The Registrar Magazine - Issue 5 - Summer 2022

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Issue 5 Summer 2022

CLEAR Choices:

Pitches from candidates for president-elect

Prioritizing cultural safety: Joanie Bouchard leads BC’s dietitians college with sensitivity to diversity, equity, and inclusion

The Registrant:

Real estate agent Michael Lewicki loves rules and regulations

Defining new regulatory standards: Ontario’s College Performance Management Framework


Issue 5 Summer 2022 Journalists and Writers Damian Ali Ritika Dubey M. Daniel Roukema Graphic Designer Marija Hajster Allison Wedler Production Manager Marija Hajster Managing Editor Alethea Spiridon Editor in Chief M. Daniel Roukema Photo credits Dreamstime Marc Spector MDR Strategy Group Ltd. Micah Matthews Michael Lewicki Mychaylo Prystupa Professional Engineers Ontario Shutterstock The Registrar magazine is produced and published by MDR Strategy Group Ltd. 800-1701 Hollis Street Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada B3J 2T9 1-800-874-3820 editor@theregistar.ca www.theregistrar.ca

Message from the editor’s desk At MDR Strategy Group, one of our service offerings is leading short and long-term planning processes with regulatory sector clients and other nonprofit organizations. In recent months, the common denominator in all our work has been that during this time of uncertainty due to COVID-19, labour market volatility, and political changes, to name only three, long-term planning can be challenging. I say this because two years ago, when we planned publishing dates, we intended to have a spring 2022 issue of The Registrar magazine. Unfortunately, the disruptors mentioned above made us rethink, reschedule, and realign our own priorities this year. Thankfully, our team remains healthy and motivated, but we have had to make tough choices and opted to delay this magazine’s publication and produce a condensed version this summer. The work of regulatory bodies never ends, regardless of pandemics, economics, and politics. Throughout the past six months, we’ve been in touch and worked with many of you on several matters, and the need to protect the public interest, if anything, has increased. As the summer ends and work and other priorities in life roar back in September, I will be aware of the many unknowns and unexpected forces that impact us, this publication, and your organization. Business aside, I will also be mindful of people’s individual struggles and aim to be patient. What strange times history we’re in, but what an excellent opportunity to take hold of the situation to be sensitive and kind. Let’s make the best of it. If you’re heading to Louisville, Kentucky in September for CLEAR’s Annual Education Conference, please come and say hi at our booth. It will be great to see you. Be well and stay safe.

M. Daniel Roukema

www.mdrstrategy.ca © 2022. All rights reserved

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summer 2022 issue


IN THIS ISSUE

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CLEAR’s candidates for president-elect

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Michael Lewicki: modest beginnings drive his success in real estate

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At a glance: Ontario’s College Performance Measurement Framework defines new regulatory reporting standards

theregistrar.ca

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Cover Story: leading with conscience, empathy, and determination. Meet Joanie Bouchard of British Columbia

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The Registrar magazine to launch podcast series

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Ontario engineering regulator celebrates centennial milestone amidst modernization efforts to advance its public interest mandate

summer 2022 issue


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CLEAR’s

candidates for president-elect In its upcoming elections, the Council on Licensure, Enforcement and Regulation (CLEAR) has two candidates for president-elect who will serve one year in that role and then as President the following. The Registrar magazine reached out to both candidates, Marc Spector and Micah Matthews, and offered them the opportunity to share their experience and vision with readers and voting Members: theregistrar.ca

Marc Spector

Micah Matthews

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CLEAR’s candidates for president-elect

Driving regulatory innovation into CLEAR’s future:

Marc Spector

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hat makes an organization successful? In 15 years working with regulators, I’ve asked myself this question countless times and I keep coming back to one idea: relevance. I believe that to be a successful organization, you have to be a relevant organization. Relevant to one’s cause, mandate, and stakeholders. We know the role we play as regulators helps ensure a balance between consumer protection and maintaining standards within regulated professions. But, for me, relevance means more than that. It means that the public we protect should see itself represented in the regulatory frameworks we’ve built. We should also be working with, and among, peers who understand that the world has evolved – as have consumer expectations. This is a view I’ve held across my career: as a lawyer; as Director of Professional Regulation at the College of Early Childhood Educators; and in my current role as inaugural Deputy Registrar at the Home Construction Regulatory Authority. In each role, I helped create and execute strategies that catapulted organizations to success – because their success was tied directly to their relevance.

And it’s not just organizational relevance as seen by regulators. I think the real key to propelling regulatory operations forward is in evolving best practices to directly serve everyone – including those who have not typically seen regulators address their needs. By making regulation more relevant to people who have been on the “outside”, we can get greater buy-in and a broader audience for the great work we all do. That’s why I have been active on CLEAR’s International Congress and Strategic Planning Working Groups and was among the first to be appointed to CLEAR’s Working Group on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. It’s also why I am speaking in September at CLEAR’s annual education conference – to talk about how we can support our Boards in regulatory relevance. And it’s why I’m running to be president. It is our collective responsibility to ensure that we are – and remain – relevant for consumers from all walks of life. Thank you for taking time to read what I have to say. I hope you’ll consider voting for me as the next president of CLEAR. Click here to view Marc Spector’s LinkedIn profile 7

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CLEAR’s candidates for president-elect

Micah Matthews

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have served in various capacities with CLEAR since 2014. I have chaired the Regulatory Agency Administration Committee and the Administration, Legislation, and Policy subcommittee (now the Regulatory, Administration, and Governance subcommittee). Additionally, I was the program chair for the Annual Educational Conferences in Philadelphia (2018) and Seattle/virtual experience (2020). My three goals during my term as president will be to continue support diversifying CLEAR’s offerings in a hybrid world, expand our international reach and participation, and solidify our diversity, equity, and inclusion principles within the Board and the organization at large. In my time on the Board, I have had the good fortune to work with and observe some incredible individuals displaying high-quality leadership. My key learning from them is the president needs to be the steady hand that can guide consistent decision making and bring out creativity and ideas from a diverse board. Both in my personal and professional life I have shown the ability to be the steady and competent hand. I am asking for your support to bring those skills and my experience to the position of CLEAR Board President.

I also participate in numerous committees with Federation of State Medical Boards including the Board Executive Advisory Committee and the Digital Credentialing and Technology Innovations Committee. The latter committee was a direct result of a resolution I envisioned, put forward through my organization, and it was adopted by the House of Delegates. In my day job I am the Deputy Executive and Legislative Director for the Washington Medical Commission (WMC), the independent regulatory authority for physicians and physician assistants in Washington state. I have worked for the WMC since 2011 and held this position since 2014. I am responsible generally for the staff and operations and set the legislative agenda with input from the Commissioners. During my time with the WMC I have contributed to numerous policies and guidelines that range from Telemedicine and Continuity of Care to Practitioner Health. My leadership philosophy can be summarized in three words: Respect, Excellence, and Fun. Thank you for reading and for your consideration of my candidacy. Click here to view Micah Matthews’s LinkedIn Profile

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Registrar and CEO The Newfoundland & Labrador Pharmacy Board (NLPB), established by legislation in 1910, is the regulatory body for the practice of pharmacy in the province of Newfoundland & Labrador. Reporting to the Board, the Registrar and C.E.O. will work in a dynamic and complex context, bringing strategic vision, an innovative mindset, and quality commitment to this significant leadership role in the province.

www.regulatoryjobs.ca


Michael Lewicki: modest beginnings drive his success in real estate

tate. “These [rules] are meant to give you a standard to rise to, no matter where you are at in your life.”

Pursuing Initial Interests

ike Lewicki always knew that his love for compliance would eventually see him heading into a regulated field.

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Growing up in a small town in southern Ontario, Lewicki first decided to pursue further education at Ottawa’s Algonquin College, graduating with a certificate in Public Relations and Media Communications. Still in Ottawa today, he was married in 2007, and after navigating a few additional important phases in life, decided to tap into the world of real estate. Michael became a real estate agent in 2011, regulated by the Real Estate Council of Ontario (RECO).

“My friends would joke around about this, but I like compliance and rules because they create a standard,” says Lewicki, who runs Terra Firma Real Es-

He eventually became a Registered Broker in 2014, and to capitalize on a unique opportunity, Lewicki joined the Commercial Services Network on

Mike Lewicki

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and his team trade real estate from, and where agents can then be trained into the commercial industry. Michael currently chairs the program, and also became a Director of the Canadian Condominium Institute’s Eastern Ontario Chapter in 2017, where education and advocacy of condominium living is prioritized.

Legislative Changes As a realtor with a bird’s-eyed view of the industry, Lewicki says that The Trust in Real Estate Services Act, 2020 (TRESA 2020), is an important and much-needed evolution from Real Estate and Brokers Act, 2002 (REBBA). Lewicki says that people choose realtors to handle one of the biggest transactions in their lives, and that TRESA continues the intent set out by REBBA in requiring professionals in the industry to rise and meet a collective and reciprocal standard.

Mike Lewicki

Ottawa’s Real Estate Board (OREB) as a Member in 2015, which later resulted in the creation of a commercial mentorship training program at Solid Rock Realty, the brokerage where he

“What many consumers don’t realize is that these two pieces of legislation also cover tenants and landlords,” Lewicki says. “Someone wanting to rent or go open their very first coffee shop is protected. So, it’s not just buying or selling; REBBA has had a fantastic uphill battle to lead to what TRESA is today.” As a Past Chair of OREB’s Professional Standards Committee, with its own

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The Trust in Real Estate Services Act, 2020 (TRESA 2020), is an important and much-needed evolution from Real Estate and Brokers Act, 2002 (REBBA). local enforcement and disciplinary action, Lewicki understands and praises the need for legislation created through the government listening. “I think that this is fantastic, because it enables the regulator to actually enforce the will of the public,” Lewicki says. “We all adhere to a baseline - minimum standards of operation and service. We’re expected to meet these minimums, and rightfully so, consequences can be harsh.”

Life Motivators Relationships are at the crux of what motivates Lewicki to put his best efforts towards in his career. He says that his mother and father,

a long-time catholic school board professional and lime quarry worker respectively, were thoroughly contributing to their communities. Lewicki says that his business is built on referrals, which demonstrates how important trust and reliability are in building sustainable relationships.

Looking Forward With 11 years in the industry, Lewicki says that there are a few moments he is most proud of. One of them includes serving as the current Chair of OREB’s Commercial division. However, he says that he is most proud of putting together a team, consisting of one partnered real estate agent and one administrator. There has never been a more consistent balance of work, Lewicki says, as he is able to generate business in a field that he loves, but remains forward-thinking in a dynamic industry. “Despite many things changing in real estate in Canada, I’ve always believed that with change comes improvement,” Lewicki said. “With an ongoing housing crisis, competent, trusted and regulated realtors that the public believes in have never been more necessary. I think, for sure, that we are more than capable of always delivering better.” 13

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Find a regulatory body, professional, complaint, or decision in seconds!

Link the Canadian Regulatory Guide to your website today www.regulatoryguide.ca

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theregistrar.ca Informing the Public

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Promoting Regulators

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Protecting Canadians


At a glance: Ontario’s College Performance Measurement Framework defines new regulatory reporting standards

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n 2020, Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, which oversees the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 (RHPA), introduced the College Performance Measurement Framework (CPMF). The purpose of the new tool is to improve public protection with a new set of standardized reporting requirements for the twenty-six health regulatory Colleges that oversee twenty-eight professions. The CPFM has seven measurement domains: governance, resources, system partner, information management, regulatory policies, suitability to practice, and measurement, reporting and improvement. Bill Campbell, media relations representative from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s communication division, says the CPMF was created collaboratively by the Ministry, the

Colleges, members of the public, and subject matter experts. “The CPMF has supported the collection of baseline data to better respond to the question ‘How do we know that Colleges are executing their mandate to act in the public interest?’” Campbell adds. It provides for continuous improvement by “identifying and reporting on commendable practices 15

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among peers,” according to the Ontario’s health website. The website also outlines the following components of CPMF: • Measurement domains: Critical attributes of an excellent health regulator in Ontario. • Standards: Performance-based activities that a College is expected to achieve and against which a College will be measured. • Measures: More specific requirements to demonstrate and enable the assessment of how a College achieves a Standard. • Evidence: Decisions, activities, processes, or the quantifiable results that are being used to demonstrate and assess a College’s achievement of a standard. • Context Measures: Statistical data Colleges report that will provide context about a College’s performance related to a Standard. • Planned Improvement Activities: Initiatives a College commits to implement over the next reporting period to improve its performance on one or more standards, where appropriate. Erin Tilley, manager of regulatory policy and research at The College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO), says system partner has been instrumental in address-

ing public interest and patient safety by working with other partners in the system. “We collaborated with the Ministry of Long-Term Care to address staffing issues in long-term care,” Tilley said. “We also partnered with employers for the Supervised Practice Experience [Partnership], to support internationally educated nurses who are applying to register in the province who don’t already meet registration requirements.” The Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario (RCDSO) have also made strides in the implementation of the CPMF. Daniel Faulkner, registrar and CEO of the RCDSO, says the CPMF gave the College a comprehensive picture of their regulatory performance, along with a baseline to evaluate improvements overtime. Faulkner says that virtually every area of the College’s regulatory performance became subject to public reporting. He says this led to areas of interest to not only be identified for continuous improvement, but the development of solutions to meet these challenges head-on. “The implementation helped identify areas in need of attention, such as timelines for processing complaints and Registrar’s investigations,” Faulkner said. “There were also specific ways

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“A big change between the CPMF in 2020 compared to 2021, in relation to changing public expectations, are more standards and measures related to diversity, equity, and inclusion,” to improve our governance, such as clear conflict of interest declarations and training for Council members,” Faulkner said. Both Tilley and Faulkner say that as public expectations for regulators evolve, the CPMF will as well. One of the central focuses of the CPMF going into the future is to implement diversity, equity, and inclusion measures, Faulkner says. “A big change between the CPMF in 2020 compared to 2021, in relation to changing public expectations, are more standards and measures related to diversity, equity, and inclusion,” Tilley said.

Faulkner says the CPMF remains critical for the RCDSO’s operations, as it’s become part of how meaningful, public-interest progress is focused on every day. He says that, in terms of overall importance, the CPFM allows for more transparency in Ontario’s health-care system, and, by extension, enhances public protection. As for the long-term viability of the framework, Campbell says future reporting cycles will identify practice-based frameworks within the CPMF that will be used to measure and assess regulatory excellence. Colleges that use the CPMF to identify opportunities will be able to sustain their operations and ensure areas of accountability and transparency to the public remain clear. Tilley says that, for example, the 2020 report showcased how commendable practices could lead to regulators continuously learning from each other to meet their own, respective mandate. “I feel like those commendable practices are a real opportunity to be inspired,” Tilley said. “It [ the CPMF] really feels like a gift at your fingertips since you know exactly where consistent and transparent information will be found. You can always identify what’s happening across the province and learn and potentially collaborate with one another.” 17

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Cover Story

Joanie Bouchard Cover Story

Leading with conscience, empathy, and determination. Meet Joanie Bouchard of British Columbia

Joanie Bouchard

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Today, the mother of a three-year-old and Registrar of the College of Dietitians of British Columbia (CDBC) is steering her interest in policy to further strengthen the regulator’s relevance in protecting the public by recognizing and correcting past systemic injustices. Born in a rural community in the region called Abitibi in northern Quebec, Bouchard studied in Montreal and moved to British Columbia five years ago. No stranger to challenges, Joanie Bouchard is a former Ironman competitor, and applies the determination and work ethic required in sports to her career.

Cover Story

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hen Joanie Bouchard entered the world of licensing and professional regulation as the Director of Professional Affairs at the Quebec College of Dietitians (l’Ordre des diététistes-nutritionnistes du Québec) more than ten years ago, the policy side of the industry fueled her ambition to lead.

Even though the CDBC’s work on equity began in 2017, the 2020 police-driven deaths of Black American George Floyd in Minnesota and Indigenous New Brunswick resident Chantel Moore heightened Bouchard’s determination to act.

Since joining CDBC, Bouchard has led significant transformational regulatory change, overseeing the importance of acknowledging diversity in protecting the public interest, and setting standards in reconciliation and equity in healthcare.

deaths of Black American George Floyd in Minnesota and Indigenous New Brunswick resident Chantel Moore heightened Bouchard’s determination to act. “We are part of a colonial system,” Bouchard says, recognizing that the police and regulatory bodies are similar in being entrusted with protecting the public. “An immediate audit of our practices made sense as a starting point,” she said.

Even though the CDBC’s work on equity began in 2017, the 2020 police-driven

In June 2020, the organization hired a consultant to conduct an operational 19

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Cover Story

and governance audit to examine CDBC’s policies and practices. Later that year, the British Columbia Ministry of Health released a report, highlighting racial discrimination against the Indigenous communities in the provincial health care system. The report, entitled ‘In Plain Sight,’ illustrated harrowing experiences and anecdotal accounts of racism which were “widespread or targeting” towards Indigenous patients — bringing wider scale attention to the issue. The report aligned with the values of BC dietitians to “practice ethically, safely, and competently,” as the College states in the Cultural Safety and Humility Q&A on its website. CDBC has been one of the architects of greater inclusion in British Columbia.

“We made cultural safety and humility our strategic priority,” Bouchard said. “We decided to bring this to our framework of what we do.” She calls this initiative, and the ones to come, “one of the biggest highlights” of her career, adding that none of it happened overnight. The report also outlined measures to address Indigenous-specific racism, suggesting the action of “attacking the roots of the problem” — and establishing a renewed foundation for Indigenous communities to access the health care system. “This challenged me [to think] ...,” she said, pausing about the importance of this work. “What is our role as a College in the whole system? How are we contributing to this situation today regarding

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The historic harm done to Indigenous communities, much of it resulting from disproportionate access to food, have been widely recorded and persist to this day. The CDBC’s role in setting standards to promote safe, competent and ethical dietetic practices is paramount and begins with recognizing past history. CDBC openly acknowledged the impacts of colonization in a report published earlier this year — including prolonged malnutrition among the Indigenous communities, increased household food insecurity, and chronic diseases. In addition to its own admission of past wrongs, CBDC and 10 fellow health regulatory Colleges in BC came together to sign a joint statement of apology and committed to change. They created a roadmap for better and more responsible protection of the public interest. The College of Dietitians of British Columbia was established in 2002 and oversees 1,500 licensed dietitians across the province. Compared to regulators, such as the BC College of Nurses and Midwives, which regulates 60,000 nurses, CDBC’s role in the province’s healthcare ecosystem seems miniscule, but has proven to be essential.

“We were repositioning ourselves for cultural safety, humility, and anti-discrimination towards Indigenous peoples,” Bouchard said. “We also recognize that there is a lot to do for EDI (Equity,

Cover Story

colonialism and racism, and what are we going to do about it?” Bouchard shared.

Beyond Indigenous and other marginalized communities in BC, the College has also focused its efforts on being more inclusive of foreign-trained professionals, especially racialized applicants.

Diversity and Inclusion) in relation to recognizing oppressed and marginalized communities.” Beyond Indigenous and other marginalized communities in BC, the College 21

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Cover Story

ganization. “We’ve been considered a leader nationally among other dietetic regulators.” Looking ahead, Joanie Bouchard has no immediate plans to return to Quebec except for holidays and personal activities. “BC has been good to me and my family, and professionally”, she said. “It has allowed me to grow exponentially, for which I am very grateful.”

has also focused its efforts on being more inclusive of foreign-trained professionals, especially racialized applicants. She adds the audit brought “really concrete (suggestions) to the organization, such as better representation on our Board and committees, and the need to review our policy and language that we didn’t know could be perceived as racist.” “We gained a lot of knowledge,” Bouchard said during the process of audit and systemic changes at the or-

As for her leadership at the CDBC, she refers to the upcoming modernization of the health regulatory framework in BC. This process, which was slowed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, will see the amalgamation of several health regulatory Colleges. Her hope is that a small regulator overseeing dietitians will continue to protect the public has it has. Bouchard’s commitment to building a fairer and more equitable BC remains at the forefront. If the mandate of regulatory bodies is to protect the public, then those regulatory bodies must acknowledge, reflect, and respect that diversity in their composition, operations, and policies. She remains hopeful that a more equitable regulatory system that contributes to safer and better care for the public-at-large will continue to unfold.

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The Registrar magazine to launch podcast series

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he Registrar magazine, the Canadian regulatory sector’s primary publication, is launching a podcast series to further promote the work of regulators and the people who commit their careers to protecting the public interest.

The Registrar podcast will produce several issues annually between the magazine’s publication dates. It will be hosted by Daniel Roukema, CEO of MDR Strategy Group, the agency that produces The Registrar magazine. “This is really exciting,” says Roukema,

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M. Daniel Roukema (left), seen here being interviewed by CBC Marketplace, will host The Registrar podcast series.

who has thirty years of experience in the entertainment sector. “Transforming print to voice has become so powerful, and I look forward to meeting and bringing out the passion and emotion of our guests to the thousands of regulators and other people who now follow the Registrar magazine.” The audio format of the magazine aims to interview regulators at sub-executive levels to discuss current issues and events, personal stories, current trends, and best practices in the licensing and regulation sector. Regulators, and those who work within the industry, have lauded The Registrar for continuing to showcase consumer protection in a new lens. “Podcasting is a great opportunity to

increase The Registrar’s reach,” says David Brazeau, communications manager with an Ontario delegated provincial authority. “This magazine has successfully brought together this vast network of regulators in Canada by sharing news, stories and best practices. I’m looking forward to hearing more about my colleagues in an engaging audio format.” The Registrar podcast is slated to record its first episodes this September at the Council of Licensure, Enforcement and Regulation (CLEAR) 2022 Annual Educational Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. It will be published in early October on all major platforms, such as Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and Google Podcasts. Episodes will also be embedded in future issues of The Registrar Magazine.

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GOOGLE ALERTS ARE NOT ENOUGH Regulators need professional issues & media monitoring services

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Ontario engineering regulator celebrates centennial milestone amidst modernization efforts to advance its public interest mandate

recognize the need to continuously evolve as a regulator to ensure we effectively fulfil our legislative mandate for the next 100 years.”

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oronto – (June 14, 2022) – Today, Professional Engineers Ontario (PEO) celebrates a century of serving the public interest through regulation of the practice of engineering in the province. “This is a proud moment for PEO,” said President Nick Colucci, P.Eng., FEC. “As we pause to reflect on this wonderful accomplishment, we

To this end, PEO has initiated major transformation initiatives to become a more modern, enlightened and responsive regulator. Work began in 2018 with an independent review of PEO’s regulatory performance, which has subsequently led to several noteworthy achievements, including: A high-level action plan to address the recommendations from the review; A two-year Governance Roadmap to enhance governance effectiveness;

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The introduction of the digital National Professional Practice Exam as part of the licensing process, allowing for a flexibly written, psychometrically sound examination of licence applicants; An anti-racism and antidiscrimination review that addressed any concerns of PEO as a regulator, employer and organization and the subsequent adoption of the AntiDiscrimination and Equity Code that codifies PEO’s fairness,

human rights and public interest obligations; A gender audit of PEO’s licensing process and internal operations; and The implementation in January 2023 of a mandatory continuing professional development program for all PEO licence holders. “We are unwavering in our commitment to enhancing all our public protection activities including our licensing, complaints and discipline 27

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processes, establishing performance guidelines and standards, and taking action against unlicensed individuals who illegally describe themselves as engineers,” added Colucci. “PEO’s regulatory mandate helps to make Ontario a better, safer place in which to live, and I look forward to continuing the transformative path we’ve embarked on as we begin our next century.”

About Professional Engineers Ontario Under the authority of the Professional Engineers Act, PEO governs over 91,500 licence and certificate holders and regulates professional engineering in Ontario. Established on June 14, 1922, PEO’s mis-

sion is to regulate and advance the practice of engineering to protect the public interest. Its vision is to be the trusted leader in professional self-regulation. Professional engineering safeguards life, health, property, economic interests, the public welfare and the environment. Professional engineers can be identified by the P.Eng. after their names. Holders of limited licences can be identified by LEL or LET after their names. For additional information, please contact: Duff McCutcheon, Manager, Communications Tel: 416-840-1068; 800-339-3716, ext.1068 Cell: 416-797-8175 Email: dmccutcheon@peo.on.ca

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