Winter 2023 issue of THE HUB Magazine

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WINTER 2023 | www.sacculturalhub.com
IN HISTORIC WIN, REPRESENTATIVE KAREN BASS IS ELECTED FIRST BLACK WOMAN MAYOR OF L.A.

MODERATOR

GUEST SPEAKERS

REV. KEVIN ROSS Senior Minister and Chief Executive Officer of Unity of Sacramento
BETTY WILLIAMS President of the Greater Sacramento NAACP
DANIEL HAHN Retired & Former Chief of Sacramento Police DR. MARY LOMAXGHIRARDUZZI Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at University of the Pacific SAVE THE DATE! Wednesday, February 15th 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM MAURICE WHEATLEY JR. AKA “KIII” Emerging Artist, Producer/Label owner and IT Specialist with C.L.A.S.S.Y Join us
The Stop The Hate campaign is made possible with funding from the California State Library (CSL) in partnership with the California Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander American Affairs (CAPIAA).
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Broadcasted LIVE via Facebook

WINTER RESET: HAPPY NEW YEAR 2023

PRAISE THE LORD! WE MADE IT to another year. And, I know that many of us that includes me have already started with our NEW YEAR resolution plans for starting or continuing exercise routines, following a nutritional diet, committing to a savings financial plan, and/ or planning for vacations.

Although winter reset is critical for us as we are still reeling from devastating events in 2020 due to COVID-19, volatile down stock market, along with natural disasters and severe weather storms/cold fronts around the country with the most recent heavy rain floods and winds right here in Sacramento.

However, I do love the new year for its fresh start when it comes to strategic planning for my business as well as my personal goals. We need to stay encouraged with building/nurturing relationships, inspiring collaborations, and creating space for learning and networking. It’s always a good idea to follow some DOs and DON’Ts to keep us aware and on track with accomplishing what we set out to do in this navigation of life:

Source: classixphilly.com/playlist/the-dos-and-donts-of-2023-new-years-resolutions/item/6

DO: Quit smoking tobacco

DON’T: Quit smoking “cold turkey”

DO: Figure out a consistent workout plan

DON’T: Stop exercising - take baby steps

DO: Gain a skill

DONT: Try to be someone/something you’re not DO: Expand your dating pool

DON’T: Search for a soulmate - let love find you

DO: Plan ahead for your vacations

DON’T: Wait until the last minute to book your travel

DO: Read More

DON’T: Be a couch potato - always on a device

DO: Share positive news

DON’T: Be the doom of gloom

DO: Find time to PRAY - there are always others to pray for DON’T: Think you are alone - please reach out for help

DO: Open your mind to therapy sessions

DON’T: Become your own therapist

DO: Volunteer your time DON’T: Be a stickler for sharing

DO: Change yourself for the better DON’T: Become jaded due to a bad year

DO: Create a personal budget and follow it DON’T: Don’t spend money frivolously

DO: Create a vision board - attract what you want DON’T: Stop dreaming - write down everything

DO: Network and be seen at events DON’T: Be a hermit - meet new people and make new friends

CONGRATS to so many African Americans making BIG legislative moves in California - THE HUB - sees you ELEVATING and we love the representation for our younger generation. We’ve spotlighted several individuals in this special edition issue, starting with the newly elected Mayor of Los Angeles, Karen Bass - first Black woman mayor of L.A.

I would be remiss if I did not reiterate how I/WE, Sac Cultural Hub Media Company, are so thankful for 20 years in business. Last year (March 2022) we celebrated our 20th Anniversary and we continue to be grateful for our clients, sponsors, advertisers and readers who support us. I personally look forward to serving you and the community in 2023 and beyond!

We hope you enjoy this issue and all that it has to offer with connecting you to resources and highlights of who’s who in Black California and what’s happening in your neighborhood.

True Blessings,

Pleshette Robertson

CEO and Founder

Sac Cultural Hub Media Company and Foundation facebook.com/pleshettemarie

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ROOM | LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
FOUNDER’S
THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 5 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG CENTERSTAGE 8 | CONGRATULATIONS TO KAREN BASS: LA’S FIRST FEMALE MAYOR 10 | CALIFORNIA’S FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN CONTROLLER MALIA M. COHEN TAKES OFFICE 12 | SHIRLEY WEBER IS SWORN IN AS CALIFORNIA’S FIRST ELECTED BLACK SECRETARY OF STATEE 14 | MOVERS & SHAKERS IN CALIFORNIA Sonya Aadam | Chet Hewitt | Marc Philpart Carol Mcgruder |Rick Callender 20 | “SILENCE BECOMES A SECRET”: WHY SPEAKING OUT ABOUT HATE CRIMES IS CRITICAL WERE YOU THERE? 24 | 14TH ANNUAL EXCEPTIONAL WOMEN OF COLOR (EWOC) AWARDS & EXPO 28 | GREATER SACRAMENTO NAACP’S KWANZAA CELEBRATION 38 | Navigating Black California IN EVERY ISSUE 4 Founder’s Room 43 Things To Do, Places To Go 43 Advertiser Index CONTENTS 24 20 10 28 8 & MOVERS SHAKERS IN CALIFORNIA 14 12

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Readers of a certain age will remember a popular television ad campaign that dominated airwaves, announcing that women could do it all. The women’s rights movement was in full swing at the time, and women were taking no prisoners on their way to the top of professions across the board. The TV spot’s legendary tagline was “I’m a woman!” The year was 1979.

In 2023, in Los Angeles, Mayor elect Karen Bass is the personification of the promise of those ads. At 69 years old, she has become the first woman elected mayor of Los Angeles in the city’s 241-year history, and only the second African American to win the mayor’s seat.

After a contentious campaign, Bass defeated a billionaire developer who had waged the most expensive campaign in the city’s history. He outspent the six-term congresswoman and former state lawmaker 10-1, tossing over $100 million of his personal finances down the political drain in his effort to defeat her. In doing so, Bass’ opponent shattered local advertising and outreach spending records.

CONGRATULATIONS TO KAREN BASS

LA’S FIRST FEMALE MAYOR

At the end of the day, dollars spent during the campaign just didn’t matter. Bass brought all of the power and force that women wield every day to what would be the political fight of her life — to-date, at least. She countered the billionaire’s fortune with a strategy that, in retrospect, seems somewhat innocuous: she marshaled her broad volunteer networks across the city, and simply got more people to the polls. In doing so, Bass earned more than 53 percent of the vote as she sent the billionaire packing.

“The people of Los Angeles have sent a clear message,” Bass said in a statement issued just after the Associated Press called her victory. “It is time for change and it is time for urgency.”

In a bit of glorious karma, Vice President Kamala Harris, the nation’s first black person and first woman to hold that office, swore Bass in as mayor of LA in December. Bass joins an increasingly female group of local leaders, including the county’s woman-dominated Board of Supervisors and the city’s first female city attorney.

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Bass said in an interview that she welcomed the chance to work with so many women in powerful, visible positions.

“These are general statements…but women are more collaborative. Women are not as transactional. And I think women focus on different issues. I think women tend to lead differently.”

“I’m a woman,” indeed!

Bass’ Beginnings

A former physician assistant, Bass started her political career as a community activist in South Los Angeles, after watching the crack epidemic decimate black and brown communities in the 1980s.

In 1990, she co-founded Community Coalition, a non-profit charged with unifying South Los Angeles communities against crime and poverty. In 2008, Bass became the first Black woman in the nation to lead a state legislative body when she was named Speaker of the House of Representatives.

“Karen continues to be inspired by Emilia and Michael’s passion for life,” according to Bass’ campaign bio.

In the wake of George Floyd’s lynching, Bass co-authored a legislative package designed to overhaul law enforcement policies. Then Vice President Joe Biden took notice, before placing her on his shortlist of Vice Presidential candidates.

Bass Looks Ahead

It will take a person of Bass’ mettle to get the job done as mayor of a city of over four million people. She’s working with a 15-member City Council that could easily sidetrack progress toward her goals, while also working with a county Board of Supervisors and an independent public school board. As she leads a city in the largest metropolis in the country, Bass also works with several leaders of autonomous city governments.

THESE ARE GENERAL STATEMENTS… BUT WOMEN ARE MORE COLLABORATIVE. WOMEN ARE NOT AS TRANSACTIONAL. I THINK WOMEN TEND TO LEAD DIFFERENTLY.

Colleagues have long been aware of Bass’ leadership acumen and, perhaps presciently, of changes that were to come in the mayor’s office.

“I’ve always believed that an individual best suited to be the next mayor has to be someone who’s engaged in bridging the racial divide, connecting communities and building coalitions,” former LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said in an interview. He helped Bass launch Community Coalition, and has known her for over three decades.

Villaraigosa wasn’t alone in seeing Bass’ greatness. Fabian Nuñez, who preceded Bass as California’s House Speaker, talked about the new mayor’s “… almost shy, quiet way…” of leading.

“She didn’t really demand that kind of attention,” Nuñez recently said of Bass, “but through her work, very quietly, [she] was a powerful force and people were drawn to her.”

Bass is well versed at rolling up her sleeves in the face of adversity. One of her daughters Emilia BassLechuga and son-in-law Michael Wright died over a decade ago in a car accident.

Bass has hit the ground running, taking on a city with residents exhausted and angered by racial tensions and weary from homelessness. She has pledged to find housing for its 17,000 people experiencing homelessness in her first year.

“Together, we will make Los Angeles more livable for all and build a City Hall that works for everyone,” Bass said.

At her December swearing in event, Bass was on fire.

“Making history with each of you today is a monumental moment in my life and in Los Angeles. I call on our city to not just dream of the L.A. we want, but to participate in making the dream come true.”

Congratulations Mayor Karen Bass! We’ll be watching, and we’ve got your back! n

The Sac Cultural Hub thanks our colleagues at the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, Politico, and Twitter for their assistance with this feature.

Follow freelance writer Michael P Coleman at michaelpcoleman. com, or on Twitter & IG: @ColemanMichaelP

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CALIFORNIA’S FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN CONTROLLER MALIA M. COHEN TAKES OFFICE

Malia M. Cohen was recdntly sworn-in as the first Black woman – and first African American — to serve as California’s State Controller.

On Monday, Jan. 2, the oath of office was administered by Gov. Gavin Newsom.

“I am proud and honored to serve as California’s state controller,” said Cohen. “The work to create a more equitable California has already begun. I look forward to ensuring fiscal accountability, with an eye toward transparency and innovation.”

On Friday Jan. 6, Cohen was given the oath of office by San Francisco Mayor London Breed with her husband Warren Pulley by her side.

“Malia has made history and continues to break barriers while helping build long-term equity throughout our communities.”

The community event was held at St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church in Sacramento.

“I am proud and honored to serve as California’s State Controller,” Cohen said. “The work to create a more equitable California has already begun. I look forward to ensuring fiscal accountability, with an eye toward transparency and innovation.”

California now has three Black politicians holding Constitutional offices including Cohen. Secretary of State Dr. Shirley Weber and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond are the others.

“Congratulations @MaliaCohen. As California’s first Black state controller, Malia has made history and continues

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to break barriers while helping build long-term equity throughout our communities. I’m confident she will continue fighting for the rights of all Californians,” Breed stated in a Jan. 6 post on her Twitter page

“I am excited to get to work on creating a more equitable California as your next Controller,” Cohen tweeted Jan. 6.

Cohen was elected to the California Board of Equalization (BOE) in November 2018 and was named chairperson in 2019 and 2022. As Controller, Cohen continues to serve the Board as the BOE’s fifth voting member.

Prior to being elected to the BOE, Cohen was President of the Board of Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. As a Member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, she also served as the Chair of the Budget and Finance Committee and President of the San Francisco Employees’ Retirement System (SFERS).

Cohen was born and raised in San Francisco. Her political journey, she says lightheartedly, began when she was elected class president of San Francisco’s Lowell High School, the oldest public high school on the West Coast. She has a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Fisk University, a Historically Black College and University (HBCU), and a master’s degree in Public Policy and Management from Carnegie Mellon University.

She and her husband reside in San Francisco along with their daughter.

As the chief fiscal officer of California, Cohen is responsible for accountability and disbursement of the state’s financial resources. The controller also has independent auditing authority over government agencies that spend state funds.

Cohen’s duties include being a member of numerous financing authorities, and fiscal and financial oversight entities including the Franchise Tax Board. She also serves on the boards for the nation’s two largest public pension funds.

At the St. Paul Baptist Missionary Baptist Church swearing-in, Kenneth Reece, the Senior Pastor, gave the opening prayer.

Held at the church six miles from the State Capitol, Cohen’s swearing-in ceremony included prayers offered

by Imam Yasir Kahn, the Chaplain of the California State Assembly, and Rabbi Mona Alfi, the Senior Rabbi of Congregation B’Nai Israel.

Among guests were Assemblymember Chris Holden (D-Pasadena), Director of Bay Area Rapid Transit Bevan Duffy, California Labor Federation Executive SecretaryTreasurer Lorena Gonzalez, the singer Aloe Blacc and Jaqueline Thompson, Pastor at Allen Temple Baptist Church in Oakland.

Cohen’s swearing-in was held on the second anniversary of the attack on the U.S. Capitol. The day was packed with political activities in Sacramento and shadowed by references to the infamous Capitol insurrection in Washington that shocked people across the country and around the world.

That day, Gov. Newsom was sworn in to a second term. Rob Bonta was also sworn-in for the first time as the state’s Attorney General. He was appointed to the position by Newsom in March 2021.

Before Newsom’s outdoor ceremony, the Governor, his wife, and four children led a march from West Sacramento, across the Tower Bridge, to the Capitol. During the Governor’s address on the steps of the Capitol, he shared his feelings about the attack on the U.S. Capitol two years ago while addressing some of the state’s most pressing issues.

“Our politics doesn’t always reward taking on the hardest problems. The results of our work may not be evident for a long time. But that cannot be our concern,” Newsom said. “We will prepare for uncertain times ahead. We will be prudent stewards of taxpayer dollars, pay down debt, and meet our future obligations. And we will build and safeguard the largest fiscal reserve of any state in American history.” n

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SHIRLEY WEBER IS SWORN IN AS CALIFORNIA’S FIRST ELECTED BLACK SECRETARY OF STATE

On Jan 9, with the sound of African drumming in the background, Shirley Weber was sworn-in as the first-elected Black Secretary of State (SOS) of California and the 32nd person to hold the position.

The ceremony was conducted at the SOS’ auditorium in downtown Sacramento, one block south of the State Capitol.

Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego) administered the oath of office in front of Weber’s grandsons Kadir and Jalil Gakunga.

“I want to thank all of those who work so hard to make this position, the Secretary of State — and all of those wonderful things that come with it — possible, and for

being in my life,” Weber said. “I have been blessed beyond imagination with all of the good things California has to give.”

The daughter of a sharecropper from Hope, Ark., Weber said she is “not supposed to be here” as the state’s chief clerk, overseeing a department of 500-plus employees.

Weber grew up in a two-room, “clapboard house” in Arkansas with her parents and five other siblings before the family relocated to Los Angeles where they lived in Pueblo Del Rio, a housing project known as the “pueblos.”

Weber said the “data” projected that she would not have a bright future. Still, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a PHD, serve on the San Diego Board of

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Education, teach African American studies at San Diego State University, and successfully ran for California State Assembly in November 2012.

‘My father came from Hope, Arkansas, because there was no hope in Hope,” Weber said. “He came to California because he wanted his children to have a better chance and a better life.”

When Gov. Gavin Newsom appointed Alex Padilla the state’s junior U.S. Senator in Jan. 2021, he nominated Weber as SOS. Padilla filled in for Sen. Kamala Harris, who was elected U.S Vice President. Weber was officially installed as SOS in April 2021.

M. Cohen and Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond.

“I want to thank all of those who work so hard to make this position, the Secretary of State — and all of those wonderful things that come with it — possible, and for being in my life,” Weber said. “I have been blessed beyond imagination with all of the good things California has to give.”

Weber’s plan after serving in the Legislature was to move to Ghana, Africa, and “build a house up in the hills.” That all changed when Newsom called.

“It was hard for me to think about becoming Secretary of State because I was so content in the Assembly,” Weber said. “When I was asked to be Secretary of State, I thought hard and long about it. I realized that everything about the Secretary of State was central to my life. I thought to myself that I am always the one taking the hard challenges. I said who better than a kid of sharecropper, who never had a chance to vote, who could fight for the rights of voters.”

The Secretary of State is the chief elections officer of the State, responsible for overseeing and certifying elections, as well as testing and certifying voting equipment for use in California. Weber’s duties also include overseeing the state’s archives division and registry of businesses.

In her remarks, Atkins praised Weber’s “leadership” and “morality” and called her “a tireless champion of democracy,” adding that those characteristics are integral to performing the duties of Secretary of State.

Atkins told guests that she first met Weber when she was 24 years old and that Weber helped her run for state Assembly.

For the first time in its history, California has three Black constitutional officers. The others are Controller Malia

“You know, our constitutional officers are unique, and I give credit to our Governor (Gavin Newsom) and the people of California. “There is no other list of constitutional officers like this. Where do you have a list of constitutional officers where it only has one White male in it? That is unheard of. The diversity (and) the fact that women are constitutional officers in California is historic.”

Weber’s daughter, Assemblymember Akilah Weber (D-San Diego) was the ceremony’s emcee while Assemblymember Chris Holden (D-Pasadena) provided the invocation. David Bauman’s African drumming and musical selections by Dr. Tecoy Porter, pastor of Genesis Church Sacramento and President of the National Action Network Sacramento Chapter and his Genesis Church choir were the entertainment. Weber’s son Akil Weber provided the closing statements.

“Words cannot express how truly proud I am of what my mother has done, what she will continue to do, the door she has opened, the legacy she is creating,” Assemblymember Akilah Weber said of her mother.” n

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cablackmedia.org

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& MOVERS SHAKERS IN CALIFORNIA
and shakers
California Black Media highlights several movers
on major achievements impacting the community at large in 2022.

SONYA AADAM

been successful in building a cadre of Black mental health advocates and activists in key regions of the state and we are so excited to continue the program through another four years of funding from the California Dept. of Public Health.

CBM: What did you find most challenging over the past year?

Aadam: Persistent limitations in funding for our work remains our greatest challenge because it means lower wages for existing staff, difficulty attracting new staff, and constant pressure to do more with less. Our dedicated team could make considerably more in salary elsewhere, but they are willing to sacrifice higher earnings because they believe deeply in the work that we do to uplift better health and wellness for Black women, girls, families, and communities.

As the CEO of this organization, this lack of sufficient resources is a major source of stress.

CBM: What are you most looking forward to in 2023?

Aadam: 2023 presents a great opportunity for expanded power building in the Black community in California to advocate for health equity, reparations, and continued recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. At California Black Women’s Health Project, collaboration is a guiding value and is absolutely necessary for our work to address health disparities, build community capacity, and empower our Sisters statewide to guard their health and wellness.

Sonya Aadam is Chief Executive Officer of California Black Women’s Health Project. Founded in 1992, the organization says its mission is to improve the health of California’s 1.2 million Black women and girls through advocacy, education, outreach and policy change. A South Los Angeles native, Aadam’s work includes mentoring and preparing women to navigate a healthcare system that has notoriously underserved Black women.

California Black Media (CBM) asked Aadam to reflect on the past year and share her plans for 2023.

CBM: With the work you do advocating for African Americans in California, what was your biggest accomplishment in 2022?

Aadam: In 2022, we lift up the four-year extension of our Sisters Mentally Mobilized Advocate Training Program among our biggest accomplishments. The program has

CBM: What’s the biggest challenge Black Californians will face next year?

Aadam: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc on the health and wellness of Black Californians. We consistently worry about the ongoing mental and emotional strain, what we refer to as “Post-COVID-StressDisorder”.

The fallout of the pandemic and ongoing challenges in securing recovery funding and support will challenge us and require organizations like ours to work harder, go deeper, and fight harder to fill gaps and advocate for mental health and other services.

CBM: What’s your wish for this holiday season?

Aadam: Black culture, the loving spirit of Christmas, and the New Year transition give me so much joy during the Holiday season. This year my Holiday wish is for a period of respite and peace, especially for those of us who work in community service. I also wish for a COVID-free Holiday season for us all. n

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CHET HEWITT

Chet Hewitt is the President and CEO of Sierra Health Foundation and its independent operating unit, the Center for Health Program Management. Since beginning his tenure in 2007, Hewitt has focused foundation investments on health disparities, health equity, and the healthy development and well-being of vulnerable youth and underserved communities.

& MOVERS SHAKERS

California Black Media (CBM) asked Hewitt to reflect on the past year and share his plans for 2023.

CBM: With the work you do advocating for African Americans in California, what was your biggest accomplishment in 2022?

Hewitt: The Center has long been dedicated to connecting our social determinants of health orientation to our social justice and equity goals. I’m exceptionally proud of our efforts to increase access to high quality and culturally appropriate mental and behavioral health services in African American communities locally and statewide. Examples include the Community Responsive Wellness Program for Black Communities in Sacramento and the statewide Behavioral Health Recovery Services Project.

CBM: What did you find most challenging over the past year?

Hewitt: We’re all still healing from the social isolation and financial instability of the pandemic. This is especially

true of our young people. Suicide is now the second leading cause of death among youth ages 15 to 24. There are incredible challenges to restoring our collective well-being. I’m grateful for programs like our Community Responsive Wellness Program that connects Black youth and families with community and mental health services in Sacramento. Connection is a key component of mental health.

CBM: What are you most looking forward to in 2023?

Hewitt: The Center launched the Community Economic Mobilization Initiative this year that will invest $19 million into equipping our communities to drive economic development. Equitable access to opportunity leads to greater health and well-being. I’m looking forward to seeing more public funds in the hands of our communities.

CBM: What’s the biggest challenge Black Californians will face next year?

Hewitt: It’s a watershed moment for Black Californians and their communities across our state. The federal and state governments are investing billions into pandemic recovery and growing the Green economy. For our community’s long-term health and prosperity, we need to work hard to ensure our children, youth and young adults have equitable access to the education, training and employment opportunities these historic investments in infrastructure and climate resilient industry will generate.

CBM: What’s your wish for this holiday season?

Hewitt: During this season and beyond, I wish everyone joy, loving relationships and a sustaining community. We all deserve to be well. n

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MARC PHILPART

Marc Philpart was named executive director of the California Black Freedom Fund in April 2022.

The five-year $100 million fund is an initiative to ensure that Black power-building and movement-based organizations have the sustained investments and resources they need to eradicate systemic and institutional racism.

On December 13th, the fund announced $1 million in general operating support to be distributed to five Black power-building organizations in Los Angeles. This is the fund’s fifth round of grants to date, with a total of approximately $26 million in investments that are building Black power across the state. Los Angeles Community Action Network (LA CAN), Dignity & Power Now, Students Deserve, The Hub at LA Black Worker Center, and Youth Justice Coalition were recipients of the funding to supercharge their organizing efforts in 2023 and beyond.

California Black Media (CBM) asked Philpart to reflect on the past year and share his plans for 2023.

CBM: With the work you do advocating for African Americans in California, what was your biggest accomplishment in 2022?

Philpart: The California Black Freedom Fund is a fiveyear, $100 million initiative to ensure that Black powerbuilding and movement-based organizations have the sustained investments and resources they need to eradicate systemic and institutional racism. The first statebased fund of its kind, the California Black Freedom Fund prioritizes investments in the courageous and visionary grassroots advocates and community leaders who are transforming our cities, our state — and our world. In 2022, across three rounds of grants, the California Black Freedom Fund invested approximately $11.8M in Black led power building organizations and networks across California.

CBM: What did you find most challenging over the past year?

Philpart: Part of our work is to organize and educate the philanthropic sector on the giving gap and needs facing Black power building organizations in California. Philanthropy has a shared opportunity and responsibility to marshal our resources in order to tackle systemic

racism and anti-Blackness in communities across California. We believe that private and corporate philanthropy has a huge opportunity to prioritize building the power and capacity of Black-led organizations as a strategic imperative. I look forward to working with philanthropic leaders throughout California in the next year and beyond on this goal.

CBM: What are you most looking forward to in 2023?

Philpart: We are excited to develop programs that can support the advocacy, research, and programming needs of Black power building organizations throughout California. By creating and accelerating a new statewide ecosystem of Black-led organizations confronting racism and anti-Blackness, this fund aims to affect the culture, policy and systems changes necessary to realize equity and justice in California.

CBM: What’s the biggest challenge Black Californians will face next year?

Philpart: Our communities must prepare for a mass civic engagement effort that will dramatically expand the Black electorate in the 2024 election. Black power building organizations will need to advocate for new laws, educate and register voters, and innovate new approaches to voter turnout.

CBM: What’s your wish for this holiday season?

Philpart: My one wish is that people keep ever present the threat that Black communities face with so much injustice in the world and give to Black led power building organizations in their communities or to the California Black Freedom Fund to support the critical work happening throughout the state. You can donate to CBFF here. n

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CAROL MCGRUDER

Carol McGruder is co-chair of the African American Tobacco Control Leadership Council (AATCLC). Formed in 2008, McGruder says the mission of the AATCLC is to inform and influence the direction of tobacco control as it affects the lives of African American and African Immigrant communities. The AATCLC works with health jurisdictions, elected officials, community-based organizations, tobacco researchers, activists, faith-based communities, and the media and it plays a key role in elevating the once obscure issue of regulating the sale of menthol and flavored tobacco products to one of national concern and action.

California Black Media (CBM) asked McGruder to reflect on the past year and share her plans for 2023.

CBM: With the work you do advocating for African Americans in California, what was your biggest accomplishment in 2022?

McGruder: It would be an understatement to say that 2022 has been a banner year for tobacco control and African Americans. The overwhelming vote in support of passing Proposition 31 is at the top of the list.

Californians went to the polls on November 8th and soundly rejected the tobacco industry’s attempt to undermine the nonpartisan passage of Senate Bill 793. Passed in 2020, Senate Bill 793 made California the second state after Massachusetts to pass legislation to take menthol and all flavored tobacco products off the market. The tobacco industry’s cynical use of California’s proposition system was resoundingly defeated. The bigger benefit of Senate Bill 793 is when Californians move to enact legislation that protects us, we advance the health and safety of Black children and communities across the country.

Another accomplishment was our lawsuit against the FDA to compel them to do what they were mandated to do in 2008, which was to take menthol tobacco products off the national market. Because of our lawsuit, the FDA has finally initiated steps to remove these products. They are in the second stage of the rule-making process, and we look forward to having a national sales ban in place in the next few years. In the meantime, we keep plugging away at local and state levels.

CBM: What are you most looking forward to in 2023?

McGruder: I am feeling so grateful and looking forward to many things in 2023. In our mission to save the 45,000 Black souls who die each year from tobacco-induced diseases, we will continue to support cities and states across the nation as they adopt and implement policies to stop this cycle of death through nicotine addiction. We will continue to be a resource for our community as we remind Californians that the responsibility of the tobacco ban is placed on retailers, not individuals. We are also looking forward to working with Los Angeles Madam Mayor Karen Bass who has supported us and worked with us throughout her political career. Her hard-fought win to become mayor of Los Angeles couldn’t have come at a better time for our movement and state. We know that she “gets it”, and profoundly understands the inter-relatedness of these issues. As we move forward to implement the removal of menthol and flavored tobacco products in our Black communities, Los Angeles will play a pivotal role.

CBM: What’s the biggest challenge Black Californians will face next year?

McGruder: I am fresh back from Cuba where I had the opportunity to study their public health system. I was inspired by how they have done so much with so little. They have eradicated illiteracy. And it is safer for a Black baby to be born in Cuba, than in the United States. We face so many challenges, but our biggest challenge is us. Rededicating ourselves to our families and communities. Putting the health, education, and well-being of our families and communities first. Let’s look forward to 2023 with power and optimism.ing IT!

CBM: What’s your wish for this holiday season?

McGruder: I wish that we all get some rest and come back in 2023 ready to move our agenda forward. While we face many challenges, we also have so many opportunities to begin … again. n

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RICK CALLENDER

Rick Callender is the President of the California Hawaii State Conference NAACP. He helps oversee 74 branches and youth units of the association which are mobilized across the states to help ensure racial justice and equality.

California Black Media (CBM) asked Mr. Callender to reflect on the past year and share his plans for 2023.

CBM: What did you find most challenging over the past year?

Callender: When fighting for justice, it’s important to remember that it’s both a marathon and a sprint at the same time. In the face of adversity, it can be challenging to continue pushing forward with the same endurance held in the beginning of the marathon, but once you see your efforts start to make even the smallest difference–that has been what’s catapulted my own power forward. At the same time, we have to often sprint to obtain justice by speaking truth to power.

CBM: What are you most looking forward to in 2023?

Callender: In 2023 I want to continue fighting for justice and equity, building our membership, and prepare for the 2024 elections. We cannot allow for the likes of Herschel Walker to gain a foothold in California or Hawaii. Further, one of our main priorities this past year has been justice on the field for young student athletes experiencing racism.

CBM: What’s the biggest challenge Black Californians will face next year?

Callender: We will continuously face being able to access equal justice under the law in all respects. Unfortunately, the fight clearly continues. The CA/HI NAACP will continue to lead the resistance for equity and equality.

CBM: What’s your wish for this holiday season?

Callender:For some relaxing time off so I can come back re-energized, focused, and ready to continue to fight! n

CBM: With the work you do advocating for African Americans in California, what was your biggest accomplishment in 2022?

Callender: First was bringing back our State Convention which was completely sold out, second was ensuring that all African American voters and members received a slate mailer on how the CA/HI NAACP suggested they vote on State-wide Propositions. The slate mailer also identified our lifetime members who were running for office. All but one of the lifetime members were successful in their elections.

& MOVERS SHAKERS

IN CALIFORNIA

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“Silence Becomes A Secret”: Why Speaking Out About Hate Crimes Is Critical

The new feature film, “Till,” masterfully shines a light on one of the most infamous race-based hate crimes. Sadly, we’re still experiencing and talking about race-based hate crimes in 2022.

“Till,” details the story of Mamie Till Mobley, the mother of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old boy who fell victim to the most infamous race-based lynching of the 20th century. Brilliantly directed by Chinonye Chukwu, “Till” walks viewers through Emmett’s fateful trip from Chicago to Mississippi during the summer of 1955.

Students of history know that Emmett never makes it back home. As such, Chukwu deftly doesn’t detail Emmett’s well-documented kidnapping, torture, and murder. The viewer’s inroad into this story is through the eyes of Emmett’s mother, a woman strong enough to stand up against the oppressive patriarchy and racism of mid-20th century America, look her son’s killers in the eye, and demand justice for Emmett.

“Oscar-worthy” seems insufficient when describing the new film. Actress Danielle Deadwyler, in the title role, undoubtedly deserves an Academy Award nomination, as do most of her co-stars. Chukwu deserves a Best Director nod.

But “Till” is so much more than any accolades that awards season may bring. Every American should see it, as the movie has the potential to change our world…or, at the very least, change the way we see it.

And if you doubt whether the topic is still relevant today, almost 70 years later, consider this: the Emmett Till Antilynching Act was signed into law on March 29, 2022 by President Joe Biden, who was born in 1940…the year before Emmett was born.

My viewing of “Till” prompted me to ponder about the mental health benefits of speaking out on race-based

hate crimes, even when most of them, in 2022, aren’t nearly as heinous as Emmett’s. I decided that pondering wasn’t enough, so I reached out to an expert on trauma and mental health.

“You really have to face the fear of how the system may or may not be for you,” said Alondra L. Thompson, LCSW. “There’s often a lot of anxiety that follows that, because the thought process changes. Often, [victims of hate crimes] have to process and work around what they thought was real, or what they thought our world was like.”

I asked Thompson about the best ways in which caregivers, those family and

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DID YOU KNOW?

friends who surround and support victims of hate crimes, can best support the victim. As I asked the question, I thought about Emmett’s mom. If I’d been in her circle, I wouldn’t have known how to most effectively support her.

“We always want to feel safe,” Thompson said. “When we feel so unsafe from our external environment, when people assault us and attack us, it’s always important for friends and family to express the love and support that is truly there.”

“Victims sometimes feel like they have nothing, like everything has been stripped away,” Thompson continued. “But the confirmation from family and friends that support is there, and helping the victim see their own resilience base, is critical. The love from family and friends can help the victim realize that despite the trauma, they have survived, through situations that have brought others down.”

“That’s resilience, and that’s to be acknowledged and celebrated, and will help the victim get back up again.”

Thompson and I talked about the many reasons victims of hate crimes of any type often are reticent about coming forward and sharing their stories, whether during talk therapy sessions or in public. She told me the stigma that still persists around mental health is paramount.

“I think we need mental wellness brokers who can go into communities of color and talk about treatment and what it means, and support the resilience of the individual,” Thompson said. “I want to have conversations within our community about stigma, and the reasons why mental illness is as important as diabetes or any other ailment that needs to be addressed.”

“When I’m talking with family members who aren’t about counseling — ‘That’s not something I do’ and ‘I’ll just go to church and pray it away’ are among the things they say — I ask them to share what their typical healing environment looks like. I assure them that that’s the same type of arena that’s provided when someone seeks a professional mental health provider,” Thompson continued. “People need to get out of the mindset that therapy is just sitting on a couch talking to someone across from you. In therapy, you’re free to speak and seek what you need.”

“Today, things are different than they were back in the day with regard to stigma around mental health,” Thompson said. “Today, counseling and therapy is a part of the fad! ‘I have a counselor.’ ‘I’m seeing somebody.’ It’s a different message. I think we’re looking at the older community

that still sees therapy as a ‘crazy person’ thing, but that’s changing. I’m seeing more teenagers and younger people, and more older people are coming in, so I know the stigma is not as strong as it was back in our day. But it’s still there.”

According to Thompson, the deafening silence about trauma, like the kind that victims of hate crimes face, has to be overcome.

“Silence becomes a secret, Thompson said. “You start to identify with the secret, and it becomes the normal, because it’s not openly discussed. And because of that, it starts to become who you are. You start to see it — the trauma — as normal, and you don’t get the opportunity to discover that it’s not normal, that it’s not who you are, or to position yourself to receive treatment to address [the trauma].

“It should never become your norm,” Thompson said of the trauma that accompanies race-based hate crimes. “You have to talk about it. And when you do, you realize that there are other individuals who’ve dealt with the same situation, and that some of them can suggest ways of coping with what has traumatized you.”

“Tell your story! You can’t let your trauma be you!”

“Till” is in theaters and available on-demand and on streaming services now.” n

Michael P Coleman is a Detroit-born, Sacramento-based freelance writer, podcast and video producer and host, and content creator. Connect with him at MichaelPColeman.com.

The Stop The Hate campaign is made possible with funding from the California State Library (CSL) in partnership with the California Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander American Affairs (CAPIAA). The views expressed on this website and other materials produced by Sac Cultural Hub Media Foundation do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the CSL, CAPIAA or the California government. Learn more about the Stop The Hate campaign at: https://capiaa.ca.gov/stop-the-hate/

THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 21 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
“People need to get out of the mindset that therapy is just sitting on a couch talking to someone across from you. In therapy, you’re free to speak and seek what you need.”
DID YOU KNOW?

Happy New Year!

www.travelwithtwlia.com
Let’s book your next adventure today
THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 23 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG 2002–2022 20th Anniversary Season is presented by The Nancy and Hank Fisher Family Fund Cécile McLorin Salvant Quintet January 27, 2023 mondaviarts.org

EXCEPTIONAL WOMEN 2022 OF

Leading the WELCOME into the 14th Annual Exceptional Women of Color (EWOC) Awards & Expo on September 20, 2022 at the DoubleTree Hotel was the Mistress of Ceremonies (MC/ Host) –star actress Neketia Henry who curated EWOC throughout the evening with intros and with our Keynote Conversation with Ms. KiKi Ayers – CEO & Founder of Ayers Publicity. Several individuals graced the stage at EWOC that included Pastor Tecoy Porter who blessed us with his message and prayer blessing. Dr. Ramona Bishop (President/CEO of Elite Public Schools) presented a special report on the state of education in our communities. Opening the EWOC program there was a profound spoken word presentation on “What makes an Exceptional Woman of Color” by EWOC 2022 Honoree – Patrice Hill (Executive Director for Sacramento Area Youth Speaks (SAYS). And then there were the unforgettable remarks by each EWOC Honoree (a total of 16) who were presented with the 2022 EWOC Excellence Awards and our Y-EWOC scholarship recipients.

SHOUT OUT of APPRECIATION and THANKS to all of the photographers (Khiry Malik, Robert Briley, Tia Gemmell), videographer – Rayford Johnson, Dj Gino (sound, lighting, music), staff of DoubleTree Hotel, ballroom decor by Hill Sisters Boogie Custom Creations, all organizations that purchased VIP table reservations, all attendees, and of course the volunteers and the EWOC/ Sac Hub team members (Lesley, Twlia, Neketia, Candice, Donna, Michal Blair, Michael Coleman, Keadrian Belcher-Harris, Vicki Blakley, Valarie Scruggs, Kimberly Bailey, Michelle Redding) and our Board of Directors (Stacy Anderson, Sheila Moody, Holly Brown, William Jahmal Miller, Gary Simon, Zoritha Thompson).

THANK YOU to all of our 2022 event sponsors and community partners along with the exhibitors for supporting the EWOC program (http://www.ewocawards.com) presented by the Sac Cultural Hub Media Foundation as this event could not be made possible without you. Over 500 photos from EWOC 2022 are posted in the Sac Hub Photo Gallery at: https://sachub. smugmug.com/Events/Year-2022

| 24 | THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG WERE YOU THERE? EWOC 2022
| 26 | THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG WERE YOU THERE? EWOC 2022

Greater Sacramento Financial Literacy Group (GSFLG) was created to educate, support and empower each other for the economic wealth and growth of our community and to help shape the future generation of wealth.

Financial literacy is the possession of the set of skills and knowledge that lets a person make informed and efficient choices with their financial resources. All people touch money and the manner in which an individual uses it is up to him or her but not being properly informed on how to make, save and invest can spell disaster.

For the Black community, it is necessary to change the habits of being consumers to becoming investors and entrepreneurs. Learning financial skills such as investing, stock trading, saving and what it takes to start a business, you are better preparing for the future and securing a financial legacy for your family.

Learn more about virtual meetings held via Zoom on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of the month.

www.facebook.com/GSFLG18 www.gsflg.org

THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 27 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
GET FINANCIALLY CONNECTED
YOU THERE? EWOC 2022
WERE

KWANZAA CELEBRATION

| 28 | THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG WERE YOU THERE? KWANZAA CELEBRATION
The Sacramento Kings, California Black Chamber of Commerce, and Greater Sacramento NAACP’s Kwanzaa Celebration held on Dec 29, 2022 included the acknowledgement of the organization’s 106th anniversary. The festivities took place inside the Golden One Center with a program of award presentations, corporate highlights, guest speakers.
THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 29 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
WERE YOU THERE? KWANZAA CELEBRATION
| 30 | THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG WERE YOU THERE? KWANZAA CELEBRATION
THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 31 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG SAVE THE DATE! www.sacculturalhub.com/media-foundation DONATE NOW! Big Day of Giving Thursday, May 4, 2023 www.bigdayofgiving.org/ organization/sacculturalhub Building a strong community of leaders by EDUCATING, PROMOTING, and INSPIRING individuals to pursue their personal, academic, and business goals.
THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 33 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
Saving Our Legacy, African Americans for Smoke Free Safe Places presents Exhibit in partnership with FREE Exhibition: February 24-26, 2023 At the 35th Annual Sacramento Black Expo, Hyatt Regency Sacramento 1209 L Street, Sacramento, CA 95834 www.savingblacklives.org www.amplify.love www.thesolproject.com For more information on this exhibit contact Twlia Laster at Twlia@thesolproject.com vhs.egusd.net www.tobaccofreekids.org A look at the Tobacco Industry’s Footprint on Black Lives and Black Lungs www.sacculturalhub.com SOL is a Project of Heluna Health, funded by the California Department of Public Health, Contract #20-10385. © January 2023
THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 35 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG Visit us at https://dot.ca.gov/ or email smallbusinessadvocate@dot.ca.gov for more information Use cell phone camera to scan QR code above to access information about Caltrans upcoming opportunities C ONTRACTING OPPORTUNITIES A VAILABLE FOR SMALL B USINESS! INCLUDING M INORITY, WOMEN, AND DISABLED V ETERANS CALL FOR APPT 530.217.9576 @ CHERRYBELLDOUGLAS NATURAL HAIR, LOCKS, FLAT IRON & BRAIDS HAIR BY MS. CHERRY PROFESSIONAL HAIRSTYLIST MS. CHERRY DOUGLAS Radio | Eblasts | Magazine | Newspaper | Street Team | Social Media One Pulse | One Voice Sacramento Black News and Media #SBMC
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Winter is lengthy and cold, and hair woes come with colder temperatures! You can do several things to help keep your hair and scalp healthy this winter. Like heat, extreme cold also affects your hair, bringing with it dry, split ends, and static.

Prevent Cold Weather Exposure

Cover your hair with a hat or a scarf to cover to help insulate your hair from the winter weather. Make sure you use a hat or scarf made of natural fibers if possible, as synthetics tend to create more static hair and damage, causing breakage. You can also wear a silk cap under your regular hat to protect your strands. You should also apply a nourishing oil or leave-in conditioner to your hair before going outside, which will help lock in moisture and protect against the cold weather. Wearing your hair in a protective style is also a fantastic way to keep your strands protected. A braid or braids, a low bun, or other protective styles all help. Remember to keep your scalp and hair moisturized, even in a protective style.

Use a Moisturizing Shampoo and Conditioner

As part of your hair care routine, using a moisturizing shampoo and conditioner is a must during the colder months. These products are specially formulated to restore hydration and keep the hair looking healthy and shiny. Look for shampoos and conditioners that are sulfate and paraben free and contain ingredients such as aloe vera juice, biotin, silk protein, and natural oils, like olive or castor oil, that are beneficial for healing dry scalp and hair. Also, be sure to use a quality heat protectant spray before you style your hair with any heated tools, such as curling irons or flat irons.

Avoid Hot Water When You Wash Your Hair

Hair in the winter is especially fragile and while a hot shower feels great, especially on a cold winter day, it can be especially damaging to hair. Using lukewarm, cool, or even cold water to wash and rinse your hair is best. Cool

or cold water tends to seal your hair cuticles, making it look shinier and healthier! Additionally try to avoid heat when you dry your hair, if possible allow your hair to air dry and only blow dry on the lowest setting you need for your hair type.

Extend Days Between Hair Washes

It is true that too much shampooing in the winter can strip your hair of its natural oils. To counteract this, cut back on how often you wash your hair during the winter months. Additionally, use a nourishing conditioner to help replenish lost moisture and hair oils, as well as a leave-in treatment or oil to further protect your locks from becoming dry.

Takeaway: Hair Care Tips for Healthy Hair This Winter Keeping your hair healthy during winter requires extra care and attention. Protect your hair from exposure to cold temperatures by using a hat or scarf. Additionally, use moisturizing shampoo and conditioner products, avoid hot water when washing your hair, and extend the amount of time between washes to help keep your hair hydrated and healthy. With these tips for healthy hair, you can easily manage and enjoy a lustrous mane all winter long!

source: https://www.trubalancehaircare.com/post/winter-hair-care-tips-how-to-keepyour-hair-healthy-during-the-winter-months

THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 37 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
www.anotherlookhairsalon.com Book your appointment now 916-688-7704 Tracy Brown Professional Hair Stylist and Co-Owner of Another Look Hair Salon 7826 Alta Valley Dr Sacramento, CA 95823 (916) 688-7704 WINTER HAIR CARE TIPS: HOW TO KEEP YOUR HAIR HEALTHY DURING THE WINTER MONTHS

NAVIGATING BLACK CALIFORNIA

Directory of Black MEDIA News Groups in California

Bay Area Registry www.bayarearegistry.com

BlackNLA www.blacknla.com

Black Cultural Events www.blackculturalevents.com

Black Voice News blackvoicenews.com

California Black Media cablackmedia.org

The Gospel Vine www.thegospelvine.com

Inland Valley News inlandvalleynews.com

LA Focus ourweekly.com

West Side Story Newspaper westsidestorynewspaper.com

Bakersfield News Group facebook.com/bakersfieldnewsobserver

Inglewood News Today inglewoodtoday.com

L.A. Sentinel lasentinel.net

• Los Angeles - KJLH 102.3

kjlhradio.com

• Bay Area - KBLX 102.9 FM kblx.com

• Sacramento - KDEE 97.5 FM kdeefm.org

L.A. Watts Times lawattstimes.com

The Oakland Post oaklandpostonline.com

Compton Herald comptonherald.org

OnMe News onmenews.com

Pace Newspaper pacenewsonline.com

Pasadena Journal pasadenajournal.com

Precinct Reporter precinctreporter.com

Sacramento Observer sacobserver.com

San Bernardino American sbamerican.com

San Francisco Bay View sfbayview.com

Sun Reporter sunreporter.com

Tri County Sentry tricountysentry.com

• Central Valley - 1001.FM Mega 100 mega100fm.iheart.com

| 38 | THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
YOU KNOW?
DID
BLACK RADIO STATIONS
FM
THE HUB’s Favorite Nationwide Black News Groups • Essence.com • TheGrio.com • BlackDoctor.org • HelloBeautiful.com • Huffpost.com/Voices/Black-Voices • Sisters from AARP
sistersletter.com • The African History Network facebook.com/TheAfricanHistoryNetworkFanpage
-

NAVIGATING BLACK CALIFORNIA

Directory of BLACK ASSOCIATION

GROUPS

in the Greater Sacramento Valley Region and Beyond

100 Black Men of Sacramento 100bmsac.org

African-Americans for Balanced Health aabh.net

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. norcal-alphas1906.com

Black American Political Association of California (BAPAC) bapacsd.org

Black Sistahs Making Friends facebook.com/groups/1091392134541999

Black Small Business Association of California facebook.com/BSBACA

Black Women for Wellness bwwla.org

Black Women Organized for Political Action (BWOPA) bwopatileleads.org

California Black Chamber of Commerce calbcc.org

California Legisative Black Caucus blackcaucus.legislature.ca.gov

Centers for Fathers & Families cffsacramento.org

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Sacramento Alumnae Chapter sacramentoalumnaedst.org

Elk Grove Chapter, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. dstegac.org

Eta Gamma Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Sacramento Chapter etagammaomega.org

Greater Sacramento Urban League gsul.org

National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Sacramento Chapter sacramentoncbw.org

National Council of Negro Women, Sacramento Chapter svsncnw.org

Neighborhood Innovation https://www.neighborhoodinnovation.com

Roberts Family Development Center robertsfdc.org

Sac Black Biz www.sacblackbiz.biz

Sacramento ACT sacact.org

Sacramento Area Black Caucus facebook.com/sacramentoarea.blackcaucus

Sacramento Area Black Golf Club sabgc.org

Sacramento Area Black Caucus facebook.com/sacramentoarea.blackcaucus

Sacramento Black Chamber of Commerce sacblackchamber.org

Sacramento Chapter of The Links sacramentolinksinc.org

Sacramento Chapter of the NAACP facebook.com/SacNAACP

Sacramento Kappa Psi Zeta Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta sacramentozetas.org

Sacramento Realtist Association sacramentorealtist.com

Sacramento Sister Circle facebook.com/groups/TheSisterCircle

Sojourner Truth African American Heritage Museum sojoartsmuseum.org

Voices of Youth voiceoftheyouth.com

THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 39 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
DID YOU KNOW?
| 40 | THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG SPONSORED ADVERTISING SECTION Abyssinia Ethiopian Restaurant (916) 481-1580 Candies Kitchen 916.439.9922 Cora Lorraines (Colos) 916-692-8948 D’s Smoking Pit 916-993-9428 Daddyo’s Smokehouse 916-821-9020 Dubplate Kitchen & Jamaican Cuisine 916-339-6978 Ermajeans Southern Cuisine Restaurant & Catering 530-749-9651 Family Pizza Take n Bake 916-333-3397 Fixins Soul Kitchen 916-999-7685 Flower’s Fish Market 916-456-0719 Louisiana Heaven 916-689-4800 Macque’s Barbeque (South Sac Location) 916-381-4119 Macque’s Barbeque (Elk Grove Location) 916-714-2910 Mo’Betta Finger Foods On Wheels 916-307-9511 Mommas Market 916-524-2782 MoMo’s Meat Market 916-452-0202 Ms. Robin’s House of Que (916) 389-0707 Muhammads Meats Vegetables and Desserts (415) 862-8997 Play Makers Toucha Class Restaurant 916.451.1786 Q1227 Restaurant 916.899.5146 Queen Sheba 916-446-1223 South Restaurant 916-382-9722 Stage Coach 916-422-9296 Toris Place Soul Food 916-646-6038 Just a reminder from THE HUB to support our local soul food restaurants in an around the Sacramento Region. Dine in and/or order for delivery and pick up. www.sacculturalhub.com/entertainment/headlines/supporting-our-local-soul-food-restaurants-in-sacramento

BLACK HAIR SALON & BARBERSHOP DIRECTORY IN AND AROUND SACRAMENTO

24K Salon & Spa

5031 Stockton Blvd Sacramento, CA 95820 (916) 579-6284

Another Look Hair Salon and Barber Shop 6666 Valley Hi Dr Sacramento, CA 95823 (916) 688-7505

Ashley Jayes Beauty Bar 5211 Elkhorn Blvd Sacramento, CA (916) 420-8208

Axis Barber Shop 2850 Northgate Blvd Sacramento, CA 95833 (916) 800-3233

Bohemian Aesthetic Atelier 106 L St # 1 Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 822-2646

Charmed Lashes & Beauty Bar

621 L St Capitol Mall Alley Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 936-2015

Crystal’s Hair Salon 9117 E. Stockton Blvd Suite 100 (916) 549-8972

Darryl’s Hair Studio & Spa 6801 Fair Oaks Blvd (916) 600 3736

Design R Touch Hair Salon

1510 16th St #106 (916) 968-8935

Diva Glam Spa Parties 2425 20th St (916) 272-5609

Double Take Hair Gallery 1007 12th Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 451-4600

Dominick’s Family of Industries Salon and Barber 3400 Bradshaw Rd A3 Sacramento, CA 95827 (916) 346-4616

Dream Girls Fine Hair Imports Salon 9090 Elk Grove Blvd Elk Grove, CA 95624 (916) 686-5030

Dutch’d Couture Extension Studio 621 Capitol Mall (Inside Sola Salons) (916) 821-4747

E Z Style & Supply Barbershop

3731 Stockton Blvd Sacramento, CA 95820 (916) 822-5081

Exclusive Hair Design 930 Alhambra Blvd #150 Sacramento, CA 95816 (916) 498-8374

Express Weave Bar 3526 Stockton Blvd Sacramento, CA

95820 (916) 823-5770

Exquisite U Beauty Boutique 2550 Valley Rd. #9 Sacramento, CA 95821 (916) 338-1137

Fadem Up Barbershop 3824 Stockton Blvd Sacramento, CA 95820 (916) 544-4062

Fadez on 20th 2423 20th St Sacramento, CA 95818 (916) 457-7913

Hair Eco Salon 6845 Five Star Blvd Ste E Rocklin, CA, 95677 (916) 242-9939 www.hairecosalon.com

Hasheem The Barber 1510 16th Street Ste 124 Inside Phenix Salon Studios Sacramento, CA 95814 (703) 200-2780

Immaculate Cuts Barbershop U.S. Bank Tower, Suite#2 (Inside Sola Salons) 621 Capitol Mall Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 271-3639

J Style in Co. Wellness & Beauty 6720 Fair Oaks Blvd Suite 103 (916) 346-7203

J. Rosé Hair Salon 6720 Madison Ave Ste 6 Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 967-7673

J’s Remixed Hair Design

2740 Arden Way Ste 224 Sacramento, CA 95825 (916) 822-2825

Kajmir Hair Studio/I Twist Sacramento 1910 16th St Sacramento, CA 95811 (916) 444-9370

Keela Hair Studio & Extension Boutique 2527 J St Sacramento, CA 95816 (916) 376-7906

Kingofcurls

4751 Freeport Blvd, ste B Sacramento, CA 95822 (916) 736-0808

Kings Joint 1900 Terracina Dr Ste 120 Sacramento, CA 95834 (916) 571-5711

Margarets Hair Gallery 1610 Fulton Ave Sacramento, CA 95825 margaretshairsalon.com

Marichal Salon, Barber Shop & Suites 2648 Del Paso Blvd Sacramento, CA 95815 (916) 226-7099

Mo Better Hair Salon & Barber 10401 Folsom Blvd Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 (916) 364-3400

My Beauty Bar & Spa

9108 Laguna Main St Elk Grove, CA 95758 (916) 684-8111

Naturalistic Salon Spa 2031 Yale St Sacramento, CA 95818 (916) 594-7274

Posh Extension Bar 1115 21st St Sacramento, CA 95811 (916) 539-8762

Rockin kidz kutz 9010 Fairway Dr Suite 113 Roseville, CA 95678 (916) 633-9392

Royal Cuts Barbershop 4400 47th Ave #102 Sacramento, CA 95824 (916) 424-2887

The Next Episode Hair Salon 2201 Northgate Blvd Sacramento, CA 95833 (916) 519-9045

Tisha’s Braids 8245 Florin Rd, Ste A2 Sacramento, CA 95828 (916) 381-8894

Urban Beauty Salon & Spa 4444 Manzanita Ave #2 Carmichael, CA 95608 (916) 891-5984

THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 | 41 | ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG
E-mail contact@sacculturalhub.com with any additions or corrections to the list of Black-owned salons and barbershops (composed by BSBA-Black Small Business Association of California - bsba-ca.org/)
| 42 | THE HUB MAGAZINE WINTER 2023 ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG WERE YOU THERE? BLACK WOMAN OWNED. LOCALLY PRODUCED. NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED. Subscribe Today - 4 Fabulous Issues | Collectors Issues to Archive Forever www.sacculturalhub.com STACEY ABRAMS SECOND RUN FOR GOVERNOR OF GEORGIA KEEPING THE U.S. SENATE & HOUSE BLUE ARE YOU READY TO VOTE IN 2022 MIDTERM ELECTIONS? celebrating YES! I’D LIKE TO HAVE THE MAGAZINE DELIVERED TO MY MAILBOX SUBSCRIBE ONLINE! http://www.sacculturalhub.com/subscription OR SUBSCRIBE BY MAIL: Name: Address: City:______________________________________________________________State:____________________________Zip: Email: q Payment enclosed Payment Method: q Check q Credit Card q Other Credit Card # (VISA/MC/AMEX): Expiration: _____/_______ CVV:_________ Phone: Billing Name: Billing Address: City:______________________________________________________________State:____________________________Zip: Signature:________________________________________________________________Date: Make check payable to: Sac Cultural Hub Mail form to: Sac Cultural Hub, Inc., 7902 Gerber Road, #367, Sacramento, CA 95828
ISSUU.COM/THEHUBMAG For the who, what, and where stay updated online with our EVENTS page and sign up to receive THE HUB’s URBAN WEEKLY e-newsletter www.sacculturalhub.com/urban-weekly THINGS TO DO, PLACES TO GO For more events in Sacramento and beyond, go to www.sacculturalhub.com/events and list your event for free online. ADVERTISER INDEX OF HUB PARTNERS To advertise in THE HUB Magazine, e-mail contact@sacculturalhub.com or call (916) 234-3589 ANOTHER LOOK HAIR SALON www.anotherlookhairsalon.com CAL HOPE | DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES www.calhope.org CALIFORNIA BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE www.calbcc.org CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY www.library.ca.gov CALTRANS | DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION dot.ca.gov CAPSITY www.capsity.com COLEMAN COMMUNICATIONS www.michaelpcoleman.com CRYSTAL’S HAIR SALON 916.549.8972 DOUBLE TAKE HAIR GALLERY www.facebook.com/tavia.jenkins GOREE & THOMPSON REAL ESTATE www.goreeandthompson.com JAMES THE BARBER AND STYLIST (916) 514-2539 KDEE 97.FM www.kdeefm.org MIXED INSTITUTE OF COSMETOLOGY www.mix-ed.com SAVING OUR LEGACY, AFRICANS AMERICANS FOR SMOKE FREE SAFE PLACES www.thesolproject.com THE GOSPEL VINE www.thegospelvine.com THE WEDDING FACTOR neketiab@gmail.com TRAVEL WITH TWLIA AGENCY www.travelwithtwlia.com UC DAVIS MONDAVI CENTER mondavi.centerdavis.org
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