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Contents Calendar President’s Message

Volume 54, Number 3

August 2010

Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Inside:

CAST 2010:

• Conference Highlights • Register Now!

Volunteering at CAST STAT Call for Board Members Plus... A Plethora of Inspiring “Back to School” Articles! The Official Newsletter of the Science Teachers Association of Texas


Contents Calendar

About Us

President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News

We are STAT, the Science Teachers Association of Texas. STAT is committed to the enhancement of the teaching of science in Texas at all levels and in all science disciplines. For STAT Position Statements, go to: http://www.statweb.org/positions STAT is: o A statewide organization of elementary, middle level, and high school teachers, college educators, supervisors of science, and others dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of science and education in our schools. o A chapter of the National Science Teachers Association o Visit the NSTA site STAT seeks to: o Serve as a unified voice for the science teachers of the state. o Keep science teachers and other members informed about current trends in science education. o Provide opportunities for members to examine techonology, curriculum, materials, and services. o Inform members of local, state and national meetings, conferences, seminars and workshops related to sciences. o Cooperate with other science oriented organizations and teacher associations in the promotion of teaching of science. History: STAT, Science Teachers Association of Texas, was formally organized in 1957 during the 4th Annual Conference for the Advancement of Science & Mathematics Teaching (CASMT). STAT membership is now more than 7,000 strong!

STAT Contacts

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Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Calendar..............................................................5 President’s Message .........................................6 Knowledge is Power ........................................9 Administrators and Policymakers Institute............11 Supplemental Materials ................................12 Call for Board Members ................................13 Educators Professional Liability Insurance ............14 CAST 2010 Guide............................................15 Volunteer @ CAST............................................22 Students Use Science to Solve Crime .........23 STAT Awards Nominations ..........................25 Even Teaching Science is an Art...................26 Affiliate News ..................................................27 STAT Contacts .................................................34 Elected Officers.....................................34 Appointed Positions.............................34 Affiliate Congress.................................35 Texas State Board of Education...........36 3


Contents

Remember the first time you fell in love with science?

Calendar President’s Message

We do. It is the reason

Knowledge is Power

we believe in hands-on scientific technology. It engages students in a meaningful way, develops keen analytical skills, and awakens a love for discovery.

API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

www.vernier.com for product tours, training videos, FREE sample labs, and to look for FREE workshops in your neighborhood.

Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art

LabQuest $

®

329

Affiliate News

Only $299 when you buy 8 or more

STAT Contacts V e r n i e r S o f t w a r e & Te c h n o l o g y • w w w . v e r n i e r . c o m • To l l F r e e : 8 8 8 - 8 3 7 - 6 4 3 7

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Contents Calendar

CAST 2010 November 11 - 13, 2010 Houston, TX

President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

September

CAST Board Meeting Nasco Kit Promotions November 13, 2010 STATellite Newsletter Houston, TX Aug 2010 STAT1008 February STAT BOD Meeting February 19-20, 2011, Austin, TX

TAEE Annual Fall Conference September 17-19 Burnet, TX

CCRI Math and Science Summit September 23-24 San Antonio, TX

ISEA Conference February 25-27, 2011 Marble Falls, TX STAT1008

TMEA Conference September 24 Corpus Christi, TX

October

Rio Grande Valley Science Conference October 9 - 10, 2010 Mercedes, TX NSTA Area Conference October 28 - 30, 2010 Kansas City, MO

November

TSELA Meeting November 10 Houston, TX 5


Contents Calendar President’s Message

A Message from President Palmer

Knowledge is Power

Over the years, I have heard teachers tell me that they get frustrated when they "teach" something but the students do not get it. During my teaching career I had many such experiences. A number of years ago, I had two experiences that helped me understand the problem.

API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

The first experience was seeing the documentary "A Private Universe" (available as streaming video HERE). This video looks at why many adults do not understand some basic science concepts that they were "taught" in school. The second was a conference speech by Grant Wiggins. Wiggins, along with Jay McTighe, wrote the book “Understanding by Design.” In their book, Wiggins and McTighe argue that one of the reasons students do not learn is that we do not design our instruction in a way that leads students to a deep understanding of concepts.

Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art

Rather, we teach using activities that are interesting to us and are related to the concept, but may not lead the students to the learning outcomes we desire. They also point out that we, as teachers, do not assess student learning in a way that truly demonstrates their understanding. Dealing with large classes and large total student numbers, we tend to use selected response tests that easily generate a grade for our grade books but do not really measure what the students learned. I began to reflect on my own teaching and assessment practices. I realized that many of my students were not learning. Like most teachers, I did not take time to go back and re-teach students who were not successful on the selected response test. I even remember times when all the students did poorly on my test. I would curve the grades and then move on. Looking back, that was educational malpractice. If the test was a true measure of what students should know, then the fact that all of them did poorly means they did not learn what they should have. If it was not an accurate measure of what the students should have known, then it was not a fair test. Either way, curving the grades and moving on was not best practice. I realize that we need to design instruction with clear outcomes in line. We need to assess in authentic ways that actually let us know what students do and do not understand.

Affiliate News Joel Palmer, representing STAT at NSTA’s CAGS Conference in Las Vegas, NV, July 2010.

STAT Contacts

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I think there is an additional component that we as science educators need to address. This additional component is our comprehension of our subject. There are some concepts that science teachers teach without thoroughly understanding. For example, in a video documentary similar to


Contents

Message from the President (cont’d. from page 9)

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

“A Private Universe” called “Minds of Our Own” (available as streaming video HERE) the producers ask college graduates at graduation where the matter in a tree comes from. In other words, you plant a small acorn and 30 years later there is a huge oak tree weighing hundreds of tons. Where does all the matter come from? A living tree has a large mass of water and it is obvious where that comes from but even totally dried the tree weighs tons. Where did all that matter come from? Over the last 10 years I have asked numerous groups of secondary science teachers this question. Few have been able to answer it. If you are not sure of the answer, check out the video or simply think about the process of photosynthesis and respiration.

and at Notre Dame University. Where do you find out about these programs? I found them in the NSTA and STAT publications, but you have to take the initiative to find them and apply. My ultimate point is that we, as science teachers, must be lifelong learners. It is not enough to get a BS or BA degree and be satisfied that you know enough. It often means more than getting a Masters degree in education. They seldom do much to increase your content knowledge. To be the best teacher you can be, you must be a consumer of knowledge.

So how do you gain a deep understanding of your subject? One step is to think deeply about your subject. What are the big ideas and underlying principals that shape your subject? Next discuss these big ideas with other teachers. Read periodicals published in your field, both educational and scientific. Then attend Staff Development opportunities were you can spend time with other science educators discussing your subject. As STAT president I must recommend CAST and your local MiniCAST if there is one in your area. Join one of the STAT affiliate groups. There are groups for almost any discipline. They can be found on the STAT website at http://www.statweb.org/affiliates. These affiliates include ones organized around Chemistry, Informal science education, Integrated science teaching, Biology, Environmental science, Elementary science teaching, Earth science, Marine science, and Physics. The dues for these organizations are very reasonable and most hold subject area meetings around the state as well as publish their own newsletters. Take university classes or considering applying to grant funded programs at both the state and national level. Some of the greatest learning opportunities of my life were summer programs where they paid all my expenses and I got to spend 2-3 weeks somewhere learning science. I attended such programs from 1989 – 1995 when I left the classroom to become a science coordinator (most require you be a classroom teacher). I spent time in San Diego, Idaho, Washington state, Montana,

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MOLU_PE3 StateliteAd 6-10:Layout 1

6/11/10

11:33 AM

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presents

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The Mobile Offshore Learning Unit (MOLU) The Mobile Offshore Learning Unit (MOLU) is

Calendar

a $1.2 million dollar engaging traveling exhibit.

President’s Message

curriculum-based, hands-on activities about energy

Knowledge is Power

the oil and gas industry. The curriculum for each

It features six self contained learning centers with and the technologies and sciences involved with of the 24 activities is based on national and Texas state standards (TEKS). Although the MOLU is

API 2010

geared for 5th grade students, it is also appropriate for other age groups. The MOLU is sponsored by Teachers will need to accomplish the following prior to the visit: ■ Administer pre-test ■ Have students view 2 complimentary DVDs, OEC’s The Offshore Story and API's Fuel-less ■ Have students complete a Career Interest Profile form

Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members

Following the visit, teachers are asked to: ■ Review and correct answers in the MOLU Pass booklet with students ■ Administer post-test ■ Score pre/post tests and mail to OEC ■ Complete online teacher evaluation form A pre-visit package containing all necessary materials will be sent to the school prior to the MOLU visit.

Devon, Dominion, ExxonMobil, Halliburton, Marathon Oil Company, and Schlumberger. For more information about the MOLU and to download a MOLU Request Form, please visit www.oceanstaroec.com

EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST

Presents

Project E³: Expanding Energy Education Workshops At Ocean

Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime

Star Museum in Galveston – 20th Street at Harborside Drive

2010 WORKSH O P D AT ES

STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art

Knowledge Box Grades 6-12

Playing with Petroleum Grades K-5

Thursday, August 5, 2010

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Saturday, September 25, 2010

Saturday, September 18, 2010

Saturday, October 16, 2010

Saturday, October 9, 2010

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Saturday, November 13, 2010

Don’t forget to visit the Offshore Energy Center’s booth 219 at CAST!!! Participants will receive free admission to the Museum, a complimentary guided tour with a light breakfast, the PE³: Expanding Energy Education Teacher Guide (a $35.00 value) and a travel stipend for those that drive depending on availability. We require a $35.00 refundable registration deposit to discourage NO-SHOWS. Registration deposits will be cheerfully refunded to registrants that attend the workshop and those that cancel three days prior to the workshop date. The workshop begins at 9:00am and ends at 4:00pm. Each participant will also receive 6 CPE hours and will be entitled to reserve a Knowledge Box or Playing with Petroleum Kit for up to 30 days to untilize in their classrooms at no charge. (Free pick-up and delivery within the Houston area.) Ask about workshops outside of the Houston/Galveston area.

Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Mail checks to: Offshore Energy Center 200 N. Dairy Ashford, Suite 6220 Houston, Texas 77079 (281) 544-2435 Fax: (281) 544-2441

For more information about the workshops, visit our website: www oceanstaroec.com or contact Doris Tomas, Education Director, dtomas@oceanstaroec.com

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Contents

Knowledge is Power

by Stef Paramoure, Presidential Award Winner for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Knowledge

“ is Power, get some and give some.” This is my personal mantra that I share with my students, other educators, parents, and anyone connected with education. These words have impacted my world so forcefully that I feel I must share my story in an effort to impact administrators and empower other educators! Let us go back to the beginning, my first year teaching. I was given a split assignment of 7th and 8th grade science. I was handed a textbook, shown the science storerooms, and encouraged by my science department team. I only remember that I was still teaching chemistry concepts in December and I never made it to ecology that year. This is a story we can all relate to. I felt dissatisfied and wanted more training. I found a weeklong summer opportunity at Texas Lutheran University as part of the AP Institute program. I was grateful that my principal supported my attendance and I received the first of my many hours of professional development. It was an incredible learning experience and I brought back several lab activities that are still part of the scope and sequence for that district. Skip ahead a few years, and I joined about the Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science and Math which provided a 105 hours of professional development (for FREE) and materials for my science class. I was thrilled and became an enthusiastic member. At this point, I will give much credit to my principal, Patti Vlieger, for supporting my participation in on-going professional development. Our district had stopped supporting teacher staff development during the school year and my principal worked with me to ask for exceptions in return for my training of other teachers. Through her acknowledgement of the power of professional development, I was able to attend CAST (although I was not given money, only the time off), CTRC trainings, and most importantly, conference time to train my science department members with an expectation from our principal that the training was not optional. In my 8-year teaching career, I have logged close to 1,000 hours of professional development, earned

a Masters degree in curriculum and technology, and attended, as well as presented, at several conferences including CAST, NSTA, and TECC. While I do not suggest this should be the standard, what I do suggest is that, based on my personal experience, knowledge is power! You may be wondering why I would share my plethora of experiences. You see, each time I attended professional development opportunties, I was able to add to my teacher toolbox. Each time I prepared to present district training or a workshop for a conference, I was reflecting and practicing “purposeful pedagogy” in my classroom to ensure that the information I shared was effective.

“In my 8-year teaching career, I have logged close to 1,000 hours of professional development... each time I attended professional development opportunties, I was able to add to my teacher toolbox... through my professional development, I went from being an enthusiastic first year teacher to an effective ebullient science teacher.” The New Teacher Project published a report called: “The Widget Effect: Our National Failure to Acknowledge and Act on Differences in Teacher Effectiveness.” The report states: “The lesson from these decades of research is clear: teachers matter. Some teachers are capable of generating exceptional learning growth in students; others are not, and a small group actually hinders their students’ academic progress.” I resemble this remark. Through my professional development, I went from being an enthusiastic first year teacher to an effective ebullient science teacher. All the routines in my classroom are designed to support learning and I can say this with confidence because of my knowledge base. I am a powerful teacher because I have been taught “how” to be effective. I have attended trainings, brought back ideas, revised labs, collaborated with others, and witnessed student success based on purposeful pedagogy.

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Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI

Knowledge is Power (cont’d.) Your next question might logically be, ‘so why am I sharing this information?’ You see, I have been honored as a result of my purposeful pedagogy. I have not only touched the lives of my students, but I have reaped the benefits of teaching awards. In the past, I have been the Secondary Teacher of the Year for Comal ISD, the Gulf Coast Association for Geological Societies Teacher of the Year, the American Association of Petroleum Geologist National Teacher of the Year and most recently I was given the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching award for Secondary Science. I get to meet the President of the United States and I will be given $10,000 dollars!! So, I have decided to use this award as a way to showcase the importance of professional development for all teachers. Had I stayed the energetic first year teacher I was, I would not have received the above awards. Albeit, my students would have enjoyed my class, I would not have made the same impact. Learning how to incorporate brain-based learning into my class, the power of journaling and MTV (Making Thinking Visible), as well as the content understanding I gained with my association with TRC has been incredible.

CAST 2010

Want to be rewarded for your teaching like Steph Paramoure? Apply for a STAT Award for your chance to shine!

Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

We know that the teacher is a critical component of student success. The Widget Effect goes on to state that, “Furthermore, it requires professional development that is tightly linked to performance standards and differentiated based on individual teacher needs. The core purpose of evaluation must be maximizing teacher growth and effectiveness, not just documenting poor performance as a prelude to dismissal.” We need to realize that individuals who enter the teaching profession must experience ongoing professional development to experience quality content training, exposure to new technologies, and the chance to mingle with other life- long learners who are dedicated to inspiring the next generation. As educators, we know the power of practicing metacognition with our students, we see the power of peer sharing and evaluation, as well as the exponential growth

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experienced when students are given the support and opportunity to learn from mistakes and take educational risks. Yet, more often than not, this is not the case for the teacher. This is a problem. Remembering the frustration that can accompany the learning of a new skill, the power of questioning why you selected your answer or supporting your choice with facts is not just for our students. We need to encourage reflection and MTV in our teachers. This cannot be accomplished without professional development opportunities. The synergy experienced when a group of educators start to share experiences is incredible. Please consider joining your local TRC collaborative , attending professional development opportunities, and reminding your administration that purposeful pedagogy requires ongoing support and practice opportunities and needs district support. I challenge you to reflect on your teaching methods. Why do you have specific classroom routines, are there other ways to accomplish the same task while increasing student involvement, are you doing most of the talking in your classroom, and what is the classroom culture you create in your first week of school? I have pondered each of these questions and more as a direct result of professional development. I still remember one CAST workshop in which I tweaked the presenter’s idea and came up with my STAR (Saluting Tenaciousness, Awesomeness, and anything else the Rocks!) program. You would be amazed at power of awarding a student a cut out star and seeing the pride and level of engagement increase. In closing, I will share with you my official press release for the Presidential award: “I am indebted to the Texas Regional Collaboratives for my growth in science content and purposeful pedagogy. This organization has impacted not only my life, but also those of my students and the students of teachers with whom I have shared information. Knowledge is power and the TRC has enabled me to become a powerful teacher. Earning the PAMEST validates how quality ongoing professional development is crucial to improving education and inspiring the next generation to pursue STEM careers.” There you have it: Knowledge is POWER, get some and give some!


Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art

You already know that the new science TEKs will change your curriculum, but do you know what you can do to improve scores in your district?

We are calling all administrators, principals, and district policymakers to join the Science Teachers Association of Texas as we host our annual Administrators and Policymakers Institute (API) to learn about the changing dynamics of the Texas science classroom. API focuses on science education objectives and administrator training for new science standards. Please join us at CAST for a special half-day program designed to fit your science goals and objectives. This year’s API will occur on Thursday, November 11 at the Houston Hilton-Americas. The low registration fee of $95 includes breakfast, an opening general session, 10 educational breakout sessions and a luncheon featuring educational consultant and expert in the “Neuroscience of Learning,” Kenneth Wesson. Wesson’s presentation, “How Children Learn: Brain Research and Inquiry-Based Science,” will give you the tools you need to understand how to get inside students’ minds and help them succeed.

Don’t be left behind! Move ahead with API!

Affiliate News STAT Contacts

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Contents

Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware! an Editorial by Kevin Fisher, TSELA President-Elect

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Beginning with the 2010 – 2011 school year, science educators will begin implementing the revised Science TEKS. This will present many challenges as some concepts have been moved to different grade levels, new content has been added to various grade levels, and the rigor has been increased in all science courses. Compounding the challenges is the fact that new instructional materials correlated to the revised Science TEKS will not be available for several years. Fortunately, the State Board of Education (SBOE) has made provisions for supplemental materials to be developed and made available to science educators beginning in the 2011 – 2012 school year. This will be a double-edged sword for the science education community. The writing teams for each subject area and grade level did commendable jobs in clarifying the documents, adding rigor, and relevance. The revised documents are not perfect, but are superior to the original TEKS written in the late 90’s. Had the documents been approved by the SBOE as submitted by the writing teams, Texas students would be the benefactors of some of the best standards in the nation. However, the SBOE added some statements to the documents that will open the door for supplemental materials that have factual errors and are designed to cast doubt on some of the most established concepts and theories in science. As was the case in English Language Arts and Social Studies, the SBOE ignored the quality work of the writing teams, and saw fit to put in statements that weaken science education for Texas students and, in some instances, pushed science back into the 1500’s. Two courses that had significant and deleterious additions were Earth and Space Science and Biology. Examples of added statements in Biology are 7B, 7G, and 9D. High-quality supplemental materials addressing 21st century science, legitimate science concepts, and correlated to the revised Science

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TEKS will be a valuable asset that can enhance classroom presentations. Unfortunately, because any entity can submit supplementary materials, some materials that are submitted will contain factual errors, convoluted information, and pretzel logic that will do little to increase student scientific literacy. We are once again in the position of having to defend science education, specifically evolution, geological concepts, the Big Bang, and the age of the universe, among others. Some examples of publications to be avoided are “Explore Evolution” and “The Design of Life.” What can we do? The first step is to make sure we have well-qualified science educators on the review committees. These committees will meet in the late fall and early spring to review materials. If you are interested in serving on a review committee, please contact me for information (kfisher56@msn.com). Next, make sure everyone is aware of which materials will ensure that our students will get a 21st century science education, and which materials would achieve less than desirable results. We are faced with enough challenges in today’s classrooms without the infusion of dubious instructional materials. The bottom line: the SBOE should respect the expertise and advice of teachers and scholars in adopting new science instructional materials and ensure that students get a sound science education that prepares them to succeed in college and the jobs of the 21st century. This should take precedence over political agendas.


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Nominate a STAT Officer

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Make your voice heard and make a difference for the science teachers in Texas by taking a leadership role with STAT. Each officer serves as a voting member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee. Below is a listing of the offices and the duties of each office: President-Elect: The President-Elect assists with conference planning, serves as the interim President in the absence of the President, and works with the Regional Directors on membership development and regional Mini-CASTs. The President-Elect serves as President the following year (June 2012-2013). Vice President: The Vice President coordinates and nominates CAST Presiders and serves as the liason for the affiliate organizations. One year term. Treasurer: The Treasurer serves as the Chief Financial Officer, supervising financial transactions, maintaining accurate records, and provides monthly reports to the Board. One year term. Secretary: The Secretary keeps accurate minutes of the Board and Executive Committee meetings, provides regular reports of the minutes to the Board, and writes correspondence on behalf of the Board. One year term. You may nominate yourself or others for multiple offices. To nominate someone for STAT Office, please visit the NOMINATION SITE and email the nomination form to stat@bizaustin.rr.com, or send to our address listed. Nominees will be sent a nomination packet to complete and return to the Nomination Comittee in order to be considered for election. The deadline for nominees is October 15th, 2010.

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Contents

Educators Professional Liability Insurance. Get the Coverage You Need to Keep Your Career Protected.

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010

The Science Teachers Association of Texas is now offering Educators Professional Liability Insurance (EPLI). For only $50/year, you can be covered for up to $2 million per occurrence. That’s a lot of weight behind your career! This is an especially important asset for science teachers. Think about all the times you’ve been in a lab this year, helping students through complicated, hands-on projects. The liability section of the policy will help protect you when unfortunate incidents occur, such as injury to a student under your watch or failure to educate. A separate section of the policy provides reimbursement of attorney fees in a broad range of situations not covered under Coverage A, such as criminal charges, allegations of sexual misconduct, actions involving dismissal, revocation of certification, and other professional rights and duties. The policy period began on 8/1/2010. If you enroll now, your coverage begins on the date of your enrollment and ends on 8/1/2011.

Volunteer @ CAST Premium Break-Down

Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art

Insurance Premium: Regular Member

$44.00

State Tax & Fees (4.91%)

$2.16

Administrative Cost

$3.84

Total Cost

$50.00

Insurance Premium: Student

$22.00

State Tax & Fees (4.91%)

$1.08

Administrative Cost

$3.92

Total Cost

$27.00

Affiliate News EPLI is a members-only benefit. If you are interested in joining STAT, visit our website and click “Join” today!

STAT Contacts

Membership is only $25/year. 14


Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

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Contents

CAST 2010 Sponsors Thank You for Making CAST 2010 Possible! For more information on each sponsor, please click their logo.

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Sponsorships are still available. To find out more, go to www.statweb.org/sponsorship. 16


Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Registration Registration

The Conference will take place November 11-13 in Houston, TX, at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Register for the conference, beginning August 15, 2010, by visiting our website: www.statweb.org/cast/register Early Bird Rate: $115 (must be registered and paid before 9.24.10) *Register early and your name will be entered in a drawing for a VIP seat and invitation to the exclusive VIP reception with Robert Ballard on Wednesday, November 10! Also, register at the Early Bird rate to guarantee that your name badge will be mailed to you in advance so you can go straight to the sessions. An additional perk is first-pick for the FREE short courses offered this year. They’ll be going fast! Advanced Rate: $145 (must be registered and paid between 9.25.10-10.15.10) Regular Rate: $160 (must be registered and paid between 10.16.10-11.13.10) Student: $25 (with proof of current enrollment) Administrators and Policymakers Institute (Thursday Only): $95 Family Member: $45 (with any full registration fee) Saturday Only: $50

HOUSING

We recommend booking rooms at our state-of-the-art host hotel, the Houston HiltonAmericas, located across the street from the George R. Brown Convention Center. Hotel: Houston Hilton-Americas Hotel Rate: $165 Hotel: Doubletree Hotel Houston Downtown Hotel Rate: $132 Attendees that book through the STAT housing site will: • Be guaranteed that their hotel will be on the CAST 2010 hotel shuttle route. • Receive lower rates through STAT’s block of rooms. • Stay at official CAST hotels, which have been inspected by staff prior to booking: we only book with hotels we have reviewed. • Be giving back to CAST: future hotel contract negotiations depend on the size of our block. CAST is able to keep rates low if more attendees book within our designated hotels. PLUS you will be entered to receive a free two night stay from The Sheraton Dallas! Visit www.statweb.org/cast/housing to book your rooms today!

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SPEAKERS AND SESSIONS

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He discovered the RMS Titanic, methanefueled mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico, completely preserved shipwrecks in the Black Sea, and much more!

Calendar

And now, famed oceanographer and explorer Dr. Robert Ballard, will take you on a journey beyond your classroom textbooks and dive into the heart of the expedition experience. Join us for this exciting keynote as Dr. Ballard takes us on a new mission to create the Classrooms of Tomorrow, November 11th during the opening Tomorrow ceremonies.

President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

You may shed a few tears, you’ll probably laugh so hard you’ll snort and, chances are, you’ll hang on every word. Take the advice of Dr. Debbie Silver and realize the benefits of Practicing Safe Stress in your classroom. Join us November 12 for this humorous and reflective keynote session: A Presentation for Educators who are OverTired, Over-Burdened, Over-Committed and/or Just About Ready to SNAP!

Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime

In addition to these fantastic keynote presentations, you will have your option of attending 14 one-hour workshops out of more than 550 options tailored to the TEKS, your grade level and subject of science. You may also individually purchase 3 hour or 6 hour hands-on short courses or half day and full day field trips to add to your experience!

STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

BRAND NEW! CAST 2010 Science JAM Sessions are included in your registration. These extra sessions, just 45 minutes long, help you keep your day JAM-packed with education and knowledge! These courses are also specifically designed to hold larger audiences and will give you an opportunity to network with teachers from across the state. 18


Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010

CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS Exhibits We know a number of teachers who pack extra suitcases for all the giveaways and new materials to purchase at our exhibit hall. CAST 2010 will feature 400 exhibit booths filled with the latest teaching tools and science activity gear. Be prepared to get moving as you venture from booth to booth and take products from “Science in the City” to your city. Science in the City Reception Join us on Thursday for our opening night grand reception, graciously sponsored by Chevron. The reception is free to all attendees and will include appetizers, entertainment, giveaways and surprises for our guests! As a special treat, the exhibit hall will stay open during the reception so you can snack while you stroll the exhibits.

Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Steppin’ Out Social Plan to attend the Friday night social at the Houston Pavilions. Special discounts for dining, drinks, entertainment, shopping, and more will be available for all CAST attendees.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston All CAST attendees will enjoy free admission to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston with presentation of name badge. Enhance your Houston experience by enjoying the almost 60,000 pieces MFAH has to offer from around the world. 19


Conference Schedule Contents

thursday, november 11th 7:00 am - 5:00 pm 7:00 am - 8:00 am 8:00 am - 5:00 pm 8:30 am - 1:00 pm 8:30 am - 5:30 pm 8:45 am - 5:45 pm 9:00 am - 12:00 pm 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010

2:30 pm - 7:00 pm 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

CAST Registration First Time Attendees Coffee Hour Scheduled Field Trips Administrators and Policymakers Institute Workshops - every hour Science JAM Sessions - every 1.5 hours 3-hour Short Courses Opening Ceremony: Keynote Speaker Bob Ballard,Teacher Award Presentation, STAT Business Meeting Exhibit Hall Open 3-hour Short Courses CAST 2010 Grand Reception

friday, november 12th

Call for Board Members

7:00 am - 5:00 pm CAST Registration 7:30 am - 9:00 am STAT VIP Breakfast 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Scheduled Field Trips 8:30 am - 5:30 am Workshops - every hour 8:45 am - 5:45 pm Science JAM Sessions - every 1.5 hours 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Exhibit Hall Open 9:00 am - 12:00 pm 3-hour Short Courses 11:30 am - 12:30 pm Keynote Speaker: Debbie Silver 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm 3-hour Short Courses 6:00 pm - 10:00 pm Science Teachers’ “Steppin’ Out” Social

EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime

saturday, november 13th

STAT Awards Nominations

7:00 am - 10:00 am CAST Registration 8:00 am - 3:30 pm Scheduled Field Trips 8:00 am - 2:00 pm Exhibit Hall Open 8:30 am - 4:00 pm Workshops - every hour 8:45 am - 11:15 am Science JAM Sessions - every 1.5 hours 9:00 am - 12:00 pm 3-hour Short Courses 11:30 am - 12:30 pm Closing Session 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm 3-hour short courses

Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

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BOARD SIGHTINGS Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members

STAT President-Elect Ross Ann Hill of Idalou ISD, posing with the STAT Banner at the 16th Annual Texas Regional Collaboratives Conference in Austin, TX.

The newly-elected STAT Board poses during the August 6-7 Board Meeting. From left to right: Deidre Parish, Tony Zahn, Patsy Magee, Ross Ann Hill, Joel Palmer, and Laurel Frank

EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

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Contents

VOLUNTEER at CAST

Calendar

We’re bringing Science to the City, and we need your help!

President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

If you’ve been to CAST before, you know that the success of this conference is due in big part to the contributions of our fantastic volunteers and we are sincerely grateful for your support! We are seeking energetic, friendly, science-loving, organized and talented individuals to help us facilitate this year’s conference at the George R. Brown Convention Center. If you love science, education and people, and are comfortable in fast-paced environments, then we look forward to having you as a volunteer at CAST! The following is a list of available positions: • Workshop and Short Course Presiders • Registration • Monitors (Exhibit Hall, Cyber Cafe, Special Events) • Runners • Green Team • Hospitality needs • Special needs • Field Trip Presiders • Badge Checkers • Photographers • Vendor Assistance • Technical Assistance (A/V Skills necessary) • Greeters • Workshop/Short Course Runners Additional opportunities may be available. If you have a specific talent you feel would be helpful, please let us know! Signing up is easy. Take a moment to complete our Volunteer Form to let us know when and where you would like to help! 22


Contents

Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime by Karen Wideman

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime

Third graders at Metzler Elementary (Klein ISD) were all abuzz with surprise as they walked into their hall, covered with yellow crime tape, the last Friday of school. There had been a theft! As music from the CSI show blared in the background, students were herded into the library for a crime briefing and were informed of the alleged crime: twelve dozen missing cookies from the supposed ‘End-ofTAKS’ party. The slide presentation explained and illustrated evidence, which included: a partial set of fingerprints, a ripped piece of a note, a reverse image a partial note, a hair, and spilled white powder (revealing a partial foot outline). As the mystery unfolded, the mug shots of five faculty members flashed on the screen, and students were informed of possible motives for each alleged suspect. Next, students were divided into groups, given detective folders that included a grid of suspects to be used as they rotated to six ‘crime labs’ (or investigative classes) throughout the day.

STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

The crime labs included: 1. The Fingerprinting Lab, where students learned how to fingerprint and actually put their own prints on a real police fingerprint card. 2. The Fingerprinting Analysis Lab, where students learned and practiced

identifying/labeling fingerprint types, and examined/compared fingerprints of the suspects with prints from the crime scene. 3. Chromatography Lab, where students made color spectrums, testing the ink from suspects’ pens and comparing them with a chromatography strip done on the ink from the note recovered from the crime scene. (Care was taken to make sure all the ink was water-soluble, since these were third grade students). 4. The Science Lab, where students analyzed the hair of the suspects and compared it with the hair left at the crime scene, measured the footprint image to compare it to shoe sizes of the suspects, and compared the powder with known powders under microscopes. (This is where a discussion of motives, availability, and uses of powders came into play). 5. The Cryptography Lab, where students decoded the reverse-image note left at the crime scene, learned and wrote several types of codes, and made a cipher wheel. 6. The Police Library, where students practiced making observations and drawing conclusions from pictures as they were read a picture mystery Where’s the Big Bad Wolf? by Eileen Christelow. Next, students were given their own picture and mystery from the Treat and Borovik book, “You’re the Detective: 24 Solve Them Yourself Picture Mysteries” to solve in groups and later shown other mystery literature. At lunch, students ate with their homerooms; excitedly discussing whom they thought had committed the crime. Having attended different classes at that point, their accusations were diverse. One of the students announced, “It is like solving a puzzle and we have different pieces. When we get all the pieces, we will have the same answer.”

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Contents

Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime (cont’d.)

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

At the end of the day, students trekked to the cafeteria for a debriefing, with their completed information grid in hand, ready to make an accusation of their prime suspect. The results of each crime lab activity were discussed, as well as the qualifying suspects in each rotation. Possible careers that use forensic science investigation were discussed and then (magically) the missing cookies were wheeled out for student consumption (with a likely explanation of what really happened).

Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

This is the second year Karen Wideman, math/science teacher, has organized this event at Metzler. The idea came to her after attending several CSI/forensic science CAST sessions in Austin two years ago, where criminal investigations were used as a catalyst for practicing scientific observation skills. Although the classes seemed to be for older students, Wideman was determined to adapt those skills to a the level of a third grade student. Upon returning, Wideman ordered books, evidence bags, finger print kits/cards, and crime tape. Additionally, she researched third grade leveled picture book mystery literature and different kinds of secret codes from her sons’ Cub Scout books. Organizing enough topics/activities into class rotations to insure the investigation could be completed in one day and include all the third grade students in the school, she brought the plan to her team. It was not hard to convince any of the teachers to jump on board because this truly is a cross-

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curricular activity. The skills of inferring, observing, and drawing conclusions are reading TEKS as well as those of science. The measuring, making/reading charts, and solving a logical problem are Math TEKS. Social Studies TEKS were included when crime investigative careers were discussed. Even art TEKS were included, as the color wheel and different ways to mix colors were discussed in the chromatography class. Each teacher chose one of the classes to teach. Metzler principal, Christine Rigia, bought into the activity right away, ordering cookies from the cafeteria and agreeing to be one of the suspects. She walked around (acting mysteriously suspicious…even wearing shoes to look like the footprint image) as students solved the crime. Cafeteria workers, custodians, and secretaries have been used as suspects well as teachers. They actually want to be the suspects. One pre-K teacher suspect would start humming ‘C is for Cookie’ every time the third grade students walked by her class.

In addition to this being a perfect crosscurricular activity, teachers, as well as students, had a great deal of fun. Some of the fun was in the actual deciding of possible suspects and their fake motives. In fact, one year, the entire faculty wanted to view the crime scene briefing video and could not stop laughing (as the motives were all too real). Most of all, this activity brought science investigations into the real world and made for a fun-filled, year-end activity.


Contents

Call for Nominations

Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power

Nominate yourself, a friend, colleague, or mentor for a 2010 STAT Award. Applications are now available, and will be accepted until September 3, 2010.

API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI

Show your appreciation for an outstanding teacher who deserves recognition!

CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime

Click Here to go to the online awards page.

STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

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Contents

Even Teaching Science is an Art by Sandy Kulkarni

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It was the last day of school. I was super busy wrapping up things, boxing important items I treasured or would need for the next year. Suddenly an envelope caught my eye. It said, “Do not open until the Last day of school.” This was it. I carefully opened it and started reading. “Dear Ms. Kulkarni, I would like to tell you something from my heart. I really hated Chemistry in the beginning. But you made the class so much fun. I don’t know when and how I fell in love with Science. You are the best teacher in the entire world. I will always remember you.”

A teacher who inspired me always said, “Teach with your heart, not just with your intellect, and rewards will walk toward you.” I always remember her message. Merely having a college degree and certification can qualify you to be a top teacher. There could be workshops and conferences to provide more training. However, what makes a teacher “great” is finding the right mix of science and art. Both seem to be totally different disciplines, but once fused together, they can generate marvelous masterpieces.

I love to watch art movies and documentaI could not stop smiling. This was the same ries. My brother likes action movies. But the comstudent who, during the fourth week of school, mon thing in us is that we both love to watch movyelled at me during class, “I hate science and I hate ies. The same story goes with our children. Each you.” How did this happen? As a science teacher, I individual could be unique with a specific learning methodically tried to figure this out. Chemistry is style and personality. How to juggle with adjusting often illustrated with laws, equations and balanced your teaching styles to bring out the best in a child reactions. Can teaching be something like that? is an absolute art. I consider teaching as not just Maybe it’s as simple as mixing the lesson plans with my profession, but also my passion. It often brings curriculum and blending them together. Maybe some sweet moments to cherish for, with few bitter a little warm-up with quizzes and tests facilitates ones. After all, that is life. the reaction. Bingo — there pops the final product, “Learning and Success.” Kabir, a famous saint from India expressed his reverence for his teacher in his couplet: So does that make teaching a science? Well, Guru Govind Dou Khade, kake lagun Paye prediction and reality do not always match in Balihari Guru apne, Govind diyon milaye scientific research. That is what makes research It means: “My teacher (guru) and God are in front more challenging. What if teachers do not see the of me. Who should I bow to first? It is my teacher, final product in our kids? Sometimes two scientists because he is the one who introduced me to God.” working on the same reaction get different yields. If teachers blend science and art along with How can you explain that? It not only takes knowledge, patience and dedication, but also skills and an their passion in teaching, they can create a lifelong impact. No wonder, they will earn that high art of handling the experiments. respect. Each day in a teacher’s life is an experiment. Sandy Kulkarni is a chemistry teacher at Allen High School Sometimes the results could be astonishing, and and a Teacher Voices volunteer columnist for The Dallas sometimes it could be failure. Science may prompt Morning News. Her e-mail address is sandy.kulkarni108@ to simply repeat the experiment, but if we add angmail.com other component — art — we can be very creative and generate wonders.

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Contents

Affiliate News

Calendar

Associated Chemistry Teachers of Texas

President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

by Amiee Modic

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

CAST Strand Workshops “A Demo A Week Makes Science Class Peak” by Vinay Dulip “Characteristics of Matter & Atomic Theory” by Claudia Wallace and Jane Smith “Chemical Reactions & Stoichiometry” by Claudia Wallace and Jane Smith “Classroom Demonstrations for Concepts in General Chemistry” by Dr. Vickie M. Williamson and Thomas Jose “Cooperative Learning in the Chemistry Classroom” by Kathleen Holley “Gases, Solutions & Nuclear” by Claudia Wallace and Jane Smith “Incorporating New TEKS into Old Favs.” by Pierette Jones “Molecular Motivation” by Sharon Williams “No Time for Lab? Take It Home!!! Help” by Amiee Modic “Periodic Table & Bonding” by Claudia Wallace and Jane Smith “The Impossible Dream (or Mission Impossible); Chemistry for Everyone” by Melissa Jones, Terri Simmons and Shelley Abernathy “The Lowly Penny; How it can be a Lab Tool” by Walt Shacklett “Using ChemSketch in the Classroom for Molecular Modeling” by Efren Rodriguez

Short Courses • “A Dozen Calculations from the Revised Chemistry TEKS” by Dr. Dianna Mason and Dr. Deborah Koeck - Short Course (6 hrs) • “New to Teaching Chemistry? Let Us Help” by Amiee Modic and Barbara Schumann - Short Course (6 hrs)

by Rosemary Martin Supporting Science, Inc.

®

Interactive manipulative activities & games  Teach, review, tutor & assess  Cover concepts & process skills  Engage learners with visuals & color  Differentiate for special populations

NEWLY UPDATED TO THE REVISED TEKS!

Science Science TEKS TEKS Charts Charts All All the the features features you you love love for for a a low price! low price! K-2, 3-5, 3-5, K-2, 6-8 or or 9-12 9-12 6-8

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Contents

Affiliate News

Calendar

Informal Science Education Association ISEA

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by Cappy Smith Recent changes to the K-12 Texas Science TEKS now have recommended and required instruction time for field and lab investigations. Although we all applaud the inclusion of these new requirements, they create additional demands on teachers who are already stretched for time and resources. Informal science institutions and the Informal Science Education Association (ISEA) offer solutions to classroom teachers. Informal science education institutions are often rich in resources, tools and equipment, science professionals, and TEKS-based experiences tailored to meet student needs. The mission of ISEA is to increase the capacity of “sciencerich” informal education institutions to support and partner with formal, K-12 education efforts in Texas. Why reinvent the wheel when you have partners that are eager to share their resources? Perhaps you’re an eighth grade teacher looking for a way to teach how land forms change over time. On a guided field trip to Canyon Lake Gorge, students can be led by educated staff and gain a better understanding of the dynamics of earth processes equipped with topographical maps, before and after satellite photos, and GPS units. These experiences not only meet the new field investigation requirements, but they educate students in a powerful and memorable way that is difficult to accomplish in the classroom. Students aren’t the only ones that can benefit from informal science institutions—teachers can too! Many of these institutions offer professional development opportunities ranging from one-day in-service workshops to week-long field experiences.

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These trainings often focus on content information, techniques, or both. Frequently, these workshops or institutes are grant funded and offered to teachers at low or no cost and include equipment and resources for the classroom. You can’t beat that! Get acquainted with some of our members and offerings at CAST. Stop by our booth in Affiliate Row or attend some of the sessions and field trips offered in the ISEA strand. The ISEA strand highlights the resources available from informal education entities and opportunities for TEKS-based programs for both students and teacher professional development. Sessions are relevant for informal educators looking to share methods, resources, and support. Mark your calendars now for our upcoming annual conference slated for February 25-27, 2011 at Balcones Springs Resortand Conference Center located in the heart of the Hill Country outside of Marble Falls. Visit the website for more information. http://www.statweb.org/ISEA/home.htm We want to be your partners in science! We invite you to contact any of our institutions and let us know what we can do for you. Our board is happy to assist you in locating your local resources. Our board contact information can be found by clicking here. We look forward to hearing from you and working to build a more science literate community.


Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Affiliate News Texas Association of Biology Teachers TABT by Sarah Anderson Below are the Short Courses and Workshops Offered by TABT for CAST 2010: Short Courses TABT Presents: Manipulatives for use in the Biology Classroom Part 1 TABT Presents: Manipulatives for use in the Biology Classroom Part 2 Workshops TABT Presents: Living it Up in 7th Grade Life Science TABT Presents: What Goes Around, Comes Around – Bio-Cycle and Energy Flow Activities TABT Presents: Biology Activities for Beginning Teachers TABT Presents: Remedies for TAKS Reviewing Blues TABT Presents: How Would Darwin Teach Evolution? TABT Presents: What the New Biology TEKS Mean for Curriculum, Instruction, TAKS, and End of Course Tests

SCIENCE TEACHERSÕ WORKSHOPS RADIATION AND HEALTH A FREE 8-hour course in Radiation Science and Technology with emphasis on safety and health, Taught in Your Facility by professionals of the South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society. (TEA Approved CPE Provider no. 501500) Topics from TEKS paragraphs 112.35, 112.38, and 112.20 Fundamentals of Nuclear Radiation, Exposure to Natural and Man-Made Radiation in Modern Life, Cellular Biology and Radiation Effects, Medical, Industrial, and Power Production Applications, Careers in Nuclear Technology, and Radiation Safety Regulation.

Free Lunch, Geiger Counter, Lecture Notes, and CD. Visit us at CAST-2010 Booth 223 OR Contact Albert E. Evans, albrtalev@aol.com, Phone: 281/937-9413 STCHPS Science Teacher Workshops Coordinator 29


Contents

Affiliate News

Calendar

Texas Earth Science Teachers Association TESTA

President’s Message Knowledge is Power

by Gail Gant TESTA will be offering Texas teachers an exciting array of short courses, workshops and field trips during this year’s CAST conference in Houston. Workshops range from providing tips on meaningful techniques for enhancing your students’ abilities to use the vocabulary of science to methods involving integrating math and science in significant ways. The topics being explored range from astronomy and rocketry to mapping, plate tectonics and the rock cycle.

API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members

TESTA is also proud to present a session entitled “Ask a Geologist” which will provide participants with a forum in which to ask a professional geologist questions related to topics they cover in their classrooms or any other questions that strike one‘s fancy. Another valuable session will inform participants of the many resources available from the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG). Make sure not to miss the TESTA Rock Raffle which is always a fun way to gather materials for one’s classroom as well as great rock and mineral samples. Another popular session is the TESTA share-a-thon which will take place in conjunction with the TAEE and HISD share-a-thons this year. Drop by and pick up lots of great ideas that can be put to immediate use in the classroom.

EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art

For those interested in a more in-depth exploration of an area of interest, TESTA will be offering a short course each day of the conference. These courses will provide resources for teaching about Earth forces, mapping, and using inquiry to explore mud in ways that will make students eager to learn more.

Affiliate News STAT Contacts

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In addition, Houston and its environs will be explored through a variety of field trips. Spend a day at the Lunar and Planetary Institute and learn ways in which to prepare for the upcoming “Year of the Solar System”. Another option is to spend a day exploring the coastal changes and current hazards taking place in nearby Galveston and see how man’s desire to live by the coast can impact and be impacted by the relentless forces of nature. A great half-day field trip option is to take advantage of a visit to the Houston Gem and Minerals Show where one can explore aisle after aisle of beautiful rock and mineral samples as well as fossils and jewelry. Don’t forget to drop by the TESTA booth where you can find helpful ideas for implementing Earth science lessons into your curriculum. TESTA is excited to be able to offer such an array of options to Texas educators. We look forward to seeing you at CAST in November!


Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010

Affiliate News Texas Marine Education Association TMEA by Nathan Veatch The TMEA Fall Workshop will be on the weekend of September 24-26. Join us as we explore the geology of Corpus Christi and collect fossils from a rock quarry in the area with a professor from Texas A & M Kingsville. The workshop agenda and application will be posted soon on the TMEA web page. Several TMEA members attended the NMEA Conference in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The high point of the conference for those from Texas was being present when our own Dr. Rick Tinnin was awarded an Honorary Lifetime Membership in NMEA for his contributions to Marine Education in Texas and for his many years of service in NMEA.

Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Squid Beak: Locate and identify the squid’s beak in the “Have Fun with Fish and Squid” Short Course.

The emails have been flying back and forth this spring and summer as TMEA has proposed and had approved a full TMEA Strand for the CAST Conference in Houston on November 11-13, 2010 at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Register early to be sure you can take your pick of the short courses and the fieldtrip. Short courses will be offered on Thursday and Friday. Workshops will proceed up the food chain with presentations: “Primarily Plankton!” “Eating Cnidarians Without Getting Stung” and “Have Fun with Squid and Fish in your Classroom.” There is a small charge for each short course.

TMEA will repeat the very successful fieldtrip to Galveston Island State Park that was offered last year at CAST on Thursday, November 11. In addition to beach and bay explorations, observe the coastal prairie’s response to Hurricane Ike and learn how to make seed balls. Take home a power point on the beach and bay habitats to share with your students and look forward to the raffle for awesome door prizes. A variety of workshops will be available on Friday and Saturday: “All in the Same Boat,” “Plankton Done the Easy Way,” “ Dipping and Diving Into Ocean Literacy,” and “Sea Creatures in the Classroom.” Be sure to drop by the double-wide TMEA booth in the exhibit hall, say hello, and see the new displays. When you register for CAST, make sure you renew your TMEA membership and sign up for the TMEA Breakfast Meeting on Saturday morning. Expect some neat door prizes! Check out the TMEA Strand Page in the affiliate section of the CAST Program for detailed information. For more information on TMEA, visit our webpage http://statweb.org/TMEA/.

Fish Print: Making fish prints will be the high point of the “Have Fun with Fish and Squid” Short Course.

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Contents

Affiliate News

Calendar

Texas Section, American Association of Physics Teachers

President’s Message

TSAAPT

Knowledge is Power

by Hugh Henderson TSAAPT Affiliate Strand (Physics and Physical Science): Teaching and Learning in Physics in the 21st Century

API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Friday, November 12, 2010 – Room 372 BE

Saturday, November 13, 2010 – Room 372 BE

8:30 – 9:45 am Middle and High School. Session 5: Teaching and Learning in Physics in the 21st Century What does it mean to teach 21st century skills in science and reach students who learn differently than their teachers? Presenter: Hugh Henderson

8:30 – 9:45 am Middle and High School. Session 10: iTouch, iDo, iLearn Physics This session introduces an accelerometer app on the iPod Touch or iPhone to measure acceleration and other quantities. Presenters: Michael Strange, Byron Barrett, & Matt Walker

10:00 – 11:15 am High School. Session 6: Incorporating PhET Simulations into Physics Instruction The Physics Educational Technologies (PhET) project has provided some incredible, no-cost simulations that can be used in a variety of ways in high school physics classes. Presenters: Paul Williamson and Tom O’Kuma

10:00 – 11:15 pm Middle and High School. Session 11: Spotlighting the Physics of the Large Hadron Collider Using Project Based Learning This workshop will present several projects using the physics of the LHC to allow students to develop simple bubble chambers to analyze particle motion, use magnetic trackers, count and calculate the rate of cosmic rays, and compile other data. Presenter: Evelyn Restivo

1:30 – 2:45 pm Middle and High School. Session 7: Hands-on Electromagnetism We will explore the interactions of electricity, magnetism and light, and will build electromagnetic systems including a speaker, a motor, and an electric guitar. Presenters: Andrew Wallace and David Bixler 3:00 – 4:15 pm Middle and High School. Session 8: Engagement Activities for the Physics Classroom We will demonstrate several engagement activities that promote student inquiry through hands-on experience in motion, forces, energy, momentum, impulse, and circuits. Presenters: Stephanie Ingle, Susan Butler & Janet Dickinson

1:30 – 2:45 pm Middle and High School. Session 12: History and Use of the Laser in the Physics Classroom This year has been designated the Year of the Laser by APS and AAPT, and the development of the use of lasers in the introductory physics classroom is very interesting – from large expensive lasers to cheap lasers you can keep on your keychain. Presenter: Hugh Henderson

4:30 – 5:45 pm High School. Session 9: Current Issues in Texas Physics Education Updates on graduation plans, the new Physics TEKS, the College Readiness Standards, end-of-course exams, course redesign, differentiation, teacher training and student engagement will be discussed. Presenter: Hugh Henderson

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Visit the TSAAPT/AAPT Booth in the Exhibit Hall!


Contents Calendar President’s Message Knowledge is Power API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Affiliate News Texas Science Education Leadership Association TSELA by Terry Talley, Ed.D. Past-President and Vanessa Westbrook, President The June 2010 TSELA Meeting was held at Our Lady of the Lake University, San Antonio with 150 members registered and 160+ attended the meeting. Highlights of the meeting included a welcome from our gracious host Dr. Thomas Gadsden from the Science Education Department at OLLU; a TEA updated from Kenn Heydrick; a description of the 2010 CAST from past STAT President and 2010 CAST Chair Patsy Magee; a STAT update from STAT President Joel Palmer. Along with these notable speakers we had a Vendor Fair with a venue of interactions with resource, materials, and equipment vendors from across the state. The meeting’s program highlighted upcoming professional development for the new TEKS, and two focus groups for Texas science leaders to converse on districts created programs for the new TEKS as well as issues that are beginning to develop. The Charles A. Dana Center, The Texas Regional Collaborative, and ESC Region 4 provided hour-long programs to describe which professional development opportunities would be available for teachers and science administrators this fiscal school year. Overall, the June meeting was very informative for the members as they begin to brainstorm and plan for their science programs for this upcoming year. Thank you to all who provided presentations and sponsorship. You made the meeting the success we pride our organization in providing to the science leadership of Texas. Make your plans now to attend the TSELA Meeting on November 10th, prior to the CAST Conference. Registration will be with the CAST registration. Be sure to pay your dues online at the same time! The November agenda will include news from Dr. Kenn Heydrick, Science Director at TEA, as well as several breakout sessions specific to meeting the needs of supervisors regarding the many tasks required of their assignments within school districts, universities, and informal science organizations. The keynote speaker is sure to provide

insights and new ideas towards implementation of the new TEKS for science. The agenda for the meeting will also include election of TSELA officers for the 2010-2011year. On the ballot will be nominations for president-elect and secretary. The TSELA Outstanding Science Leadership Awardee, sponsored by CPO-Delta Education, will also be announced! The TSELA strands at the CAST Conference will be on Friday. Be sure to watch for TSELA Presents: in the program for workshops and sessions focusing on the role of science leadership in the implementation of the TEKS and gearing towards the new STAAR and EOC Assessments. As many of you have already noticed the TSELA official website is online, and is full of information for members and potential members. Please visit www.tselaonline.org to look at the work that we have been putting into this electronic communication tool. We plan to highlight past presidents and awards winners of the organization; and the membership section is currently being enhanced to provide members with various information regarding member benefits, professional development resources, etc. TSELA would like to announce that as of July 24, 2010, the organization is officially an associate group of the National Science Teachers’ Association. TSELA is the fourth science leadership association to be approval by the board of directors; TSELA will join the Massachusetts, New York, and Louisiana Science Leadership groups. Texas now has two associate groups: Texas Council of Elementary Science and Texas Science Education Leadership Association. The TSELA executive board is very excited at this new connection to the NSTA. We look forward to seeing you at CAST!

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Contents Elected Officers

STAT Office

Calendar President’s Message

Mailing Address: 5750 Balcones Dr., Ste 201 Austin, TX 78731

Knowledge is Power

Phone: (512) 491-6685

API 2010

Fax: (512) 873-7423

Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

www.statweb.org stat@bizaustin.rr.com

Call for Board Members

President: Joel Palmer

Past President: Patsy Magee

President-Elect: Ross Ann Hill

Treasurer: Laurel Frank

Vice President: Tony Zahn

Secretary: Deidre Parish

(972) 882-7388 president@statweb.org

(806) 892-1900 presidentelect@statweb.org

(817) 251-5519 vicepresident@statweb.org

EPLI

(409) 617-5054 pastpresident@statweb.org

(281) 356-7797 treasurer@statweb.org

(469) 633-5500 secretary@statweb.org

Appointed Positions

CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST

Executive Director: Chuck Hempstead

Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime

(512) 491-6685 stat@bizaustin.rr.com

CAST Exhibits Manager & Advertising Manager: Frank Butcher

STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art

(281)424-1230 frank.butcher@comcast.net

TEA Representative: Kenn Heydrick

Affiliate News STAT Contacts

(512) 463-1827 Kenn.Heydrick@tea.state.tx.us 34

Texas Science Teacher Editor: Joel Palmer (972) 882-7388 president@statweb.org

STATellite Editor: (512) 491-6685 stat@bizaustin.rr.com


Contents Calendar President’s Message

ACT

Knowledge is Power

Associated Chemistry Teachers of Texas

API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

Amiee Modic

TABT

ISEA

Informal Science Education Association Kiki Corry

amodic@sbcglobal.net

kikicorry@tpwd.state.tx.us

TAEE

TCES

Call for Board Members

Texas Association of Biology Teachers

Texas Association for Environmental Education

Texas Council of Elementary Science

EPLI

Sarah Anderson

Sally Wall

Deborah Rang

sarah.anderson@ttu.edu

swall@gccisd.net

deborah_rang@roundrockisd.org

TESTA

TMEA

TSAAPT

CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations

Texas Earth Science Teachers Association Gail Gant

ggant@sjs.org

Texas Marine Educators Association Marolyn Smith

marolyn.smith@yahoo.com

TSELA

Even Teaching Science is an Art

Texas Science Education Leadership Association

Affiliate News

Vanessa Westbrook

Texas Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers Hugh Henderson

Hugh_Henderson@birdville.k12. tx.us

vwestbrook@mail.utexas.edu

STAT Contacts

35


Contents Gail Lowe, Chair Lawrence A. Allen, Jr., Vice Chair Terri Leo, Secretary

Calendar

William B. Travis Building 1701 North Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78701-1494

President’s Message SBOE District 1 - Rene Nuñez

Knowledge is Power

1521 Upson Dr. El Paso, TX 79902 (915) 351-9923 (512) 936-4319 fax

API 2010

SBOE District 2 - Mary Helen Berlanga 2727 Morgan Ave. Corpus Christi, TX 78405 (361) 881-1000 (361) 881-1028 fax

Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware

SBOE District 3- Rick Agosto 205 N Presa, Ste B 200 San Antonio, TX 78205 (210) 226-7106 (210) 226-7104 fax

Call for Board Members

CAST 2010

Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime

SBOE District 7 - David Bradley 2165 North St. Beaumont, TX 77701 (409) 835-3808

SBOE District 8 - Barbara Cargill 61 W. Wedgemere Cir. The Woodlands, TX 77381 (281) 465-8095

Affiliate News

SBOE District 11 - Patricia Hardy 900 N. Elm Weatherford, TX 76086 (817) 598-2968 (817) 598-2833 fax

SBOE District 13 - Mavis B. Knight

23516 Twin Oaks Dr. RR#5 Spring, TX 77389 (281) 257-0832 fax (call first)

Even Teaching Science is an Art

22123 Skyridge Ln. Richmond, TX 77469 (512) 463-9007 (512) 936-4319 fax

SBOE District 5- Ken Mercer

SBOE District 6 - Terri Leo

STAT Awards Nominations

SBOE District 10 - Cynthia Noland Dunbar

SBOE District 12 - Geraldine Miller

PO Box 781301 San Antonio, TX 78278 (512) 463-9007 (512) 936-7319 fax

Volunteer @ CAST

9277 Brookwater Cir. College Station, TX 77845 (979) 255-2538 (979) 846-1174 fax

SBOE District 4 - Lawrence A. Allen, Jr. 4302 Grapevine Houston, TX 77045 (713) 433-4643 (713) 556-7243 fax

EPLI

SBOE District 9 - Don McLeroy

1100 Providence Tower West Dallas, TX 75244 (972) 419-4000 (214) 552-8560 fax PO Box 763337 Dallas, TX 75376 (214) 333-9575 (214) 339-9242 fax

SBOE District 14 - Gail Lowe

11 Chris Ave. Lampasas, TX 76550 (512) 556-6262 (512) 556-3278 fax

SBOE District 15 - Bob Craig

PO Box 1979 Lubbock, TX 79408 (806) 744-3232 (806) 744-2211 fax

Need to find your state legislators? Search by zip code at:

STAT Contacts

http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us 36


Contents

President’s Message

Want to be published? E-mail us your letters and articles!

Knowledge is Power

STATellite Due Dates

Calendar

API 2010 Supplemental Materials: Buyer Beware Call for Board Members EPLI CAST 2010 Volunteer @ CAST Metzler Students Use Science to Solve Crime STAT Awards Nominations Even Teaching Science is an Art Affiliate News STAT Contacts

Due dates for publication of articles in The STATellite are: Submission Deadline February 1 May 1 August 1 December 1

Publication Date February 15 May 15 August 15 December 15

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Changing your e-mail address? Login to your STATweb.org user account and update your information. If you’ve forgotten your password, visit the main page and select “Request New Password” under the User Login section. 37

The STATellite (August 2010)  
The STATellite (August 2010)