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Volume 55, Number 4

December 2011

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits

Inside this Issue:

Contacts

• CAST 2011 Photo Gallery • CAST 2012 Preview • Classroom Tips and more...!

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The Official Newsletter of the Science Teachers Association of Texas


Contents

Remember the first time you fell in love with science?

Calendar

We do. It is the reason

President’s Message

we believe in hands-on scientific technology. It engages students in a meaningful way, develops keen analytical skills, and awakens a love for discovery.

CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps

www.vernier.com for product tours, training videos, FREE sample labs, and to look for FREE workshops in your neighborhood.

Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

LabQuest $

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Vernier Software & Technology | www.vernier.com | Toll Free: 888-837-6437

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About Us Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

We are STAT, the Science Teachers Association of Texas. STAT is committed to the enhancement of the teaching of science in Texas at all levels and in all science disciplines. For STAT Position Statements, go to: http://www.statweb.org/positions STAT is: o A statewide organization of elementary, middle level, and high school teachers, college educators, supervisors of science, and others dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of science and education in our schools. o A chapter of the National Science Teachers Association o Visit the NSTA site STAT seeks to: o Serve as a unified voice for the science teachers of the state. o Keep science teachers and other members informed about current trends in science education. o Provide opportunities for members to examine techonology, curriculum, materials, and services. o Inform members of local, state and national meetings, conferences, seminars and workshops related to sciences. o Cooperate with other science oriented organizations and teacher associations in the promotion of teaching of science. History: STAT, Science Teachers Association of Texas, was formally organized in 1957 during the 4th Annual Conference for the Advancement of Science & Mathematics Teaching (CASMT). STAT membership is now more than 7,000 strong!

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Calendar

Calendar .............................................................5 President’s Message .........................................6 CAST 2011 Photo Gallery ................................8 Minds, Models, and Maps..............................11 Newton’s Third Law Paradox .......................15 STAT EPLI ........................................................16 CAST 2012 Preview.........................................17 STAT Membership Benefits ..........................18 STAT Contacts .................................................20 Elected Officers.....................................20 Appointed Positions ............................20 Affiliate Congress ................................21 Texas State Board of Education..........22

President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

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Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

STAT Board Meeting February 11-12 Austin, TX

You and your school could win up to $25,000!

ISEA Annual Meeting February 15-17 Sky Ranch: Van, TX Metroplex Mini-CAST February 18 Colleyville, Texas TSELA Meeting February 24-25 Location TBA Region 5 Mini-CAST February 25 Location TBA STAT BOD Retreat May 18-20 TBarM Ranch: New Braunfels, TX CAST 2012: Get Your Geek On! November 8-10 Corpus Christi, TX

Lindsay Richard 2011 Rising Star Winner

If you are a passionate and committed educator, then you could have what it takes to be an H-E-B Excellence in Education Award winner!

Teachers: can win up to $25,000, with a matching grant for their school. Principals: can win $10,000 with a $25,000 grant for their school. Districts: can win up to $100,000. New Award Category! Early Childhood Schools and non-profit learning centers that focus on the care of children five and under can receive up to $25,000.

Visit heb.com/education today to complete your application! Applications Deadline: January 6, 2012

©2011 HEB, 12-0856

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A Message from President Hill

Calendar President’s Message

Hopefully, your experience at Dallas CAST 2011 was fabulous! The volunteer teams worked extremely hard; and, in my opinion, it was one of the smoothest conferences ever, even with a total of 5,907 attendees! With 3,000 teachers at the opening assembly, we honored our award winners and were entertained by the humorous and educational Reed Timmer, from Discovery Channel’s StormChasers. The Cirque Imagination performance at the reception was not only incredible but mind-bending (no pun intended)! Friday night’s social at the Dallas Museum of Art was utterly remarkable. Needless to say, this small town girl was overwhelmed and amazed!

CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

Thank you to Joel Palmer and the plethora of volunteers who worked countless hours planning and working at the conference. Sometimes I think people forget that our conferences are planned and implemented by volunteers, people with other jobs who donate their time for an under-appreciated position. Without these volunteers, CAST would certainly cease! Thank you, attendees, for being flexible as you tolerated workshops that filled or waited to catch a bus or accepted tired feet as you trekked around the huge convention center.

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As always, science teachers excel with remarkably positive attitudes! That’s why I love working with science educators; we are an exciting, passionate, and entertaining group of people! Thank you to all who played a part in CAST 2011. Definitely, the bar has been set high as we begin planning CAST 2012 in Corpus Christi, November 8-10. (Did you stop by our 2012 CAST booth for chap stick and a new pocket protector?) Next year’s conference, “Get Your Geek On,” is going to be extraordinary! Since we are already in the early planning stages, let me know if you wish to help. While we attended the conference, your president-elect Sharon Kamas was testifying at the State Board of Education. We are extremely pleased that the Board has put science on the adoption cycle! However, we must continue encouraging and persuading our legislators for funding in the next session because rumors persist that more budget education cuts are imminent; so we must persevere so that science stays at the forefront. This link, proposed adoption cycle, provides information about current districts and members of the Texas Senate, Texas House of Representatives, the Texas delegation to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, and the State Board of Education. Contact your representatives now about science education and its priority! Let our voices be heard!


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Calendar President’s Message

May your holidays be filled with rest, relaxation, and joy. Although the spring semester may bring apprehension and anxiety, we will manage this new round of changes in our lives and be better for it. Good luck and see you soon!

CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

Succeed with Science Our science solutions integrate the right web-delivered curriculum, the right teacher tools, and the instructional expertise of the best implementation, PD and support team in the business. We can help you overcome the major challenges facing science educators today: · Leverage your existing resources · Identify new resources—many free · Provide focused, effective professional development (PD) · Motivate, engage and excite students · Improve science test scores · Create a truly integrated, project-based learning program

Contact me today to get going! Jim Wheat jwheat@learning.com 512-913-5765

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CAST 2011 Photos CAST 2011: The ART OF SCIENCE

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

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CAST 2011 Photos

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits

Congrats to our 2011 STAT Award Winners: David Lamp, Rosemary Martin, Denise Skinner, Kisaundra Harris, Rita Williams, Sharon Yee, Ashley Ediger, and Patsy Magee, with President Ross Ann Hill

Contacts

Click Here to See the Full CAST 2011 Photo Gallery! 9


Contents K-­‐12 Online  STEM  Curriculum  

Science, Technology,  Engineering,  and  Ma3he4a5c6  

Elementary K-­‐  5  ★    Middle  School  6-­‐8  ★ High  School  Biology    

Calendar

«  Rice University’s  online  science   program  from  the  makers  of   TAKScopesTM     «  Serving  over  300,000  students   and  counPngQ     «  EasyRtoRuse  curriculum  Pghtly   aligned  to  100%  of  the  science   TEKS  for  Kindergarten  through   Biology     «  Addresses  the  rigor  of  STAARTM    

President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits

Comprehensive STAAR-­‐Ready   100%  TEKS   5E  Learning   Hands-­‐On  

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oday T e l p m a S   a Explore    

Contacts

es.com p o c s m e t s . sample   login:  guest uest   g   : d r o w s s a P Science...Blast Off!

Center for  Technology  in  Teaching  and  Learning  

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Website: www.STEMscopes.com   Email:  STEMscopes@rice.edu   Phone:  713.348.5433  


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Minds, Models, and Maps

by Kenneth Wesson

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

The solar system is too large to bring to school. Mammalian life cycles stretch well beyond the academic year, and tiny organisms are too small to examine closely. Prehistoric animals are, well, “pre-historic.” However, the forever fascinating world of science from the massive to the minute, of today and of years long gone, opens immediately to all students by way of sketches, models, simulations, maps, and other visual learning devices. Collectively, they allow young learners to make cognitive leaps from the intangible to the comprehensible. We say that we “see” with our eyes, although vision is more accurately accomplished by specialized brain cells that effortlessly convert the external world into the neural language of the brain for encoding, processing, storage, and retrieval. Beginning at birth, the eyes and the brain undergo a daily training regimen for understanding models, maps, and images well before the first day of formal education. For millions of years, vision has been our species’ primary method of experiential data collection. Nearly 80% of the information entering our conscious sensory world does so by way of the eyes, making sight our major pathway to discovery, learning, and knowledge. When the human brain processes an object in the external world, the same neural systems in the visual cortex are reactivated when the brain later “recreates” that object as an internal (“mind’s eye”) representation of the original object (Pinker 1998) or experience. A learner can only retrieve from memory that which has been properly stored earlier. The ability to bring to mind mental representations or images is a powerful determiner of both attention and comprehension—the linchpins to learning. To promote the initial mental imagery formation, no children’s book is complete without

an abundance of illustrations. The direct engagement of the visual cortex is essential to all human learning. Once we “recognize” an object, separating image from name and the name from function becomes next to impossible. Vision is so central to factual certainty that our initial sensory impressions, and eventually our overall cognition, are validated by our eyesight. As we so often hear, children assure others that “I saw it with my own eyes!” underscoring a pinnacle in experiential confidence that cannot be humanly exceeded. Visualizing is integral to reading for comprehension. To understand what they read, students must rely heavily on the “picture-making” mechanisms in the visual cortex in order to extract meaning from the text. The association cortex is charged with the task of making sense of the incoming visual information. Learners can only make sense of abstract information based on preexisting internal mental models. Teaching visual-spatial thinking skills helps in the construction and the recreation of mental pictures. Not only do models, illustrations, and maps give students a “second way of knowing,” they bring those objects, processes, cycles, systems, and events literally within arm’s reach of the learner. This key facet of learning would otherwise remain outside the impenetrable borders of time, space, and normal perception. For many children, new words alone foster a shallow conceptual understanding at best, because the children are unable to generate the intended images inside the mind’s eye with vivid accuracy. Text-relevant illustrations, hands-on models, and visual aids produce precise mental pictures that would be inaccessible solely by means of the printed word. Children receiving formal instruction on (1) how to form mental images on their own, and (2)

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Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

Minds, Models, and Maps (cont’d.) paying atten¬tion to illustrations in text, significantly outperform their counterparts on tests of comprehension and recall (Presley 1976). Particularly taking time to provide opportunities for young girls and students from linguistically diverse backgrounds to develop visual–spatial thinking skills will enhance both the process and the results of learning in science. Young learners need regular opportunities to develop abstract thinking by “downloading” their ideas onto paper with illustrations, maps, and models. These mental meanderings have inspired great works of art, serendipitous discoveries in every field of medicine and every academic discipline, every invention in science, and every “a-ha” moment in the classroom when a student screams, “I got it!” The dynamic back-and-forth process of shifting im¬ages from the mind’s eye to paper and to tangible models is when children make their most creative and memorable connections. Whether the topic is atoms or architecture, planetary systems or brain structures, working with im¬ages and models is compulsory to the learning process. A paucity of opportunities to create and translate illustra¬tions, maps, and models into personal knowledge can impede conceptual development as well as creativity in the classroom. This article is re-published with the permission of its author. It was originally published in the journal “Science and Children” in September 2011. Kenneth Wesson (kenawesson@aol.com) is a former college and university-level faculty member and administrator. He delivers keynote addresses on the neuroscience of learning for educational organizations and institutions throughout the United States and overseas. He will be a featured speaker at the 2011 NSTA Regional Conferences. References Marzano, R., D. Pickering, and J. Pollock. 2001. Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Pinker, S. 1998. How the mind works. New York: William Morrow. Presley, G. 1976. Mental imagery helps eight-year-olds remember what they read. Journal of Educational Psychology 68 (3): 355–359.

Easy-to-implement strategies for incorporating illustrations, models, and maps. I. For elementary students, plan the following: 1. Introduce a “big idea” by inviting students to discuss and draw a picture of what they think they will learn based on the title or a description of the topic that will be under investigation. 2. Share their predictions with classmates or in small groups. 3. Engage students in an active science investigation. 4. Maintain a “mind-map”* recording the vocabulary, what they see, hear, and do. 5. Record the sequence of steps in the investigation and what occurred at each. (Once on paper, there is less ambiguity in their ideas.) 6. Discuss the sequence of their steps and any early outcomes they begin to notice. 7. Ask “what if” questions. (“What would happen to ___, if we changed ____?”)

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Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI

Minds, Models, and Maps (cont’d.) 8. Draw a picture of the concept learned, its connections, and the related vocabulary (an informal assessment of comprehension giving students a “safe” venue to connect images, pictures, symbols and words that are linked with the student-developed pictures). 9. Orally describe (or report) how their picture explains the concept and represents the significant aspects of the activity/investigation. Compare their findings and conclusions. When an experiment or science investigation is deliberately left incomplete, ask students to illustrate how they think the investigation will end. Students can describe their predictions orally. This informal assessment can serve as another check for conceptual understanding. II. Students compare and discuss their drawings, illustrations, maps, and models: 1. Students receive immediate and ongoing feedback (informal peer-reviewed assessment) promoting new opportunities for idea elaboration and/or revision. 2. Feedback is given on their representations and perceptions through academically relevant social interactions as peers analyze their symbolic information. 3. Student drawings are not crafted with photographic fidelity. Instead, students interpret reality through their models and illustrations. The learning goals are self-expression and cognitive development, not “gallery-quality” products. *Mind-maps and other thinking tools allow drawings to converge with words and short phrases to create a mental summary of a concept complete with vivid imagery. When practiced regularly, a 27 percentile gain can be the expected outcome (Marzano, Pickering, and Pollock 2001).

CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

Kits coming soon! Just in time for your Spring & Summer Professional Development. Contact your Texas sales reps for kit contents and pricing. tom_avery@vwreducation.com or 817-721-7497 deborah_linscomb@vwreducation or 832-599-8108 STEMScopes Kits are available exclusively through

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With Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Holt McDougal, every student can be a science star!

Contents

Texas Science Test Preparation Be Science STAAR–ready with our practice workbooks and professional development!

Calendar

Texas Science Leveled Reader Library Science Leveled Reader Kits for K–Grade 3 and Grades 4–5 are available in English and Spanish!

President’s Message

Texas Science Equipment Kits

CAST 2011 Photo Gallery

Science Equipment Kits are available for Grades 5–8, and each contains materials for six groups or lab stations!

Minds, Models, and Maps

To learn more, visit us online: www.hmheducation.com/tx/science

Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits

We have the materials you need for K-12 solutions:

• Hands-On Science • New and Expanded TEKS • STARR Resources • STEM Resources • Summer School/Extended Day • Informational Text

Contacts

Contact a sales representative to learn more. Verne Isbell 817-239-4493 Delta Education North Texas

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Joan Lyles 210-287-8263 Delta Education South Texas

Sally Dudley 972-825-6588 CPO Science Texas


Contents

Newton’s Third Law Paradox

by Frank Butcher

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

Newton’s Third Law Paradox Explained with a Bad Joke by Frank Butcher, retired physics teacher frank.butcher@comcast.net Almost every physics student can quote Newton’s Third Law – For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. But to really understand the implications of this law, students must internalize four ideas implicit in this simple statement. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Forces always come in pairs: There is no such thing as a single isolated force. Paired forces are equal in size. Paired forces are opposite in direction. Paired forces act on different objects.

To test my students’ understanding of the third law, I resorted to a bad joke, not original by any means, but one that I think will make an impression on your students and is worth sharing. A farmer wants to take his produce to market so he loads up a cart, hitches up his donkey (named Clyde), climbs aboard, takes the reins and says “giddy-up”. But the donkey just stands there. The farmer is a bit perturbed and shouts “GIDDY-UP” but the donkey doesn’t move. The farmer is angry now, pulls out his whip, and cracks the whip right above the donkey’s ears. Still the donkey does not move. The farmer yells at his donkey “What’s the matter with you, Clyde?” Clyde (who is smarter than your average donkey) turns his head toward the farmer, and replies “Well, it’s like this. I’ve been attending physics classes at Deer Park High School, studying Newton’s Third Law, and I’ve learned that for every force there is an equal an opposite force. So if I exert a force on the cart, the cart will exert an equal and opposite force that will cancel my force. No matter how hard I pull, the paired equal and opposite force will make it impossible for me to pull this cart. Since it is theoretically impossible for me to pull the cart, I’m not even going to try.” At this point you solicit your students’ opinions to explain the flaw in the donkey’s logic. Clearly, donkeys can pull carts, so where does Clyde’s argument go wrong? This situation is one version of a classic paradox, and my experience is that students do not easily come to a correct conclusion. It will take coaxing and free body diagrams, but eventually they see that paired forces do not act on the same object. One force is acting on the cart, and the paired force is acting on the donkey. Paired forces can never cancel because they act on different objects. Whether the cart moves or not depends on the sum of the forces acting on the cart. If the donkey’s pull is greater than the frictional forces on the cart, it will move. Finally, the punch line. You tell the students, “Did you know that Clyde was expelled from Deer Park High School?” Then wait for them to ask why. Your answer… “Because nobody likes a smart ass.”

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STAT EPLI Did You Know?

The Science Teachers Association of Texas offers Educators Professional Liability Insurance (EPLI).

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

For only $50/year, you can be covered for up to $2 million per occurrence. That’s a lot of weight behind your career! This is an especially important asset for science teachers. Think about all the times you’ve been in a lab, helping students through complicated, hands-on projects. The liability section of the policy will help protect you when unfortunate incidents occur, such as injury to a student under your watch. A separate section of the policy provides reimbursement of attorney fees in a broad range of situations not covered under Coverage A, such as criminal charges, allegations of sexual misconduct, actions involving dismissal, revocation of certification, and other professional rights and duties. Your coverage begins on the date of your enrollment and ends on 7/31/2012. Premium Break-Down* Insurance Premium: Regular Member: $44.00 State Tax & Fees (4.91%): $2.16 Administrative Cost: $3.84 Total Cost $50.00 EPLI is a members-only benefit. You must login to www.statweb.org to purchase.

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Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

Download the CAST App and visit the CAST 2012 page to be entered to win a free registration for CAST 2012! Be sure to fill out your profile info in order to be entered.

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STAT Membership Your STAT Membership

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview

If you attended CAST 2011, you are now a proud, official member of the Science Teachers Association of Texas! Our $25 annual membership is included in your CAST registration. We want to take this opportunity to say: Welcome... or Welcome Back! Member Benefits included in your annual membership: • Subscription to the Texas Science Teacher, STAT’s official electronic journal. • Subscription to the STATFlash, priority email notifications from STAT. • Subscription to the quarterly electronic newsletter: the STATellite. • Access to statweb.org and its members-only benefits, including our new Social Networking Site. You can make a member profile, post your own blog, make friend networks, & more! Exhibitors! Want another way to reach out to your clients at CAST? STAT Business Memberships are also available. Just $200/year gives you access to a social network of more than 7,000 teachers. Build a community of customers today!

STAT Membership Benefits

We look forward to serving you as a member of the Science Teachers Association of Texas!

Contacts

STAT. Supporting Science Educators Since 1957.

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Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits Contacts

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Contents Elected Officers

STAT Office Mailing Address: 5750 Balcones Dr., Ste 201 Austin, TX 78731

Calendar President’s Message

Phone: (512) 491-6685

CAST 2011 Photo Gallery

Fax: (512) 873-7423

Minds, Models, and Maps

www.statweb.org stat@bizaustin.rr.com

President: Ross Ann Hill (806) 892-1900 president@statweb.org

Past President: Dr. Joel Palmer (972) 882-7388 pastpresident@statweb.org

President-Elect: Sharon Kamas (281)-604-7000 presidentelect@statweb.org

Treasurer: Terry Ward (817) 305-6741 treasurer@statweb.org

Vice President: Donald Burken (713) 723-0273 vicepresident@statweb.org

Secretary: Jo Anne Jackson (806) 766-1162 secretary@statweb.org

Members At Large: Kiki Corry Dr. Denise Hill Dr. Deidre Parish

Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI

kiki@statweb.org denise@statweb.org deidre@statweb.org

Appointed Positions

CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits

Executive Director: Chuck Hempstead (512) 491-6685 stat@bizaustin.rr.com

Contacts

TEA Representative:

Irene Pickhardt Assistant Director of Science (512) 463-9581 irene.pickhardt@tea.state.tx.us

Assistant Executive Director: Texas Science Teacher Lauren Swetland Editor: (512) 491-6685 lauren@statweb.org

CAST Exhibits Manager & Advertising Manager: Frank Butcher 2020

(281) 424-1230 frank.butcher@comcast.net

Dr. Joel Palmer

(972) 882-7388 pastpresident@statweb.org

STATellite Editor: (512) 491-6685 stat@bizaustin.rr.com


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ACT

Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI CAST 2012 Preview

Associated Chemistry Teachers of Texas

Informal Science Education Association

Amiee Modic

Chip Lindsey

TAEE

TCES

amodic@sbcglobal.net

TABT

Texas Association of Biology Teachers Michael Wells

ISEA

Texas Association for Environmental Education Sally Wall

chip@dhdc.org

Texas Council of Elementary Science Deborah Rang

mwells@springisd.org

swall@gccisd.net

deborah_rang@roundrockisd.org

TESTA

TMEA

TSAAPT

STAT Membership Benefits

Texas Earth Science Teachers Association

Texas Marine Educators Association

Contacts

Gail Gant

Marolyn Smith

ggant@sjs.org

marolyn.smith@yahoo.com

Texas Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers Karen Jo Matsler kjmatsler@gmail.com

TSELA

Texas Science Education Leadership Association Kevin Fisher

kfisher56@msn.com

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Contents Barbara Cargill, Chair Bob Craig, Vice Chair Mary Helen Berlanga, Secretary Calendar

SBOE District 1 - Charlie Garza

SBOE District 10 - Marsha Farney

SBOE District 2 - Mary Helen Berlanga

SBOE District 11 - Patricia Hardy

12453 Tierra Cipres Dr. El Paso, Texas 79938 (915) 630-2427

President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery

2727 Morgan Avenue Corpus Christi, TX 78405 (361) 881-1000 (361) 881-1028 fax

Minds, Models, and Maps

SBOE District 4 - Lawrence A. Allen, Jr.

SBOE District 13 - Mavis B. Knight

SBOE District 5- Ken Mercer P.O. Box 781301 San Antonio, TX 78278-1301 (512) 463-9007

CAST 2012 Preview STAT Membership Benefits

SBOE District 6 - Terri Leo 23516 Twin Oaks Dr. RR#5 Spring, TX 77389 (281) 257-0832 fax

Contacts

900 North Elm Weatherford, TX 76086 (817) 598-2968 (817) 598-2833 fax

SBOE District 12 - George Clayton

2130 Vermillion Oak St. Fresno, Texas 77545 (713) 203-1355

STAT EPLI

P.O. Box 99 Georgetown, Texas 78627 (512) 966-6771

SBOE District 3- Michael Soto 2034 W. Kings Hwy. San Antonio, TX 78201 (210) 685-8378

Netwon’s Third Law Paradox

William B. Travis Building 1701 North Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78701-1494

SBOE District 7 - David Bradley 2165 North Street Beaumont, TX 77701 (409) 835-3808

526 Tiffany Trail Richardson, Texas 75081 (972) 834-3618 6108 Red Bird Court Dallas, TX 75232 (214) 333-9575 (214) 339-9242 fax

SBOE District 14 - Gail Lowe

11 Chris Avenue Lampasas, TX 76550 (512) 556-6262 (512) 936-4319 fax

SBOE District 15 - Bob Craig

P.O. Box 1979 Lubbock, TX 79408-1979 (806) 744-3232 (806) 744-2211 fax

SBOE District 8 - Barbara Cargill 61 W. Wedgemere Circle The Woodlands, TX 77381 (281) 465-8095

SBOE District 9 - Thomas Ratliff P.O. Box 232 Mount Pleasant, TX 75456 (903) 717-1190

Need to find your state legislators? Search by zip code at:

http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us 22 22 22


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Want to be published? E-mail us your letters and articles! Calendar President’s Message CAST 2011 Photo Gallery Minds, Models, and Maps Netwon’s Third Law Paradox STAT EPLI

STATellite Due Dates Due dates for publication of articles in The STATellite are: Submission Deadline February 1 May 1 August 1 December 1

Publication Date February 15 May 15 August 15 December 15

Text files or Microsoft Word documents are preferable, but InDesign files are also acceptable.

CAST 2012 Preview

A minimum of one picture to accompany each article is required.

STAT Membership Benefits

Mail or e-mail your submissions to:

Contacts

The STATellite 5750 Balcones Dr., Ste 201 Austin, TX 78731 stat@bizaustin.rr.com The views of the columnists in The STATellite do not necessarily represent the views of STAT or its Board members. Changing your e-mail address? Login to your statweb.org user account and update your information. If you’ve forgotten your password, visit the main page and select “Request New Password” under the User Login section. 23 23 23223 3

The STATellite (December 2011)  
The STATellite (December 2011)