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lamp THE MAGAZINE OF THE NSW NURSES AND MIDWIVES’ ASSOCIATION

VOLUME 73 No.11 DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

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COVER STORY

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CONTENTS

CONTACTS NSW Nurses and Midwives’ Association For all membership enquiries and assistance, including Lamp subscriptions and change of address, contact our Sydney office. Sydney Office 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo NSW 2017 (all correspondence) T 8595 1234 (metro) 1300 367 962 (non-metro) F 9662 1414 E gensec@nswnma.asn.au W www.nswnma.asn.au

VOLUME 73 No.11 DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

Hunter Office 8-14 Telford Street, Newcastle East NSW 2300

COVER STORY

8 | Anti-privatisation push builds at Shellharbour Momentum grows against the giveaway of our public hospitals, as 1000 people turn out for a Sunday rally at Shellharbour.

REGULARS

COVER STORY

10 | A united front

Editorial Your letters News in brief Ask Judith Nurse Uncut Social media Nursing Research Online Crossword Books Movies of the month Diary dates

The NSWNMA, the HSU and ASMOF – all coordinated by Unions NSW – have pulled together to fight the threat of privatisation to public hospitals.

AGED CARE

Produced by Hester Communications T 9568 3148

Editorial Committee • Brett Holmes, NSWNMA General Secretary • Judith Kiejda, NSWNMA Assistant General Secretary • Coral Levett, NSWNMA President • Peg Hibbert, Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital • Michelle Cashman, Long Jetty Continuing Care • Richard Noort, Justice Health Advertising Danielle Nicholson T 8595 2139 or 0429 269 750 F 9662 1414 E dnicholson@nswnma.asn.au

Information and Records Management Centre To find archived articles from The Lamp, or to borrow from the NSWNMA nursing and health collection, contact: Jeannette Bromfield, Coordinator T 8595 2175 E gensec@nswnma.asn.au The Lamp ISSN: 0047-3936 General Disclaimer The Lamp is the official magazine of the NSWNMA. Views expressed in articles are contributors’ own and not BORDER FORCE ACT necessarily those of the NSWNMA. Statements of fact are believed to be true, but no legal responsibility is accepted 19 | Brave stand leads to backdown for them. All material appearing in The Lamp is covered on Border Force Act by copyright and may not be reproduced without prior Kick back written and relax withThea NSWNMA four-book permission. takes no responsibility The federal government for thePenguin advertising appearing herein and it does not gift pack from Random House. has repealed a provision necessarily endorse any products advertised. in the Border Force ActWe have four gift packs (of four books Privacy away with titles including: that could have seen each) to give Privacy statement: The NSWNMA collects personal health professionals jailed information from members in order to perform our role Our Vietnam Nurses by Annabelle Brayley. of representing their industrial and professional interests. for two years for speaking Stories from nurses medics that and enhancing We place greatand emphasis on maintaining out about conditions in theof privacy security of War your personal theand Vietnam that information. immigration detention show a side Personal information is in protected under law and can played an important part shaping centres. only be released to someone else where the law requires Australia’sorpresence in permission. the War.If you have concerns where you give about your personal information, please contact the For the office. LoveIf of Kellythat your NSWNMA youHorses are still notby satisfied privacy is being can contact the Privacy Wilson. In maintained, 2012 theyou Wilson TELEHEALTH Commission. sisters embarked on a journey Subscriptions 2017Kaimanawa 32 | Dodgy internet hinders to rescue theforwild Free to all Association members. Professional members Telehealth horses from themagazine slaughterhouse, can subscribe to the at a reduced rate of $30. Telehealth could cut and tame the Individuals $82, Institutions $138, Overseas $148. untrainable horses.

Holiday reading

14 | Senate hears of aged care funding crisis Aged care assistants in nursing are paid less than Woolworths checkout attendants and trolley collectors, a Senate inquiry has heard. COMPETITION

22 | Christmas Giveaway Wishing all our members a Merry Christmas and offering you the chance to be part of this year’s Christmas giveaway.

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For all editorial enquiries letters and diary dates T 8595 1234 E lamp@nswnma.asn.au M 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo NSW 2017

Press Releases Send your press releases to: F 9662 1414 E gensec@nswnma.asn.au

Aimee Johnson, Chevonne Cowell and Julie Lyubovic from Shellharbour Hospital. PHOTOGRAPH: SHARON HICKEY

5 6 29 37 39 41 43 45 47 49 50

NSWNMA Communications Manager Janaki Chellam-Rajendra T 1300 367 962

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EDITORIAL BY BRETT HOLMES, GENERAL SECRETARY

Baird must back down Big turnouts at our rallies against the privatisation of local public hospitals and a 30 per cent swing against the National Party in the Orange bye-election send a very clear message from regional NSW to Mike Baird that he ignores at his peril. Over the last two months NSW nurses and midwives have stood up strongly for our public health system. At rallies throughout the state thousands of nurses have been joined by thousands of community members who share our serious concerns and anger about the privatisation of regional public hospitals. 2000 people at Wyong, a thousand more at Shellharbour and other very well attended rallies at Maitland, Bowral and Goulburn have put the Baird government on notice they have a fight on their hands if they want to give away our cherished public hospitals to their mates in the private sector. Already we have garnered broad political support for our campaign. NSW Labor has strongly committed to preserving our public health system (see p.9). We have also received solid backing from the Greens and the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party. All the health unions – the NSWNMA, the HSU and ASMOF – who represent the great bulk of public health sector workers – are united behind the campaign. For Unions NSW, repelling the attack on public hospitals is a high priority. CAMPAIGNING WORKS No doubt the Baird government was hoping they could give away five regional hospitals to the corporate sector under the radar of the public. But our efforts over the last two months have been very effective in alerting the public to this outrageous policy. A failure to listen to the wishes of the people and a failure to even consult people had a significant influence on

“We cannot assume the public knows that our public hospitals are being privatised or understands what the consequences are. Our challenge, our job, is to keep it front and centre in people’s minds.” the bye-election in Orange where there was a 30 per cent swing against the National Party. The Baird Government needs to listen to the people and undertake true consultation on major changes such as privatisation. Privatising public health is electoral poison but people need to know what is happening. The government relies on the issue disappearing from people’s minds soon after the announcement is made. We cannot assume the public knows that our public hospitals are being privatised or understands what the consequences are. Our challenge, our job, is to keep it front and centre in people’s minds. Our experience is that when they do know and they understand the consequences they are very angry with what the government is doing. We need to keep pressure on Premier Baird until he backs down on this appalling policy. We have an obligation to stand up for our members and help them to stand up for their patients’ rights to access public health care. We will

continue to do that up to the next State election in 2019 and beyond. WE SUPPORT CHOICE In this issue of The Lamp we announce a new choice for our members – an exclusive health fund for nurses and midwives. Some might find this contradictory when we are running a vigorous campaign against privatisation. But it is completely consistent with long-held NSWNMA positions. We have always recognised that the community is entitled to personal choice. We have always recognised the contribution of private health care and of our members who work in private health care delivery. We have always recognised there is a role for private health insurance for those who can afford it. The health fund for nurses and midwives has been established by Teachers Health Fund and will be not-for-profit. In some ways it is a similar initiative to industry super which returns all benefits back to members and is also a legacy of the union movement. Teachers Health was originally set up by the NSW Teachers’ Federation. It is a highly respected service to teachers and educators. I hope that Nurses and Midwives Health will be welcomed and valued by our members. Not all nurses and midwives are able to afford private health insurance but many of you make the decision to buy health insurance. I trust that you will have a good look at what this fund will offer in comparison to your current choice. You are guaranteed that no shareholder is making money out of your choice.

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 5


YOUR LETTERS

LE T T E R OF THE MONTH

A deliberately deceptive government Letter to Gareth Ward, MP for Kiama Parliamentary Secretary for Illawarra and South Coast [This letter has been edited for space] In relation to the Public/Private Partnership (PPP) Agreement planned for Maitland, Goulburn, Bowral,

Wyong, and Shellharbour Hospitals. The history of PPPs in terms of health provision has been a poor one, with NSW Port Macquarie Hospital standing out as an example of a community being ill served by a profitdriven care provider. Sadly, there are other examples such as La Trobe Regional Hospital, Modbury (SA), Robina (Qld) and the recent hospital on the Sunshine Coast, all of which have been bought back by respective state governments. At Joondalup Hospital (WA) - the model that is being used for “future” PPPs - performance indicators such as off stretcher times – are the worst performing of all hospitals in Perth. The proposed benefits cited by NSW Health are identical to those of other failed PPPs. Even Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney has cancelled its contract with private operators due to compromised patient care. One of the main concerns I have is the decrease in staffing in contrast to current NSW award agreements with nursing hours per patient day (ratios). They have been proven to provide vastly improved health outcomes for patients. I realise more staff will be employed, but existing wards will have less staff than currently and the chance of adverse events will rise dramatically. This is not what the people of our community deserve. I am unsure if you are aware of the Northern Beaches contract for staff conditions and awards, with two years’ employment guarantee and protection of conditions. After this staff will revert to an award below that of the current one. In terms of pay and security, Wollongong and the

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Shoalhaven offer greater employment incentive and could severely affect the attraction of high quality staff for our area. How will a nurse be able to buy a home in the area without the security of a permanent job? The most vulnerable low paid-workers in our system will be treated most harshly as evidenced in other PPPs. How will the attempts by your government to regulate the sector and ensure appropriate standards are maintained balance up with inclusions in [free trade] agreements that allow corporations to sue the Australian Government (NSW Government) for loss of profit if this impacts on their profit margins? In 1996, the NSW Auditor General cited the high level of risk shouldered by the public sector stating “the Government is in effect paying for the hospital twice and giving it away”. Pat Barnes, the former Commonwealth Auditor General, stated that the risks are not asymmetrical or evenly shared, with the private partner gaining substantially more than the public. All the previously mentioned examples of PPPs initially contained losses by reducing services, so patient waiting times increased, making cuts in care provision and equipment access, in some instances sought additional funding, and reduced nursing, staff and skill mixes. I am disappointed with the way the proposal was announced and also that it was not highlighted prior to the 2015 election. I have tried to remain apolitical, however, while researching this topic I discovered a website from the NSW Liberal Party citing “40 Foley Falsehoods, Deceits, Deceptions and Misrepresentations”. Number 22 on the list was “NSW Hospitals will be privatised”. The announcement after the election of this proposal does little to instil confidence or trust and rightly or wrongly (irrespective of the terms “privatisation/PPP”) makes the government appear to be deliberately deceptive. Once again, thank you for your time and courtesy. Glenn Hayes RN CNS, Barrack Heights

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YOUR LETTERS

Film-making is fun! The recent NIDA film-making workshop for NSWNMA members was a very inspiring, creative and hands-on two days. I’d never realised how much I didn’t know about film making – now I know a little bit more. It was daunting but great fun putting some of what we learned to use, filming a short scene together. Turns out nurses can also make great actors! Having watched lots of great shorts and talked nothing but film for two days, I was left a little overwhelmed with all that new knowledge, but also filled with creative inspiration, some more technical know-how and a long list of films to watch. Lucy was a great teacher, passionate about film, easy to understand and engaging. It was also great to meet nurses from across the state and share our stories. Thanks so much for the opportunity, Nerida Grant RN, Marrickville

The burden of assisted dying There is much discussion at the moment about the choices we have around dying. Most of this discussion is about those with a terminal illness having the right to choose to die. It has become a highly emotive area with strong views for and against. What I have been pondering about assisted dying is are we considering the effect for the health professionals directly involved? Whilst we may say “Yes”, I agree with this”, have we considered if there will be ramifications on the well-being of health professionals? How well does this sit with us if we are the person directly involved? Who are we assuming will take charge of this? While we absolutely need to consider our patients, I feel this discussion needs to be much broader. Whilst it’s not necessarily an easy task to be with or care for someone who is dying, what is it like to be with someone whose life you end? Even at their very clear request. Whilst actions may be able to be legally justified, I feel the weight of this participation will be a very heavy one for the doctors and nurses involved. Jennifer Smith CNS Palliative Care, Maclean

HAVE YOUR SAY Send your letters to: Editorial Enquiries email lamp@nswnma.asn.au fax 9662 1414 
 mail 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo NSW 2017.

Please include a high-resolution photo along with your name, address, phone and membership number. Letters may be edited for clarity and space. Anonymous letters will not be published.

No pathway for AiNs I am sorry to attract your attention towards large scale discrimination being done to all AiNs working for NSW Health, as there is a restriction on salary increases for us except for the minimal increase which the NSW Government decides for all employees in the public sector. A registered nurse gets this year by year increase till they reach level RN-8 whereas the increase for AiNs is restricted after AiN-4. A Registered Nurse has avenues to further increase their salary, as they can develop to CNE/CNS/NUM and various positions in Nursing Administration. When they operate as team leaders on the shift, they get extra money besides regular loadings. Unfortunately, an AiN has no opportunity to grow in the system. If one is an AiN, then they are always an AiN, unless studying towards becoming an EEN or RN. AiNs, of their own initiative and with online education such as HETI Online, are educating themselves. Very often we are more vigilant regarding the total health scenario of a patient since we are always around them. Often it’s AiNs who observe a sudden decline in vital signs, and press for CERS or MET call. It’s also a fact that they are the ones who undergo bullying, harassment and bad behaviour at the hands of a few senior RNs in almost all public hospitals. By and large nobody stands by AiNs in our hospitals. As a vigilant worker and union member, I would request NSWNMA to study this discriminatory attitude within our system and try to bring some change to the situation for AiNs working for NSW Health. Sharat Aggarwal AiN, Carlingford NSWNMA responds: NSWNMA values our AIN members who provide an essential and high standard of care in the public health system, aged care, disability services and other areas. If you wish to further your nursing career we encourage you to pursue studies to become an enrolled nurse, registered nurse or midwife, as indeed many of our members do. As you have correctly identified Mike Baird’s NSW Government Wages Policy severely limits our capacity to have fair and reasonable pay increases and increment structures revisited. NSW Health has a zero tolerance policy towards bullying and harassment in the workplace. If you are experiencing bullying then please consult NSW Health policy, Bullying – Prevention and Management of Workplace Bullying in NSW Health PD2011_018. NSWNMA is always available to provide you with confidential advice or support.

Advertise in The Lamp and reach more than 61,000 nurses and midwives.

To advertise please contact Danielle Nicholson 02 8595 2139 / 0429 269 750 dnicholson@nswnma.asn.au THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 7


COVER STORY

Anti-privatisation push builds at Shellharbour Momentum grows against the giveaway of our public hospitals, as 1000 people turn out for a Sunday rally at Shellharbour.

A united front of unions, community groups and the public massed opposite Shellharbour Hospital on 6 November to show Mike Baird their strong opposition to the privatisation of the local hospital. Organisers estimated more than a thousand people attended the rally on a sweltering Sunday afternoon. It was the latest in a series of well attended rallies at Wyong, Maitland and Bowral, where the local hospitals are also in line to be given away to private operators. There was also a rally at Goulburn. Although the government has backed off plans to privatise Goulburn Base Hospital, it still intends to close down Goulburn’s Bourke Street Health Centre with its rehab, palliative care and oncology wards and hydrotherapy pool. The Shellharbour rally was attended by a number of ALP state MPs including opposition leader Luke Foley, shadow health minister Walt Secord, David Harris from Wyong, and federal MPs Stephen Jones and Sharon Bird.

The Greens and the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party also expressed their support for the campaign to stop the privatisation of hospitals. Luke Foley pledged that under Labor “our great public hospitals will always be run as public hospitals. There can be no ‘ifs’ or ‘buts’ here”. “We draw a line in the sand whether it’s Shellharbour, Bowral, Goulburn, Maitland, Wyong or anywhere else in the state. We will stand up and defend the best public health system in the world,” he said. NSWNMA General Secretary Brett Holmes welcomed the broad political support but made it clear nurses and midwives would defend the public health system no matter who led the government. “I want to thank Luke Foley and other MPs who have come along to show their support for our public health system. We will hold them all to account,” he said.

‘I WANT TO THANK LUKE FOLEY AND OTHER MPS WHO HAVE COME ALONG TO SHOW THEIR SUPPORT FOR OUR PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEM. WE WILL HOLD THEM ALL TO ACCOUNT.’ — Brett Holmes 8 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

What health workers say A member from each of the health unions addressed the Shellharbour rally: Glen Hayes – RN CNS and NSWNMA member “Our local member has accused nurses of lying. In the seven weeks since this was announced we’ve heard nothing from the health minister. The premier ran away when we went to meet him. The minister, the premier and Gareth Ward (local MP) have said: ‘If things go wrong we can buy the hospital back’. Who are we buying it back from? We own it. It’s our hospital.” Gillian Riley – clinical support officer and HSU member “The Baird government has been willing to sacrifice the health of each and every one of us to boost the balance sheet of the private sector. Public health is not profitable but it is ours. It is regulated and answerable. All the rules change when you put profits ahead of patients. Your right to free access to quality healthcare is in serious jeopardy.” Associate Professor Jeff Murray – salaried doctor and a member of ASMOF “In this area only about 26 per cent of people have private health insurance. A private operator is not going to make any money out of the other 74 per cent of public patients. How are they going to make a profit? One sure way to do it is to cut costs by reducing patient safety.”


Glen Hayes, Julie Lyubovic and Aimee Johnson with opposition leader Luke Foley.

Foley commits to fight election on public hospitals Opposition leader Luke Foley pledged to fight the next state election on the issue of keeping public hospitals in public hands. This is what he told the Shellharbour rally: “We live in a time when the government of this state thinks that every public asset is there to be sold. Nothing is sacred. Mr. Baird and his colleagues believe in their hearts that government is the problem, never the solution. They have an ideological belief that on every issue, in every aspect of life,

health system. We have the best health system in the world here in Australia. It is our Australian achievement built by generations, fought for by nurses and midwives, health services workers, doctors and the public. The people of NSW and Australia won’t let their premiers and their

“UNDER LABOR OUR GREAT PUBLIC HOSPITALS WILL ALWAYS BE RUN AS PUBLIC HOSPITALS. THERE CAN BE NO ‘IFS’ OR BUTS’ HERE.” — Luke Foley

the private sector should run things and the government should just get out of the way. Now they’ve taken that ideology to an extreme by saying our public hospital system – that I consider to be the envy of the world – is up for sale as well. There is one thing I don’t think we should copy and that is the American

prime ministers, whoever they are, sell out our birthright. We got a backdown on (Baird’s) ban of greyhound racing. Well, we are going to get a backdown on a more important issue – public hospitals and public health. We won’t have it dismembered. Mr. Baird will capitulate in the face of public opinion. But if he doesn’t,

if he is too arrogant to you and communities around the state I will fight the next election against Mr. Baird on this issue. The commitment I make is this: under Labor our great public hospitals will always be run as public hospitals. There can be no ‘ifs’ or ‘buts’ here. Today. This week. Over the next two years till the next state election we will roll back and defeat the Americanisation of our health system.”

Resources available on our website Join our campaign to keep your hospital public. Go to our campaign pages for petitions, flyers and other resources: http://www.nswnma.asn.au/ get-involved/keep-it-public/

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 9


COVER STORY

Tony Sara, Brett Holmes and Gerard Hayes

A united front The NSWNMA representing nurses and midwives, the HSU representing ancillary and allied health workers and the ASMOF representing salaried doctors – all coordinated by Unions NSW – have pulled together to fight the threat of privatisation to public hospitals. This is what their leaders told the Shellharbour rally.

Don’t forget! Get involved There is plenty you can do to help:

Collect petitions Download

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Go to

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Keep sHellHarboaur/ port Kembl Hospital public! sw.org.au/ www.unionsn italspublic keepourhosp c #keepitpubli

leaflets and petitions to take to your local shopping centres, train stations and markets. You’ll also find factsheets with answers to FAQs, as well as flyers for upcoming rallies.

Print out the petition and collect as many signatures as possible. The aim is for at least 10,000 signatures for each hospital so that it can be tabled in parliament.

10 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

We must stand firm — Brett Holmes, General Secretary NSWNMA “We can’t afford for our public health system to be handed over to the shareholders of private corporations. The ones who are bidding are, of course, multi-nationals. I’m sure the government will be trying to encourage some so called not-for-profit, non-government organisations to put their hands up as well. But let’s be real. All these organisations want to divert some of our public hospital money – the scarce amount that there is – into either shareholders’ pockets or other works that those NGOs might want to undertake. Public health is starved of enough money not to waste hundreds of millions of dollars supporting shareholders. We just cannot do that. We can’t afford it. Our members and other workers in our public health system struggle every day to deliver the care that the community wants, needs and deserves. Where will it end? Clearly it won’t end until Baird’s mates at the rich end of town have had their fill of profits and we know that is an inexhaustible thirst. Where is this Baird government’s sense of community, compassion and caring? There has been a severe lack of consultation and a severe lack of community consideration. We’ve got to keep all politicians to account. They need to know we are not going to stand by and allow them to privatise our hospitals. We as a community must stand firm. We must stand strong and fight back against the Americanisation of our public health system and other health services in our community. We paid for them. We deserve them. We need them. They’re ours.”

‘WE PAID FOR THEM. WE DESERVE THEM. WE NEED THEM. THEY’RE OURS.’


Chevonne Cowell, Julie Lyubovic and Glenn Hayes with Brett Holmes.

Doctors’ training under threat

An assault on regional jobs

— Dr Tony Sara, President of ASMOF – salaried doctors

— Gerard Hayes, Secretary, Health Services Union

“For my members – salaried doctors – the public teaching hospital is the cornerstone of clinical and medical education. That’s where we train our young doctors. This is all under threat because of the Baird government’s ideological obsession with privatisation and its obsession with undermining the public sector. We hear the tired mantra of competition and efficiency and reducing costs being trotted out. But the allure of for-profit institutions and the reliance on market mechanisms as a panacea to the health system is seriously misguided. It is not supported by theory or evidence. My colleague Dr Andrew Refshauge (former NSW Health Minister) said that the privatisation of Port Macquarie Base Hospital was “an unmitigated disaster”. It was a dismal economic and health policy failure. Our members, our union are bitterly opposed to this process of privatisation of public teaching hospitals. We can look to the United States where extensive research shows that for-profit health institutions provide inferior care and inflate prices. Why? Because the reliance on market mechanisms and for-profit firms does not work in the provision of health services to the public. We, ASMOF, the salaried doctors in NSW – there are 4000 of us – do not accept that privatisation of public hospitals is desirable or necessary.”

“What this government is on about is destroying this community. They’ve attacked regional areas because they think they can win here. Over the last year, they’ve tried to wipe out the kitchen at Port Kembla Hospital – $4.2 million that goes into the local economy. They’ve tried to wipe out 70 jobs from the Illawarra Linen Service. They are giving it to the private sector and say it is some sort of efficiency. It’s efficient as it stands. We’ve already been down this path before at Wodonga Health. They tried to privatise 174 jobs. They went through an efficiency process and guess what: it was more efficient to keep it in-house. I can give you a couple of figures that blow my mind and will blow your mind. Let’s look at the Americanisation of the system. Do you know how big the US military is? It’s pretty big. They put 4.4 per cent of GDP into that military system. They put 17.5 per cent of their GDP into their health system and half of their people can’t access it. So where is that money going? It’s going to the profits of the private sector and it’s not going into public services. It’s outrageous.”

‘THE ALLURE OF FORPROFIT INSTITUTIONS AND THE RELIANCE ON MARKET MECHANISMS AS A PANACEA TO THE HEALTH SYSTEM IS SERIOUSLY MISGUIDED. IT IS NOT SUPPORTED BY THEORY OR EVIDENCE.’

‘WHAT THIS GOVERNMENT IS ON ABOUT IS DESTROYING THIS COMMUNITY. THEY’VE ATTACKED REGIONAL AREAS BECAUSE THEY THINK THEY CAN WIN HERE.’

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 11


COVER STORY

Goulburn

Regions rally against privatisation Rallies were held in Bowral and Maitland where the local hospitals are on the government’s giveaway list and also at Goulburn where insecurity still stalks the local health services despite the government doing a u-turn on the privatisation of the Base Hospital. Uncertainty still hangs over Goulburn The private sector’s lack of interest in taking over Goulburn Hospital has seen the Baird government back away from its privatisation plans, but members need to remain vigilant, says EN Stewart Chapman. “My understanding is that they won’t revisit [privatisation] now, but there’s nothing to say they won’t approach it again,” says Stewart, the NSWNMA branch president based at Goulburn’s Bourke Street Health Service. “There’s a possibility the government could still call for a second stage tender,” he said.

hospital is built, but nurses are concerned that they won’t be able to offer the same standard of services. “We don’t want it to move until the new facilities are built. We’re worried about the patients, particularly the palliative care patients. “We take a lot of pride in what we do. We’ve got a quiet environment, and we’ve got room for family to move in and stay overnight. “If we move in to a busier hospital how will that change? Will patients get the same number of nursing hours there?” He adds that the government needs to come clean about the budget for the new Goulburn hospital: the $120 million

“WE’RE DOING PETITIONS AND HOLDING MEETINGS. WE NEED DEFINITE ANSWERS. AT ELECTION TIME WE NEED TO REMEMBER THIS.” — Stewart Chapman, EN In the meantime, community members and health professionals are worried about the loss of services at the 100-year-old Bourke Street Health Service, which the government is moving to Goulburn base hospital. “We offer a palliative care and long term rehabilitation,” says Stewart. “We’re also a source for community facilities like the hydro pool and oncology services.” Stewart and his colleagues have been told that Bourke Street’s services will be moved in to Goulburn hospital while a new

12 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

announced is half of what’s needed. “We deserve a hospital that can grow into the future, something that will benefit Goulburn and its community into the future.” With so much uncertainty in the air, local branches are remaining vigilant, says Stewart. “We’re doing petitions and holding meetings. We need definite answers. At election time we need to remember this.”


Bowral

Maitland

“I THINK THIS IS JUST THE FIRST PART OF IT. LITTLE BY LITTLE THEY WILL END UP SWALLOWING US UP COMPLETELY.” — Shari Bugden, RN and midwife

Five hundred attend Bowral rally The privatisation push at Bowral Hospital is looking like a takeover by stealth, says NSWNMA delegate Shari Bugden. “It’s very confusing for staff here,” explains Shari, an RN and midwife based at Bowral Hospital. “The government is cherry picking the best parts, like surgery, where the private sector can make money.” She believes the privatisation of the surgery department will inevitably mean all pre-op surgical and post-op services will leave the public hospital too. The departments that stay public will then be called on to care for long-term patient needs and complicated health problems. “People will come in and they will push them through surgery, and if they have multiple issues or complicated issues they will push them through to the public side, and the public sector will have to deal with the problems.” Picking off a profitable area like surgical is just the start, Shari says. She says it is hard to see how the private sector won’t start eyeing off other potential money making areas like pharmaceutical. “I think this is just the first part of it. Little by little they will end up swallowing us up completely.” Shari says the move to privatise is also devastating for the wider community. “We’ve got such a supportive community here that has raised over $2 million for the children’s ward. They’ve also raised money for different equipment for the maternity ward and other parts of the hospital. It’s not fair that a private company comes in and takes that over.” Despite having a very short window of time to organise a

rally opposing privatisation at the end of October, Shari says 500 people attended the event. The Bowral NSWNMA branch is now helping to organise a community forum with representatives from across the community and all parts of the hospital, including unions, management and community groups. “If we’ve got a collective forum in town, everybody can ask questions.” In the meantime, members and delegates are out at marketplaces and shopping centres talking to people. The branch aims to present a petition of 10,000 people opposing privatisation to parliament next year.

Seven hundred turn out at Maitland Some 700 health workers and community members rallied on 23 October to protest the state government’s decision to fund the new Hunter hospital through a public-private partnership. Loretta Baker, a local councillor and a community health nurse in Maitland, says she’s concerned about the affect privatisation will have on health services in the region. “We are the fastest growing inland city in NSW. We have lots of new housing estates. The estate growth is fastest in the west, and yet they are talking about moving the hospital site to the East,” she said. Loretta says the privatisation of Maitland Hospital raises issues of service quality and reach. “A private hospital certainly won’t deliver the same services equally and we don’t know if they will deliver all the services we currently have now.” THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 13


AGED CARE

Senate hears of aged care funding crisis Aged care assistants in nursing are paid less than Woolworths checkout attendants and trolley collectors, a Senate inquiry has heard.

tracks. I think we need to go back to that and say that Failure to properly value aged care work is a “core issue” for society and government funding of the sector, ‘Living Longer, Living Better’, properly implemented, NSWNMA General Secretary Brett Holmes has told a has a chance, but it probably needs to be funded better Senate committee of inquiry. so that we can ensure that the care is going to be able to be delivered. Brett told the inquiry into the future of Australia’s aged care workforce that the union had compared rates of “It is possible to do this, but… it takes commitment from pay for AiNs and Woolworths workers, not including the government to say to the community, ‘If you want penalty rates. this quality of care, then this is going to cost a bit more, and choices have to be made about that cost.’ “Across all the comparable types of jobs people at the checkout get paid better than assistants in nursing; “There has been a move more towards user pays, but people who are supervising a small division get paid there is a limit to that. We have to be a community better than an assistant in nursing with a certificate III and a society that says, ‘We value our elderly people who is termed a team and we’re prepared leader. That can be to pay more tax or 68c to $1 an hour. make some other sacrifice to say that “It is pretty sad that a we’re going to look trolley collector gets after them.’ It can paid more than an be done.” assistant in nursing.” Brett said that The inquiry follows despite a rising the federal Liberal proportion of aged governments move care residents with to cut funding from high care needs, the previous Labor the number of government’s 2013 registered nurses — Brett Holmes “Liv ing Longer, employed in aged Living Better” aged care is declining and care reform package. they are being replaced by AiNs or, more commonly, The committee is due to report its findings in April. personal care workers. Brett said he had been a full-time union official for “If 80 per cent of residents have high or complex care 26 years and “I have been on this battle from day one. needs and they are being funded by the Commonwealth “Small steps are made forward, and then we go for that, …surely you should be able to afford to have backwards, and a lot of it comes down to the commitment registered nurses to at least supervise the care that is of the Commonwealth government to properly fund the being given,” he said. industry and to ensure that the money that it spends in “We value the role of AiNs and have more than 5000 funding it is properly acquitted.” members working in those roles. “However, they themselves acknowledge that they WE’VE GONE BACKWARDS cannot replace a registered nurse. Senator Linda Reynolds asked Brett: “How do we do that without a plan that everyone is working to?” “They are not legally allowed to make clinical decisions about when to administer as-required pain medication He replied: “There was a plan, and it was stopped in its

“SMALL STEPS ARE MADE FORWARD, AND THEN WE GO BACKWARDS, AND A LOT OF IT COMES DOWN TO THE COMMITMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH GOVERNMENT TO PROPERLY FUND THE INDUSTRY.”

14 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017


96%

More than 96 per cent of Australians believe the current level of aged care funding does not meet the needs of residents – particularly those who need high care.

‘IT TAKES COMMITMENT FROM THE GOVERNMENT TO SAY TO THE COMMUNITY, ‘IF YOU WANT THIS QUALITY OF CARE, THEN THIS IS GOING TO COST A BIT MORE, AND CHOICES HAVE TO MADE ABOUT THAT COST.’

— Brett Holmes or dangerous medications and cannot make complex clinical decisions regarding the management of care.” “For myself, when I think about the care of my mother, who, with Parkinson’s, will eventually end up in a facility, I worry that it will be like putting her on an aeroplane and knowing that they have very good flight attendants there who care about their passengers but for whom there is no pilot licensed to be at the head of the plane. It is going to be on autopilot. “We see this in many circumstances now where facilities say they do not or cannot put registered nurses on night duty. “The expectation is that it will be all okay – autopilot will work, the flight attendants will call for help and somewhere somehow help will be available at some point in the future.” RATIOS ARE A SOLUTION

He said the union had been in dispute with agedcare providers who had begun cutting hours in response to funding cuts. This included elimination of handover time, which forced

staff to “go straight to the resident and commence care without having the opportunity to have heard what happened in the last eight or 12 hours or more.” He said federal legislation should provide for staffing ratios related to the acuity of aged are residents. The union was convinced that only ratios would ensure staff could “be satisfied that you have done the job you are supposed to be doing.” “There is nothing more debilitating than going home every day feeling guilty that you have not done your job and you have left Mrs Holmes in a wet bed and you know it, but you cannot do anything about it because there were 10 other residents that you were looking after, and she screamed the least. “That is the sort of situation we have to move. “And we have to acknowledge that if you are going to deliver quality care you have to get enough people there to do it, and you will not do that if you do not pay them, and you have to get those numbers right.” THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 15


AGED CARE

A law needed on minimum staffing Minimum staffing and skill mix rules should be put into law, says Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation.

‘IN MANY FACILITIES NOW, IN ORDER TO SAVE MONEY, HANDOVER IS COMPLETELY GONE.’ — Lee Thomas

It is not uncommon for one registered nurse and two assistants in nursing to be looking after as many as 150 residents in an aged care facility, a Senate inquiry into the future of Australia’s aged care workforce has heard. Lee Thomas, federal secretary of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, told the inquiry minimum staffing and skill mix rules should be mandated by law. “It is not appropriate – it is not safe, frankly – to have vague estimates of what the staffing level and skills mix should be in a residential facility,” she said. She said a national Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (ANMF) project to determine adequate staffing levels and skills mix recommended a one to 4.3 nursing hours per day for each resident. That would ideally include a RN ratio of 20 per cent, EN of 30 per cent and AiN of 50 per cent. Instead, she said, employers had cut care hours in many residential facilities. “It is not unusual to hear six hours a day being taken out of care staffing in a residential facility. There is a freeze on employment. “There has been less and less handover time. Handover is a very important part of the care, moving forward, for a resident or a patient, whether it is in an acute facility or a residential facility. “In many facilities now, in order to save money, handover is completely gone

16 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

or… has been decreased to 15 minutes. When you have 100 residents to hand over, how on earth you do that in 15 minutes completely defies me. “What happens is you hand over the sicker, the more acute, and so not everybody gets a go; not all residents get handed over. We see this time and time again. It just leads to a decrease in quality of care.” REGULATION OF AINS IMPORTANT

Lee said there should also be a minimum mandated educational requirement legislated for assistants in nursing. “The other thing that we have been nagging about for a number of years is that assistants in nursing need to be regulated for the protection of the public. “We are all nurses sitting at this table; we are all regulated for the protection of the public. Assistants in nursing, personal care assistants, are doing some of the most intimate nursing care, but they are not regulated, and they should be.” She said RNs were moving away from the bedside into administration and documentation. As a result, care teams were losing the RN’s assessment and supervisory skills. “We really need to be cognisant that whilst the management aspect and the funding aspect – which the registered nurses are often asked to do – are vitally important for the maintenance of the home, there is also this care element that is being missed out.”


Almost everyone’s got the aged care blues More than 96% of Australians believe the current level of aged care funding does not meet the needs of residents – particularly those who need high care. That is one of the main findings of an opinion poll conducted by the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (ANMF). Almost 2500 people took part in the ANMF phonein and online questionnaire. Among the results: • 79.12% of aged care workers and 85.32% of the public said current staffing at their facility was not sufficient to provide an adequate standard of care; • 68% of workers and 85% of the public said the current ratio of RNs to other care staff at their facility was inadequate; • 93.76% of workers and over 96% of the public said current funding for aged care was inadequate and did not meet the needs of aged care residents. When asked what needs to be done to improve aged care, over 80% of workers and the public pointed to greater government funding, with 80% of workers and 91% of the community calling for regulated nurse ratios. A total of 63% of workers and 91% of the public also cited minimum training

and regulation of care staff as needing improvement. Fifty two percent of workers and 75% of the community said there should be financial penalties for providers who do not deliver a minimum standard of care. Survey comments from aged care staff included: “Staff are always working short. Even fully staffed there are not enough staff to adequately care for the residents. On evening shift, one RN looks after 115 residents onsite, and another 25 offsite – it is not physically possible to provide quality care. ENs are caring for up to 35 residents each. Of an evening, an AIN cares for up to 34 residents by themselves.” “I go to work and I am one nurse to 120 so I’m very concerned. The lack of staff and conditions are revolting.” “Resistance from the company to release money for residents’ needs. Wound care products...it’s very difficult to get a superior product due to the cost. This means delayed wound healing. Inability to provide quality of care. “Put a politician in our jobs for a week and I’m sure they’d be keen to change things. Even better, admit them as a resident.”

79.12%

of aged care workers said current staffing at their facility was not sufficient to provide an adequate standard of care.

85.32%

of the public said current staffing at their facility was not sufficient to provide an adequate standard of care.

68%

of workers said the current ratio of RNs to other care staff at their facility was inadequate.

85%

of the public said the current ratio of RNs to other care staff at their facility was inadequate.

93.76%

of workers said current funding for aged care was inadequate and did not meet the needs of aged care residents.

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 17


Family Planning NSW

Upcoming courses for nurses Clinical Forum/Nurse Education Day

20 CPD hours

Update your knowledge on the latest in reproductive and sexual health at this one-day forum for nurses and other health professionals. Ashfield: 24 March 2017 • Newcastle: 18 August 2017

Well Women’s Screening Course

40 CPD hours

This blended delivery course helps nurses, midwives and enrolled nurses develop confidence and competence in the provision of cervical screening. Course content includes current and future cervical screening methods, history taking and breast awareness. Newcastle: 18 January 2017 • Blacktown: 5 April 2017 • Orange: 26 April 2017

Reproductive and Sexual Health Clinical Accreditation Program

120 CPD hours

February & June 2017 A 21-week clinical program that prepares nurses and midwives for extended clinical roles in the specialty of reproductive and sexual health. Integrate theory into practice through simulation, observation and a four day clinical placement. Successful completion gives Recognised Prior Learning for UTS Grad Cert in Advanced Nursing Practice. Scholarships are available for participants from regional areas.

Now taking enrolments. For more information or to enrol now, visit www.fpnsw.org.au or email education@fpnsw.org.au

Follow your passion, advance your career. STUDY POSTGRADUATE NURSING AT UOW IN 2017. A postgraduate degree in nursing from UOW lets you specialise in your area of interest and gives you the qualifications you need to become a healthcare leader. Complete a Masters or Graduate Certificate in: – Health Leadership and Management – Mental Health Nursing – Dementia Care – Gerontology and Rehabilitation – Nursing – Nursing International

“Postgraduate study is challenging, however, the experience and knowledge gained far outweighs any negatives. I now have greater confidence to challenge and support colleagues. I also have the skills and knowledge to lead changes in healthcare that improve the industry and foster a truly supportive and compassionate environment for the benefit of healthcare users and providers.” Kay Maddison

Master of Health Leadership & Management (2015) Clinical Nurse Consultant – Hand Surgery

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18 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017


BORDER FORCE ACT

Brave stand leads to back down on Border Force Act The federal government has repealed a provision in the Border Force Act that could have seen health professionals jailed for two years for speaking out about conditions in immigration detention centres. The Lamp talks to a whistleblower, an activist and a legal expert about the ramifications.

The whistleblower The fight isn’t over Alanna Maycock, the nurse who bravely spoke out last year about her experiences in Nauru, is relieved by the government’s decision but says the fight isn’t over. Alanna, who runs the refugee clinic at Westmead, describes the government’s backdown as “a huge relief for health care workers”. But now she is worried that the agencies providing health services at Nauru are increasingly employing foreign staff to avoid health workers returning to Australia to testify about conditions on the island. “The other issue now is that teachers, social workers and child protection workers are still not exempt from the threat of jail terms for speaking out,” she said. “The challenge is that it needs to go back to the High Court to get all workers exempt.” In December 2014, Maycock and her colleague, paediatrician David Isaacs, were employed by International Health and Medical Services to spend five days consulting at the Nauru island detention centre. Maycock and Isaac were gravely concerned by what they saw. At the end of her stay a seven-year-old girl clung to Maycock’s legs. “Take my photo and tell the world what is happening to me,” begged the girl, one of a number who surrounded Alanna. Haunted by what she’d seen and plagued with nightmares, Maycock made the difficult decision to break her confidentiality contract and speak out about what she’d seen. Continued overleaf. Alanna Maycock, RN THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 19


BORDER FORCE ACT

In July 2015, when the Border Force Act 2015 came into effect, Maycock learnt she could now face jail for speaking out. “It was a really scary time. I remember sitting on the sofa with my partner, trembling,” says Maycock, herself a mother of two young children. “It is ingrained in you from the minute your training starts, that you must report abuses and failure of care. The government put us in a very, very difficult situation to choose between the duty of care you have to your patients and the duty of care you have to your family.” Maycock now believes the government’s threat of jail terms to health workers was aimed at intimidating and silencing workers like herself. “Slowly but surely, we began to realise the Border Force Act was a gagging order, rather than any real intention to prosecute. The government realised if they tried to prosecute us all their dirty secrets would come out.” Maycock also credits the community’s respect for health professionals, particularly doctors, for the backdown. “I think in the end the government knows the doctors have a lot of backing, and they hold a lot of weight. “Ultimately they know that when children are being abused health care workers are going to have to report it.” But the backdown has also left Maycock with new concerns: she says Australian health workers are being increasingly overlooked in favour of overseas doctors and nurses to minimise the chance of stories getting back to Australia. “The IHMS is employing more and more overseas staff. They have employed quite a lot of staff from the Philippines. “We’re delighted to not have the threat of a prison sentence, but there’s a bigger fight now.”

20 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

– Nerida Grant

Nerida Grant

The activist A huge win

Nerida Grant, an activist with the Refugee Action Coalition, says the backdown is a “huge win” that shows the power of a coordinated campaign of many different groups. “It’s a really big success and it just shows the government is on the back foot with this policy,” says Nerida, a primary care nurse at the Kirketon Road Centre. “It is an admission that it is unworkable and unpopular and potentially an admission that it is illegal.” While it is important to celebrate this win, the community needs to use the momentum of the win to keep fighting until we close the camps and bring the refugees here, says Nerida. Nerida says the power of health professionals to intervene on behalf of patients in need of care was demonstrated at Brisbane’s Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, when staff refused to discharge baby Asha, an asylum seeker child from Nauru, from their care. Lady Cilento staff were supported by doctors and nurses across Australia, including staff from Royal Prince Alfred in Sydney. Nerida herself had first-hand experience of caring for refugees when she spent time working at Royal Darwin Hospital emergency. She treated young refugee Afghani men coming in with heart attacks, severe mental health issues and attempted suicides. The coalition of groups supporting refugee rights is broad-based, she says, and the support of the NSWNMA, including the constant presence of the union at rallies supporting refugee rights, has been key. “We’re the biggest union in NSW. The support of the union is really important: you need to have that broad kind of movement if we want to have change.”

A short history of the Border Force Act

JULY 2015

“THE AGENCIES PROVIDING HEALTH SERVICES AT NAURU ARE INCREASINGLY EMPLOYING FOREIGN STAFF TO AVOID HEALTH WORKERS RETURNING TO AUSTRALIA TO TESTIFY ABOUT CONDITIONS ON THE ISLAND.” – Alanna Maycock

‘IT JUST SHOWS THE GOVERNMENT IS ON THE BACK FOOT WITH THIS POLICY.’

The Border Force Act, introduced in July 2015 by the Coalition government with the support of the Labor opposition, imposed a penalty of up to two years’ imprisonment on health and other professionals such as social workers working in the detention system, for disclosing instances of abuse of people locked up in detention in north Australia and on Nauru and Manus Island. A number of clinicians, including Sydney nurse Alanna Maycock, publicly condemn conditions at Nauru detention centre, in contravention of the Act.


Clinicians call for release of children in detention

The lawyer

A law designed to intimidate The Border Force Act introduced last year had an immediate chilling effect on professionals working in detention centres, according to David Manne, executive director of Refugee Legal. “The Act imposed a penalty of up to two years’ imprisonment on health and other professionals such as social workers working in the detention system for disclosing instances of abuse of people locked up in detention in north Australia and in Nauru and Manus island,” says Manne. The Act targeted whistleblowers, says Manne, who has provided legal advice to a number of professionals who’ve worked in detention centres. His clients have felt “huge dilemmas” trying to reconcile how the Act’s provisions could be consistent with their professional obligations to uphold people’s wellbeing. “The laws have fundamentally compromised their ethical and legal obligations to people held in detention whom they have a duty to care for.” After Doctors for Refugees mounted a High Court

challenge to the Act’s secrecy provisions, the government “carved out health professionals” from the section of the Act that sought to gag workers, Manne says. But Manne remains concerned the threat of jail still hangs over other workers, such as teachers, social workers, lawyers and people working in a detention centre in security. “It’s quite clear that while these provisions still apply, there are still very significant concerns about their constraints on the ability of all professionals to speak out.” Manne says there is “a legal question mark” over whether there could ever be a successful prosecution of someone disclosing abuses when they are upholding their professional duties to care for these people subject to their defences. Regardless, the secrecy provisions that remain in place for non-health professionals are doubtless having the desired effect of intimidating those who might otherwise speak out. “Is it necessary to bring more cases to the High Court for the government to back down and concede that these are unjust laws?” asks Manne.

“THE LAWS HAVE FUNDAMENTALLY COMPROMISED (CLINICIANS), ETHICAL AND LEGAL OBLIGATIONS TO PEOPLE HELD IN DETENTION WHOM THEY HAVE A DUTY TO CARE FOR.” – David Manne

July 2016, Doctors for Refugees in a High Court challenge against the Border Force Act and its provisions to gag health workers from speaking out against abuse.

OCTOBER 2016

JULY 2016

The Australian Medical Association, Royal Australasian College of Physicians, Australian College of Nursing, Australian College of Midwives, the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses and the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation oppose the new Act.

October 2016, on the eve of the High Court challenge, the federal government backed down and amended the Act and removed “health professionals” from the definition of “immigration and border protection workers”. Other workers including teachers, lawyers, security staff and social workers are still subject to the gag.

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 21


COMPETITION

From the nswnma Sydney Festival and accommodation package Wishing all our members a Rediscover Mercure Merry Christmas and offering Win a double pass to see Sydney Festival’s Ladies in Black at Sydney Lyric Sydney located in the you the chance to be part of at The Star on Thursday 5 January at 8pm. heart of the CBD amongst one of Sydney’s most this year’s Christmas giveaway. Major prize winner also wins a two-night

+ How to enter To be in the draw to win one of these fabulous prizes, simply provide your name, address, membership number and the prize you would like to win (a separate email is required for each prize) and email your entry with the subject: Christmas giveaway (Prize title) to lamp@nswnma.asn.au IMPORTANT: Only one entry per member for each competition will be accepted. Entries must indicate which prize you would like to win in the email subject. *Conditions apply. Competition entries from NSWNMA members only and limited to one entry per member per prize. All entries must be in by Thursday, 15 December 2016. The prizes will be drawn on 16 December 2016. If a redraw is required for an unclaimed prize it must be held up to 3 months from the original draw date. NSW Permit no: LTPM/16/00329

stay (for two) at the Mercure Hotel Sydney with breakfast each morning at the Four Elements Restaurant and parking included for the duration of your stay.* Sydney Festival: 150 events, 46 venues, 23 days (7-29 January 2017). www.sydneyfestival.org.au Returning in January, Sydney Festival transforms Sydney with a cultural celebration based on the highest quality art and ideas. To celebrate, Sydney Festival is giving away three double passes to Ladies in Black on Thursday 5 January at 8pm. The swankiest new home-grown musical since Priscilla was queen, Ladies in Black is a whirling, toe-tapping trip back in time. Based on a beloved comic novel by Madeleine St John, it’s a uniquely Australian fashion-forward fairy tale with all the shine and sparkle of Broadway.

exciting precincts, Central. Surrounded by Sydney’s newest bar and retail scene, Mercure Sydney is ideally located for you to experience the hidden gems including the outdoor hawker style food market and niche lifestyle retail. Retreat to one of our comfortable rooms with all the modern amenities and comforts. Make your way down to Four Elements restaurant to enjoy food that has been prepared using traditional cooking style and seasonal ingredients sourced from local producers.

Special Offer

Book and Stay by 31 January 2017 and you can indulge in Mercure Sydney’s Drive, Stay and Play package which includes 1 nights’ accommodation, buffet breakfast for two and parking for $259 per room per night#. To book, contact Emma Rundle on 9217 6792 or go to www.mercuresydney.com.au

*Conditions apply. Winner can choose to use the tickets and accommodation package at the same time or separately. Accommodation package is valid until 30/6/17 and not valid during school holidays or special event periods (not valid on New Year’s Eve). Rooms subject to availability. #Prize must be redeemed by 31 January 2017 (not valid during Public Holidays, including Christmas Day and events such as New Year’s Eve & Australia Day). Rooms subject to availability.

22 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017


Holiday reading Kick back and relax with a four-book gift pack from Penguin Random House. We have four gift packs (of four books each) to give away with titles including: Our Vietnam Nurses by Annabelle Brayley. Stories from nurses and medics that show a side of the Vietnam War that played an important part in shaping Australia’s presence in the War. For the Love of Horses by Kelly Wilson. In 2012 the Wilson sisters embarked on a journey to rescue the wild Kaimanawa horses from the slaughterhouse, and tame the untrainable horses.

Indulge in a Majestic Blue Mountains getaway Relax & unwind in beautiful Hunter Valley Leisure Inn Pokolbin Hill is a picturesque retreat set on 25acres of tranquillity in the heart of the Hunter Valley Wine Country. Leisure Inn Pokolbin Hill boasts an unbeatable location, with many cellar doors and attractions such as the Hunter Valley Gardens within easy walking distance. The Lamp is offering members the chance to win a three-night midweek (Sunday to Thursday) stay in a one bedroom apartment for 2 adults. You will receive a bottle of wine and Hunter Valley chocolates on arrival, late checkout of 12noon and free tennis hire.

Special Offer

Make a booking during the month of January for stays until July and you will receive 10% off published rates. Use the promocode ‘LAMP’ when booking online at www.leisureinnpokolbinhill.com.au *Conditions apply. Rooms subject to availability. Prize must be redeemed by 12 August 2017 (not valid during School Holidays, Public Holidays or Long weekends).

The House on the Hill by Susan Duncan. The third memoir from Salvation Creek’s author, Duncan reaches an age where there’s no point in sweating long-term ramifications: there aren’t any.

The Family Secret by Fiona Palmer. Take a dose of fresh A heartwarming story about when to mountain air and relax, fight and when to surrender – and how recharge and recuperate new love can heal old wounds. amid luxurious heritage at the Hydro Majestic Hotel in A Single Tree – voices from the the Blue Mountains. bush by Don Watson. A Single The Lamp is offering members the Tree assembles the raw material chance to win a two-night midweek underpinning Don Watson’s (Sunday to Thursday) luxury stay in a award-winning The Bush. heritage room with breakfast and high These diverse and haunting voices span tea for two in the Hydro Majestic Hotel. the four centuries since Europeans first Stroll through some colourful theatres set eyes on the continent. of history such as the famous Shanghai chic The Story of Australia’s People Vol 2 Salon du Thé tearoom and bar, sumptuous by Geoffrey Blainey. The Story of Cat’s Alley bar & gin palace and the Australia’s People: The Rise and Fall of Majestic Ballroom with vaulted ceilings, Ancient Australia is the culmination of open fireplaces and glamour of yesteryear. the lifework of Australia’s most prolific Complete your injection of high and wide-ranging historian. altitude opulence with a signature high tea in the Wintergarden Restaurant The Chocolate Tin by Fiona McIntosh. with therapeutic views over the A heartbreaking tale about a triangle of Megalong Valley. love and a story about the bittersweet Or take a casual lunch repast in taste of life and of chocolate. the Boiler House Café, followed by The Book of Joy by Dalai Lama a browse of fine art and then retail & Desmond Tutu. In April 2015, therapy of regional gourmet products in Archbishop Tutu travelled to the Dalai the Hydro Majestic Pavilion. Lama’s home in India, to celebrate His Go to hydromajestic.com.au Holiness’s eightieth birthday and to for more details and bookings. No create this book as a gift for others. second opinion needed. THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 23


TPP buried under public protest The death of the TPP trade deal is a win for consumers and workers and a defeat for big corporations.

The Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement is effectively dead following six years of widespread global public opposition. Australia’s Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) is a major winner from the TPP’s demise. It would have given pharmaceutical companies greater influence over the PBS and increased the price of medicines in Australia. Following the election of Donald Trump as president, the United States administration effectively abandoned the TPP by announcing it would not to try to push the agreement through Congress. Trump rode the wave of public opposition to the TPP by campaigning against it. In Australia, thousands of people including many nurses mobilised against the agreement by participating in online actions, attending rallies and public meetings and writing and talking to politicians. TPP GAVE CORPORATIONS POWER TO SUE GOVERNMENTS OVER POLICY

NSWNMA Assistant General Secretary Judith Kiejda said the union opposed many provisions of the TPP including stronger monopoly rights for pharmaceutical companies. “The TPP would have strengthened patent rights and provided additional monopoly rights for the costly biologic medicines used to treat cancer and other serious diseases,” she said. “It would have restricted and delayed access to lowerpriced medicines for millions of people, especially in developing countries.” She said the TPP would have allowed corporations to sue state and federal governments in international tribunals if a change in law or policy “harmed” their investment. “This provision would have been used against health, environment and even minimum wage laws as evidenced by the case brought by big tobacco company Philip Morris against the Australian government over our plain packaging laws. 24 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

‘THE TPP WOULD RESULT IN A POORER OUTCOME FOR OUR PATIENTS.’ — Jessica Houston

“Global corporations could even have used the TPP to sue governments for taking action against climate change.” TOO MUCH INFLUENCE ON PBS BY PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES

Earlier this year the union’s Committee of Delegates heard community nurse Jessica Houston outline the case against the TPP. “Agreeing to the TPP in its current form would mean increasing the rights of pharmaceutical corporations to extend their patents and therefore delay access to cheaper generics for our patients,” Jessica said. “This would have the knock-on effect of reducing competition and increasing the costs of all our medications.” She said the TPP would give foreign pharmaceutical companies the ability to influence what drugs are included and/or excluded from the PBS in the interests of their profitability and not community needs. “From a community care standpoint, I come across patients who already are often non-compliant with their medication for many reasons, one of which is cost. “The TPP would make matters worse and result in a poorer outcome for our patients. “As a frontline community nurse I also care for oncology and palliative patients. Under the TPP many affordable cancer treatments would not be available to them, as pharmaceutical companies would be allowed to extend their patents by three years. “This will result in a decline of our patient’s quality of life by denying them access to medication they require and could deny them treatments that may extend or save their lives.”


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NEWS IN BRIEF

World

Global gender pay gap on the rise A new report by the World Economic Forum predicts it could take 170 years to eradicate the disparity in pay and employment opportunities between men and women. A study by the WEF found the gap has widened since the global financial crisis in 2008 and now sits at 59 per cent, reports The Guardian. Last year, the WEF calculated it would take 118 years for parity to be achieved. This year, it has calculated the gap would take 170 years to close. “More than a decade of data has revealed that progress is still too slow for realising the full potential of one half of humanity within our lifetimes,” the study said. The economic gap is caused by a number of factors, it says, including women being paid almost half of what men receive, working on average 50 minutes a day longer and having a much slimmer chance of reaching senior roles. Slower economic growth is also keeping women out of the workforce and automation is affecting jobs in sectors with relatively high levels of female employment like sales and administration. The Global Gender Gap Report can be found at: https://www.weforum.org/reports/theglobal-gender-gap-report-2016

Australia

Partner violence linked to women’s disease burden Research by Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety has found an association between women experiencing partner violence and a wide range of health impacts. The study, reported in The Conversation (November) found “compelling evidence” linking partner violence to: • anxiety • depression • suicide and self-inflicted injuries • alcohol use disorders • homicide and violence • early pregnancy loss. According to the research partner, violence was among the top ten risk factors contributing to disease burden among all adult women.

A working day for men and women

Source: Global Gender Gap Index 2016, World Economic Forum

“MORE THAN A DECADE OF DATA HAS REVEALED THAT PROGRESS IS STILL TOO SLOW FOR REALISING THE FULL POTENTIAL OF ONE HALF OF HUMANITY WITHIN OUR LIFETIMES.”

Among women 18 to 44 years, it was the biggest single risk factor when violence in all intimate relationships was included. It was bigger than smoking, alcohol use or being overweight or obese. When considering only violence by live-in partners, in this age group, partner violence ranked second only to alcohol use. The study found the burden was even greater among Indigenous women. Physical and sexual partner violence is the leading risk factor contributing to disease burden in Indigenous women aged 18 to 44 years. Rates for Indigenous women were: • 6.3 times greater than nonindigenous women 18-44 years; and • 5.3 times greater than nonindigenous women of all ages.

“PARTNER VIOLENCE WAS A BIGGER RISK FACTOR THAN SMOKING, ALCOHOL USE OR BEING OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE.” THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 29


NEWS IN BRIEF

Australia

So much for the fair go A new report questions Australia’s selfperception as a country of the ‘fair go’.

Australia

More student nurses needed for the bush New efforts to promote nursing careers outside the main cities are needed to encourage graduates to work in rural areas according to new research. Nursing students know little about initiatives and incentives aimed at reducing the shortage of rural and regional health professionals according to a study commissioned by Rural Health Workforce Australia. Universities should increase the number of places in their nursing and allied health programs for rural and remote students to help tackle the shortage of health professionals outside metropolitan Australia, it says. The report calls on universities to boost the number of rural clinical placements available to students and the amount of rural health practice content in curriculums reported The Australian. Researchers claim there is a lack of awareness of the practice opportunities in rural areas among students and teaching staff at urban universities. They point out that the federal government does not fund rural placements for nursing and allied health students to the same extent as it did for medical students. “Doctors are important but they’re not the only answer to addressing the disparity in health outcomes between rural and metropolitan Australia,” says Dr Tony Smith, deputy director of Newcastle University’s Department of Rural Health. Experts say the recent $4.2 million cut to annual Commonwealth scholarships for allied health will exacerbate the shortage of health professionals in the bush.

“DOCTORS ARE IMPORTANT BUT THEY’RE NOT THE ONLY ANSWER TO ADDRESSING THE DISPARITY IN HEALTH OUTCOMES BETWEEN RURAL AND METROPOLITAN AUSTRALIA.” 30 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

The report, by the Community Council of Australia, paints a damning picture of a society characterised by rising inequality, rising suicide rates and increasing incarceration rates. According to the study, the national incarceration rate increased by 6% to 196 people for every 100,000 in 2015, higher than any country in western Europe. In the Northern Territory imprisonment rates are four times the national average, at 885 for every 100,000, and higher than the rate of imprisonment in the United States. The Indigenous incarceration rate was 15 times the national rate, at 2,253 for every 100,000 in 2015. “Incarceration rates are like the canary in the coalmine: they tell you how your most vulnerable are being treated,” the report’s author David Crosbie told Guardian Australia. Suicide rates in Victoria, the Northern Territory and South Australia increased by more than 20% last year. The national suicide rate is 12 deaths for every 100,000 people, or 7.8 deaths by suicide a day. The study also revealed surprising perceptions of safety. Only 48% of Australian women said they felt safe walking alone at night, significantly lower than the OECD average of 60.6%. Australian men, in comparison, felt safer than the OECD average, with 76% reporting they felt safe at night. The Australia We Want report can be found at: http://www.communitycouncil.com.au/ content/australia-we-want-first-report

“INCARCERATION RATES ARE LIKE THE CANARY IN THE COALMINE, THEY TELL YOU HOW YOUR MOST VULNERABLE ARE BEING TREATED.”


NEWS IN BRIEF

United States

New study shows fatal consequences of reduced RNs A study, published in the journal BMJ Quality and Safety, has found that replacing one fully qualified nurse with a nursing assistant on a ward of 25 patients increased the risk of a patient dying by 21%. The research, led by Dr Linda Aiken of Pennsylvania University’s school of nursing, found that: “A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. “Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages.” The findings were based on research in adult acute care hospitals in six European countries, including England and the Republic of Ireland. The study is based on data from 13,077 nurses in 243 hospitals and 18,828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. It also found that a “richer skill mix, for example every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel, was associated with lower odds of mortality, lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients, and lower odds of reports of poor quality, poor safety grades and other poor outcomes”.

“A RICHER SKILL MIX WAS ASSOCIATED WITH LOWER REPORTS OF POOR QUALITY, POOR SAFETY GRADES AND OTHER POOR OUTCOMES.”

“TOBACCO COMPANIES ARE USING COLOURS TO MISLEAD CONSUMERS THAT CERTAIN PRODUCT RANGES ARE ‘HEALTHIER’ OPTIONS.”

Australia

Big tobacco “gaming” Australian health laws The tobacco industry has come up with a variety of strategies to blunt the effectiveness of Australia’s plain packaging laws. Tobacco companies have developed sophisticated marketing practices to counter the impact of Australia’s tough tobacco regulations, according to experts. These include price reduction, brand differentiation and promoting the idea of healthier cigarettes. Prof Steven Greenland from Swinburne University says tobacco companies are “gaming the system by anticipating regulatory impact and then using unregulated marketing elements to overcome it”. “Regulatory price increases are financial deterrents to smoking. The low-price branding and discounting strategies in Australia (by tobacco companies) are clear attempts to get around these, and reduce smokers’ financial motivation to quit or cut down,” he wrote in The Conversation (November). He says although plain packaging was expected to restrict the number of tobacco brands, their range has actually expanded. “Since plain packaging was introduced, tobacco companies have varied the names of brands as well. Names have evolved to include the information previously covered by packaging, such as colour and new product features. “For example, Dunhill Infinite is now Dunhill Infinite White + Taste Flow Filter. Today around 80% of Australia’s leading brands’ variant names include a colour, compared to less than half before plain packaging. Tobacco companies are using colours to mislead consumers that certain product ranges are ‘healthier’ options.” THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 31


TELEHEALTH

Dodgy internet hinders Telehealth Telehealth could cut billions of dollars from the nation’s health bill, but its development is hamstrung by the Coalition government’s demolition of Labor’s original National Broadband Network.

Australia’s first large-scale trial of telehealth has shown it could save the nation’s healthcare system up to $3 billion a year. The research led by the CSIRO involved 287 elderly, chronic disease patients at six trial sites over a 12-month period. Test patients were given a telehealth device that included participant/clinician video conferencing capabilities, messaging features and the delivery of clinical and study specific questionnaires, as well as vital signs devices to monitor their ECG, heart rate, spirometry, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, body weight and body temperature, with glucometry an optional add-on.

“Our research showed the return on investment of a telemonitoring initiative on a national scale would be in the order of five to one by reducing demand on hospital inpatient and outpatient services, reduced visits to GPs, reduced visits from community nurses, and an overall reduced demand on increasingly scarce clinical resources,” he said. The trial was one of several originally designed to test the benefits to the healthcare system of the National Broadband Network (NBN) promised by Labor in the 2007 election campaign.

“HARDLY ANY NEW (E-HEALTH) INITIATIVES HAVE BEEN UNDERTAKEN SINCE 2013, WHILE THE EARLY INITIATIVES HAVE LARGELY BEEN PUT ON HOLD.” — Paul Budde

Labor set out to deliver ultra-fast broadband to the whole country, including regional and remote Australia, by replacing Australia’s ageing copper phone network with high-speed fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) broadband. The Liberal/National Party Coalition attacked this as unnecessarily expensive, even though FTTP has been rolled out in countries such as the United States and France. The new Coalition government ended the rollout of FTTP in 2013 and replaced it with a cheaper multi-technology mix, estimated to cost between $46 billion and $54 billion. That is similar to what the government is spending on buying 12 French submarines. As AAA Technology Review magazine noted: “While the Coalition Government’s plan means fast broadband can be rolled out more quickly and at less cost than sticking with the original plan, it does not deliver the same level of speed or quality to as many homes.” Telehealth trial sites were chosen partly on the area’s early participation in the roll out of FTTP. This was relaxed to any kind of broadband provision including ADSL/ADSL2+ and 3G/4G wireless after the Coalition won government in 2013. The telehealth magazine Pulse+IT reported mixed preliminary results from some of the trials in 2014.

Using four different models of care that enabled patients to self-manage their conditions at home, the trial demonstrated Medical Benefits Scheme expenditure savings of 24 per cent. This was achieved through reductions in the number and cost of GP visits, specialist visits and procedures. In addition, the trial showed a 36 per cent decrease in hospital admission and a 42 per cent reduction in length of stay if admitted to hospital during the 12-month trial. Patients had a reduced mortality rate of more than 40 per cent, said CSIRO lead researcher Dr Rajiv Jayasena.

32 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

FIBRE TO THE PREMISES IS FAR SUPERIOR


“MUCH OF THE COPPER-BASED NBN WILL NEED TO BE REPLACED IN 10 TO 20 YEARS’ TIME, IF NOT SOONER.” — Laurie Patton FTTP was clearly superior to other broadband delivery services in speed and reliability, the magazine reported. “Project leaders agreed that the NBN was the gold standard” it said, adding that trials that used 3G and other low-cost technologies experienced “traffic snarls when the 3G spectrum was busy.” In its 2014 report on the telehealth trials, AAA Technology Review covered a trial run by Feros Care using a mix of technologies. “So far, NBN (with FTTP) wins hands down,” said Glenn Payne, chief information officer for Feros Care. FTTP had enabled Feros to run a stable and consistent service into clients’ homes, he said. “We have had little to no issues with regards to service availability and the quality of the video conferencing has been outstanding.” By contrast 4G was unreliable at times, he said. “4G has been a great gap filler for us, but is not comparable to fibre as far as quality and stability of the service.” SLOW E-HEALTH DEVELOPMENT

Another trial project in the Kimberley, WA, and Illawarra, NSW, regions used a mix of FTTP connections and ADSL. ADSL had proved adequate for health monitoring functions, Suri Ramanathan, chair of the Aged Care IT Industry Council, told AAA Technology Review. “The outcomes are still very good on ADSL2. All those remote and regional people don’t have to travel into the big towns. That’s the biggest item, particularly for older Australians.” Paul Budde of BuddeComm, an independent telecommunications research and consultancy company, described progress in e-health developments in Australia as “slow and low key”. “With the downgrading of the NBN and a lack of interest from the current government in e-health in general, hardly

any new initiatives have been undertaken since 2013, while the early initiatives have largely been put on hold,” he wrote. The consumer lobby group Internet Australia is campaigning for a return to a fibre-based NBN. “Sadly, we’ve moved from a state-of-the-art FTTP model to one that relies heavily on Telstra’s old and decrepit copper network – and the not so old, but not exactly modern, hybrid fibre coaxial (HFC) networks originally built for pay TV by Optus and Telstra 20 years ago,” said CEO Laurie Patton. “Much of the copper-based NBN will need to be replaced in 10 to 20 years’ time, if not sooner. “We didn’t argue over the need to provide other essential services such as roads, rail, water and power, so why are we doing it over this piece of critical 21st century infrastructure?”

Australia has one of the world’s worst internet speeds Earlier this year, technology group Akamai calculated the percentage of broadband customers who were achieving speeds of 15Mbps (megabits per second) or above across the globe. In Australia, it estimated 10 per cent; in New Zealand 15 per cent, the United States and United Kingdom at about one third, and in Hong Kong almost half of all customers. Australia’s global rank for internet speeds fell from 30th to 60th under the Coalition, the ABC’s FactCheck program confirmed in June. The Essential Report poll last month (October) found just 22 per cent of voters believe the NBN will be adequate for Australia’s future internet needs, while 47 per cent believe it won’t be. Even 44 per cent of Coalition voters believe it will be inadequate. THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 33


Do you have a story to tell? INTERNATIONAL MIDWIVES’ DAY & INTERNATIONAL NURSES’ DAY

2017 Short Story & Poetry Competition Nurses and midwives have always talked about the amazing, uplifting and special moments they experience in their work. These stories inspire the nurses and midwives who hear them, as well as some who, after hearing such poignant stories, decide to take up the profession. So without breaching confidentiality, let’s celebrate International Midwives’ and International Nurses’ Days 2017 by sharing our stories in prose or poetry. First State Super is once again proud to help celebrate this short story and poetry competition by sponsoring the FIRST PRIZE OF $2000, and the 2 RUNNER-UP PRIZES OF $500. These prizes will be awarded to members or associate members of the NSWNMA who can tell an entertaining and inspiring story that promotes the wonderful work of nurses and midwives. As well, readers will have an opportunity to select the winner of the READERS’ CHOICE AWARD OF $500 sponsored by the NSWNMA.

. Conditions of Entry Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z Z

Entrant must be a financial or associate member of the NSWNMA Entry must be original and the work of the entrant Entry must not have been published previously Stories/poems to be no longer than 2500 words Confidentiality must not be breached, patient/client names must not be used. And the facility in which your story takes place must not be identifiable Please keep a copy of your story as your entry/entries will not be returned The NSWNMA reserves the right to retain and publish copies of the entries, in The Lamp and on NSWNMA online (including nurseuncut.com.au) Copyright remains with the author Judges’ decision will be final Failure to meet the conditions above will render entries ineligible.

. How to enter Z There is no limit on the number of entries, but each entry must have its own entry form Z Complete the online entry form Z Number and title each page of your story or poem Z Do not include your name and address anywhere on your story/ poem copies Z Keep within the word limit Z Three (3) copies of the story to be included for the judges and to be double spaced on one side only with a 2cm margin.

First prize Readers’ Choice Award

Two runner-up prizes of

Entries close 5 pm Friday 17 March 2017 Winners will be announced on 2 May 2017 Readers’ Choice winner will be notified on 9 June 2017 34 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

www.nswnma.asn.au


VALE

Momina Jahan Rahman 1972 – 2016 Farewell to a fighter On Tuesday, 6 September 2016, NSW Nurses and Midwives Association lost a loyal and hardworking member. She was a fighter and it is very unfortunate that she died at quite a young age. Momina was born on 22 August 1972 in Labasa, one of the cities in the Fiji Islands. Her family adored her because of her pleasant nature and her being the only female child in her family. Her mother, Nur Jahan, raised her after her father, Mohammad Khalil, passed away. At that time she was only thirteen, and was devastated to see her father leave this world forever at a very young age. Momina completed her high school education in 1989 from Nasinu Muslim College, Nakasi, Fiji. Soon after her graduation she started working at the Fiji Muslim League and she also worked with FIT in the examination section to support her family - her mother and her younger brother Mohammad Ilyas Khalil. At that time her mother fell very sick and was admitted to hospital. Three months later, she lost her life to cancer and passed away. Soon after Momina married and moved to Australia, living in

Cabramatta, NSW. Life was not easy and in order to get over her past and the tragedies in her life, including the break up of her marriage, she started working at Colombia Nursing Home in Chatswood. She started studying aged care at TAFE. After completion of that course she got a job in St Joseph Hospital at Auburn and decided to continue her studies further. She started studying a Bachelor of Nursing. She completed her degree on 21 April 2009 from The University of Western Sydney, Parramatta and started working full time as a registered nurse. She worked at several workplaces including at United Care Medical Centre, Lidcombe. Seven weeks prior to her death, she fell very sick and started complaining about her lungs and kidneys. She was admitted to Westmead Hospital and received treatment for pneumonia and kidney disease. She came home with a big smile on her face and a strong hope to live again but unfortunately, she died a couple of weeks later and left this world forever. She’ll always be remembered in our hearts. Shafi-ur Rahman

Christmas ONLINE GIFT VOUCHERS

Blue Mountains luxurious gift ideas

AN INDULGENT JOURNEY ON THE EDGE

www.hydromajestic.com.au THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 35


Registered and Enrolled Nurse members of the Association are invited to apply for an OPWC Aged Care Scholarship The NSW Nurses and Midwives Association is pleased to announce the final round of the Old People’s Welfare Council (OPWC) Scholarships, opening for application on 1 November 2016.

OPWC Scholarships are available under the following categories:

WHO MAY APPLY

CATEGORY 2: Scholarships for extended study (duration over 6 months) leading to the award of a formal qualification at a recognised tertiary institution in Australia or overseas.

1 Registered or Enrolled nurses;

CATEGORY 1: Scholarships for a short course (duration less than 6 months), study tour or conference, either in Australia or overseas, not necessarily leading to an award or an additional formal qualification.

Please note, applications are for studies being undertaken in the academic year 2017.

2 You must be currently registered with the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia; 3 A financial member of the NSWNMA; 4 You must be currently working in aged care; 5 The scholarship is open to Australian citizens and permanent residents.

TO APPLY 1 Read the Scholarship Terms and Conditions at www.nswnma.asn.au/education 2 Complete the OPWC Scholarship application form 3 Send your application to NSWNMA by 5pm, Monday 19 December 2016. FAX 02 9662 1414 MAIL M. West, OPWC Scholarships EMAIL gensec@nswnma.asn.au NSW Nurses and Midwives’ Association 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo NSW 2017 FOR ENQUIRIES, please contact the Association on 1300 367 962 or (02) 8595 1234

The Scholarship program is due to a generous grant by the Old People’s Welfare Council Ltd to the NSW Nurses and Midwives’ Association. The scholarships aim to enhance the care of older people by supporting the undertaking of further studies by nurses who would then apply their learning in their aged care work. OPWC Scholarship advert half.indd 1

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MEMBERSHIP FEES 2017 Classification

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$181.75

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$27.96

Enrolled Nurse

$618.00

$154.50

$51.50

$23.76

Assistant in Nursing+ Residential Care Nurse

$509.00

$127.25

$42.41

$19.56

POST GRADUATE NURSING COURSES

*All membership fees include GST +Trainee AiNs have their fees waived for the period of their traineeship

36 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 Membership Fees 2017.indd 1

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• Graduate Diploma of Nursing • Graduate Diploma of Nursing (Specialisation - Paediatric Nursing)

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ASK JUDITH WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR RIGHTS AND ENTITLEMENTS AT WORK, NSWNMA ASSISTANT GENERAL SECRETARY JUDITH KIEJDA HAS THE ANSWERS. Allegations that lack detail I am a registered nurse in a public hospital. I have been asked to respond to certain allegations about my conduct that, if proven, could be a breach of the code of conduct. However, the allegations provided are general and lack specifics. How do I respond in such circumstances? PD2016_042 (Managing Misconduct) sets out some reasonably clear parameters. In the first instance, there must be an initial review (Section 2.1) to establish, amongst other things, if the allegations as far as can be gleaned are credible, and in turn if they warrant being dealt with under the Managing Misconduct policy. If the answer is yes, then written advice must be provided to the staff member about the subject of the allegations with sufficient information about them to allow a considered response to be made (Section 5.3). This written advice should also contain all relevant information about the investigation process to be followed. If the allegations provided to you are vague or lack sufficient detail to permit an informed response, you should contact the investigator and indicate that while you are happy to comply and provide a response, the information provided does not permit that to occur. You can also seek advice and additional information/support from the Association if necessary.

Discussing workload issues I recently commenced work as a registered nurse in a nursing home operated by RSL Lifecare. At a recent staff meeting, mention was made of workload issues being a standing agenda item. I have not come across this before and was wondering how it worked. Clause 36 of the RSL LifeCare, NSWNMA and HSU NSW Enterprise Agreement 2015 – 2017 sets out that workload management must be an agenda item at staff meetings on at least a quarterly basis. Further, items in relation to workloads must be recorded in the minutes of the staff meeting, as well as actions to be taken to resolve the workloads issue/s. The clause further sets out the criteria by which workload issues can be resolved. These include, but are not limited to:

BREAKING NEWS Attack on redundancy rights In previous Lamps we have reported how the Baird NSW Government, without any prior warning or consultation, gazetted the Government Sector Employment Amendment (Transfers to Non-Government Sector) Regulation 2016 (‘Regulation’). The Regulation further eroded the rights of government sector workers whose role may be subject to privatisation. Unions NSW and affiliates have asked cross bench members of the NSW Legislative Council to support a disallowance motion on the Regulation (i.e. have it set aside) tabled by the ALP Opposition. After numerous postponements, this debate is now scheduled to occur next year on 23 February 2017.

Leave Matters Manual The Ministry of Health has commenced a review, in consultation with public health unions, on PD2014_029 (Leave Matters in the NSW Health Service). This policy directive is significant as over several decades it has ‘filled in the gaps’ on how some award entitlements are applied and utilised. Award clauses often do not address the myriad of individual circumstances and complexities that can arise with the application of leave entitlements. The policy directive has, over a considerable period of time, built up as a statewide resource that permits certain interpretations or operational/practical approaches to be applied on a consistent statewide basis. At this stage the approach adopted by the Ministry is not one of wholesale change. Rather, it would seem more intent on refinement or adding clarity to new situations or circumstances that have emerged. Public health unions, including the NSWNMA, have been working collectively to ensure that this resource (of 60 plus pages) is reviewed meticulously and that it addresses some of the issues impacting on members when attempting to access leave.

Additional Christmas holiday in public health An additional public holiday for all NSW Health staff is observed during the Christmas/New Year period. Following consultation with all public health unions, it has been decided that NSW Health staff (with the exception of NSW Ambulance) will observe an additional public holiday on Friday 30 December 2016.

clinical assessment of residents’ needs; the facility layout; workplace health and safety legislation; requirements of nurse regulatory legislation; reasonable workloads; accreditation standards; replacement of employees on leave; and budgetary considerations.

What is a TIRA? I am an Enrolled Nurse working in a Public Hospital and have heard colleagues speaking about a roster arrangement called a “TIRA”. What is this? TIRA is an acronym for Temporary Individual Roster Adjustment. A TIRA is generally used in situations whereby a staff member requires reasonable adjustment to be made to their roster (arising, for example, from carer responsibilities or disability) that permits their continuation of employment equally with other employees who have no such limitations. The TIRA is described in the NSW HealthShare Roster Resource Manual (page 48). There is a sample TIRA request form on page 54 of the manual. Any applications should be discussed with your NUM in the first instance. Of course, the Association can provide advice if you are unclear on your rights or an application has been unreasonably refused.

When do uniform and laundry allowances increase? I am an assistant in nursing in a public hospital and some of our allowances went up with the July 2016 pay increase, but not uniform and laundry. Shouldn’t they all go up at the same time? The uniform and laundry allowances, along with the climatic and isolation allowances, are considered expenserelated allowances. Accordingly (and by agreement), they are alternatively adjusted in line with movement of the CPI. The Industrial Relations Commission of NSW recently varied these allowances by a 1.3% increase (being the CPI movement from March 2015 to March 2016). The increase is effective from the first full pay period on or after 1 July 2016

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 37


Going to work shouldn’t mean stepping into this.

ARE YOU A VICTIM OF WORKPLACE VIOLENCE? Have you or a colleague been assaulted at work? Have you reported your incident?

Download the NSWNMA App and report your workplace violence incident. The NSWNMA has a new tool as part of our NSWNMA Toolkit App that allows you to quickly report an incident to the Association as soon as it happens. It’s an easy fillable form that you can submit from your mobile device and an officer of the Association will be in touch with you. Nursing is considered one of the most dangerous professions. HELP STOP VIOLENCE AT WORK!

38 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

NSWNMA Toolkit App is FREE and available to download from iTunes and Google Play store


A BLOG FOR AUSTRALIAN NURSES AND MIDWIVES www.nurseuncut.com.au

WHAT’S HOT THIS MONTH

Do you have a story to tell? An opinion to share?

Nurse uncut is written by everyday nurses and midwives. We welcome your ideas at nurseuncut@nswnma.asn.au

David: As a profession, it’s time to act on assisted dying

Nurses face a dilemma when people in intractable pain and distress ask for assistance to end their lives.

www.nurseuncut.com.au/david-as-aprofession-its-time-to-act-on-assisteddying

Crashing after night shift

Deciphering econobabble

The possibility of falling asleep at the wheel and having a car accident while driving home from night shift is an occupational hazard for health workers. www.nurseuncut.com.au/crashingafter-night-shift

In Australia today, economic language isn’t used to help, inform or educate but to silence us, argues Richard Denniss. www.nurseuncut.com.au/decipheringeconobabble-by-a-plain-speakingeconomist

A warning about vaccination The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia issued a stern warning about giving information that is not in accordance with the Australian National Immunisation Handbook. www.nurseuncut.com.au/nursesmidwives-and-vaccination-a-warning

A short film about people who actively choose to die at home and the health staff who support them. www.nurseuncut.com.au/everyonewill-die-once-so-we-have-to-get-it-rightthe-first-time

When one nurse is always late What can you do when one nurse regularly turns up late, causing a rushed handover or there is a cascade of lateness? www.nurseuncut.com.au/problemwhen-one-nurse-is-always-late

We all die once

Talking about euthanasia A palliative care nurse considers the impact on the wellbeing of health professionals when they assist patients to die. www.nurseuncut.com.au/theeuthanasia-conversation

We’re on

Instagram! Share your photos by tagging @ nswnma and don’t forget to use the hashtag #nswnma!

New on SupportNurses YouTube channel WYONG SHOWS UP The Central Coast community is outraged. http://bit.ly/ wyongrally

Connect with us on Facebook

Nurse Uncut > www.facebook.com/ NurseUncutAustralia New South Wales Nurses and Midwives’ Association > www.facebook.com/nswnma Ratios put patient safety first > www.facebook.com/safepatientcare Aged Care Nurses > www.facebook.com/ agedcarenurses

SHELLHARBOUR OUT IN FORCE It’s not your hospital to sell! http://bit.ly/ harbourrally

Follow us on Twitter

@nswnma @nurseuncut

Listen to our podcast MENTAL HEALTH FORUM Cultural barriers to accessing services. http://bit.ly/ culturalhealth

Look for your local branch on our Facebook page

www.facebook.com/ nswnma

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 39


40 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017


SOCIAL MEDIA | Facebook

WHAT NURSES & MIDWIVES

SAID & LIKED on Facebook www.facebook.com/nswnma It’s just a putdown When Caitlin Brassington was told she was ‘just a nurse’, she wrote a Facebook post which went viral. We asked if you’d shared this experience.

An avalanche of support Nurses at Wyong got the 10,000 petition signatures needed to force Parliament to debate the future of their hospital.

Too many near misses Falling asleep at the wheel – it happens after night shift more often than is talked about. What can we do to stay safe and awake?

A tough call Palliative care nurse Jennifer thinks it’s all very well to support assisted dying in theory, but how would it feel to be the one who has to end a life?

It was a CUBless Cup Day for these Illawarra members.

Worse, been called nothing but a doctor’s servant. I am an RN and have heard others refer to themselves as ‘just an EN’ or ‘just an AIN’. I have pulled them up on the ‘just’ bit... I’ve also heard ‘I’m just a cleaner’ and ‘I’m just the ward clerk’... nobody is ‘just’ anything! We as AINs hear ‘I’m just an Ain’. I’m an AIN, have been for over 15yrs, proud to be one. We nurse, cry, advocate for residents, cry with them and their families. Families love to see a familiar face. I may be just a nurse however I have been blessed with the opportunity to help and provide holistic care to a person at the most vulnerable time in their life, that is more rewarding then being in a job that is glamorous It is not what others say it’s what you know in your heart. I am just a nurse and mother. A powerful combination! I have an A4 envelope filled with more too! Good work. Hopefully they will back down like they did at Goulburn. Just keep reminding them about Port Macquarie. Well done – show Mad Mike that he won’t get away without being brought to account for this betrayal. They are going to close the hospital I work at and all we get is the spin doctors’ diatribe. When a relevant question is asked the answer is something like “that’s not important at this time” or “don’t worry. It will be fine”. So over this government’s steam roller tactics! Why is he selling our hospitals and why hasn’t there been an uproar about it? Because any smart politician knows not to advertise what the bigger plan is. It’s an absolute disgrace to privatise any hospital. I have most certainly taken micro naps driving home after night shift but the one time that scared me the most was when I woke to my chin hitting my chest. The last memory I had was at least 5 seconds before. I felt awful. I could have hurt someone and didn’t even see it coming. I pinch myself, hit my face hard enough that the pain wakes me up. I often go home with my husband asking why is your face red and bruises on your legs. I gotta do what I gotta do to get home, right? Driving expressway, all of a sudden woke up 4 lanes across highway, thank God it was early Sunday morning or it would have been a disaster not only for me but others on the road. Hospitals have us work 2-3 16 hour shifts because no one to cover but not willing to keep us safe when we are totally exhausted – no wonder mistakes are made – we’re humans not robots! I would feel honoured to assist a palliative patient to die at the time of their choosing. Who are we to drag on the inevitable and stand by while our patients are in pain and distress. Whilst we may not like the idea of assisting a person to die, it is their choice and part of our job is to be the patient’s advocate. As stated in Australian nursing code of ethics we do not have to participate if it is against our moral ethical code or religious so I would expect we would have a choice in being involved, same as not all nurses are involved in abortion etc. If it was their desire it would be a privilege. I made my decision and quit my nursing career over the euthanasia issue – this was one step too far for me to endorse and I could see the writing on wall so I walked away. I love what palliative care offers people and endorse that approach as the humane option for all when death is inevitable.

Heather Dunn bore a simple message in Lismore.

Mudgee goes pink, in support of women with breast cancer.

Farewell to university life – a final union bbq for Sydney Uni students.

Sydney and Sydney Eye hospital members with a heartfelt message.

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 41


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unionmotormarket.com.au 42 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017


NURSING RESEARCH ONLINE

The healing impact of an apology In September this year, the Australian Psychological Society issued a formal apology to Indigenous Australians for their past failure as a profession to respond to the needs of Aboriginal patients. Is it now time for the nursing and midwifery professions to reflect on our historical involvement in the subjugation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders through our role as healthcare providers. In the past, the NSWNMA and ANMF more broadly have issued statements of apology for our professions’ involvement in the practices associated with the forced adoption of babies during the period from the 1950s and 1980s. In doing so we recognised that while the nurses and midwives were working under direction, it was often them that took the babies away from mothers who had been forced, pressured and coerced into relinquishing their children. We apologised for and acknowledged the unbearable pain these mothers, fathers and children had experienced in their lives as a result. Following on from the commendable move by the Australian Psychological Society, is it now time for the nursing and midwifery professions to reflect on our historical involvement in the subjugation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders through our role as healthcare providers and consider whether we owe a similar statement of regret for our failures as part of the wider healthcare system to respond to the needs of Aboriginal Australians? Do such apologies mean anything? WHY AN APOLOGY IS IMPORTANT Professor Alan Rosen, AO (a non-Indigenous psychiatrist) makes a cogent argument for an apology by the Australian mental health professions to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: The recent apology by the Australian Psychological Society to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is of profound national and international significance. The APS is believed to be the first mental health professional representative body in the world to endorse and adopt such a specific apology to indigenous peoples for what was done to them by the profession as part of, or in the name of mental health/psychological assessment, treatment and care. Historically, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have suffered much more incarceration, inappropriate diagnoses and treatments, and more control than care in the hands of mental health professional, facilities and institutions. This is also true for all First Nations peoples, globally.

Professor Rosen argues that such apologies demonstrate concern for possible historical wrongs, either deliberate or unwitting, by professionals and institutions and the enduring mental health effects of colonialism. A RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN So, just as we have recognised and apologised for the role our professions played in forced adoptions, is it now time to examine and take responsibility for our professions’ historical contribution to undermining Indigenous Australians social and emotional health and wellbeing? Janine Mohamed, CEO of the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) argues we should. Between 1908 and 1919, hundreds of Aboriginal patients were incarcerated in the Lock Hospitals off the coast of Carnarvon, with more than 150 people dying there. The Fantome Island Lock Hospital operated in Queensland from 1928-45 under similar arrangements, detaining Aboriginal people with suspected sexually transmitted infections. There was also a lazaret on Fantome Island (1939-73) for segregated treatment of Aboriginal people with Hansen’s disease. Aboriginal people taken to the hospitals were often forcibly removed from their families and communities and transported in traumatic conditions, in chains and under police guard. There is also evidence of medical experimentation and abuse. Janine Mohamed writes: While we ourselves did not work there, the societal beliefs interwoven with the professional theories practised at that time are a legacy we have inherited. Those attitudes and practices remain present within our professional space. Have we done sufficient work to decolonise ourselves? The Association has embarked on a process of developing a Reconciliation Action Plan. As a first step in this process over coming months we will be working on developing a more thorough understanding of how historical practices have affected Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our care.

Contribute to the discussion A longer version of this article can be found on NurseUncut. com.au and we welcome feedback, especially from our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander colleagues.

More information Australian Psychological Society apologises to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People, Sept 2016 http://www. psychology.org.au/news/media_ releases/15September2016/ AMNF apology to mothers, fathers and children affected by forced adoption practices, October 2013 (https://anmf.org. au/news/entry/anmf-apology-tomothers-fathers-and-childrenaffected-by-forced-adoption) A global push for mental health professionals to apologise to indigenous peoples, Sept 2016 https://croakey.org/aglobal-push-for-mental-healthprofessionals-to-apologise-toindigenous-peoples/ A call to acknowledge the harmful history of nursing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Janine Mohamed, Oct 2016 https://croakey. org/a-call-to-acknowledge-theharmful-history-of-nursing-foraboriginal-and-torres-straitislander-people/

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 43


e n i l n o s l i Upd ate your membership deta raw to win d e t o t & go in

5-NIGHT BATEMANS BAY ESCAPE Eurobodalla, land of many waters, sits less than 4 hours’ drive south of Sydney and 2 hours east of Canberra on the NSW South Coast. Eurobodalla is over 110kms of unspoilt beauty. The region is known for award winning Montague Island; home to thousands of fur seals and colonies of penguins, 83 spectacular beaches and ancient headlands, four major rivers and vast tracts of wilderness, national parks and forest. Abundant wildlife dominates the visitor experience while vibrant communities and the picturesque historic and coastal villages connect the main towns of Batemans Bay, Moruya and Narooma. UPDATE YOUR DETAILS ONLINE AT WWW.NSWNMA.ASN.AU AND YOU WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE ENTERED IN THE DRAW TO WIN A 5 NIGHT ESCAPE FOR TWO TO BATEMANS BAY. You and a friend will stay at Corrigans Cove for 5 nights in a gorgeous pool view room with continental breakfast daily. This fantastic package also includes dinner for two on two nights of your stay at Corrigans Cove; entry for two to the fantastic Mogo Zoo and a double pass to the Original Gold Rush Colony Mogo.

VALU ED AT $150 0.

For your chance to win, simply login online at www.nswnma.asn.au to register or update your details. You can now change your details at a time that suits you, pay membership fees online, print a tax statement or request a reprint of your membership card – it’s simple! All members who use our online portal from 1 December 2016 until 30 June 2017 will automatically be entered in to the draw to win this fantastic escape. *Conditions apply. Rooms subject to availability. Prize must be redeemed by June 2018 and is not valid for use during school holidays or public holidays. The prize is non-redeemable for cash or any unused portion of the prize. Competition entries from NSWNMA members only and limited to one entry per member. Competition opens 1 December 2016 and closes 30 June 2017. The prize is drawn on 1 July 2017. If a redraw is required for an unclaimed prize it must be held up to 3 months from the original draw date. NSW Permit no: LTPM/14/00042 44 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017


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Across 1. Study of relations of occlusal surfaces of opposing teeth and their effect on related structures (8.8) 9. The 19th letter of the Greek alphabet and symbol for relaxation time (3) 10. A band or bundle of fibres, usually of muscle or nerve fibres (8) 12. One of the kingdoms of eukaryotic organisms (5) 13. Transient ischaemic attack (1.1.1) 14. A plant known to reflect the fluorine content of the soil on which it grows (8) 15. Small spikes (7) 18. Symbol for mercury (2) 19. ENT specialist (16) 24. The speech act of refuting by offering a contrary contention or argument (8) 26. An order of crustaceans that includes shrimps and sand hoppers (9) 27. Antibody induced clustering of plasma membrane molecules, usually proteins or

glycoproteins (8) 30. Sodium (7) 31. A long, thin, curved instrument for traction or holding (4) 32. The conscious subject (3) 33. To examine or map the body with a sensing device (4) 34. Something that provides cover or protection, as from weather or danger; place of refuge (7) 35. Pruritus (4) 36. An infectious disease caused by HIV (1.1.1.1) 38. Hardening of the arteries (16) Down 1. An inability to recognise smells, a common finding in parietal lobe tumours (9.7) 2. Resembling milk (7) 3. Over long periods of time; gradual (7) 4. Antibody (1.1) 5. A small, flat, pigmented spot on the skin (7)

6. Factors capable of eliciting responses in nerves (7) 7. Intraarterial (1.1) 8. Below a cartilage (16) 11. Estimated time of arrival (1.1.1) 12. Foetal alcohol syndrome (1.1.1) 16. Draw blood (12) 17. Suffering from abnormally afraid of open or public places (11) 20. A patient whose treatment does not require an overnight stay in a hospital (10) 21. To apply a substance to the body of a patient (10) 22. Intestine (3) 23. Taking place in the past (6) 25. Sudden involuntary or spasmodic muscular movements (8) 28. Antioxidant (1.1) 29. Creatine kinase (1.1) 33. Symbol for scandium (2) 36. Symbol for arsenic (2) 37. Decilitre (2)

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 45


RECRUIT A NEW MEMBER & GO INTO THE DRAW TO WIN A 4-NIGHT STAY AT

LOCKYER VALLEY, QUEENSLAND

PRIZE DRAWN 30 JUNE 2017

THE 2016 – 2017 NSWNMA MEMBER RECRUITMENT SCHEME PRIZE The winner will experience all the style and comfort of a luxury retreat with the warmest of country welcomes. A four-night (midweek) stay for two with: • Wine and cheese plate on arrival; • Breakfast daily; • Two x 2-course lunches; • Two x 3-course dinners; • Two x 60-minute facial or massage for 2 guests (4 in total); • Four-wheel-drive tour for 2 guests.

The NSWNMA will arrange return flights for two from Sydney to Brisbane and car hire for the duration of the prize. Spicers Retreat Hidden Vale is a gem, an uncomplicated escape just an hour’s drive from Brisbane. Experience the uniquely revitalising effect of spending time on 12,000 acres of true Australia bush. Space to relax. Space to listen, to laugh and to embark on an adventure amongst the abundant wildlife. Every member you sign up over the year gives you an entry in the draw!

46 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

RECRUITERS NOTE:

Join online at www.nswnma.asn.au If you refer a member to join online, make sure you ask them to put your name and workplace on the online application form. You will then be entitled to your vouchers and entry in the NSWNMA Recruitment Incentive scheme. SPICERSRETREATS .COM

Conditions apply. Prize must be redeemed by 30 June 2018 and is for stays outside of school holidays, midweek (Monday to Thursday). Competition opens on 1 August 2016 and closes 30 June 2017. The prize will be drawn on 30 June 2017. If a redraw is required for an unclaimed prize it must be held up to 3 months from the original draw date. NSW Permit no: LTPM/16/00329.


BOOK ME All the latest Book Me reviews from The Lamp can be read online at www.nswnma.asn.au/library-services/book-reviews. BEDSIDE GUIDE FOR NEONATAL CARE Julia Petty Palgrave (available from Booktopia): http://www.booktopia.com.au RRP $45.95. ISBN 9781137398468 A convenient guide to bedside neonatal care. In clear diagrammatic form and using simple accessible language this book introduces key tools to aid day-to-day working and identifies parameters of care and supports practice decisions.

LEADERSHIP IN HEALTH CARE, 3RD EDITION Jill Barr, Lesley Dowding SAGE (available from Footprint): http://www.footprint.com.au RRP $56.95. ISBN 9781473904569 This bestselling book seamlessly brings together the seminal theories of leadership with the experience of everyday health care across all settings. It includes a website with teaching resources; reflective questions which challenge students to apply the theory to everyday health care; illustrations of leadership models and a discussion of a range of key topics, including change management, decision-making and patient safety. This Third Edition has been updated with new information on the implications of the Francis Report, globalisation and team working.

PERSON-CENTRED APPROACHES IN HEALTHCARE – A HANDBOOK FOR NURSES AND MIDWIVES Stephen Tee

Open University Press (available from McGraw Hill) http://www. mheducation.com.au RRP $79.95. ISBN 9780335263585 Written by practitioners, academics and, more importantly, the people who use health services, this unique text examines the application of person-centred principles across a range of healthcare contexts. It will provide you with the essential skills, techniques and strategies needed to deliver person-centred care. Putting people at the heart of healthcare is essential to effective practice, and this book interweaves real patient stories into every chapter, bringing nursing and midwifery theory to life and helping students and practitioners hone and develop their skills.

DISCOUNT BOOKS FOR MEMBERS! The Library is pleased to announce that McGraw Hill Publishers are now offering members a 25% discount off the RRP! The offer currently covers medical as well as a range of other professional series books. Please see the online Book Me reviews for a link to the promotion code and further instructions, or contact the Library directly for further information.

SPECIAL INTEREST BEFORE I FORGET – LOVE, HOPE, HELP AND ACCEPTANCE IN OUR FIGHT AGAINST ALZHEIMER’S B Smith & Dan Gasby

Harmony Books (available from Fishpond): http://www.fishpond. com.au RRP $43.88. ISBN 9780553447125 Restaurateur, magazine publisher, celebrity chef, and nationally known lifestyle maven, B. Smith is struggling at 66 with a tag she never expected to add to that string: Alzheimer’s patient. She is not alone. Every 67 seconds someone newly develops it, and millions of lives are affected by its aftershocks. B. and her husband, Dan, working with Vanity Fair contributing editor Michael Shnayerson, unstintingly share their story. At its heart, “Before I Forget “ is a love story that illuminates a love of family, life, and hope.

UNDERSTANDING TEAMWORK IN HEALTH CARE Gordon Mosser, James Begun McGraw Hill Education (available from McGraw Hill): www.mheducation.com.au RRP $87.00. ISBN 9780071791953 This important guide focuses on the core skills necessary to effectively implement teamwork in a complex hospital or primary care setting. The book’s mission is to make often-overlooked perspectives about teamwork more widely known and used. No matter what your prior level of team involvement may be, this is the one resource that will help you adeptly participate in, lead, or manage teams.

All books can be ordered through the publisher or your local bookshop. NSWNMA members can borrow the books featured here via the Library’s Online Catalogue: visit http://www.nswnma.asn.au/library-services. Call 8595 1234 or 1300 367 962, or email gensec@nswnma.asn.au for assistance with loans or research. Some books are reviewed using information supplied and have not been independently reviewed. THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 47


NURSES & MIDWIVES: There are many benefits of being a financial member of the NSWNMA — did you know that

Authorised by B.Holmes, General Secretary, NSWNMA

YOUR MEMBERSHIP FEES COVER YOU FOR TRAVEL TO AND FROM WORK? If you are involved in an accident while travelling to or from work, NSWNMA’s Journey Accident Insurance provides you with peace of mind. In recent years this insurance has been a financial safety net for many members who have met unfortunate circumstances travelling to or from work. As a financial member of the NSWNMA you are automatically covered by this policy. It’s important to remember however, that it can only be accessed if you are a financial member at the time of the accident. So make sure your membership remains financial at all times by paying your fees by Direct Debit or Credit. Watch Alexis talk about Journey Accident Insurance

JOURNEY ACCIDENT INSURANCE

Your journey injury safety net

UNSURE IF YOU ARE FINANCIAL? IT’S EASY! Ring and check today on 8595 1234 (metro) or 1300 367 962 (rural). Change your payment information online at

48 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

www.nswnma.asn.au


MOVIES OF THE MONTH

METRO MEMBER GIVEAWAY A United Kingdom

Love in the time of apartheid This is the true story of Seretse Khama, an Oxford-educated African King, and Ruth Williams and their forbidden marriage in 1948 during the era of apartheid. It shines a light on issues of racism, sexism and colonialism writes Stephanie Di Nallo. With terrific warmth, idealism and irresistible story-telling the British director Amma Asante gives us a romantic story. It is a story of the joys of falling in love against heartbreaking odds. The bigotry of the British government plays a particularly shabby and nasty role in trying to stop the union of these two people in love. It is a story of imperialism, bullying and Westminster functionaries passing off their taboo horror of interracial marriage as a matter of realism and political expediency. The couple face harassment and dirty looks in the streets of Britain and derision from the citizens of his homeland. Part of this inspirational love story is how proud Seretse is of having Ruth by his side and Ruth feeling greater joy by being there. The love story of Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo) and Ruth Williams (Rosamund Pike) – a white woman and a black African man – who fall in love is told with openness and an ingenuous quality. Seretse Khama is a law student and also Prince of Bechuanaland (now Botswana). He has spent his whole life preparing to rule his kingdom – which is a British protectorate that effectively submits to imperial rule – via a native tribal council.

RURAL MEMBER GIVEAWAY DVD

Love and Friendship Kate Beckinsale shines in this witty adaptation of a little known Jane Austen novella, Lady Susan, which is directed by Academy Award nominated filmmaker Whit Stillman (Metropolitan, The Last Days of Disco). LOVE & FRIENDSHIP stars Kate Beckinsale, Chloë Sevigny, Xavier Samuel, Tom Bennett and Stephen Fry.

In London, Seretse falls in love with Ruth who is employed as a typist. They marry and propose returning in triumph to his homeland – to the horror of the people of Bechuanaland, who are suspicious of a white queen. The British government is terrified that South Africa will take this marriage as a provocative affront and could possibly retaliate by leaving the Commonwealth and deprive Britain of its gold and strategic minerals. The smug hierarchy and political ‘wannabes’ in the government react by doing everything they can to destroy the marriage and undermine Seretse Khama’s legitimacy and keep the couple apart. It is an ordeal that requires him to be in long exile in London, while Ruth remains behind in Africa as a kind of hostage.

Set in the opulent drawing rooms of eighteenth-century English society, LOVE & FRIENDSHIP follows the scheming and manipulative Lady Susan Vernon (Kate Beckinsale). Aided and abetted by her loyal friend Alicia Johnson (Chloë Sevigny), Lady Susan is on a mission to find a husband for herself and her longsuffering daughter Frederica. But two young men, the handsome Reginald DeCourcy (Xavier Samuel) and wealthy Sir James Martin (Tom Bennett), severely complicate their plans.

This movie is a rich, stirring look at one of modern society’s enduring marriages, underpinned by political machinations that remain all too relevant. The movie has candour and heartfelt belief. It is not just the love story about a handsome prince and an office girl, but does show that love conquers all – though not always immediately. Sue Miles is a CNC at RPA hospital

EMAIL The Lamp BY THE 12TH OF THE MONTH TO BE IN THE DRAW TO WIN A DOUBLE PASS TO A UNITED KINGDOM THANKS TO TRANSMISSION FILMS. EMAIL YOUR NAME, MEMBERSHIP NUMBER, ADDRESS AND TELEPHONE NUMBER TO lamp@nswnma.asn.au FOR A CHANCE TO WIN!

MAIL THE LAMP BY THE 15TH OF THIS MONTH TO BE IN THE DRAW TO WIN A DVD OF LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP THANKS TO TRACEY MAIR PUBLICITY. EMAIL YOUR NAME, MEMBERSHIP NUMBER, ADDRESS AND TELEPHONE NUMBER TO lamp@nswnma.asn.au FOR A CHANCE TO WIN!

THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 49


COVER STORY DIARY DATES — CONFERENCES, SEMINARS, MEETINGS

DIARY DATES IS A FREE SERVICE FOR MEMBERS Please send event details in the format used here: event name, date and location, contact details – by the 5th of each preceding month. Send your event details to: lamp@nswnma.asn.au Fax 02 9662 1414 Post 50 O’Dea Ave, Waterloo NSW 2017. All listings are edited for the purposes of style and space. Priority is given to non-profit professional events.

DIARY DATES IS A FREE SERVICE FOR MEMBERS lamp @ nswnma.asn.au NSW 26th Nepean Midwifery Conference 10 March 2017 Hawkesbury Valley Race Club, Clarendon Juanita Taylor: 0417 123 900 Blacktown and Mount Druitt Hospital Nursing and Midwifery Research Symposium 12 April 2017 Call for abstracts now open Contact Caroline O’Donnell at caroline.odonnell@health.nsw.gov.au 2017 Westmead Women’s and Newborn Health Conference 5-6 May 2017 Education and Conference Centre, Westmead Hospital WSLHD-Women&newbornhealth@ health.nsw.gov/au Resus at the Park 1-2 June 2017 Luna Park, Sydney http://resusatthepark.org.au/ 4th International Collaboration of Perianaesthesia Nurses [ICPAN] Conference 1-4 November 2017 Luna Park, Sydney www.icpan2017.com.au INTERSTATE

4th National Eating Disorders and Obesity Conference 7-8 August 2017 Gold Coast http://eatingdisordersaustralia.org. au/ INTERNATIONAL 2nd International Conference on Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders 5-7 December 2016 Phoenix, AZ, USA http://parkinsons.conferenceseries. com/abstract-submission.php Emergency Care Conference 6-10 February 2017 Hokkaido, Japan www.emsconferences.com.au 6th World Congress of Clinical Safety 6-8 September 2017 Rome, Italy www.iarmm.org/6WCCS 10th European Congress on Violence in Clinical Psychiatry 26-28 October 2017 Crown Plaza, Dublin, Ireland http://www.oudconsultancy.nl/ dublin_10_ECVCP/index.html REUNIONS

St Vincent’s Darlinghurst PTS Class 5th Closing the Gap Indigenous January 1977 40-Year Reunion Health Conference and 2016 Mary Piechowski (nee Morris): World Indigenous Allied Health piechow@grapevine.com.au Conference Anne Barudi (nee Whelan): 15th World Congress on Public Health annebarudi@optusnet.com.au 3-7 April 2017 Melbourne www.wcph2017.com Australian & New Zealand Addiction Amy* is still Conference waiting for a 15-16 May 2017 foster carer. Gold Coast Six year old Amy https://www.vision6.com. is on the autistic au/ spectrum and No More Harm National urgently needs someone who Conference can give her the 26-27 June 2017 stability and time Brisbane she deserves. http://nomoreharm.com. Call us today au/ 1800 663 441

barnardos.org.au/katie-and-amy ABN 18 068 557 906 | A Company Limited by Guarantee | Registered Charity | *Names changed and models used for privacy | FAF_15_00552

50 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017

Tamworth Base Hospital February 1976 intake 40-Year Reunion Contacts: Sandra Cox: sandra.cox@hnehealth.nsw Sean O’Connor: 0408 349 126 Gerard Jeffery: 0417 664 993 Auburn Hospital October 1976-1979 40-Year Reunion Sharon Byers: 0419 144 965 or sbyers01@bigpond.net.au Margaret Borg (Mueller): 0431 159 964 or margaret_borg@bigpond.com Royal Prince Alfred Hospital January 1977 (including Rachel Foster Hospital) 40-Year Reunion 3 Day Comedy Cruise P&O Pacific Pearl; Cruise Number: P207 Booking Reference: GNVQXN Departs Sydney – 27 January 2017 Contact Michele Kristidis (nee ‘Lee’ Sweeney): michelekristidis@hotmail. com RAHC Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children PTS 1977 40-Year Reunion 4-5 February 2017 Coleen Holland (Argall): bobandcolh@yahoo.com.au St Vincent’s Darlinghurst PTS Class March 1977 40-Year Reunion 25 March 2017 Frances O’Connor (nee Pugh): 0415764131 or fgoconnor@optusnet. com.au 25-Year reunion: 1992 UWS Nepean Graduating Class July 2017,Sydney, NSW Bede McKinnon: bede01@bigpond.com CROSSWORD SOLUTION


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THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 | 51


COVER STORY

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firststatesuper.com.au | 1300 650 873 Consider our product disclosure statement before making a decision about First State Super. Call us or visit our website for a copy. FSS Trustee Corporation 52 | THE LAMP DECEMBER 2016 – JANUARY 2017 ABN 11 118 202 672 ASFL 293340 is the trustee of the First State Superannuation Scheme ABN 53 226 460 365.


Lamp December 2016 – January 2017