 males and 66 females, and any student classified other than a sophomore was excluded from the study. The classes included were taught by the same Chemistry teacher, insuring that the students were receiving the same curriculum and level of instruction; however, the math courses and teachers varied. Concurrent math courses included, 41 students enrolled in MMA, 78 enrolled in Geometry, and


46

The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

The Math-Chemistry Connection: Using Data to Make Student-Centered Decisions (continued)

only 9 students were enrolled in Algebra II.

the data in this study reveal that low Algebra I performance and MMA enFor veteran teachers that Recent overhauls of gradu- rollment are indicators are familiar with the cross- ation requirements for a that these students will be curricular connection be- Texas high school diplo- more likely to struggle with tween math and chemis- ma have allowed students the heavily quantitative try the results were not some flexibility in fulfilling Chemistry objectives, IPC surprising. The Algebra the four math credits and will more effectively meet I STAAR scores their academic and Chemistry needs. The goal spring averages of secondary had a strong, education is to positive correlaprepare stution, which was dents for either statistically sigthe workforce, nificant, rs = vocational stud.633, N = 120, ies, or post-secp < .001. Addiondary courses. tionally, Algebra More importantI final course avly, it is to create erages and the conditions for combined Chemsuccessful comistry averages pletion of high were compared school, and reand reported duce the effect similar results; rs Figure 1: Mean averages for Chemistry students en- of the number = .732, N = 125, one reason sturolled in MMA and Geometry. p < .001, also a dents drop out strong, positive correlation four science credits. Re- of high school which is that that is statistically signifi- search shows that students they were failing too many cant. The standardized as- who feel successful in their classes (Gould & Weller, sessments were compared high school courses are 2015). using the same statistical more likely to finish high model and also found to be school and continue their Reference: Gould, S. & Weller, C. significant at rs = .640, N education whether through (Oct. 10, 2015). The most common = 112, p < .001. In ad- vocational or collegiate reasons students drop out of school dition, Chemistry averages programs. Consequently, are heartbreaking. Tech Insider. Rewere significantly greater effective student place- trieved from http://www.techinsider. for students enrolled in ment may predict future io/most-common-reasons-studentsGeometry (Mdn = 88.0) success, and encourage drop-out-of-high-school-2015-10. than for students enrolled students to complete their in MMA (Mdn = 76.8), U secondary courses. Since,

publications@statweb.org

= 2765, p < .001, r = .46 (see Figure 1).


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48

The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Science Education in Texas: The Tail Wagging the Dog By Sandra S. West, Ph.D. STAT Legislative Committee

T

exas science educators need to be at the table when science education issues arise such as revising our science standards, the TEKS. We need to be well informed, well prepared and directly involved to address science education in Texas. And you are the biggest part of that effort. STAT will enable you. Current Issue & Process The title of this piece is, “The Tail Wagging the Dog.” Last session, state lawmakers heard from teachers and administrators that Texas has too many standards (TEKS) in all courses. However, the effort reduce the number of the standards in all courses began with science, without any formal process to initially involve science teachers statewide, to streamline those standards. As part of the Science TEKS streamlining process, the Texas Education Agency on behalf of the State Board of Education belatedly collected information from science educators because of staff and logistics constraints. The survey asked for information regarding the scope of student expectations for each grade level/course to inform the work of SBOE-appointed streamlining committee.

publications@statweb.org

However, the survey closed September 19 after the first Science TEKS Streamlining Committee meeting that was held on July 1921 and where many of the decisions were made. If that alarms you, it should. Science teachers statewide should be the first participants in the revision of science standards because it impacts everything from instructional materials to budgets to testing to the ability of Texas students to be ready for college, career and competitive in today’s world .

Lost Instructional Time On another important note related to streamlining science TEKS, the STAT survey shockingly revealed that as many as 23 days are lost (or stolen depending upon how one views the activities) for instruction through both testing (re-

quired district and state) and non-testing activities such as picture days or assemblies, etc. Furthermore, the new requirement to measure instruction in minutes instead of days is likely to reveal that lost instructional time may be a larger problem than too many TEKS. See the STAT chart that summarizes the STAT survey findings. STAT is active in this effort. I’ve attached our testimony to the State Board of Education. You, too, need to be involved. I encourage you to provide input on the Science TEKS. If you do participate, I would strongly urge you to review the STAT Science TEKS Survey results. Science content standards change and evolve. It’s important our standards and national standards (A Framework for K-12 Science Education found at http://www.nap.edu/ catalog/13165/a-framework-for-k-12-scienceeducation-practices-crosscutting-concepts and the Next Generation Science Standards found at http:// www.nextgenscience.org/) are on par. As science educators, it’s our job – more than anyone else – to ensure our students have the best standards and instruc-


Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Science Education in Texas: The Tail Wagging the Dog (continued)

tional materials possible. Also, make your comments throughout the streamlining process to your respective SBOE member at http://tea.texas.gov/ sboe/. To idenitfy your SBOE (or other) representative is, go to http:// www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/ Address.aspx/. Additionally, register to vote, educate yourself and vote on every item on the ballot. Never underestimate your importance in the process. Too often, science gets caught up in disagreements with controversial topics. But, that leaves the vast majority of our content untouched by any significant input. If you teach that content, get involved. If you don’t get involved, we may end up with content that is not the best for our students. When science educators are not involved in developing the content that we will teach, we have given over to “The Tail Wags the Dog” scenario. Becoming a part of the conversation, giving voice to what is Best Practice in our science classrooms and how we can effectively grow our students into next generation scientists, and advocating for the protection of instructional time will transition the current ‘Dog Wagging” situa-

tion to one where the Dog actually Wags the Tail. I’d also encourage you to attend and testify at the SBOE meetings Nov. 16-18 at the TEA Headquarters located at 1601 N. Congress in Austin, TX. /. Chuck Hempstead (chuck@hempsteadassociates.com) can provide guidance for registration and testimony anytime you wish to testify. You are able to watch the livestreaming of the next meeting or videos of the past meetings such as the September 14th meeting regarding the progress on the TEKS Streamlining at http://www.adminmonitor. com/tx/tea No date has been announced by TEA for the final decision on streamlined standards. Get involved and stay involved with our effort to maintain solid science standards in Texas. Contact Chuck Hempstead for additional information on involvement. Here is the testimony STAT provided at the last SBOE: Thank you for this opportunity to testify. The Science Teachers Association of Texas (STAT) respectfully suggests the following considerations for stream-

lining the science TEKS. (We can provide additional examples if needed.) CAUTIONS • TIME: Streamlining teams of 2009 were not allowed adequate time to critically think through a very difficult assignment. Teams of expert teachers, science coordinators and science educators in science content and pedagogy across Texas who have endeavored since January to focus on the bigger ideas and sub-concepts in the TEKS found that it requires hours of research, discussion and consensus for even a couple of TEKS Student Expectations. Time for vertical alignment is also critical. We are concerned that, once again, the science writing/ streamlining team will not be allowed enough time to provide the quality product that is needed. • VERTICAL ALIGNMENT: The current TEKS are not well aligned due to a lack of time allotted to the writing team as a consequence of the textbook adoption timeline. The strands must be vertically aligned and that can best be accomplished using the K-12 Standards for Science Education. Perhaps the Board

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49


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Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Science Education in Texas: The Tail Wagging the Dog (continued)

could consider initially meeting by strand (such as Motion & Force) initially, rather than by grade level where it is more likely that the focus will be on individual grade-band TEKS. • STAAR: Science instruction is too often driven by STAAR, rather than the TEKS. Moreover, in some cases STAAR is testing a math skill rather than a science concept or science items test beyond the TEKS. More importantly, the high stakes (>50%) accountability has driven science education to Worst Practices (worksheets, lectures, etc.). • SUPPORTING TEA DOCUMENTS: The lack of K-12 adequately prepared science teachers and reducing the TEKS compels not only the creation of well-designed TEKS, but of “Clarifying” documents that explain what the TEKS mean and what they don’t mean such as TEA provided for math. The NGSSS provides examples of “Clarifying Statements” and “Assessment Boundaries” that are very helpful in studying the TEKS. (See example) The TEKS and supporting documents need to be written for the least prepared teacher.

• VOCABULARY: Include only important academic vocabulary (names for concepts) so that science doesn’t become even more of memorizing vocabulary instead of understanding concepts through inquiry and concrete/hands-on experiences for conceptual understanding and laying the foundation for deeper understanding at the next grade level and career/college readiness. The TEKS should prescribe the “academic vocabulary” not STAAR items. • NATIONAL SCIENCE STANDARDS: Science has a series of national standards from as early as the 1994 AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy (BSL) to the most current A Framework for K-12 Science Education (2012) and Next Generation Science Standards (2013) which, when researched, can provide clarity for writing TEKS. The BSL also provides the research on misconceptions that TEKS writers need to know. • UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES: The designation of “Readiness” and “Supporting” TEKS resulted in districts, principals and teachers teaching only the “Readiness” TEKS and

thus not laying/scaffolding the foundation for the conceptual understanding the “Readiness” concepts. • SCIENCE PROCESSES: Experts (scientists, teachers, coordinators & science educators) agree that the processes are how scientists learn about the patterns in the natural world and are not separate from the content. Thus, the requests from some to either delete some of the processes or to combine them with content TEKS reveals a lack of understanding of how science works. Science processes are the tools scientists use to answer the research questions or test hypotheses and they are the tools students must use to learn about patterns in nature. Science never separates them so that chemists use only a certain few and biologists use different processes. In contrast, scientists use any of those science practices/ tools/processes needed for solving the research question just as engineers use “engineering practices” to solve a problem. • “STOLEN” INSTRUCTIONAL TIME: Some of the cries of “too many TEKS” come from teachers whose class time is “stolen” either

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52

The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Science Education in Texas: The Tail Wagging the Dog (continued)

in minutes or whole periods by school assemblies, pep rallies, school photos, “fun days”, etc. There are schools in the same district where there is a difference of 15 days of instructional time as previously reported to the SBOE.

TEKS in 2009. Details like names of scientists were deleted along with some concepts.

• MATH: Students who have not learned the math skill in their math classes before using in science suffer in both math and science because science may be teaching math tricks and thus undermining math conceptual understanding. Similarly, science students do not understand the science concept that requires the prerequisite math skill that they haven’t yet learned. We know this lack of horizontal math and science alignment is a problem beginning at grade 6 and we are researching if/ how it may show up in K-5 perhaps in measurement, graphing, etc.. There is also a difference between the way science handles formulas/equations and the use of “pretty/even” numbers versus decimal numbers.

SUGGESTIONS:

• TEKS REDUCED IN 2009 & with TEA ‘Readiness” designations. The SBOE directed the 2009 writing team to “reduce” the

publications@statweb.org

• ANECDOTES: Anecdotes, rather than the research/ Best Practices, tend to drive decisions.

• DELETE: There are TEKS that can be deleted because - they are not cognitively appropriate such as “mass” in K-5 or - no higher level courses are dependent upon them (6.5 c Calculate density) or - the TEKS are included in another TEKS (6.7 a Speed also found in 8.6 c) and its removal would not undermine student understanding of motion at grade 8 or the CCRS although I would not necessarily recommend it. • CONSOLIDATION: 6.5 A & C can be combined to include “differentiate between element, compound, molecule and atom” to form a bigger idea about “matter”. However, if all of these concepts are taught in one lesson, students are not likely to develop the

conceptual understanding of them. • CLARIFICATION: There are some TEKS knowledge and skills statements “student understands…_” which need editing for clarification and continuity. • MATERIALS: Instructional materials produced by national corporations are generic for the entire U.S., not specific for science and, therefore, should not play a major role in streamlining decisions. For example, one widely adopted 5th grade science book contains the 8th grade concept of “acceleration”. • WORKFORCE/COLLELGE READINESS: The business community has strongly indicated the need for certain areas of preparation, many of which are found in science TEKS such as Force/Motion or Engineering Practices and thus the need to keep physics and chemistry TEKS in mind during streamlining. • The “HESS Cognitive Rigor Matrix (Math Science CRM) is a useful tool to enable the writing team to identify the “verbs” for the TEKS. (see example)


Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Science Education in Texas: The Tail Wagging the Dog (continued)

QUESTIONS: • How severely does the SBOE expect the “streamlining” to go? Easy deletions include removal of all “including” and “such as” examples. Is TEA going to provide the supplemental documents to replace the clarification that teachers requested with “such as”. • Is there a magic number for the maximum number of TEKS? Some CTE courses have several times

as many TEKS as science. For example, Biology has 58 TEKS whereas §130.6. Veterinary Medical Applications has 107 TEKS. • Will TEA clarify the link between the process and content TEKS for underprepared teachers? The 5th grade has only 23 Science content SEs despite the testimony of some witnesses. Expert teachers design their Scope and Sequences by content TEKS, not process TEKS

and teach the process TEKS needed by students to learn the content TEKS. The Science Teachers Association of Texas represents over 6,000 Texas science teachers and we remain ready to assist when and wherever needed. Thank you for the opportunity to testify.

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55

The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Summary of Results from STAT TEKS Streamlining & Lost Instructional Time Survey Summary of Results from STAT TEKS Streamlining & Lost Instructional Time Survey Distribution of Survey Participants

Region Center

ES

1

MS

Total 1

12

6

18

6.7

3.3

10.0

1

1

17

10

27

9.4

5.6

15.0

7

24

12

7.9

19.9

6.7

4.4

11.1

2

7.5

10

17.5

4.2

5.6

9.8

1

2

24.5

24

48.5

13.6

13.3

26.9

HS

1

2

Distribution of Missed Curricular Days

Test Days Lost (Avg)

Other Days Lost (Avg)

Total Days Lost (Avg)

Test Days Lost (% SY)

Other Days Lost (% SY)

Total Days Lost (% SY)

3 4

10

5

2

6

1

7

7

4

4

8

15.7

12.8

28.5

8.7

7.1

15.8

8

1

1

2

7.5

4.5

12

4.2

2.5

6.7

9 10

11

4

8

23

10.5

8.8

19.3

5.8

4.9

10.7

11

21

13

19

53

11.3

9.7

21

6.3

5.4

11.7

12

1

1

2

29

13.5

42.5

16.1

7.5

23.6

13

3

12

30

14.1

10.3

24.4

7.8

5.7

13.5

1

11

1

12

6.1

0.5

6.6

1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1

2

5

7

1.1

2.8

3.9

14

15 1

1

15 16

1

17 18

1

1

2

3

11

15

26

6.1

8.3

14.4

1

1

3

10.5

10.5

21

5.8

5.8

11.6

3

3

6

9

10.2

19.2

5.0

5.7

10.7

Other Days Lost (Avg)

Total Days Lost (Avg)

Test Days Lost (% SY)

Other Days Lost (% SY)

Total Days Lost (% SY)

9.9

22.7

7.1

5.5

12.6

19 20

Total

ES

MS

HS

Total

Test Days Lost (Avg)

51

51

61

163

12.8

Purpose of the publications@statweb.org Investigation: The Science Teachers Association of Texas STAT TEKS Streamlining & Lost Instructional Time Survey was created to (a) allow STAT members input on the Science TEKS Streamlining and (b) more clearly understand membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; complaints about losing instructional


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Summary of Results from STAT TEKS Streamlining & Lost Instructional Time Survey

Note: The survey requested responses in days, not minutes. However, these results in days may under report lost instructional time because often a whole day is not lost, but periods are shortened so total instructional minutes are lost. No participants in ESCs 3, 9, or 19 (red rows) responded to the survey.

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ASSOCIATION

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TE

publications@statweb.org

Lost instructional days as reported by science teachers are due to state and local testing (SAT/ACT, SSI, STAAR, TELPAS, CBAs, MAP, etc.), as well as nontesting days (picture day, assemblies, pep rallies, test rallies, fund raisers, career fair, STAAR review, cultural education rallies, student iPad distribution, field day, drug/alcohol awareness, awards day, final exams, early release, Worth the Wait, anti-bullying, UIL events, UIL students leav-

The results of this initial research have provided useful insights and a beginning point for a wider and in-depth study of lost instructional time as reported by science teachers.

OF

Discussion of Data: There were an equal number (51) of responses from elementary and middle school teachers with slightly more responses (61) from high school teachers. The average number

Lost instructional time attributed to Testing was 7.1% of 180 days or13 lost instructional days whereas lost instructional time attributed to Other (nontesting-related activities) was 5.5 % of 180 days or 10 lost instructional days for a total 13 days. Approximately 23 or12.6% Total days of instructional time was lost due to Test related and Other activities.

ing early or absent, suicide prevention, character education, bus training, fair day, parties, pullouts, health tests, course selection, fund raising, school field trips, blood drive, extracurricular, school movies, Jr. Achievement, teacher PD, etc.) See the TEKS Streamlining chart for additional examples.

NC

Summary: SY = School year of 180 instructional days as per HB 2610 which allowed districts to choose either 180 days or 75,600 minutes (one day defined as 420 minutes) for 20152016. The average of the Total (Testing and Other) Lost instructional days was 12.6% of 180 days which results in a loss of 22.68 instructional days.

of lost instructional days for Testing (state, district, school) was 12.8 with a range of 2 to 29. The average number of Other Lost Days (non-testing related activities described below) was 9.9 with a range of 1 to 24.

E CI

Purpose of the Investigation: The Science Teachers Association of Texas STAT TEKS Streamlining & Lost Instructional Time Survey was created to (a) allow STAT members input on the Science TEKS Streamlining and (b) more clearly understand membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; complaints about losing instructional time and the impact on being able to teach the TEKS. Teachers were asked to remember, estimate the amount, and cite the reasons for days that were lost for instruction and enter their data on the STAT website.


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SCIENTIFIC


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Live On an Active Volcano in Hawaii and Erupt Your Earth Science Enthusiasm By Gary Lewis - President, CEOect

L

ive on an active volcano in Hawaii and erupt your Earth science enthusiasm. Nothing sparks excitement and enthusiasm more in Earth science than seeing some amazing phenomenon in the field. It is true of our students, and it is also true of us teachers as well. We all bring our life and travel experiences into the classroom to encourage and install passion into our students about all aspects of science. Earth science is one of those areas that many folks feel uncomfortable and lack enthusiasm to teach - and it show though to our students. So why not change that by spending a week on an active volcano in Hawaii on the Discover

Recent teacher group stand in front of Kilauea Iki with the rising plume from the summit lava lake in the background

Hawaii’s Active Volcanoes STEM Teachers trip (July 2017). You will come back a changed education, and maybe a changed person! For over twenty years, Gary Lewis has been leading teachers from across the nation and around the world into the field to see firsthand volcanism and its effects on the communities that live on the flanks of active volcanoes. He Examining recent lava flows on Kilauea specializes in

publications@statweb.org

nurturing enthusiasm and understanding for those with little or no Earth science background and loves to model a wide range of teaching techniques in the field. Participants on Gary’s trips come home with tools, samples and skills for sharing that enthusiasm with their students. Part if this is because of Gary’s passion for Earth science, his love of volcanoes and his intimate knowledge of classroom teaching from being a high school teacher himself and working with teachers from many systems and countries around the globe.


Volume 60 Issue 2

STATellite

Live On an Active Volcano in Hawaii and Erupt Your Earth Science Enthusiasm (continued)

“I attended a professional development session in Hawaii with Gary Lewis. Though he had conducted this session on volcanoes numerous times before, it did not diminish Gary’s enthusiasm, which was contagious. His knowledge is impressive and he has a passion that invigorates others. During this session Gary used demonstrations, discussions, and handson activities in the field to teach a substantial quantity of material. The amount I learned was staggering and I thank Gary for being such an inspiring example of what it means to be an outstanding teacher!” Stephanie Jhones, Colorado.

Teachers examining spatter materials from a fissure eruption

A breached cinder cone full of green sand

The eight day Discover Hawaii’s Active Volcanoes trip is based in Hilo, Hawaii and takes the group though the basics of Plate Tectonics, hot-stop volcanism, volcano life cycles, volcanic products and more. We collect data, samples and learn how to develop scientific field notes and map in the field and in a lava cave. Participants also visit an active volcano observatory, a tea farm and winery, historical parks and learn about local traditions and culture that has developed through living with the hazards of volcanic activity. We look at examples of engineering solutions to some unusual

hazard problems in Hawaii. So almost each and every

Teacher Amy McGoo stands in front of the vent of a 1959 fire fountain

www.statweb.org

59


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Live On an Active Volcano in Hawaii and Erupt Your Earth Science Enthusiasm (continued)

area of the NGSS standards are hit over the eight days. There is even time to walk on a black and green sand beach, swim in volcanically heated hot pools and snorkel on a coral reef with turtles and dolphins (if they appear). “Taking learning out of the classroom and into the “real” world is what all science teachers strive for, and Gary Lewis is an expert. Having worked with Gary to plan a trip for middleschoolers, and having participated myself on one of his trips for teachers, it’s clear that he not only knows his stuff inside-out, but he understands his audience, too. Gary does a wonderful job tailoring incredible experiences for multiple levels of learners. His materials are top-notch and his excitement at sharing his experience with students is beyond compare.” Ian H. D. Clark, Middle School Science Teacher, CT. The trip caters for a small number of teachers so that personalized learning experiences can happen for

publications@statweb.org

all the participants. The trip is also not overly expensive, with all the land transport, accommodation, breakfasts, most dinners, and park entry fees covered. All you need to do is get to and from Hilo, Hawaii and make your field lunches and you are almost set.

For more information you can visit http://geoetc. com/hawaiijuly17/ or email Gary at gary@geoetc.com for more details. You can find us on Facebook at https://www. facebook.com/events/ 1106073509460672/

View from the historic park towards the snorkeling site


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

SBOE Members District 1 El Paso Martha M. Dominguez

District 9 Mount Pleasant Vice Chair Thomas Ratliff

District 2 Brownsville Ruben Cortez, Jr.

District 10 Florence Tom Maynard

District 3 San Antonio Marisa B. Perez

District 11 Fort Worth Patricia Hardy

District 4 Houston Lawrence A. Allen, Jr

District 12 Dallas Geraldine Miller

District 5 San Antonio Ken Mercer

District 13 Fort Worth Erika Beltran

District 6 Houston Chair Donna Bahorich

District 14 Waco Sue Melton-Malone

District 7 Beaumont David Bradley

District 15 Amarillo Marty Rowley

District 8 The Woodlands Barbara Cargill publications@statweb.org


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

STAT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 2016-2017

President

Past President

(972) 907-2838

(713) 723-0273

George Hademenos president@statweb.org

Matthew Wells pastpresident@statweb.org

President-Elect

Vice President

(469) 633-6805

(469) 633-6805

Treasurer

Secretary

(806) 766-1744

(281) 328-9237

Laura Lee McLeod presidentelect@statweb.org

Kara Swindell treasurer@statweb.org

Terry White

vicepresident@statweb.org

Melissa Gable secretary@statweb.org

Members At Large:

Ann Mulvihill

ann@statweb.org

Kayla Pearce

kayla@statweb.org

publications@statweb.org

Linda Schaake

linda@statweb.org


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The Official Publication of The Science Teachers Association of Texas

Affiliates TABT

Texas Association of Biology Teachers Daniel Bryant thedanielbryant@gmail.com

TAEE

Texas Association for Environmental Education Lisa Brown lob002@shsu.edu

TCES

Texas Council of Elementary Science Wilma Stewart tcespresident@gmail.com

TESTA

Contacts

kathryn.barclay@fortbend.k12.tx.us

TEA Representative:

Texas Earth Science Teachers Association Kathryn Barclay

TMEA

Texas Marine Educators Association Terrie Looney tslooney@ag.tamu.edu

TSAAPT

Texas Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers Karen Jo Matsler kjmatsler@gmail.com

ACT2

Associated Chemistry Teachers of Texas Karen Compton karen.compton@pisd.edu

ISEA

Informal Science Education Association Lynn Christopher

Irene Pickhardt Curriculum Division (512) 463-9581

irene.pickhardt@tea.state.tx.us

Executive Director: Chuck Hempstead (512) 491-6685 stat@statweb.org

Assistant Executive Director: Janet Morrow (512) 491-6685

janet@statweb.org

STATellite Editor: Derek Buczynski

lchristopher@saws.org

STATellite Submissions:

TSELA

publications@statweb.org

Texas Science Education Leadership Association Cynthia Ontiveros ccontive@gmail.com

publications@statweb.org

(512) 491-6685


Profile for The STATellite

The STATellite (September 2016)  

The September issue of the STATellite is now available!

The STATellite (September 2016)  

The September issue of the STATellite is now available!

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