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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Welcome!

to ‘The Deux-Sèvres Monthly’ magazine... Issue 20: October 2012. Firstly let me say a HUGE Thank You to so many of you for coming to visit us at o u r fi r s t F o i r e C o m m e r c i a l e i n Secondigny last month. The day was a great success and we are now preparing to do it all again next year! Well, the weather is changing - I’ve noticed that the mornings have turned a little cooler now and we have already ordered our firewood in preparation for starting the burner. Wood burners are beautiful and very economical but they are a lot of hard work....thank goodness Rob loves chopping the wood! Hope you all have a happy October.

à plus, Sarah.

Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or Tel: 05 49 70 26 21.

Annual Subscription. If   you   would  like  to  receive  a  copy  of   ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’   magazine  by  post  each  month,  please  complete  this  form  and  send   to  La  Bartière,  79130  Secondigny.  Please  enclose  a  cheque  to  cover   postage  for  the  year. 28€  within  France,  18€  to  addresses  in  UK. (Unfortunately  the  cheaper  ‘printed  papers’  rate  cannot  be  applied   to  addresses  within  France,  only  when  sending  abroad)   Full  Name: Postal  Address: Postcode:

Country:

Tel: Email: Please make  cheques  payable  to  SARAH  BERRY.

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

© Sarah  Berry  2012.    All  rights  reserved. Material   may   not   be   reproduced   without   permission.    While   care   is   taken   to   ensure   that   articles  and   features   are   accurate,   Sarah   Berry   accepts  no   liability   for   reader   dissatisfaction.    The   opinions   expressed   and  experiences   shared   are   given   by   individual   authors   and   do   not   necessarily   represent   the   views   or   opinions  of  the  publisher. Please   ensure   you   verify   that   the   company  you  are   dealing   with   is  a   registered   trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly>>   est   édité   par   Sarah   Berry,   La   Bartière,   79130,   Secondigny.  Tél:   05  49  70   26   21.     Directeur   de   la   publication   et   rédacteur   en   chef:   Sarah   Berry.   Crédits   photos:   Sarah   Berry,   Clkr   et   morgeufile.com.   Impression:   Raynaud   Imprimeurs,   zone   industrielle,   BP13,   79160,   Coulonges-­‐ sur-­‐l’Autize.     Dépôt   légal:  octobre   2012  -­‐   Tirage:  5  000   exemplaires.     Siret:  515   249  738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

CONTENTS

What’s On.......................................................................................................4 Getting  Out  &  About......................................................................................6 Hobbies,  Clubs  &  Associations.....................................................................13 Take  a  Break..................................................................................................14 Our  Furry  Friends..........................................................................................15 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness..............................................................................16 The  Great  Outdoors......................................................................................17 French  Life,  Food  &  Drink.............................................................................20 French  Adventures.......................................................................................24 Motoring.......................................................................................................25 Communications...........................................................................................26 Building  &  Renovation..................................................................................29 Business,  Finance  &  Property.......................................................................34

THIS MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS   79  Renovations........................................................................................30 Abordimmo.............................................................................................39 Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)......................................................... 25 Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  D/Glazing).............................2 AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)................................................................... 31 Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)......................................................... 29 Andrew  Longman  (Plumber)...................................................................29 Andrew  Quick  Building  Services............................................................. 31 An  English  Nursery  in  France  (Garden  Centre).......................................19 Antiquites  Decoration  &  Galerie  du  309................................................ 6 Architect  anglais  en  France  (Vaughan  Abbott)...................................... 33 Art  Course,  Josie  Bounds........................................................................ 6 Auberge  de  Blanzay................................................................................ 21 Blevins  Franks  Financial  Management  Ltd............................................. 35 Bois  Nature  Energie  (Firewood  Supplier)............................................... 18 British  Mobile  Mechanic  (John  Purchase)..............................................25 Cabinet  Harel  (Chartered  Accountant)................................................... 36 Cafe  Cour  du  Miracle.............................................................................. 22 Café  des  Belles  Fleurs............................................................................. 20 Chris  Bassett  Construction..................................................................... 32 Chris  Dwyer  (Handyman)....................................................................... 30 Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)......................................... 6 Cottage  Services  (Garden  Maintenance)............................................... 19 CSB  Construction.................................................................................... 30 Cut  46  (Hair  Salon).................................................................................. 16 Dave  Bowring  (Electrician)..................................................................... 32 D  J  Maintenance  (Handyman)................................................................ 30 David  Watkins  (Chimney  Sweep)........................................................... 32 deVere  Group  (Financial  Advisors)......................................................... 37 Energie-­‐79............................................................................................... 29 Fresco  Interiors  (Interior  Design)............................................................33 Garage  Planchet  (Renault)......................................................................26 Gardening  &  Cleaning  Services  (Dean  Smalley)..................................... 37 George  Rayner  Computers..................................................................... 26 Hair  by  Janet........................................................................................... 16 Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers)........................... 32 Holistic  Therapy  (Soul  to  Sole)............................................................... 17 Homes  in  France  (Estate  Agent)..............................................................39 Insink  Plumbing...................................................................................... 29 John  Etherington  (Home  and  Garden)................................................... 19 John  Snee  (Groundworks  &  Septic  Tanks).............................................. 34 John  Spray  Maçonnerie  (Stonemason).................................................. 32 Julie’s  Cleaning  Services......................................................................... 37 Keith  Bassett  General  Building  Services................................................. 31 La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier)....................... 33 La  Joie  de  Vivre....................................................................................... 6 Le  Forgeron  (Ornamental  Ironwork).......................................................32 Le  Logis  (Rare  Breed  Pigs  in  France)....................................................... 21 Leggett  Immobilier.................................................................................. 38 Man  &  Van.............................................................................................. 26 Michael  Glover  (Plasterer,  Renderer  &  Tiler)......................................... 32 Michael  Hobson  (Painter  &  Decorator).................................................. 33 MS  Electrique  (Electrician)..................................................................... 33 Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances............................................................ 26 Neal’s  Yard  Consultant  (Suzanne  Thorne).............................................. 16 Nathan  Foster  Building  Services............................................................. 31 Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology)...................................................17 Phil  Savage  (General  House  Repairs)......................................................33 Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire)............................................................... 34 Plombiere  Anglais  en  France  (Plumber)................................................. 29 Poitou  Property  Services.........................................................................38 Premier  Autos  -­‐  Mike  Lane  (Mechanic).................................................. 25 R&A  Services  (Renovation)..................................................................... 30 RDK  Roofing  &  Building  Services............................................................ 32 Red,  White  &  Blue.................................................................................. 22 Restaurant  des  Canards.......................................................................... 22 Robert  Walker  Plomberie  (Plumbing,  Heating,  Air  con)........................ 30 Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)................................ 27 Satellite  TV  (Nigel  Gubb)........................................................................ 26 sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Groundwork  &  Construction).................................33 Shaun  Grice  (Home  Renovation)............................................................ 30 Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)................................................................... 36 Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)................................................ 34 Steve  Enderby......................................................................................... 33 Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation).......................................... 8 The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre................................................25 The  Market  (Luché-­‐sur-­‐Brioux).............................................................. 6 Total  Renovation  Services  (Michael  Dominey)....................................... 29 Tracey  Bowring  (Hairdresser)................................................................. 16 Traducteurs  Assermentés  sarl  (Sworn  Translators)................................ 9 Val  Assist  (Translation  Services)............................................................. 8 VeVo  British  Boutique............................................................................ 20 VMP  (Windows  &  Doors)........................................................................2 Page 3


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

What’s On... October 2012 5th October  -­‐  'Sunny  Valentine  Quartet'  LIVE  Jazz  Group Playing   at   Auberge   de   Blanzay,   86400.   Moules   Frites   available   €9.50,  bookings  are  necessary  for  the  food.  Tel:  05  49  87  50  87 5th  Oct  -­‐  Phoenix  Cards  &  Gifts. At  the  Tipsy  bar,  Coulonges  sur  L'autize,  4-­‐6pm.  New  Autumn/Winter   range  from  Phoenix  available  incl   Christmas  cards,  wrapping  paper  &   gifts.  Contact  Della  James  05  49  05  78  61/  dellajamesie2@aol.com  for   info  or  to  request  a  catalogue. 5th  -­‐  7th  October  -­‐  Hope  Association  Book  Sale 10am  to  3pm  at   The  Salle  des  Fetes,  Clussais  la  Pommeraie,  79190.   See  P7  for  more  info. 6th  October-­‐  Pomm  ‘Expo,  Secondigny.   Opening   Ceremony   at   2.30pm.   Annual   apple   festival   with   this   year’s  theme:  Water.    For  more  information  see  P7  and  back  page. 6th  October  -­‐  Pétanque  Competition At  Lac  des  Effres,  Secodigny  at  2.30pm 7th  October  -­‐  Pomm’Expo  Cycle  Race Around  the  streets  of  Secondigny,  2pm. 7th  October  -­‐  Fêtes  des  Plantes Around  the  Chateau   grounds,  Bressuire.  10am  -­‐   6pm.    Please  see   poster  on  P7  for  more  details. 8th  &  9th  October  -­‐  Exposition  de  champignons. At  La  Courde.  See  P.7  for  more  details. 9th  October  -­‐  Randonnée  Pédestre  (Walking/Hiking) 9am  outside  the  Mairie,  Secondigny. 11th  October  -­‐  Pomm’Expo  -­‐  Talk  on  Water  Mills At  le  petit  théâtre,  Secondigny  at  2.30pm.    Entry  free. 12th  October  -­‐  LIVE  Music  with  Kader At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    See  P20  for  more  details. 12th  October  -­‐  Bilingual  Social  Evening At   The  Market,  Luché  sur  Brioux.  With  wine  and  beer  and  fun  quiz.     Please  see  P6  for  more  info. 13th  October  -­‐  Boules  en  Bois  competition At  Lac   des  Effres,  Secondigny  at   2pm.    Organised  by  la  Société  de   Boules. 14th  October  -­‐  Giant  Market  /  Vide  Grenier In  the  streets  of  Secondigny  -­‐  all  day,  starts  early. 16th  October:  Wine  &  Card  event  in  aid  of  MayDay  Mes  Amis  Charity. At   La  Bodiniere,  79320,   Moncoutant,   7.00-­‐9.00pm.  Phoenix  Cards   &   Gifts,   Loulesbelles   Clothes   &   Jewellery   and   discuss   your   Christmas  order   with   Red,   White  and   Blue.   Tel:  05   49   65   04   09   joashforth.phoenix@gmail.com. 19th  October  -­‐  'Open  Mic  Night'  with  Dennis  DeBanks. At   Auberge   de   Blanzay,   86400.   Chilli   and   Rice   available   €9.50   bookings  are  necessary  for  food.  Tel:  05  49  87  50  87 20th  October  -­‐  VeVo  British  Boutique Massive   Clearance   Sale   at   Café   des   Belles   Fleurs,   Fenioux   11am-­‐5pm.    See  P5  more  more  info. 20th  &  21st  October  -­‐  Fête  Automne  des  plantes  et  du  jardin Big  plant  and  garden  event  at  Prisse  la  Charriere,  79360 27th  October  -­‐  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs  -­‐  1st  Anniversary  Party LIVE  music  with  Rock  duo  ‘Alan  Vee  &  Andy  Em’,  prizes  and  food  -­‐   Entrance  free.    See  P20  for  more  details.

What’s Coming Up... 2nd December  -­‐  Christmas  Fair. At   Melleran,   11am   -­‐   4pm   in   aid   of   Cancer   Support   Deux-­‐ Sèvres.   To  reserve  a  table   please  book  early  as  they  are  much   in   demand.   Contact   Ann   on   05   49   27   22   83   or   email   theashwells@googlemail.com

Monthly services   in   the   English   speaking  Anglican   Church   in   Deux-­‐Sèvres Jassay The   Chaplaincy   of   Christ   the   Good   Shepherd,   Poitou-­‐ Charentes,    has  a  Home  Group  Service  at  Jassay    commencing  at   11.00am  on  every  2nd   Sunday  in   the  month.  It   is   held   at   the   home   of   Ann   White,   a   warm  welcome  awaits  everyone  for   a   time  of  worship  and  fellowship. St Leger The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also  holds  services  on  the  1st  Sunday  of   each  month  at  10.30am   at  St  Leger  near   Melle.  After  each  service,  tea  or  coffee  is  served   and  an  opportunity  to  meet  other  people  in  the  area. Parthenay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also  holds  services  on  the  4th  Sunday  of  each  month  at  10.30am   in   the   Presbytery   Rooms,   rue   de   la   Citadelle,   Parthenay,   opposite   St   Croix   Church.   After   each   service,  tea   or   coffee   is   served  and  everyone  is  invited  to  a  'bring  and  share'  lunch.   For   further  details  about  venue  and   services  consult  our   website   on  www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com

Monthly services  in   the   English   speaking   Anglican  Church  in  the   Vendée: Puy de Serre All   Saints,  Vendée  holds  two  services  each  month,   on   the  2nd  and   4th   Sundays  at   the  church   of   St.  Marthe,   Puy   de   Serre,  at   11am.     After   each  service,  tea  and   coffee  is  served  in  the   parish  room  and   everyone  is  invited  to  a  ‘bring  and  share’  lunch. Other  services  are  held  in   the  west  of  the  Vendée,  in  La  Chapelle   Achard  and  La  Chapelle  Palluau.     For  details  of  these,  please  check   the  website:    www.AllSaintsVendee.com.

A VERY  WARM  WELCOME  awaits  you  at  ESCOVAL   (The  English  Speaking  Church  of  the  Valley  of  the  Loire).     Communion  Services  are  held  on  the  3rd  Sunday  of  each  month   at   La  Chapelle  de  la  Bonne  Dame  de  Ranton  at  11.30am  followed  by  a   Bring  and  Share  lunch.   Full   details   of   how   to   find   us   may   be   found   on   our   website   at:   www.escoval.org   or   please  telephone   us   at:  05  49  66  79   14.     Our  GPS  address  is  46˚59'25.30  N    0˚02'06.22  W.

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY                                                                                              

                                                                         

Open 6-8p                                    La            Vendee  Chippy m                                                          Traditional  Fish  &  Chips  in  France!

Paperback Jan Books  in  English

Wednesdays (Oct 17th, 24th, 31st only) Bar ‘Auberge le St Vincent’, St Vincent Sterlanges Thursdays (Oct 18th, 25th only) Bar ‘La Rando’, Mervent. Fridays (Sept 19th, 26th only) Bar ‘Au Bon Coin’, Thoursais Bouildroux

3rd Oct:  Cafe  Cour  de  Miracle,  Vouvant.  2.30pm-­‐4.30pm   4th  Oct:    Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud.  2pm-­‐5pm   4th  Oct:    Bar  La  Cabane  de  Vouhé,  Vouhé.  6.30-­‐8pm   5th  Oct:    Bar  de  la  Paix,  Thouars.  12pm-­‐2pm 5th  Oct:    Le  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges  sur  l’Autize.  4pm-­‐6pm 7th  Oct:    Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  2pm-­‐4pm 9th  Oct:    Pizzeria  Resto  Bar,  Bressuire.  2.30pm-­‐4.30pm 11th  Oct:  Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie.  2pm-­‐5pm     12th  Oct:    Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay.  11am-­‐4pm 13th  Oct:    Cafe  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole.  10am-­‐1pm 25th  Oct:    Joie  de  Vivre,  Moncoutant.  2pm-­‐5pm

For more  info  please  email:  lavendeechippy@hotmail.fr

For more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

+ a

little something extra...

Anyone who fancies seeing their writing prowess in print, could think about writing a book review for the spot on Page 12: ‘YOUR Book Reviews’. Sarah is always looking for budding authors to write a piece about 150 words long, describing their take on a particular book. I am offering a prize of one free book to anyone who is successful in having their review printed.

We would  love  to  show  more  of  YOUR  Book  Reviews.  If  you  would  like  to  share  one  with  us,   please  send  it  on  an  email  to:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Open 6-8p m

Fish 4 Chip Fish, Chips & mushy peas!

Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket) Tel: 06 37 53 56 20, or visit: www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

Reel Fish & Chips Traditional English style Fish & Chips

3rd October -  The Canteen, Etusson 5th October -  Bar Tabc PMU, Bouille-Loretz 6th October -  Cafe des Sports, L'Absie 17th October - The Canteen, Etusson 18th October - St Martin de Sanzay 19th October -  Bar Tabac, Genneton

There are  lots  of  Vide  greniers  taking  place   around  the  region. To  find  out  the  latest  information  try:   www.vide-­‐greniers.org  or

18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H00 - 22H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00

Tel: 06 04 14 23 94, or visit: www.reelfishandchips.net

www.rendezvousduchineur.unblog.fr

Local Markets Tuesdays:

Wednesdays: Thursdays: Fridays: Saturdays:

Sundays:

• Lencloitre (1st Monday in month) (dept.86) • Lezay • Coulonges-sur-l’Autize • Thouars • Parthenay • Sauzé Vaussais • Niort • Thouars • Melle • • • • • •

Chef Boutonne Airvault Niort, St. Maixent l’École Fontenay le Comte Neuville (dept.86)

Mr T’s Friterie Plat à Emporter Traditionnel Britannique

With regular venues at:

• Aulnay • Beauvoir-sur-Niort • Loulay

Open 6-9p m

• Matha • St. Hilaire de Villefranche • St. Jean d’Angély

See www.frying2nite.com for details or call 06 02  22  44  74

Photo: Lisa Roberts

Mondays:

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2012 (remaining): Thursday 1  November........... All  Saints’  Day  (La  Toussaint) Sunday  11  November............ Armistice  Day  (Jour  d’Armistice  1918) Tuesday  25  December........... Christmas  Day  (Noël)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Getting Out & About...

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Pomm’Expo, Secondigny A word  from  Monsieur  le  maire:  

The Pomm’Expo   (Apple  festival)  represents  one   of   the  highlights  of   the  year  for   Secondigny. For  this,   the   58th   Pomm’Expo,   which   will   take   place   between   6  -­‐14  October,  Secondigny  has  chosen  as   this  year’s  theme  to  honour   one  of  the  treasures  of   humanity  –  Water.

This valuable  resource  that  is  seen  in  our  district   with   the  river  Thouet  and  Sevres  Nantaise,  and  other  small  rivers,  naturally   make   the   apple   the  flagship   produce   of   the   Gatîne.     Through   this   theme,   Secondigny   with   water   mills   and   the   lake   Effres,   offers   a   refreshing  9   days  for   tourists,  fishing  enthusiasts  or  simply  lovers  of   unspoiled  nature. A  big  thank  you  to  Jean-­‐Pierre  Collineau  of   the  Horticultural  Society,   and  its  employees   for  making  the   main  display.     The  scenery  of  the   great  Tivoli,  home  of   fishermen,  the  wheel,  wells  and  water  will   be   popular  with  our  visitors. In  2012  as  usual,  nature  and  painting  will  come  together  on  the  theme:   <Nature  and  Water  Reflections>.  Individuals,  associations  and  schools   of   painting   were   invited   to   compose   and   expose   the   fruit   of   their   labour.     Please   note   that   children   can   too,  give   free   rein   to   their   imagination  <aquatique>:  they  have  their  support  in  a  Tivoli.

The Pomm'Expo   committee   continues   the   public   awareness   to   the   protection  of  the  environment  while  providing  a  range  of  activities  in  a   fun  and  festive  way.    Water,  a  rare  precious  commodity  -­‐  make  sure  we   all  respect  and  preserve  it! This  year  it  will  do  as  well  as  previous  years.  Even   better!   What   would   Pomm'Expo   be   without   its   regional   products,   teaching  workshops,  paintings   and  trade  show?    The  funfair,  the  large  market  and   garage   sale   will   close  the   event   on   Sunday  14th   October  2012,  with   the  sale  of  apples  available  at   each  entrance  into  Secondigny. Pomm'Expo  members  are  well   aware  that  without   the   support   of   Collectives,   Sponsors,   Associations,   Schools   and   Colleges,  they  would  not   realize  the  impossibility  of   this  great   event   with   such   magnitude.   They  appreciate   the   support   of   the   Région   Poitou-­‐Charentes,  the  department  of  Deux-­‐Sèvres,  Pays  de  Gatine,  of   the  Communauté  de  Communes,  Sponsors,  Bakers,  of  Arborists,  of  the   Fédération   de  la  Chasse  et  de  la  Pêche,  of  the   Société  d’Horticulture.   The  Committee  would  like  to  thank  them  all  warmly. All   the  Pomm'Expo   team  look   forward  to  seeing  you  in  Secondigny   for  a  visit  from  Saturday  6th  to  Sunday  14th  October  2012.  Thank  you   to  our  thousands  of  loyal  visitors,  of  all  ages. Monsieur  G.Vitré Mayor  and  President  of  the  Pomm’Expo  Committee

THE HOPE  ASSOCIATION  -­‐  HELPING  ANIMALS  IN  NEED   THREE  DAY  BOOK  SALE  to  be  held  at  the  SALLE  DES  FETES,   79190  CLUSSAIS  LA  POMMERAIE   (D45  Sauzé  Vaussais  to  Lezay  Road)

FRIDAY  5th,  SATURDAY  6th  &  SUNDAY  7th  OCTOBER Doors  open  10am  to  3pm.     THOUSANDS  OF  ENGLISH  AND  FRENCH  BOOKS  FOR  JUST  1  EURO  EACH.   BRIC  A  BRAC~JULES  HALL  WITH  HER  LOVELY  SCARVES  AND  SPICES~EDDIE  GRIFFEE   WITH  HER  AMAZING  SELECTION  OF  GREETINGS  CARDS~LAURA  WALKER  SHOWING   HER  STUNNING  HAND  MADE  JEWELLERY~RAFFLE~REFRESHMENTS  WITH  YUMMY   HOME  BAKED  CAKES~ENGLISH  FISH  &  CHIPS~BACON  BUTTIES  and   much  much  more  to  enjoy! ALL  MONEY  RAISED  FROM  THIS  EVENT  WILL  GO  TO  HELP  ANIMALS  IN  NEED  AND   SUPPORT  OTHER  ANIMAL  ASSOCIATIONS If  you  have  books  to  donate,  please  email:      givebooks4hope@gmail.com        

Visit our  website  www.hopeassoc.org

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Parlez-vous Frenglish?

by Sue  Burgess

Je ne   parle   pas   le  français.  Don't   you?   If   you  speak  English   you   most  certainly  know  a  lot  more  French  words  than  you  think. A  great   number  of   words  of  French  origin  have  entered  the  English   language. According  to  different  sources,  nearly  30%  of   all  English   words   have  a   French   origin.   This   fact   suggests  that   80,000   words   should   appear   in   this   list.   However,   this   list   does   not   include   derivatives  formed  in  English,  but  only  the  words   imported  as  such   directly  from  French  (for  instance  joy  and  joyous  can  be  found  on   the   list,  but   not   joyful,  joyfulness).  Neither   does   the  list   include   words   which   are   combinations   of   words   of   French   origin   with   words   of   origin  other  than  French  (e.g.  Ice-­‐cream,  sunray,  jellyfish). It  also  excludes  English-­‐made  combinations  of  words  of  French  origin   (e.g.  grapefruit  is  made  of  grape  and   fruit).  This  list  does  not  include   words  that  come  from  French  but  were  introduced  into  the  English   language  via  another  language  than  French. Most   of   the   French   vocabulary   now   appearing   in   English   was   imported  over  the  centuries  following  the  Norman  Conquest  of  1066,   when   England  came   under   the  administration  of  Norman   peoples.   The   majority   of   the   population   of   England   continued   to   use   their   Anglo  Saxon  language,  but  it   was   influenced  by  the  language  of   the   ruling  elite. Words   of   French   origin   often   refer   to   more   abstract   or   elaborate   notions   than   their   Anglo-­‐Saxon   equivalents   (e.g.   Liberty/freedom,   justice  /fairness),  and  are  therefore   of  less  frequent   use  in   everyday   language.  It  may  not  be  the  case  of  all   English  words  of  French  origin   though.

The vocabulary   of   heraldry  has  been   heavily  influenced   by  French   (blazon,  or,  argent).  Sometimes  used  in  heraldry,  some  mythological   beasts   (dragon,   griffin,   hippogriff)   or   exotic   animals  (lion,  leopard)   draw  their   name  from   French.  It   is  also  the  case  for   some  animals   native  to  Europe,  (falcon,  squirrel). Vocabulary  /  Vocabulaire For  this   month,  a  little  puzzle  -­‐   match   the   proper  English   words  to   their  Frenglish  equivalent >après-­‐ski/après  ski/apres  ski  (n) >clientèle/clientele  (n) >communiqué/communique  (n) >déja-­‐vu >en  route   >erquese >fiancé/fiancée >fête/fet >impromptu >impasse >joie  de  vivre >pied-­‐à-­‐terre >trompe  l'oeil >tour  de  force >venue

>Without any  planning > f e e l i n g   o f   h a v i n g   experienced   something   before >after-­‐ski  pastimes   >boy/girl   to   whom   one   is   engaged   >impressive  achievement     >meeting-­‐place   >on  the  way   >painted   to   give   the  illusion   of  reality   >small   town   house   used   for   short  periods   >official  statement   >customers   >good  behaviour/manners   >party/garden  party     >a  dead  end  situation   >state  of  happiness

After the  rise  of  Henry  Plantagenet  to  the  throne   of  England,   other   forms   of   dialectal   French   may   have   gained   in   influence   to   the   detriment   of   Norman  French   (notably  the  variants   of   Anjou   where   the   House   of   Plantagenet   came   from,   and   possibly   Poitevin,   the   tongue  of  Eleanor  of  Aquitaine).  With  the  English  claim  to  the  throne   of  France,  the  influence  of  the  language   in  use  at  the  royal  court   of   France   in  Paris  increased.  The  cultural  influence  of  France  remained   strong  in  the  following  centuries.   Norman   rule   of   England   had   a   lasting   impact   on   British   society.   Words  from  Anglo-­‐   Norman   or   Old   French  include   terms  related  to   feudalism  and  other  institutions  (chancellor,  government,  parliament,   chivalry),   the   organisation   of   religion   (abbey,   clergy),   the   nobility   (baron,   count,   dame,   duke)   and   the   art   of   war   (armour,   baldric,   dungeon). The   Norman   origin   of   the   British   monarchy   is   still   visible   in   expressions  like  Prince  Regent,   heir  apparent,   Princess  Royal,  where   the  adjective  is  placed  after  the  noun,  like  in  French.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY UP

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Letters for the Toilet

On arrival in France, Blair McKewen got a knock on the door and the 'facteur' asked "Où est votre boîte à lettres?" Blair thought that the postman was asking "Où est votre toilette" and led him down the entrance hall and through the kitchen. Maybe you have several such short funny stories of misunderstandings in French? If you send them to Peter (contact@traducteurs-assermentes.fr) and he receives enough good ones, he will print them in a new column starting in the new year. Please add your name and whether you'd like it printed or not.

Notes from the North September  was  a  busy  month  for   the  Northern  Section  of  the  Royal   British  Legion,  Poitou-­‐Charentes  Linazay  Branch. We  began  the   month   on  at   the   produce   show  of  Les  Jardiniers  du   Poitou,  in  the  beautiful  gardens  of   Le  Logis  du  Theil.  Our  stand  was   manned  by  members  of  the  Northern  Section  who   enjoyed  the  day   immensely.   The   produce   and   entertainment   made   for   a   very   enjoyable  day. The   5th  of  the  month   saw  us  at   our  second  trip  to  a  vineyard  in  Le   Puy  Notre  Dame.  The  proprietor  took  us  on  a  trip  around   the  vines,   described   methods  of  production  and   then   took  us  into  the  tufa   caves  below  the  chateau  and  vineyards.  The  tour  was  followed  by  a   very  generous  wine  tasting,  and  many  of  us  took  advantage  of  the   visit  to  fill   our   wine   racks.  One  recommendation  here   is  to  always   have  a  nominated  driver  when  going  on  wine  tasting  trips  as  some   hosts  can  be  extremely  generous. The  commemoration  for   the  relief  of  Parthenay  took  place  on  the   6th  September,  and   Branch   members  and  visitors  were  invited  to   attend,  as  we   are  every  year.    This   was  held  at  the  memorial  in  the   Jardin  du  Public  -­‐  a  short  but  moving  ceremony.

Important! Rules change for Winter Fuel Payments for Ex-pats in the EEA for 2012/2013. See if you now qualify... The Department   of   Work  and   Pensions  (DWP)   have   announced   that  ex-­‐pats  over  60  years  of  age  (Born  before  5th  July  1951)  are   now  able  to  claim  the  Winter   Fuel   Payment,  even  if  they  did  not   qualify  for  it  before  they  left  the  UK. Under   the   new  rules,  a  claimant   should   be  of  suitable   age  and   “have  a  genuine  and   sufficient  link  with  the  UK,  for  example,  you   have  lived  or  worked  in  the  UK  for  most  of  your  working  life”. Your   entitlement   to   a   Winter   Fuel   Payment   depends   on   your   circumstances   in   the  qualifying  week,  for   winter   2012/13  this  is   17-­‐23  September  2012.  

‘The Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’  magazine’s  Foire  Commercial   was   the   next   event  on  our   monthly  calendar   on   8th   September,  and   once   again   members   and   our   stand   were   in   attendance.   It   was   an   interesting  and   productive   day  for   the   Branch  as   several   persons   were   interested   in   joining   our   ranks,   and   should   have   received   their  membership  forms  by  the  time  we  go  to  press. Our  last   event  of  the  month   is  at  Paperback  Jan's  open  day  on  the   30th  September,  and  as  I  write  we  are  organizing  the  horse  racing,   tombola  and  tea  and  coffee  stands. October   will   be  another   busy  time  with   the   commencement  of  Remembrance  Tide  and  the   delivery  of  Poppy  Boxes  around  the  region.  Please   dig   deep   when   you   buy   your   Poppy   and   wear   it   with  pride. Terri  Laverick,  PRO  Northern  Section.

Please note  time  limits  apply  to  most   Winter  Fuel  Payment  claims   and  the  DWP  must  receive  your  claim  form  for  winter   2012/13  by   31  March  2013. The  payment  is  likely  to  be  £200,  or  £300  if   the   household  includes  a  qualifying  person  aged  80  or  over.   I   could  not   find   up   to   date  information  on   the  DWP  website  as   yet.  However,  for  a  claim  form  you  may  visit: www.direct.gov.uk/ prod_consum_dg/groups/dg_digitalassets/@dg/@en/ @over50/documents/digitalasset/dg_202418.pdf.   There   is   more   information   on   this   Government   website:   www.direct.gov.uk/en/Pensionsandretirementplanning/ Benefits/BenefitsInRetirement/DG_198331 For   more  detailed   information   you   will   need   to   ring  the   Winter   Fuel  Payment  helpline  on  0845  915  1515.  If   you   use  a  textphone,   the  number  is  0845  601  5613.  The  number  to  contact  the  DWP  is   +44   191   21  87777   if   calling  from  abroad.     Lines  are  open  from   8:30am  to  4:30pm  Monday  to  Friday  UK  time.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Everyone said the French would turn up on Sunday . . .

Glyn, Gordon   &   Jocelyn   were   nervous   as   Sunday   2nd   September   dawned   with   only   two   reservations   for   the   first   presentation.   However,  twenty  enthusiastic  participants  soon  joined  them.  By  mid-­‐ afternoon  seventy  people  queued  for  Michel  Cordeboeuf’s  stories  and   legends   of   the   Poitou.  St   Clémentin’s   population   (500)   more   than   doubled  during  the  three-­‐day  festival. In  their  résumé  the  Linen  Press  from  Edinburgh  said,  “This  festival  was   special.   It   was   small   scale,   meticulously   organised   and   warmly   welcoming.  It  was  hard  to  tell   who  were  authors  and  poets,  clustered   around  Didier’s  bar  under  the  blue  skies  and  marquees  .  .  .” Supporting  our  principal   guest   Helen  Dunmore  were  poets,  novelists,   short-­‐story  writers,  musicians,  historians,  cultural   commentators,  film   makers,  and  installation  artists.   A  wide  variety  of  genres  entertained   and  challenged  -­‐  from  the  musings  of  a  French  cow  to  a  workshop  on   inter-­‐textual  borrowings  between  Ted   Hughes  and  Sylvia  Plath.  There   was  even  (alarmingly)  the   beginning  of  a  Celtic  fringe  by  poets  Donal   Dempsey  and  John  Hudson.     A  selection  of  comments  received  from  authors  and   visitors  will  give   readers  the  flavour:   • ‘It   was  terrific   -­‐   a   time   of   meeting  people,  thinking,  celebrating   poetry  and  fiction,  celebrating  a  shared  interest   in  bilingual  'flying'   and  how  it  changes  perspectives.  .  .’ • ‘And   the  weather!  –  how  fortunate  ...  and  Chez  Didier’s   …  and  the   hunting-­‐horns  and   frescoes   at   the   chapel   …   and   the   wonderful   welcome.’ • ‘The  festival  is  still  fizzing  in  my  mind  -­‐  it  was  absolutely  great!’ • ‘A  wonderful  weekend.  Our  party  from  Correze  had  a  truly  inspiring   and  enjoyable  time.’   We  would   like  to  say  a  big  thank  you   to  everyone  who  participated:   the  authors,  the  public,  and  our  team  of  friends  who  made  each  day   run  smoothly,  selling  books,  English  tea,  homemade  cakes  and  raffle   tickets  to  augment  the   funds  (the  festival  is  totally  non-­‐profit  making   and,  one   fears,  out-­‐of-­‐pocket   making).   Cathy  Welch   stoically  spent   twenty  hours  creating  a  fine  lace  bookmark  for  a  ‘fringe’  raffle.  Music   provided  by  Brenda  Eeds  added  to   the  charm  of  eating  out  in  Didier’s   garden   whilst   our   local   horn   players   delivered   a  rousing   chorus   of   hunting  calls   both   in   the   Chapelle   des   Rosiers   and   the   Presbytery   courtyard.     None  of  it  could  have  happened  without  our  splendid  and   far-­‐seeing  mayor   and  the  willingness  of  the  villagers  to  put   up   tents   and  furnish  us  with  benches,  tables  and  chairs.   People   came  from  Normandy,  Brittany,  Dordogne,  Limousin,  Haute   Marne,  Maine  &  Loire,  from  Paris,  Cognac,  Tours,  Angers  and  Poitiers   and   were  not   disappointed.  Encore,  encore,   they  call!     The  festival   may  become  part  of  the  Departmental  calendar  but  for  this  to  happen   a  great   deal  of  input  from  both  English  and  French  enthusiasts  will  be   required.   Results  of  the  Segora  poetry  competition,  announced  at  the  Festival,   can  be  read  on  www.poetryproseandplays.co.uk  where  a  selection  of   festival   photos  may  be  seen.  It  is  intended   that  a  photo-­‐montage  will   be  mounted   by   Anne  Darling  and  Victoria  Simmonds   for   exhibition   throughout  the  region.  

‘The Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’  Trade  Fair (Foire  Commerciale  Anglo-­‐Française) Having   worked   incredibly   hard   to   put   together   our   first  Trade  Fair   last  month,  I   am   delighted   that   it   was   such  a  huge  success. The   event   was  opened  at   10.30am   by  the  Mayor   of   Secondingy,   Monsieur   Vitré,   and   from   then   Opening Ceremony hundreds   of   visitors   poured   into   the   Salle   Alauna   21,  Lac   des   Effres,  in  Secondigny.     Many  visitors  stayed   for   hours  -­‐  browsing  the  53  Exhibitors’  stands,  having  their  Fish  and  Chips   lunch   and   enjoying   the   live   music   in   the   glorious   sunshine.     The   children  were  entertained  by  the  Bouncy  Castles  and  pony  rides,  plus   of   course   the   many   facilities   already   in   situe   at   the   location   (playground,  crazy  golf,  cycle  routes,  pedalos  etc). The   bar   was   busy   throughout   the   day   serving   refreshments   and   homemade   cakes   and   biscuits   -­‐   and   thanks   to   some   wonderful   helpers,   everybody   was  served   quickly  and   with   a   smile.   Thank   you   again   -­‐   you   know  who  you  are! Bar area

For this   1st   Anglo-­‐Française   event,  the  majority  of   exhibitors   were  British  with   just  a  10%  French  contingent.    The  stands  included   English   Books,  double   glazed   windows   and  doors,   Estate  Agencies,   Companies   offering   financial   advice,   jewellery,   gifts,   massage,   reflexology,  digger  hire,  woodburners,  painted  furniture,  stained  glass,   a   local   brewery,  craft   courses,   swimming   pool   builders,  herbs  and   spices,   stonemasons,   general   builders,   translators,   British   Beers,   English   groceries,   clothing,   wood   carvings,   plants,   cards   and   stationery,   farm   products,   computer   support,   French   tutors,   photo   transfers,  beauty   products,  holiday  letting  agents,   interior   design,   gardener,   chimney   sweep,   and   currency   exchange. The  atmosphere  on  the  day  was   incredible   and   many   of   the   exhibitors   have   asked   for   the   Inside the busy Salle Alauna 21 event   to   be   repeated   each   year.     So,   now   that   I’ve   recovered,   I   can   confirm   that   the   2nd   Foire   Commerciale   Anglo-­‐Française   will   be   held   at   the   same   location   in   Secondigny,  September  2013.    (Date  to  be  confirmed).      This  time  I   would  very   much   like   to   increase  the  number  of  French   exhibitors.     We  do  live  in  France  after  all. Thank   you   to   everyone   who   visited   and   for  supporting   our  local   businesses.

Read Glyn  Pope’s  moving  reflections  on   his  final  festival  blog:  http:// segorastclementincelebratetheword.blogspot.fr/2012/09/the-­‐final-­‐ blog-­‐dust-­‐needed-­‐to-­‐settle-­‐on.html Lastly  it   has  been   a  pleasure  for   me,  Jocelyn,  to   write  this   series  of   articles   in   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’.   We   know   it   has   been   an   excellent  vehicle  for   communication.  Thank  you,  Sarah,   for  giving  us   space  to  publicise  the  festival.   Jocelyn  Simms  is  a  member  of  the  Nord  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Writers’  Circle.   page 10 10 Page


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A whopping 2666.00 € !! The Nattering Network (Réseau Papot’age) offers visits from people who speak English to residents in the Gâtine who might enjoy a good natter! Would YOU like a visit or do you know of someone who would?

For  all  of  us  who  come  to   live  in  France  the  move  carries  with  it   the   risk  of  a  certain  degree  of  isolation.  We  are  leaving   behind   friends   and   some  of   our  family  and  then  trying  to  make  new  friends,  some   who   speak   a   different   language  and   have  cultural   traditions   with   which   we   are  unfamiliar.   Although   it   is   often   quite   good   fun   and   amusing  to  start  with  it  does  not  always  make  it  easy  to  develop   the   same  kind   of  relationships  we  have  left  behind.  It's  hard   to  have   a   really  good  natter  in  a  second  language!  Getting  older  tends  to  make   this  even  more   difficult   and,  in  addition,  losing  partners,  suffering   health   problems,  maybe   financial   hardships   too,  all   increase   the   potential  for  us  to  become  more  isolated  and  lonely. To   try   and   help   ease   this  situation   we   have   created   a   ‘Nattering   Network’  with  two  local  French  offices,  CLIC  who  organise   services   for   the   elderly   within   their   association   the   ‘Gérontologique   de   Gâtine’   and   the   MSA   (Mutualité   Sociale   Agricole).   This   means   that    we  have   the  backing  of   the  French  social   welfare  offices  and   they   will   notify   the   CLIC   if   they  come   across   people   who   would   benefit   from   receiving  visits;  they  will   also   promote  these  English   speaking  services.  People  can  be  visited  at  home,  at  hospital  or  in   a   retirement  home.   There  is   a   clear   set   of   ground   rules   for   the  visited  and   the  visitor,   which  we  have  taken  from  the  french  system,  and  all  the  volunteers   have   been   trained   and   will   have   specialised   guidance   from   the   French  offices.   The   visits   are   free   of   charge   and   purely  social,  meant   for   mutual   enjoyment.    The  first  meeting  is  organized  to  introduce  the  two  parties   and   the   following   visits   are   then   set   up   between   you   and   your   visitor.     During  the  visits,  you  can  chat,  go  for   a  walk,  play  a  game   but  not  ask  the  visitor   to  do  chores  for   you  as  this  is  the  responsibility   of  other   services  (see  below).  Nor  can  the  visitor  transport  the  person   being  visited  by  car.   The  Pays  de  Gatine  has  organised   several   meetings   (during   ‘La   Semaine   Bleue’)   to   inform   the   English   speaking   population   living   in   the   Gâtine   how   they   can   get   help,   if   and   when   they   need   it.   They   will   be   organising   another   meeting  on  15th  October  2012  at   10h00  in  Le  Tallud  which  will  look   at  how  you  can  become  a   part   of   the   french   health   system,   what   services  are  available  and  how  you   can  get  access  to  them.   Should  you  have  any  questions  you   can  email  :  julia.salvat@gatine.org Or  if  you  would   like  a  visit,     please  contact  the  CLIC:  05.49.63.45.70,   20  rue  de  la  Citadelle,  79200  Parthenay

That’s the  amount  that   was   raised   by   all   the   locals   and   friends   of   the   Bar   de   la  Poste  in   L’Absie   for  their  month   long  series  of  events  in   aid   of  Cancer   Support   Deux-­‐Sèvres.   For   the   whole  of  August  there   were  a  wide  variety  of   events  starting  of  with   Presentation of cheque to CSDS Dean’s   Dynamic   Quiz   and   ending   on   the   28th  with  Bernie’s  Quiz  and  the  Grand  Raffle  Draw.     Highlight  of   the  month  has  to   be  the  ‘Oscars   Night’  when  over  30  people  came   dressed  in  their  finery  or  as  characters  from  the  films.   Clive  and  Julie,  the  proprietors  of  the  Bar  de  la  Poste  first  took  over  the   Bar   in   2005.  It   was  run   down   and   had   been  closed   for   some  time.   From  these  beginnings   they  have  now   built  up  a  very  good   mixed   clientele  of  French  and  English.     For  several   years  now  during  August,   with  the  support  of  all  their  customers,  they  have  been  raising  funds   for   charity.  It  started  several  years  ago  when  there  was  a  campaign  to   raise   funds   for   the   Heritage   Society   which   is   responsible   for   the   restoration  of  the  murals  in  L’Absie  Church.  Another  year  their  chosen   charity  was  the  Hope  Association,  followed  by  Mayday  Mes  Amis. It   was  Jacqui   who   suggested  that  with   so  many  people   affected  by   cancer,  it   would  be  a  good   charity  to  support   this   year.    Jacqui   has   always  supported  the  charity  events  at  the  Bar   de  la  Poste  but  until   recently  was  often   away  working.  However,  this  year,  with  more  time   available,  she  offered  to  help  Julie  organize  the  month  long  event  and   together   with   a   small   team   of   volunteers;  Bernie,   Nick,  Linda  and   Dean,   they   started   the   ball   rolling   by   contacting   June   Searchfield,   President  of  Cancer  Support  Deux-­‐Sevres.   Bernie   and   his  faithful  dog  Max   (now  14  years  old),  are  often  to  be   seen   around   L’Absie.  This  year   he  organized  the  General  Knowledge   Quizzes  and   also   the  Pétanque  Tournament   which   incidentally  was   won  by  the  only  french  competitor,  the  local  baker  and  his  brother-­‐in-­‐ law!     Bernie   got   involved  with  the  Quiz  a  couple  of   years  ago  when   asked  to  stand  in   for  the  former  Quiz  Master  and  subsequently  took   on  the   job,  now  running   a  Quiz   every  other  Tuesday.     Throughout   August   on   the   alternate  Tuesdays,   Nick  ran   a  Music   Quiz  and   also   several   Music   Nights.   A   true   Londoner,   Nick  started   playing  semi-­‐ professionally  at  the  age  of  16  and  hasn’t  stopped  since.    By  20  he  was   playing   professionally  touring  all  over  the  world  including  Japan  and   the  United  States.  He  plays  guitar  and  double  bass  but  also  sings.  He   still   performs  several  times  a  year  somewhere  in  the   world  and  is  off   to   Sweden   towards   the   end   of   September   where   he   will   be   performing  with   his  regular  band  which  includes  a  german  drummer,   a  finnish  guitar  player  and  a  Swedish  double  bass  player.  Fifth  member   of  the  team,  Linda,  is  a  local  estate  agent.  She  has  lived  in  France  for   twelve   years   and   is   a   fluent   French   speaker.     When   Jacqui   first   suggested  helping  Cancer   Support   Deux-­‐Sevres  this   year,  Linda  was   wholeheartedly  in  favour.    Last  of  the  team  is   Dean  who  runs  a  bed   and  breakfast   establishment  in  the   Square.  Apart   from  running  the   first  Quiz  he  also  did   ‘Name  the  Kitten’  and  occasionally  stands  in   for   Bernie  when  needed.   Clive  and  Julie  would  like  to  thank  all  their  customers  and  supporters   for   helping  to  raise   such   a  fantastic  sum  which  will   go  to  help  the   ongoing  work  of   Cancer  Support   Deux-­‐Sevres.     If   you   are  or  have   been  affected  by  cancer  and  need  someone  to  talk  to,  please  contact   J u n e   S e a r c h f i e l d   o n   0 5   4 9   6 4   5 9   9 6   o r   e m a i l :   junesearchfield@gmail.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY Last month   Alison   Morton   suggested   what   to   do   after   writing   your  novel  and   here  she  follows  with  how  to   edit  and  prepare  for   the  next  stage.

Preparing your book for publication

You sit   back,  your   mammoth  writing  task  over.  You’ve  clicked  Save,   you’ve  emailed  your  manuscript  to  yourself   in  case  your  computer   dies,  and  you’ve  reached   for   that   well-­‐deserved  cuppa  or  glass  of   wine. Ideally,  you   should  put   the  novel   away  in  a  drawer,  real  or   digital,   for  at   least   a   couple  of  months.  This  gives  you   distance  from  the   world   you’ve   been   immersed   in   for   the   past   few   months.   All   professional  writers  admit   their  first  drafts  are  rough.  So  when  you   can  no  longer   resist  the  urge  to  work  on  your  novel   again,  it’s  time   for  the  red  pen.   This  is  when  you  weed  out  the  over-­‐writing,  the  bad  grammar,  the   poor   syntax,  unnecessary  characters  and   those  excessive   adverbs   and  adjectives.  double-­‐check  any  plot  holes.   I  like   the  red  pen.  Some  say  it’s  crushing,  demeaning,   aggressive.  I   find  it’s  clear  -­‐    an  excellent   contrast  to  black  type  on   white   paper.   And,   yes,  you   do   need   to   print   out   your   novel   for   this  stage,  in   double  spacing,  so   that  you   can  write  notes  above  and   below  the   line. I  urge  you  to   be   strict   with   your   own   work,  to   try  to   detach   and   pretend  it’s   another   person’s  work,  and  that  the   other  person  has   told  you  to  spare  nothing.  You   are  not   attacking  your  baby.  Like   a   child,  it  needs  both  loving  discipline  as  well  as  encouragement  if  it’s   going  to  grow  into  an   independent,  well-­‐adjusted  member   of   the   book-­‐world.

How to start self-editing 1. Check  you  have  indented  each  paragraph,  except  the  first  one  in   each  chapter  –  indents  or  tabs,  please,   not  spaces.  No   line  spaces   between   paragraphs   unless   cutting  to  a  different   scene  and   then   start  the  first  line  of  the  new  scene  with  no  indent.     2.  Go  back  and   do  the   research  for   technical   points.  If  you  have   a   climbing   scene,  do   you  know  the  difference  between   a  carabiner   and   a  belayer?   Is   your   action  hero   using   a  Sig   Sauer   or   a   Glock?   Does  your  heroine  shop  at  the  correct  store  in  the  correct  street? 3.  Check   that   eye  and   hair   colours,  and   height   and   build   of  your   characters  are  consistent. 4.  Make  sure  a  character  doesn’t   know  something  before  they’ve   been  told/found  it  out. 5.  Make  sure  it’s  not   snowing  in  June  in  the  northern  hemisphere   or  you  have  any  eleven-­‐month  pregnancies. 6.  Fill  in,  yes  add,  description/narrative  where  you  skimmed   over  it   and   where  it’s  necessary.    Make   sure  you’ve  used  all  five  senses,   not  just  sight  and  sound.  Half  a  dozen  words  or  a  simple  sentence   can  bring  a  dull  scene  alive. 7.  Check  the  voice  is  consistent  and  characters  use  the  correct  type   of  speech  for  their  background  and  age.   8.  Substitute    ‘dynamic’   verbs  for   boring  or   limp-­‐wristed  ones  and   active  voice  for  lurking  passives.

9. Make  every     ‘very’,   ‘then’,   ‘suddenly’,  ‘mostly’,  ‘quite’,   ‘nearly’,   etc.  justify  its  existence.  They’re  usually  not  necessary. 10.  Make   every  sentence  a  true  gem  –  no  clunkiness,  no  gratuitous   or  padding  words.    Is  each  word  or  sentence  necessary  to  the  text? 11.   Make  your   eyes  bleed   by  checking  that   every   single   comma,   semi-­‐colon,  colon,  speech  mark,  exclamation  and  question  mark  is   necessary,  in  the  right   place  and  correctly  typed.     And  resist  using   exclamation  marks!   12.  Read  the  whole  piece  aloud. And  finally,  repeat  1  to  12.

Alison Morton  writes  alternative  history  thrillers,  blogs  about   writing  and  Romans  at  http://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  and  is   a   member   of   the   Romantic   Novelists’   Association   and   the   Society  of  Authors.

YOUR Book Reviews... This   month’s   book   review   has   been   sent   in   by   Wendy   Graves.     Thanks  Wendy! The Light Behind the Window Lucinda Riley  

In this book the story is told by Emilie, in her own time being 1998 and Constance who tells her story in wartime France. I don't usually  go  for books that have anything to do with the war but as this one was about France I thought I would give it a go and I have to say I could not put it down, I read this book in 2 days.   The book starts with Emilie, who has just lost her mother and inherited  her Parisian house, jewels and the  château which has been the ancestral home. Whilst deciding what to do she meets Sebastian, a man who has links to the château as he says that his grandmother Constance stayed there in the war.  As Emilie sorts out the family affairs she begins to unlock the family's secrets, look into the past and learn about her father and his sister, Sophia, and the secret room found in the cellar.   We also learn about Constance, a young woman whose husband is missing in action and selected for a special mission and sent to France. I have learnt a great deal reading this book and enjoyed both stories running along side of each other.   The Light Behind the Window is a love, mystery, adventure, suspense and very moving book which is very believable and one which I could not stop reading until I discovered all the secrets for myself

I was kept guessing until the very end which which was a refreshing change and would highly recommend it.

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Hobbies, Clubs & Associations... The Filling  Station  Poitou-­‐Charentes On   October   11th,   we   are  meeting  at   The   Little   Stone  Church,   14b   Avenue   de   d’Hôtel   de   Ville.   79110   Chef   Boutonne.   ALL   WELCOME.   Interested   to   find   out   more?   Please   view   the   website:   www.thefillingstation.org.uk     or   contact     Mike  Willis   05  49  87  89  16.  michael.willis@sfr.fr The  Filling  Station,  Vendee On  10th  October  we  are  pleased  to  announce  the  opening  of  a   new  branch  of   TFS.   Our   speaker   will   be   the   Rev  Nick  Crawley   who  will  be  speaking  on  The  Word  &  The  Spirit.  The  meeting  will   start   at  6.30  pm  with   coffee  and   biscuits.  La  Brionniere,  St  Pierre   du   Chemin,   85120,   near   La   Chataigneraie.   Telephone   Chris   &   Julie  on  Tel:  0960  497850  or  email  christopher.taylor85@orange.fr Interlude16. An association offering ‘Leisure & Culture for all’. Lots of regular events organised. Please see website www.interlude16.org for more information.

LA CHAPELLE  GAUDIN  CRAFT  GROUP

We are   a  small  group   of   ladies   who   are  keen  to   meet   other   like   minded  people  to  form  a  craft  circle. All  crafts  are  welcome  -­‐  needlecraft,  paper  craft  -­‐  anything  goes! We  hope  it  can  be  a  place  where  we  can  work  on  current  projects,   swap   ideas,   patterns,   fabrics   and   materials,   plus   a  place   where   skills   can   be   shared   and   taught.   If   you   are   interested,   please   contact  HELEN  AURELIUS  HADDOCK:  helen.aurelius@gmail.com or  join  us  on  FACEBOOK    (search:  LaChappelleGaudinCraftGroup) CRAFT  CAFE  CREATIF

If you enjoy sewing, knitting, crochet or any crafts, you are invited to bring along your current project to our venue in L’Absie and join a like-minded group of women, for friendship and to exchange ideas over a cup of tea. For further information contact: knight.margaret@orange.fr.

Book Group....meeting 2nd Thursday of the

Association Meridien Green

month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information.

We are  an   Anglo-­‐French   group   which  was  founded   in   2001   for   mutual  understanding  of  each  other's  language   and  culture.  We   meet  twice  weekly  in   the  Salle  des   Associations  in  St   Coutant,   79120.     The   best   way  to   find  out   more   is  to  visit  our  website  -­‐   www.meridiengreen.asso.fr  or  contact  Maureen  Dalby:   05  49  29  94  50. The  name   of   our  group   comes  from  the  fact   that  St   Coutant   is   on  the  Greenwich  Meridian!

Language Group You  speak  french  (un   peu),  I  speak  english  (a  little  bit),  why  don't   we  meet  up  to  improve  each  language? One  hour  per  week  could   be  good  timing,  by  phone  or  for  coffee   mornings. I'm  retired,  living  in  Niort. Please  call  at  06  73  70   14  21  or  send   email  for  more  details:  joseph.aubineau@laposte.net.

Alone in  France?

www.getogether-france.org

We are  a  group   of  people  living  alone  in  the  L'Absie  area  who   meet  regularly  for   coffee  and  lunches.    We  meet  on  the  1st  and   3rd   Tuesdays   at   11am   for   coffee   at   the   Pause  cafe  in   L'Absie.     Our   lunches   are   at   different   venues   each   month.   There's   a   warm  welcome  if  you'd  like  to  join  us.   More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  47.

Secondigny Running Club... Put the bounce back in your step. Join our friendly and supportive running group. All abilities welcome. Email Kelly for more details: kellyencezelle@hotmail.co.uk

Anyone in   the   Le   Busseau   area   interested   in   Scalextric   racing   for   fun?  I  had  a  set   for   my  65th.  birthday,  but   playing   on   your   own  is  getting  boring!   Maybe  meet  once  a  month   for   a   bit   of   fun   and   a   beer?   Please   phone  Dave   Lowe   on   0549042198  or  email  dave4lowe@yahoo.co.uk Franglais  Thouars The   Thouars   ‘Franglais’   group,   (a   member   of   l’   Association   du   Centre   Socio-­‐Cultural   de   la   Communauté   de   Communes   du   Thouarsais)     meets   every  Wednesday  from   19.30h   to  21.00h,  in   the   Association’s   centre   at   7   rue   Anne   Desrays,   Thouars,   for   conversation  in  English  and  French. We   welcome   those   of   all   nationalities   who   would   like   to   participate.  Either  come  along  to  see  us  one  evening,  or  contact  us   at:  Mobile:    06  52  21  92  34  ~  Email:    jcbed@orange.fr

The Harmonics based  in  the   Salle   d'Annexe   behind  

the mairie   in   Civray   are   looking   for   singers.   We   meet   each   Wednesday  from  2.00pm  to  4.00pm.  No  experience   necessary  just  a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.   We   sing   all   sorts   of  music,   from   stage   and   screen,   gospel,   classical,   country   songs,   madrigals   and  in  several   languages,  whatever   the  music  dictates.   We   support   charities  by   donations  or   by  participating   in  their   events  by   singing   for  them  and  each  year  we  hold  our  own  annual  concert.   We  are  a  small  and  friendly  group  who  would  love  to  meet  you.  

Contact: Dolly  Ait  Boualou:05  45  22  89  32 email  sylvia.murray@wanadoo.fr or Margaret  Gomersall  on   05  49  48  09  02,  email:  margaretgomersall@sfr.fr

2nd Sunday Motorcycle Club www.2ndsundayclub.fr If you would like to attend our coffee mornings please contact us via the website........ New members always welcome!

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Take a Break... DSM Easy  Crossword! Across: Down: 8.   Type  of  rice  (5) 1.   Tinned  meat  (4) 9.   Flying  machine  (7) 2.   Power  tool  (6) 10.   US  State  bordering  4  down  (7) 3.   Balkan   Republic   (alternative   spelling)   11.   Cowboy  show  (5)   (7) 12.   Almond  paste  and  egg  whites  (8) 4.   A  nation  in  North  America  (6) 13.   Fool  (4) 5.   Cornish  City  (5) 15.  Ladle  clumsily  (4) 6.   An  unilluminated  area  (6) 17.   Celestial  body  (8) 7.   Having  just   emerged   from   the  ground   21.   Medium  for  communication  (5)   (8) 22.  A  sudden  desire  (7) 12.   Edible  fungi  (8) 24.   An  eight-­‐sided  shape  (7) 14.   Courteous  regard  for  people’s   feelings   25.   Latin   American   dance   of   3   steps     (7)   and  a  kick  by  people  in  single  file  (5) 16.  Something  unusual  (6) 18.   Thinness  (6) 19.   Type  of  rectangle  (6) 20.    Soaked  with  moisture  (5) 23.   Type  of  cheese  (4)

Down: Toughie Crossword! 1.   Sustained   injury   from   unknown     quantity  in  abject  despair  (8) 2.   Queen  follows  maripme  direcpon  in     carrier  (6)   3. Chuck   or   rasp   eg.   for   old   rocker   or     rude  response  (5) 4.   Exceptional   mention   many   are   out  to     render  without  expression  (6) 5.   Ribs   hit!   Broken,   but   may   still   show     stiff  upper  lip  (7) 6.   King  in  flimsy   garment   draws   a   crowd     (6) 7.   One  with  bent  bill  in  alibi  sensation  (4) 14.   Most   diminutive   exotic   horses   mixed     up  in  island  race  (8) 15.   Backward   vicar   in   familiar   earphones     finds  underground  chambers  (7) 17.   Novel   lion   takes   time   to   get   on   the     slope  (6) 18.   TV  changeover  gives  purpose  for  make     up  (6) 20.   Make  changes.  Review  every  vehicle  in     safety  examinations  for  starters  (6) 21.   He   has  nowhere   to   go  when  form   of     transport  finds  parking  (5) 22.   With  time  out  of  condition,  satisfy  the     remainder  (4)

Sudoku Corner... Easy

www.sudokupuzz.com

Hard

With thanks  to  M.Morris

Please see  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr  for  answers

Across: 8. Organic   compound   made   from     mixing  pint  of  ore  solution  (7) 9.   Brief  recovery  from  bizarre  habits  (5) 10.   Very   early   female   MP;   Daisy,   we   are     told  (5) 11.   When   choices   are   to   be   made,     chooses  to  include  particle  (7) 12.   Geek   follows  short  road  after   being     given  directions  (4) 13.   Notes   made   by   wise   man   in   army     canteen  (8) 16.   Theatrical   result   of   cart   upset   by     clumsy  maid  (8) 19.   Therefore  it  follows  from  being   right     in  oneself  (4) 22.   Entails   a   complete   revision   to     become  outstanding  (7) 23.   Fixer  involved  in   a   drive   to   improve     things  (5) 24.   Only  half  a  joint   made   when  wrong     note  takes  a  bearing  (5) 25.   Is  following   direction  in  oriental  dish     to  arrive  at  final  downfall  (7)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Our Furry Friends... APPEAL

Meet Cappi...

ings Can (only) Get Better

by Nigel  Franks There  were  over   900  cats  and   kittens  handled  by  the  animal  rescue   organisations  in  the  Vendée  so  far  this  year.  It's  mainly  due  to  people   neither   identifying   nor   sterilising   their   cats.   Irresponsible   owners   abandon  their  cats  when  they  get  pregnant  or  abandon  the  kittens  if   they   can't   give   them   away.     It's   a   familiar   refrain   which   I've   mentioned  before. Good   news  is  that  recent  legislation   means  that  from  1st  September   2012  all   cats  being  adopted   from  an  animal   shelter  will  be  sterilised,   identified   and   entered   on   a   register.   If   they   are  too   young  to   be   sterilised  when  adopted,   the  new  owner   has  to  get   them  sterilised   within  six  months.    From  the  1st  September  2014   this   measure  will   be  applied  to  all  cats  when  they  change  hands.

This adorable Fox Terrier is 3 years old. He has been sterilized, microchipped and vaccinated. His owner sadly died and he was brought into the vet to be put down. The vet now is holding him for Hope but unfortunately he has to find a home very shortly. He has a wonderful personality, very friendly with people but he does not get along with other dogs and cats. He is looking for an owner with no other animals. He makes a lovely companion so can you give this cheeky chappy a home? Contact Hope: Email: juliahunt4hope@gmail.com or call 06 24 07 69 33.

HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF is  open   to   anyone   with   an  equine   interest.    You  do  not   need  to  own  a  horse!    We   meet  about   once  a  month  for   talks,   visits  etc.    Interested?

Equine Rescue France

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF. Please contact the Equine Rescue on Tel: 05 49 48 27 91 or visit our website www.equinerescue.org

In addition,  every  town  must  have  a  contact   point  for   stray  cats,  so   that  they  can   be   captured,  sterilised,   released  or  if  badly  injured/ill   put  down.  The  town  must   ensure  that   the  released   cats  are   given   food  and  that  shelter  is  provide  for  bad  weather. The   bad   news   is   that   we're   not   talking   about   France   here,   but   Belgium.  In  France  it  has  been  a  legal  requirement  for  over  20  years   that  cats  and  dogs  have  to  be  identified  before  they  change  owner,   but  it  does  not  seem  to  be  enforced.    Just  look  at  the  number  of  ads   on   ‘le   Bon   Coin’   where   animals   are  given   away  for   free   with   no   mention   of  their   identification   number.  The  ironic  thing  is  that   the   French  like  their   ”histoire  belge”:  Belgian  joke,  but   you  have  to  ask,   who  are  the  real  jokers? In   an   attempt   to   get   things   moving   in   France   we're   writing   to   the   appropriate   French   minister   and   the   animal   friendly   members   of   the   French   Senate   to   bring  these   developments   to  their   attention.   Maybe  a   bit  of   friendly  rivalry  between   the  two  countries  could  lead  to   some  progress?

Above Ginger  and  Gaby   (adopted  through  NALA)   An   update   on   Harley   the   'Hog:   when   his   hard  at  work  being  cats!

weight approached  600g  I  researched  houses  for  hedgehogs  so  that   we  could  construct  suitable  accommodation  to   get  him  used  to   the   Big   Outdoors   before   winter.   It   wasn't   anything   special:   a   large,   upturned  plastic  flower  pot  with  a  big  entrance  hole   cut  in  the  side.   There  was  a  saucer  on  top,  raised  a  little  bit  on  some  wooden  blocks,   to  provide  ventilation  and  an  entry  tunnel  formed  from  some   bricks   to  stop  cats  getting  in.  This  was  going  to  be  insulated  with  dry  leaves   and   sods  of   turf   on   top.   The  whole   set   up   was   in   a  wire   netting   enclosure.   So   one   evening   I   introduced   Harley  to   his   new   home   which  he  entered  straight  away. Next   morning  we  checked  to  see  how  he  was.  He  wasn't  there.  He   had   scraped  away  the  earth  from  under  a   corner  of   the  enclosure   and   done   a   runner!   We   haven't   seen   him   since   which   is   not   surprising  as  he  only  comes  out  at  night.  Every  evening  we  put  down   food  which   disappears  by  morning  so  we  think  that  he's  still  around.   Actually  it  reminds  me  a  bit   of   my  kids...without  the  piles  of  dirty   washing. We  are  constantly   looking   for   foster  homes   and  people   to   adopt   our  animals.  If  you  are  interested  please  get  in  touch  with  us:   Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 07  70  31  54  59  ~  Email: nala85480@hotmail.com

www.nosamislesanimaux.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Health, Beauty & Fitness... October Pink Ribbon Month

by Suzanne  Thorne

Evelyn Lauder,   daughter-­‐in-­‐law   of   Estée   Lauder   pioneered  the  idea  for   October  to  be  forever  known   as   ‘Pink   Ribbon’   month   to   help   breast   cancer   awareness. Sadly  she  passed  away  in   2011  but  now  into  its  20th   year,   more   than   115  million   pink  ribbons   have   been   given  away  around  the  world. Being  diagnosed  with  breast  cancer   is  a  shock  and  moving  through   the   treatment   and   subsequent   changes   it   brings   about,   is   an   unknown  journey. Whilst  appearance  may  seem  trivial  at   a  time  when   you  have  had   to  deal  with  illness,  fear  and  extremely  invasive  treatment,  how  we   look  is  so  often  reflected  in  how  we  feel. Our   appearance  is  often   the  barometer   by   which   we   are  judged,   rightly  or   wrongly,  and   for   women  suffering  hair   loss,  changes  in   skin  as  well  as  the  illness  itself  must  affect  ones  morale  hugely. I   know   that   when   I   am  out   and   about   without   a   smattering   of   make–up  on  that  will  be  the  day  that   I  meet  the  world  and  his  wife   and  comments  will   range   from,  ‘Are  you  ok?’  ‘You’re  looking  a  bit   peaky  today’  to  ‘You’re  looking  tired’.    By  the  time  I  return  home  I   will  feel  all  of  the  things  said  to  me! Obviously  the  skin   is  more  sensitive  to  products  so  it’s  worth  using   organic   and  paraben  free  products.  Parabens  have  been  linked  to   cancers  and  therefore  the  last  thing  you  want  to  put  on   your  skin  &   hair. Support  Pink  Ribbon  Month  by  booking  an  event/coffee  morning/ party  with  me  and   I  will   donate   10%  of  all  sales   to  Breast  cancer   Research.   With  so  many  great  products  to  keep   your  skin,  hair  and  body  both     looking  and   feeling  great   without   chemicals,  please  support   Pink   Ribbon  month  and  give  me  a  call.

Suzanne ~  Independent  Neal’s  Yard  Consultant. Tel:  05  49  26  27  74  email:  suetho@hotmail.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

The teachings of yoga, especially Satyananda yoga create, with practices, a union of body, mind and emotions. Yoga changes you, creates an integrate whole personality within life's experiences, positive and negative. Why suffer at the mercy of the mind? As our beloved guru Swami Satyananda said "There is no noise in the city there is no stillness in the Himalayas - it is all inside” Classes at ‘Maison pour tous’, L’Absie.7pm - 8.30pm. **New class starting 3rd October in Largeasse (79240)** At Salle de danse, rue saint roch. 7pm - 8,30pm Contact Rysz for more info: 06 42 35 97 11

The Great Outdoors...

Nature Calls!

by Maureen  Cowell This   year   during   the   gran   and   grandad   special   time   with   our   grandson,  we  decided  to   have  a  bash   at   prising  him  away  from   his  3DS  and  the  endless  supply  of   computer   games  which  seem   to  be  the  favourite  pastime.   We  booked  into   ‘Parc   de  la  Belle’  for   just  one   night.  Reluctantly   Jack   abandoned   his   electronic   games   and   gadgets   and   steadfastly   announced   he   would   not   enjoy   the   back   to   nature   experience.   We   had   promised   a   quirky   adventure   of   amazing   heights.  He  was  thinking  fun  fare,  rides  and  roller  coasters  while   we  were  thinking,  don’t  rain,  please  just  don’t  rain. Parc  de  la  Belle  is  south  of  Poitiers  in  the  village  of  Magne.   The   majestic   manor   house   built   in   the   nineteenth   century   is   surrounded  by  beautiful  gardens,  parkland  and  forest  and  it  is  in   the  forest  you  find  the  tree  house  accommodation. On  arrival  we   were  given  our   instructions,  a  map  and  a  rucksack   with  bed   linen,  a  torch  and  assorted  essentials  for  a  night’s   stay.   We   parked   the   car,   unloaded   the   bikes   and   loaded   up   our   trundle  wagon. Our   cabin   was   not   the  highest   but   at   8   metres   was   just   great.   The  luggage   was  winched   up   and   unpacked   [the  winding   steps were   much   too   narrow  to  carry   anything   but  ourselves]  and   we   sat  among  the  topmost  branches  of  our  tree  to  enjoy  lunch. Remarkably   our   grandson   was   beginning   to   really   enjoy   the   experience,   particularly   the   idea   of   the   winch   and   he   was   captivated  by  the  natural  wacky  shaped  bed.

By early  evening  we  had   explored   the  magnificent   gardens   and   forest,  had   met  the  donkeys  and  goats  and  were  amazed  by  the   splendid  peacocks. Amazingly,   electronic   games   and   gadgets   had   not   been   mentioned,  and,  we  were  having  jolly  good  fun!! We   slept   well,   not   a   sound   to   be   heard,   just   the  gentle  swaying  of   the   lush   green   tree  tops.  Next  morning,  breakfast  arrived   at  our   cabin   in  a  picnic   hamper.  Someone,   we  think  it   was  probably  a  wood   nymph,   a„ached   it   to   the   winch   hook  and   with   great   amusement   and   laughter   Jack   winched   it   up   and   set   it   out   on   our   treetop  terrace.  It   was  incredibly   tasty   and   plen…ful,   fresh   orange,  buns,   croissants,   homemade   jam  and   hot   coffee.  Enough   to   doggy   bag  for  later.

Enjoying lunc h in the

tree tops

Packing up  and  winching   down   was   just   as   much   f u n   a n d   w i t h   a   l i „ l e   sadness   we,   all   three   of   us,   decided   to   come   back   again.   Next   year   Jack   is   determined   to   repeat   his   extraordinary  back   to   nature   adventure   with   his   parents   but   only   if   they   leave   their  mobile  phones  at  home!! page 17 Page


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY ıııı

Life on the Farm...

Sadly none   of   the   eggs   hatched   that   Bianca   our   broody  Bantam   was   sitting   on,   but   she  just  won’t   give   up.   After   the  usual  21  days   she  still  sat  on  the  eggs.  Finally  after   about  a  month  we  managed  to   take    the  old   eggs  away  and  replaced  them  with  some  Guinea  fowl   eggs  hoping  that  she  will  stay  put  and  hatch  those  instead.

by Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

It’s officially  autumn  already,  the  mornings  and  evening  are  starting   to   have  a  chill   about   them,   but   even   more  importantly,   it’s   time   again   for   Beavis   our   Suffolk   cross   ram   to   earn   his   keep.  He   is   a   gentle  giant  until  he  gets  in  with  his  harem  and  then  he  becomes   a   typical  grumpy  ,  very  unpredictable  and  protective  ram  .  Our  fields   become  a  no  entry  zone  when  Beavis  is  in  with  the  ewes. Our   garden  party  was  a  great  success.    We  slow  cooked   a  whole  pig   (Gloucestershire   Old   Spot  crossed   with  a  Saddleback)   in  a  pit.  The   pig  was  carefully  wrapped  in  tin  foil  (and  lots  of  it)  then  completely   wrapped   in   wet   hessian   sacking   followed   by   chicken   wire   for   stability.    At  midnight  the  night  before  the  party  we  lowered  the  pig   into  the  pit   and   covered   it   with  the  hot   ashes  from  the  fire  which   had   been  burning  for   about  6  hours.     We   then   covered   the   hole   with  corrugated  sheets  and  sealed  it  with  earth  to  make  sure  there   were  no  air  holes.  The  45  kilo  pig  then  slowly  cooked  overnight  and   was   perfect   for   our   sit   down   dinner   for   70   friends   and   family   at   midday.    It  really  was  absolutely  delicious  if  I  do  say  so  myself!   Our   two   new   Chamois   goats   called   Biff   and   Boff   are   doing   well.   They  are  now   5   months  old   and  weren’t   used  to  human   contact.     We  have   had  to   spend   lots   of   time   with   them  as   we  need   to   be   able  to  handle  them  as  our  plan  for  the  future  is  to   be  self  sufficient   with  their  milk,  for  cheese  and  yoghurt  as  well  as  everything  else. Both   their   mother   and   grandmother   were  maiden   milkers   which     means   they  produced  milk  before  being  in  kid.     But   as  usual  not   everything  goes  according  to   plan.     We  built  a  new  enclosure  with   high   fences   to   keep   them  in   and   incorporated   an   existing  cattle   feed  trough.  What   we  didn’t   realise   was  that   one   of   the  wooden   uprights     that  formed  part  of  the  trough   was  broken  at  the  bottom.   It   took   the   goats   less   than   two   hours   to   find   an   escape   route.   Luckily  they  only  went  as  far  as  the  veggie  patch.

Cats are   not   my  favourite  animal   but   they  are   very  necessary  as   mousers  here  on  the  farm.  We  had  two  -­‐   Stella  who  we  have  had   for  about   a  year   and   a   half  and   our   new  addition   Aldo.  Not   sure   how   it  happened  but  when   we   popped  out   to   return   some  items   we  had  borrowed  for  the  party    we  returned    with  yet  another  little   kitten!    What  will  be  our   last   kitten  (Jenny  please  take  note  –  our   last   kitten)   has  been   named   Naga  (after   the  chilli)   as  he’s  a  fiery   little  red  head  but  he  is  very  cute. Time  for   Digger  and  Ham-­‐ilton  (two  of  the  pigs),  to  go  on  their  last   journey.    Having  had  a  house  full  of  visitors  last  month  our   freezer   is  very  low  indeed.     Jen’s  home  made  English  style  sausages  and  my   home  cured  and  hand   sliced  “proper”  bacon  were  a   real  hit   with   our  guests  along  with  our  free  range  eggs. Most   of   our   veggies   have  done   really  well   this  year   with   a  good   crop  of  French  beans,  courgettes   (which  the  ducks   love   grated  in   their  water)    pumpkins,  butternut  squash   and  beetroot.    Sadly,     due   to  blight  our   tomato   harvest  has  been  quite  poor  this  year,  enough   for  salads  but  not  enough  to  store  for  winter  sauces. Finally  both  of  our  female  rabbits  have  had  a  visit  to  the  male  as  we   have  done  really  well  selling  our  first  two  litters  . See  you  next  month  for  another  update  of  Life  on  the  Farm.   Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

October’s Lunar calendar...

1st Quarter:8th

New Moon: 15th

Full Moon:29th

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

THE AMATEUR GARDENER

by Vanda Lawrence

I can't   believe   it's   October   again   already.     Nearly   time   to   concentrate   on   preparations   for   Christmas,   (dare   I   say   it!)   but   before  that   let's   get   the   garden   jobs   ticked  off  the   list   so   we  can   enjoy  the  celebrations  with  a  clear  conscience. Dahlias  are  still  giving  us  a  good  show  as  I  write  this,  but  we  shall   have  frosty  weather  in  due  course.    As  soon  as  the  top   growth  has   been  blackened   by  frost  you  can  cut  them  down   to  about   6"  and   then   lift   carefully  with  a  fork.     Stand  the  tubers   upside-­‐down   in   a   frost-­‐free  place  to  dry  out  then  store  crown-­‐uppermost  in  boxes  of   very  slightly  damp   peat.     Keep  crowns   above   the   peat   and   dust   with  flowers  of   sulphur.    Store  in  a  frost-­‐free  shed   or   greenhouse   for  the  winter,  checking  the  tubers  every  2  or   3   weeks.     If   they  are   shrivelled   drop   them   into   a   bucket   of   tepid   water   overnight   to   plump  them  up  again. Clematis   can  be  layered   any  time  now   to   produce  new   plants   for   next   year,  but   this  year   I   am   going  to  try  sowing  seeds  from   my   favourite  clematis  'Albatross'.     Mike  Curtis   (An   English  Nursery  in   France)  tells  me   it's  quite  easy  -­‐  just  cut  off   the  fluffy  seed  heads   and  store  in  a  paper  bag/envelope  until  dry.    Rub  off  the  'fluffy'  bits   and   then  make  the  seeds  think  they  have  lived  through   a  winter  by   putting  them  in   the  freezer  for   a   couple   of  months.     You   can  then   sow   them  into  seed  trays.     Mike  says  Clematis  seeds  do   not  always   germinate  and  do  not  always  grow   true  to  form  but  I  would  like  to   have  a  go  and  see  what  comes. Plant   winter   &   spring   bedding   plants   such   as   wallflowers,   polyanthus,  winter   pansies,  forget-­‐me-­‐nots,   and  continue  to  plant   spring  flowering  bulbs  in  flower  beds  or  containers. The  vegetable  garden  is,  as  always,  needing  attention.     Continue  to   crop   and   store   your   vegetables   and   dig   over   the   potager.     For   winter   spinach,   put   cloches   over   young   plants   to   protect   them   from   frost.     You   can   plant   garlic   now   and   sow   more   carrots.     Strawberry  plants  are  available  in  the  garden  centres,  also  rhubarb.     These  can  be  planted  while  the  soil  is  still  warm.    Tomato  plants  are   about  finished   now  and  should  be  lifted  before  the  first  frosts.     Any   green  tomatoes  will  ripen  on  a  sunny  windowsill,  or  failing  that  you   can  make  chutney  -­‐  just  so  long  as  they  don't  go  to  waste.     As  the  evenings  draw  in  and   we  spend  less  time  in  the  garden  it's  a   good  idea  to  start  cleaning  garden   furniture  before  storing  it   away   for   the  winter.    Oil   springs,  hinges  etc   and  treat  wooden  furniture   with   teak  oil  or   similar  to  feed  and  protect   the  wood.    As  you  use   garden   tools   for   the   last   time   this   season   try   to   make   time   to   sharpen,  clean   and   oil   as   necessary  so   they  will  be  rust-­‐free  and   ready  to   use   next  year.    To   clean   &  oil  larger  items  such  as   forks,   spades  etc   plunge  them  several   times   in   and   out   of   a   bucket   of   sharp  sand  with  a  little  oil  mixed  in  -­‐  simple! Lastly  for   this  month,  those  of  us   with  garden  ponds  can  potter  in   the  late  autumn   sun  clearing  the  marginals   and  most  importantly   cutting  back   the   oxygenators.     Also   remove   faded   flowers   from   water  lilies.     If   you   have  deciduous   trees  nearby  put   a  fine   mesh   net   over  the  pond  to   prevent   leaves   falling  into   the   water.     (NB:   Please   secure   the   net   well   around   the   edges   to   stop   animals   getting  underneath  &  being  trapped  in  the  water).     If  you   have   a   problem  with  herons  it  would  be   a  good  idea  to   leave  the  netting   in  position  until  the  spring. And  now,  time  for  a  cuppa,  what  say  you?    Happy  gardening    .....

‘The DSM’ Monthly Photograph Competition

WINNER! Congratulations to this month’s competition winner, Sally Coppack, 79160 For a  chance  to  see  YOUR  photograph  on  the  front  cover  of  our   magazine  (5000  copies!)  -­‐  enter  our  monthly  photo  competition. Entry  is  free  and  limited  to  one  photograph  per  month. Please  see  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr  for  further  details.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Life, Food & Drink... Vive la Difference

by Gilly  Hunt  

September was  the  month  I  had  been  waiting  for  –  the  weather  was   glorious  and   there  was  just   so  much   going   in  the   Deux-­‐Sèvres,  that   my  feet  barely  touched   the  ground!      The  month   started  with  our   annual   hamlet  picnic,  which   is   held   the   first   Sunday  of  September   each   year   –   this   is   frequently  the   way  that   events   are   diarised  in   France,  by  day  rather  than  by  date.

Autumn is  a  great   time  for   foraging;  one  can  find  many  edible  fruits   and  berries  in  the  hedgerows.     In  my  opinion  there  is  nothing  more   satisfying  than  picking  blackberries  and  then  going  home  and  making   jam  with  them  and  all  at   very  little  cost,  yet  another  bonus  of  living  in   rural   Deux-­‐Sèvres.     And   for   those   of   you   who   have   taken   up   the   French  hobby  of  making  eau  de  vie,  there  are  many  berries  and  fruits   for   you  to  make  your   own  special  blend/flavour  –  but  please  make   sure  that  they  are  edible  and  not  poisonous! The  topic   of  environmentally  friendly  power   is  never  far   away,  and   there  have  been  many  new  wind   turbines  or   éoliennes  in  our   area.   Now  I  know  that  this  is  rather  an  emotive  subject  for  many  and   I  am   the   first   to   admit   that   I   am   a   NIMBY   (Not   In   My   Back  Yard)   as   although  I  think  they  look  very  graceful   and  in  time  will   contribute  to   environmentally  friendly  power,  I  would  not  like  to  live  near  one.   I  visited  some  the  other  day  and  you  would  be  amazed   at   just  how   tall  they  really  are  and   also  the  noise   that  they  emit.  I  can  see  how   they  are  disturbing   for   all  whom  live  within   their   vicinity   including   wildlife.    

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The Saturday  afternoon   was   rather   like   a   warm  up   event,   with   a   crowd   of   us   setting   up   tables,   chairs,   benches   and   flags,   all   culminating  in  aperitifs  and   a  resume   of  last  year’s  event.      On   the   Sunday  morning  a  few  of  us  went  over   to   put   on   the   tablecloths,   place  vases  of  flowers  on   the   tables   and   do   some   last   minute   touches   before   the   rest   of   the   hamlet  arrived.    This  year   it   was   particularly  lovely   as   we   had   our   newest   resident   at   just   5   days   old,   who   popped   in   to   meet   everyone,   and   a   new   young   couple   who   had   moved   in   only   a   week   before.     It   was   great   to  see  the  eldest  and  the  youngest  in  congenial  conversation   over   a  few  drinks.    I  just   love  the  way  that  there  appears  to  be  no   ageism  in  France,  in   restaurants,   bars   and  at   social   events,  all   are   welcome  and   families   are   never   made   to   feel   awkward   walking  in   anywhere.

Do remember  to  visit  Secondigny  in  October  for  the  annual  apple  fair   (PommExpo)  it  is  an  event  not  to  be  missed.    See  you  there. Vive  la  Difference.  

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Bnzonf!gos!tfdonet@

by John  Sherwin

In last   month’s  piece,  I  talked   about   the  1855   classification   and   how   that   graded   the   best   Bordeaux  wines  from  First  to  Fifth  growths,  in   decreasing  quality  and   price.  I  also   promised   to   explain   how   to   acquire   wines   from  these   classified  vineyards  at  a  reasonable  price. Let’s   put   this   into   context.   These   classified   growths  have  never  really  been  just  bottles  of   wine  to   be   opened   and   enjoyed   in   convivial   company.  For   some,   they  are   to   be  hounded   down   at   auction,   and   hoarded.   For   others,   they  add   to   the   heady   mix   of   snob   appeal   already   fuelled   by   the   accumulation   of   Bentleys  and   blondes.  Others,  pawing  calculators  lasciviously,  buy   wine  as  ‘futures’  (en  primeur  in  French)  before  it   is  even  bottled,  in   the  hope  of  securing  a  good  wine  cheaply  or  making  a  quick  buck   when  the  wine  is  eventually  available  to  be  sold  on. Of   course,  we  are  all   susceptible  to   the  ‘special  occasion’  when  we   are   tempted   to   spend   beyond   our   means,   and   the   classified   growths  and   their   purveyors   stand   ever   ready  to  fuel   our   hubris.   And   just   how   hubristic   are   you   and   your   wallet   feeling?  A  2009   Lafite-­‐Rothschild   will   set   you   back   around   €1750.   One   bottle.   Margaux   2009   in   the   region   of   €1400.   One   bottle.   Dude,   how   popular  do  you  want  to  be?  How  popular  can  you  afford  to  be? Chateaux   owners   are   not   stupid,  and   they   know   that   producing   wine   with   a   more   user-­‐friendly   price   tag   and   ready   to   drink   younger  is  good  for   cash-­‐flow.     Enter   the  second   wine.  Try  to  put   bad   connotations  out  of  your  head.  This  is  not  a  case  of  passing  off   something  inferior   as   better  than  it   is.  This  is  a  proper  wine  in   its   own  right,  made  in  a  proper  way.

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Typically, a  second   wine  will  be  made  from  younger  vines,  anything   from  six  to  fifteen  years  old,  say.    Although  the  young  grapes  don’t   yet   have  the  complexity  they  will   enjoy  in  years  to   come,  they  are   still   fed   from   the   same   terroir   –   the   same   micro-­‐climate   for   shorthand   –   that   the   first   wine   enjoys.  The  wine  will   be   aged  in   barrel   for   less   time,  and   the   barrels  themselves  will   be  hand-­‐me-­‐ downs   from  the  first  wine.    But,  and  it’s  a  big  but,  the  wine  will  be   made  in  the  same  place  as  the  first  wine,  and  by  the  same  skilled   people.  With  the  same  love,  commitment,  and  attention  to  detail. So   what   kind   of   difference   are   we   talking   about?   Two   elements   need  to  be  considered:  quality   of  the   wine,  and   cost.  As   I’ve  said,   these  second   wines  are  made  to   be  drunk  young,  which  is  another   way  of  saying  they  are  not  made  to  be  cellared.  They  will  develop   a   little   in  bottle,   but   they   don’t   have   the   tannic   structure   for   long   ageing.  Some,  like  me,  might  be  tempted  to  say  whoopee  and  get   stuck   in   –   and   cost   wouldn’t   be   a   prohibitive   factor.   Typically,   second   wines  are   around   a  third   to   a   quarter   less   than   their   big   brothers.   Worth   doing  your  own  fun   research.  For   a  list   of   second   wines   –   www.terroir-­‐france.com/wine/grandscrusbordeaux_second.htm.

RESTAURANT REVIEWS... If you have positive restaurant experiences to share, we would love to print them here. Please email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr for inclusion into future issues.

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours Email: johnsherwin@orange.fr ~ www.french-wine-tours.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Village Diaries

by Jacqueline  Brown.

To be   a   true   petrol   head,   or   so   I   have  heard,  you  must  have  owned   an   Alfa   Romeo.     This   got   me   thinking   about   a   challenge   I   set   myself  recently  –   making  my  own   French   patisserie   delicacy,   the   macaron,   in   a   gentle   girlie   pink   colour   of   course.     Now   I   have   (almost)   successfully   made   macarons  am  I   one  step  closer  to   calling   myself   a   true   French   Foodie? I   am   passionate   about   my   food   and   love   to   cook   and   bake;   however  this  is  something  that  has  grown  with   me   as  our   veggie   garden   here   in   France   has  grown.    With   the  first   gluts   from  our   orchard  eight  years  ago  it   seemed  wrong  not   to  use  what  we  had   picked  so  my  first  steps  at  experimenting  in  the  kitchen  began.   The  more  I  cooked,  the  more  I  wanted   to   cook  and  the  more  home   grown   and   home   cooked   food   we   ate   the   more   important   the   quality  of  the  ingredients  became.    Despite   my  enthusiasm  I  have   had  no  training  so  have  no  real  skill  in  the  finer  things   like  using   a   piping  bag.    With   the  house   eerily  quiet  after  la   rentrée  I  felt   the   need   to   bake   and   to   try   something  outside   my  normal   comfort   zone.     Enter  the  very  French  macaron!    I  had   great  fun,  but   it  was   rather   sticky   stuff   for   a   messy  person   like  me   to   work  with,  and   consistency   in   size   and   shape   was   not   something   I   had   much   control   over.    However,  I  was  pleased  with  the  results,  they  had   a   crisp   outer   shell   with   a  soft,   chewy  middle   and   the  addition   of   rosewater   in  the  filling  gave  them  a  lovely  delicate  flavour,  despite   their   appearance.     But  I  do  have  issues  with  them,  firstly,  with  the   amount  of   sugar   in   the  recipe  and  also  the  lack   of   anything  fresh   from   the   garden.     By  default   my  normal   cake  recipes  tend   to   be   healthy  ones,   my  fat   free   cherry  cake  or  courgette  and   chocolate   brownies  for  example,  and  I  will  often  reduce  the  amount  of   sugar   after   the   first  time,  as   it   will  have   been   it  too  sweet.     Macarons   don’t  really  fit  into  my  ‘norm’  and  I  had  to  ask  myself  if  I  would  try   again   and  if   so   what  would  I  do  differently  (I  always  like  to  add  my   own   twist   to   a   recipe).     I   probably   won’t   change   the   sugar   quantities   as   I’m   sure   it   is   a   tried   and   tested   formula,  but   I’m   positive  the  colour  and  flavour  can  be  home  grown.     I’m  thinking  a   delicate  purple  from  blackberry,   hint   of   pink   from   raspberry   and   maybe   green   from   courgette. Thankfully   I   have   just   discovered   a   friend   in   the   village   has   some   hidden   skills   as   in   his   previous   life   he  was   in  the   catering  field.     Not  only  is  he  French,  but  he   was   also   a   chef   in   Lyon,   the   gastronomic   capital   of  France   (and   therefore   probably  the  world   too).    I  have  now  experienced  the   amazing   art   that   is   one   of   his   buffets,  so  I  think  I  might  try  to  talk   myself   into   some   lessons   in   macaron  making.

Follow Jacqui’s  blog  at   hWp://www.frenchvillagediaries.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Reader’s Restaurant Reviews

Thank you  to   Ian   McKay  for   this   month’s   Restaurant   Review:   Le  Scorlion,  5  rue  de  l’Abbaye,  17400,  St  Jean  d’Angely   Tel:  05  46  32  52  61 Saint   Jean   d’Angely,   some   50km   south   of   Niort   is   not   in   Deux-­‐ Sèvres  but   in  neighbouring  Charente-­‐Maritime.    However,  we  went   with   friends   to   Le   Scorlion   restaurant   for   lunch.   The   name   apparently  is  a  mix  of  Scorpion  and  Lion  though  I  don’t   quite  know   why  they  chose  such  a  name.  It  is  close  to   the  old  abbey  in  an  old   building  (the  walls  looked  about  a  metre  and  a  half  thick).  Inside  it   was  light  and  clean  and  more  importantly  the  food  was  excellent.   The   lunchtime  clientele  appeared  to   be   a  mixture  of  French   and   British.  I  opted  for  the  three  course  menu  at  15.50  euros  whilst  my   wife  and  our   two  friends   went  for  the  two   course  option  at  13.80   euros. My  wife  and  I  both   chose  the  half   dozen  oysters  for   entrée  ,   one   friend   had   potato   soup   and   the   other   had   tartine   à   volaille   et   champignons,   which   sounds   much   grander   than   chicken   and   mushroom  on   a  slice  of   bread.  For  main  course   my  wife  had   the   salmon   served   with   courgettes,   our   friends   both   had   the   pork   tenderloin   with   polenta   and   I  opted   for   the   piece   of   beef   with   mashed  potatoes  and  salad.  For  some  reason   I  was  expecting  the   piece   of   beef   to  be   something  like  stewing  steak  and  was  rather   taken  aback  when  I  was  asked   how  I  would  like  it   cooked.    I  was   pleasantly  surprised   when   it   arrived.     It   was   a   delicious,  tender   steak  cooked   to   perfection.   The   jus   served   with   the   meat   was   lovely.  We  all   thought  the  main  courses  were  delicious.  I  soldiered   on  alone  with  the  dessert.    Well  someone  has  to!     I  had  chosen  the   café  gourmand.     It   was  very  tasty  but   a   bit  healthy  for   me  –  a  cup   of   coffee   served   with   a   small   glass   of   raspberry  coulis,   a   small   peach   sorbet   and   a   small   very   light   chocolate   mousse.     I   had   expected   something   rather   less   healthy   –   more   biscuity,   more   cakey,  more  thick  chocolatey. We  had   to   add   to  the  basic  bill,  two  orange  juices  at  3.50  each,  2   coffees   at   2.50   euros  each  and   three  glasses  of  very  nice  red  wine   at   4   euros  each.     So  the  total  bill   for  the  four   of  us  came  to  80.90   euros.   We   all   considered   it   to   be  an   excellent   lunch   and   the  

staff were  pleasant  and  charming.  

October’s Recipe:   Carrot  and  Pumpkin  Curry Ingredients: • 150ml  /  1/4  pint  vegetable  stock • 2.5cm/1   inch   piece   fresh   galangal,   sliced • 2  chopped  garlic  cloves • 2  fresh  red  chillies • 1  lemon  grass  stalk,  chopped  finely • 4  carrots  peeled  and  cut  into  chunks • 225g/8  oz  pumpkin,  peeled,  deseeded  and  cut  into  cubes • 2  tbsp  vegetable  or  groundnut  oil • 2  shallots  finely  chopped • 3  tbsp  Yellow  Curry  paste • 400ml/14fl  oz  coconut  milk • 4-­‐6  sprigs  fresh  Thai  basil • 25g/1  oz  toasted  pumpkin  seeds Ingredients  -­‐  Yellow  Curry  Paste • 3  small  fresh  orange  chillies,  chopped  coarsely • 4  shallots,  chopped  coarsely

BOOK AND COFFEE MORNINGS 2 Books for 1 Euro! 45 RUE  DU  BOIS  BAUDRON,  79100  MAUZE  THOUARSAIS Well,  what  can  I  say!    All  you  book  lovers  out  there  must  now  be  busily   reading  away  if  the  success  of  the  July  and  August's  book  morning  are   anything  to  go  by!   The  July  morning  raised   175  euros  but  the  best  yet   was  August  when   we  sold  over  260  books  and  raised  220  euros.    Many  thanks  to   those   who  are  our  "regulars"  and  welcome  to  those  who  were  newcomers.     Jo   from   Pheonix   cards   was   also   very   busy   and   was   even   selling   christmas  cards!    Because   of  the   popularity   of   these  mornings,  we   have  arranged  another  for  Wednesday   31st   October  2012   with  the   possibility  of  another  date  at  the  end  of  November.     We  hope  to  see   you  all  again  and  all  newcomers  are  very  welcome.   The   money   raised   goes   to   the   Helianthus   Association   based   in   Mayenne.    Founded  in  2008,  the  aim  of  the  association  is  to  help  stray,   abandoned  and  endangered   animals,  and  to  assist   elderly  people  on   low  income  to  care  for  their  pets.    They  are  not  an  animal  refuge  but   help   with   veterinary   costs   such   as   spaying,   worming   and   testing,   which  can   all  encourage  the  adoption  of  an   animal.   Because  of  the   ever-­‐increasing   demands   for   help,   Helianthus   extended   its   fund-­‐raising   means   by   opening   its   own   Charity  Shop   which  is   run  by  both   French   and  English  volunteers.    You  will  find  more   information  on  their  website: www.helianthus-asso.org. We  look  forward  to  seeing  you   and   if  it   is   wet,   don't   worry,   we   have   space   to   have   everything  under  cover!

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr • • • • •

3tsp ground  turmeric 1  tsp  salt 12-­‐15  black  peppercorns 1  lemon  grass  stalk 2.5cm/1  inch  piece  fresh  root  ginger,  chopped.

Method:-­‐ Firstly pour  the   stock  into  a  large  saucepan  and  bring  to   the  boil.     Add   half  the  garlic,  the  galangal,  lemon  grass,  chillies  and  simmer   for  5  minutes.    Then  add  the  pumpkin   and  carrots  and  simmer  for   a  further  6-­‐7  minutes  or  until  tender. To   make   the   curry   paste,   put   all   the   listed   ingredients   into   a   blender   and  process  until  thick.    Make  sure   it  is  well   combined   and  blended. Meanwhile,  heat   the   oil   in   a   wok  or   frying  pan   and   stir-­‐fry  the   shallots   and   remaining   garlic   for   2-­‐3   minutes.     Add   the   curry   paste  and  stir-­‐fry  for  2  minutes. Stir   the  shallot   mixture  into  the  saucepan  and   add  the   coconut   milk  and  basil.    Simmer  for  3-­‐4  minutes.    Serve  hot,  sprinkled  with   the  toasted  pumpkin  seeds.    Enjoy!

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Adventures... Thanks to  Stuart  Cook,  Co-­‐owner  of  Camping  le  Moulin  &  Restaurant   des  Canards,  Chef  Boutonne  for  his  “French  Adventure”. Some  8   years  ago,  the   family  in   all   their   wisdom   (that's   Vera   and   Geoff,   my   mother   and   father-­‐in-­‐law,  my  dear  wife  Sara   and   I,   the   quiz  master   Stuart)   decided  on   a  whim  (instigated   by  myself  -­‐  oh  dear!)  that  after   having   numerous   holiday's   in   France,   we   should   make   the   move   here.    A  change  to  our   lifestyle  and  vocations  past,  to   ily Stuart with his fam start  a  new  adventure  and  buy   our  first  business  in  the  tourism   sector.     A  campsite  and  restaurant  by  the  name  of  Camping  le  Moulin   &  Restaurant  des  Canards. We  found  a  beautiful  little  campsite  just  outside  the  centre  of  the  small   market  town   of  Chef  Boutonne,  home  of  the   famous   and   beautiful   Chateau  Javarzay  just  700  metres  from  the  entrance  to  the  campsite.   After   flying  back  and   forth  to  complete  the  never-­‐ending  paperwork   and   spending   many   hours  on   Google  translate   and   equivalent,  we   eventually   signed   our   lives   away,   set   for   our   new   way  of   life   and   looking  forward  to  the  exciting  challenge  ahead.    We  soon  realised  that   if  we  had   had  the  French  language  down  to  a  tee  before  moving,  this   would   have   made   our   lives   much   easier   during  the   early   stage   of   signing   for   the   business.   Our   lack   of   knowledge   in   understanding   exactly  what  we  were  signing  left  us  with   many  problems  that  had  to   be  overcome   with  the  day-­‐to-­‐day  running  and  even  the  legal   titles  -­‐   which  unfortunately  were  not  complete.    We  therefore  decided  to  get     everything  fully  legal   and  running   smoothly  as  soon   as   we  possibly   could  -­‐  thus  affecting  our   immediate  business   plan   for   development   and  improvement. The  move  from  the  UK  to  France  was  very  smooth  on   the  UK   side!   However,  no  form  of  planning  could  have  solved  the  minor  problem  of   cramming  2  houses  into  one  old  small  storage  room  at  the  back  of  the   mill.   After   stacking   to   the   rooftop,   we   needed   an   immediate   emergency  contingency  plan,  so  we  decided   to  store   for  a  few  weeks   the  remaining  items  in  the  restaurant.    Wearing  our  baseball  caps  to   deflect   the   beautiful   sunshine,  we   proceeded   however,   we   hadn't   taken  into  account  that  the  average  French  local,  back  in  the  day,  was   approximately  4’0”  in  height!    I  came  too  on  the  floor  of  the  restaurant   after  bashing  my  head  on  the  beautiful  oak  beam  as  the  delivery  lorry   entered   the  parking  area.   From   then   I  formulated   the   first   plan   of   action,  to   raise  the   door   so   that   anyone,   whatever   shape   or   build,   could  enter  without  peril.    This  would  also  help  with  handicap  access  in   one  design. Due  to  our  backgrounds,  varied  as  they  were  (Sara  was  a  manager   for   a  large  insurance  company  and  studied  for   a  degree  in  Insurance   +   Psychology,   myself,   ex-­‐forces   in   electronics   and   an   ex-­‐engineer   in   electrical   installations,   Vera   involved   in   property   management   and   Geoff  a  shop-­‐fitting   consultant   for   Marks  and  Spencer),   we  assumed   we  could  cover   all  the  bases  -­‐   but,  “Oh   how   wrong  we  were!”     We   have  found  all  the   physical  works  on  site  and  bookkeeping  etc  to  be   relatively   easy,   but   to   learn   the   French   for   some   of   the   building   products   has   been   quite   interesting   (We   have   made   a   few   mistakes...but  don’t  we  all?). We  wish  to  this  day  that  we  had  contacted  one  of  the  TV  companies  to   run  a  program  around  the  family  for   the   first  year   as  I  am  convinced   from  an  outsider’s  point   of  view,  it  would  have  made  a  great  TV  Series   with  very  high  ratings!    It  was  in  contrast,  a  year  in  the  ‘merde’.

The family  has  undergone  many  projects  involving  the   external  and   internal  modernisation   of  our   former  flour-­‐mill.  Even  to   the  point   of   restoring  the  mill   machinery  to  its  former  glory  -­‐  a  satisfying  project   and  in  keeping  with  the  350  year  old  building.   The   beautiful   River   Boutonne   runs   through   our   campsite   and   is   diverted  underneath  what  is  now  a  lounge  area.  The  restoration  works   have  also  rolled  out  from  the  restaurant,  modernizing  the  bar  and  the   eating  area  that  sweeps  onto  the  terrace  beside  the  pool. Many  great  evenings  have  been  spent  with  our  clients  around  the  pool   whilst  listening  to  our  French/Anglais  Jazz  band.    We  have  had  live  Jazz   here  in  the  restaurant   for   over   6  years.  The  band  members  change   frequently   and   our   guests   love   the   atmosphere   and   food   created   within  our  mill   walls.    The  demand  by  expats  and  our   French  friends   alike  are  still  as  high   as  they  were  the  day  we  started,  both  in  the  high   and  the  low  season.    We  have  even  hosted  a  special  evening  here  with   our   resident   French  Chef   a n d   fa m i l y ' s   h o m e   cooking,  laying  on  a  feast   enjoyed   by   the   locals   with   a   22-­‐piece   brass   band   on   tour   from   the   UK,   playing   around   the   floodlit   poolside   and   dancing  the   night  away;   Great   memories   for   us   all.     22 piece

brass band playing by the pool Due to   the   demand   of   our   clients,  we  even   run   the  Restaurant  3  Canards  quiz.    This  also  seems  to  be  growing  year   on   year   with   a  combination   of  great   simple  food   and   your   slightly   dyslexic  host  (especially  after  a  few  beers!).     It  seems  to  be  a  winning   formula!    Please  come  along  if  you  love  to  have  lots  of  fun  and   laughs   followed   by  a  late  night  swim  in  the  pool   for   the   kids   that   are  brave   enough!

Our bizarre  move  to  France  to  own  and  run  a  campsite  and  restaurant   has   at   times,   been   extremely   demanding   with   all   the   things   you   associate  with  living  and  working  with  a  young  family.    Learning  new   skills  and  applying  them,  utilising  your  old  skill-­‐set  and  developing  new   ones,  and  not  forgetting  overcoming  the  language  barrier;    I  wish  I  had   studied  latin  at  school!     Even  though  it  may  be  a  very  long  time  until   anyone  can  really  understand  our  version! We   can   say  that  we  have   enjoyed   meeting  people  from   around  the   world  since  arriving  -­‐   and  we  are   amazed  at  the  people  that   are  still   camping  and  more  importantly  still   enjoying   every  experience.     We   have  learnt  so  much  from  all  the  members  of  the  Caravan  Club  and  the   Camping   and   Caravanning   Club   and   not   forgetting   the   Fédération   Français  de  Camping  et  de  Caravaning  members. Our  son,  now  8  years  old,  has  fitted  into  the  local   school  well  and  has   become  engrossed  in  various  sports,  which  in  turn  has  developed  our   relationships  with  the  local  community,  which  we  really  enjoy.   Camping  le  Moulin  &  Restaurant  des  Canards: Phone:    05  49  29  73  46  ~  Email:  info@campingchef.com www.campingchef.com  &  www.restaurant.campingchef.com (Please  see  our  advert  on  page  22) Thank you to Stuart Cook for sharing his family story with us.....If you would like to share your ‘French Adventure’, please email your story to us for consideration.

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Motoring... The Alpine Way

by Helen  Tait-­‐Wright

Last month  I  said  there  were  two   French  cars  on   my  wish  list,  so   this   month  I’d  better  tell  you  about  the  second  one  ...... It’s   slightly   newer   than   the   Bugatti,   but   also   has   a  distinguished   motorsport  history,  and  is  also  most  famous  in  blue!!   This  month  we  look  at  the  Renault  Alpine  A110. Alpine  was  the   official  competition   arm  of   Renault   between   1955   and  1974,  run  by  Jean  Redele  from  his   factory  in   Dieppe.     Redele’s   formula  for  success  was   to   produce  a   car  which  had   a  lightweight   body  and  a  tuned  rear  engine  driving  the  rear  wheels. The  A110,  also   known  as  the  "Berlinette",  was  unveiled  at  the  Paris   Motor  Show  in  1962,  and  produced  until  1977.  The  car  used  Renault   8  parts,  and  characteristically  featured  a  steel  backbone  chassis  with   fibreglass  body,  and  an  offset  rear-­‐mounted  engine.  Over  the  course   of   its   life   the   car   was   powered   by  various   Renault   engines   as   its   performance  was  honed. Most  Alpine  A110  Berlinettes  were  built   in  Dieppe,  but  variants  were   also  built  under  licence  in  Brazil,  Bulgaria,  Mexico  and  Spain.  All   the   cars  are  left  hand  drive   and  the  A110  was  never  offered  for  sale  as   new  in  the  UK. Successful   in   motorsport   throughout   it’s   life,   this   lightweight,   manoeuvrable   little   car   reached   international   fame   during   the   1970-­‐1972   seasons   when   it   participated   in   the   newly   created   ‘International   Championship   for   Manufacturers’,   winning   several   events  around  Europe  and   being  considered   one  of  the  strongest   rally  cars  of   its   time.     Notable  performances  from  the   car  include   victory  on  the  1971  Monte  Carlo  Rally. This   incarnation   of   the   car   had   an   aluminium   block   Renault   16   engine,  allowing  even  the  production  1600S  to  reach  a  top  speed  of   210  km/h  (130  mph).   The   A110   was   essentially   a   motorsports   vehicle   that   was   also   available  to  amateur   drivers  looking  for   thrills.    Even  so,  there  was   absolutely  no   question   of   adapting   your   new   Alpine   for   urban   or   family   use.   Drivers,   be   they   professionals   or   amateurs,   had   to   shoehorn   themselves   into   the   minuscule   cabin   and   squeeze   their  legs  into  the   tunnel   as  best   they  could.    Only  then   could  they   experience  the  joys  of  driving  this  lively  sports  model! Such  was  the  impact   of  the  A110  that  to   mark  the  50th  anniversary   of  its  debut,  Renault  have  recently  (May  2012)  announced  a  “new”   A110  concept  car,  designed  to  pay  homage  to  the  original,  which  has   a  body  crafted  from  carbon  fibre  and   dipped   in  a  shade  of  the  same   iconic   Alpine  Blue  we  all  know  and  love.  Under  the  skin   though,  this   is   a   different   beast   altogether   with   a   3.5   litre   V6   mid   mounted   engine  producing  400bhp,  and  benefits   from  the  latest  technology.     There  is  a  great   piece  of  video   featuring  the  two   cars   together   at   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-­‐11A-­‐FtTibs Personally,  I’ll   hang   out   for   the  original   version   with   the  1.6   litre   engine,   which  these  days  can  fetch  anything   between   55,000  and   110,000   Euros.  So,  I  still   need   to   win   the   lottery,  but   if  I  get   one,   don’t  bother  thumbing  a  lift  -­‐  there  ain’t  room!!   Contact  Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

How to speed up your PC

by Ross  Hendry

Part 12:  Re-­‐loading  /  re-­‐installing  Windows  7 During  the  preparation   required  for  re-­‐loading  Windows,  you  should   have   created   a   check   list   and   have   all   of   the   necessary   disks   containing  programs  and   drivers  for   your   hardware   and   of   course   your   data   and   settings   to   get   your   PC   set   up   as   you   need   it.   (As   detailed  in  Part  9,  July  2012). Windows  Vista  and  7  have  several  editions,  from  Starter  to  Ultimate,   with   the   exception   of   the   Starter   edition,   the   versions   are   also   available  in  both  32  and  64  bit  versions.  Ensure  that   you  choose   the   correct  version  for  your   hardware.     I  would  strongly  recommend  that   those   of   you   that   have   Vista,   consider   installing  Windows   7,   it   is   simply  a  better  version  of  Windows,  and  with  Windows  8   due  to   be   launched  soon  it  pays  not  to  get  too  far  behind... To  install Windows 7 using  the  Custom  option  with   formatting   the   hard  disk 1. To  format   your  hard  disk  during  Windows  7  installation,  you'll   n e e d   t o   s t a r t ,   o r   b o o t ,   y o u r   c o m p u t e r   u s i n g   the  Windows  7  installation  disc  or  USB  flash  drive. 2. Turn  on  your  computer  so  that  Windows  starts  normally,  insert   the   Windows   7  installation   disc   or   USB   flash   drive,  and   then   shut  down  your  computer. 3. Restart  your  computer.   4. Press  any  key  when  prompted,  and  then  follow  the  instructions   that  appear. 5. On   the   Install   Windows   page,   enter   your   language  and   other   preferences,  and  then  click  Next. 6. If   the   Install   Windows   page   doesn't   appear,   and   you're   not   asked   to  press  any  key,  you  might  need  to   change   some  system   settings.  To  learn  how  to   do   this,  see  Start  your  computer  from   a  Windows  7  installation  disc  or  USB  flash  drive  . 7. On   the   Please   read   the   license  terms   page,   if   you   accept   the   license   terms,   click   I   accept   the   license   terms,   and   then   click  Next. 8. On   the   Which   type   of   installation   do   you   want?   page,   click  Custom. 9. On  the  Where  do  you  want  to  install  Windows?  page,  click  Drive   options  (advanced). 10. Click  the  partition  that  you  want  to  change,  click  the  formatting   option  you  want  to  perform,  and  then  follow  the  instructions. 11. When  you've  finished  formatting,  click  Next. 12. Follow   the   instructions   to   finish   installing   Windows   7,  which   include   naming   your   computer   and   setting   up   an   initial   user   account.

Or to  install Windows 7 using  the  Custom  option   without  formatting   the  hard  disk 1. Turn  on   your  computer   so   that  Windows  starts  normally,  then   do  one  of  the  following: a) If  you  downloaded  Windows  7,  browse  to  the         installation  file  you  downloaded,  and  then  double-­‐click  it.   b)   If   you   have   a   Windows   7   installation   disc,   insert   the     disc   into  your   computer.  Setup   should  start  automatically.     If   it   doesn't,   click   the   Start   button   ,   click   Computer,     d o u b l e -­‐ c l i c k   y o u r   D V D   d r i v e   t o   o p e n     the   Windows   7   installation   disc,   and   then   double-­‐     click  setup.exe. c) If  you've  downloaded  Windows  7  installation   files  onto     a   USB   flash   drive,   insert   the   drive   into   your   computer.     Setup   should   start   automatically.   If   it   doesn't,   click     the   Start   button   ,  click   Computer,  double-­‐click  the   drive,     and  then  double-­‐click  setup.exe. 2. On   the   Install   Windows   page,   follow  any  instructions   that  are   displayed,  and  then  click  Install  now. 3. On  the  the  Get   important   updates  for  installation  page,  I  skip   this   option   because   I   like   to   install   Windows   without   the   PC   connected   to   the   internet.  These   updates   will   be   available  to   you  after   the  installation  is  complete  via  the  Windows  Update   service. 4. On   the   Please   read   the   license  terms   page,   if   you   accept   the   license   terms,   click   I   accept   the   license   terms,   and   then   click  Next. 5. On   the   Which   type   of   installation   do   you   want?   page,   click  Custom. 6. On  the   Where  do   you   want  to  install   Windows?   page,   choose   the  partition  containing  your  previous  version  of   Windows   (this   is  often  the  computer's  C:drive),  and  then  click  Next. 7. In  the  Windows.old  dialog  box,  click  OK. 8. Follow   the   instructions   to   finish   installing   Windows   7,  which   include   naming   your   computer   and   setting   up   an   initial   user   account. You   should   now   have  a  "Raw"  installation   of   Windows  Vista   or   7   working  on  your  PC.  Next  you  will  have   to  ensure   that  you  have   the   latest   drivers  for   your   hardware  and   of   course   your   programs  and   data  ready  to  install.  Please  look  at   Part  11   (September  2012)   the   procedure  for   loading  your   drivers  programs   and   data   will   be   the   same.   Ross   Hendry   is   the   proprietor   of   Interface   Consulting   and   Engineering,   who  has   over  42  years  experience  in   Communications,   Computer   Technology   and   Direct   Marketing.   (See   advert   below   for   more  information).

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A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres A-Z of the Communes of the by Sue  Burgess Deux-Sèvres. CERIZAY Cerizay  is  found  in  the  North-­‐West   of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres,  15  minutes   from   Bressuire,   35   minutes   from   Cholet   and   20   minutes   from   Pouzauges   (85).  The   town   lies   along  the   green   banks   of   a   small   stream   which   runs   from   East   to   West   and   flows   into   the   Sèvre   Nantaise   river   just   a   few   kilometres   away.   The   inhabitants   of   Cerizay  are  known  as  Cerizéens. The   origin   of   the   name   Cerizay  would   seem  to   be   Gallic-­‐Roman.   During  the  Middle  Ages,  the  town's  centre  was  at   the  foot   of   the   feudal   castle.   The   two   last   towers   of   the   castle   as   well   as   its   romanesque  chapel  dating  from  the  XIIth  century  were  demolished   when  the  present  church  was  built  in  1890. On   the  25th   August  1944,  German   troops  coming  back  from   the   coast,  bombardes  and  machine-­‐gunned  the  town  leaving  behind  5   victims  and  destroying  172  houses.     A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE The   Abbey   Notre-­‐Dame   de   Beauchêne  in  which   the  President   of   the   French   Republic  has   a   stall   because   of   his   title   of   “First   and   only   honorary   Cannon”   of   the   Archibasilica  Saint-­‐Jean  de  Latran.   The  main   employer   in  the  town   is  the  automobile  builder  Heuliez.   The   town   is  home  to   the  head  office  and  the   main  production  unit   of   this   company   which   is   considered   to   be   France's   fourth   car   company. Heuliez   was   taken   over   in   2009   by   the   Bernard   Krief   Consulting   (BKC)  group.  This  group  wishes  to  concentrate  its  production  on  the   electric  car   -­‐the”Mia”     (the   “Friendly”  in  English)  which  it   hopes  to   sell  mainly  to  local  authorities. CERSAY The   inhabitants   of   Cersay  are   les   cersaisiens.     Cersay  is   situated   15km  from  Thouars,  30km  from  Bressuire,  35km  from  Saumur  and   only  60km  from  Angers.    Cersay  is  a  parish  of  the  markets  of  Anjou,   situated  within  the  perimeter  of  the  vineyards  of  Saumur. In   1973   Saint   Pierre   à   Champ   became   an   associated   commune. The  name  Cersay  comes  from  the  latin   "cerasus"  (cherry  tree). The   economic  activity  of  these  two  communes  which  are  the  two  most   northerly   communes   of   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres,   is   balanced   between   traditional   agriculture   (breeding,   cereals,   vines)   and   small   businesses.    The  area  is  part  of  the  Anjou  AOC  wine  growing  area.   The  houses  are  built  in  Angevine  style.  The  slate  roofs  of  the  large   tuffeau   stone   houses   contrast   with   the   tiles   of   smaller   more   modest  houses  built  out  of  local  stone.     CHAIL The     505   inhabitants   of   Chail   are   called   the   Chaillois   and   the   Chailloises.    The  name  of   the  village  «Chail»  probably  comes  from   the  Poitevin  word  «chail»  which  means  «pebble».    The  patron  saint   of  the  Church  of  Chail  is  Peter  («the  Rock»).      

Cer - Champ

A VOIR  /  MUST  SEE St   Pierre   Church   is  a   small   Romanesque   church   which   has   often   been  remodelled.     It  was  built  at  the  end  of  the  Middle  Ages  by  the   monks  and  was  a  priory  of  the  Canons  of  the  Abbey  of  Notre  Dame   of  Réau.    The   lower   part  of   the  walls   and  the  facade  dates  from     Roman   times  and   the  Benedictines.     The  nave   which   was  partly   destroyed   during   the   wars  of   religion,   was   restored  in   1638.     In   1844  the  pointed  gable  of  the  facade  was  rebuilt. CHAMBROUTET Chambroutet   is   a  commune   which  is  part   of   Bressuire    (see   June   2012   issue).   The   inhabitants   of   Chambroutet   are   the   Chambroutéens. CHAMPDENIERS-SAINT-DENIS The   inhabitants   of   Champdeniers-­‐Saint-­‐ Denis   (called   Chandna  in   Poitevin   dialect)  are   called   campidénariens.  The  nearby  commune   of   Champeaux   became   an   associated   commune  of  Champdeniers-­‐Saint-­‐Denis  on  the   19th    December  1973. Champdeniers  is  a  peaceful   little   town   situated  in   a  basin   or   dip.   The  river   Egray   flows  through   the  town.  The  commune  is  situated   at   the  crossroads   of   the   county  roads  D745  and   D748  which   link   Bressuire  to  Niort  along  a  North/South  axis  and  Fontenay-­‐le-­‐Comte   to  Saint-­‐Maixent  from  East  to  West.   In   1469,   King   Louis   XI   stayed   at   Champdeniers,   before   a   reconciliation   with   his   brother   Charles   de   Guyenne   who   had   provoked  a  feudal  revolt. The   commune   of   Saint-­‐Denis   joined   Champdeniers   in   1973   and   Champdeniers  became  Champdeniers-­‐Saint-­‐Denis.   A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • Notre-­‐Dame  church  with  its  polygonal  tower  which  was  added  in   the  XVIth  century  and  which  is  probably  of  Limousine  influence.   • The   funeral   stone   under   the   doorway   and   the   XVIIth   century   wooden  statue  of  the  Virgin  Mary.   • Nucheze  Hall • The   Skate  Park  opened  at  the  end  of  the  90s   which   was  inspired   by  plans   by  James  Hoban   for   the   White   House   in   Washington   D.C.   • The   underground   river   which   can   be   visited   from   the   spring   time   until   the   end  of  the   summer  with  its   impressive   grottos   and   its   2km   trail   under   the   town   centre. • The   old   town   hall   of   St   The old Town Hall of St Denis Denis Famous  people  connected  to   the  commune:  the  minister  Charles   Cochon  de  Lapparent  (1750-­‐1825)  was  born  in  the  commune.

More ‘A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.’ next  month...

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Building & Renovation...

Short editorials  can  be  offered  to  advertisers,   free  of  charge.

ARTISANS &  TRADESMEN... Do  you  have  any  top  tips  you  can  share  with  our  readers?       We  would  love  to  include  them  in  this  section!

Please call  Sarah  to  find  out  more.

For more  details,  please  see  the  ‘Written  Contributions’  page   on  our  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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Business, Finance & Property... Ask Amanda.

One thing   I   notice   in   France   is   the   wealth   of   information  available  for  expatriates  who,  like  me,   live  here  permanently.  Whether  on  the  internet  via   websites   and   discussion   forums,   or   as   printed   media,   such   as   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’   Magazine,  there  is  always  information  and  opinion   for   you   to   digest   regarding   specific   queries   you   may  have.

Whether you   want   to   register   for   our  newsletter,  attend   one  of   our   road   shows  or   speak  to  me   directly  please   phone   or   email   on   the   addresses  below  and  I  will  be  happy  to  speak  to  you. Amanda  Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

The hardest  task  for  me  is  sifting  through  the  raft  of   varied  opinions  and  recommendations  I  find,  to  get  to  the  facts  which   will  help  me  choose  the  correct  path.  If  I  am  looking  for  information  on   an   electrician   or   heating   engineer,  I   will   look   for   someone   whose   business  is  registered  to  provide  the  service  I  want  and  I  am  sure  most   of  you  would  do  the  same? Managing  your  finances  is  another  area  where  you  want  to  be  sure  the   information   you   receive   is   accurate   and   provides   you   with   the   professional   peace   of   mind   you   need   to   protect   your   assets.   The   Spectrum  IFA  Group  is  regulated  in  France,  under  its  trading  name  TSG   Insurance  Services  S.A.R.L,  by  ANACOFI-­‐CIF  and  Orias  (see  our  website   for  details  of  these  organisations)  to  provide  financial   advice.  Our  free   financial   consultation   means   that   you   do   not   have   to   spend   your   valuable  time  separating  fact  from  opinion  when  ensuring  your  estate   is  as  tax  efficient  as  possible.   When  it  comes  to  keeping  abreast  of  changes  to  French  financial   legislation  you  can  always  register  for  the  Spectrum  IFA  Group’s   regular   newsletter.  It  will  provide  details   on  changes  in  the  law   and  the  impact  this  could  have  on   you,  as  well  as  bringing  you   details  on  financial   road  shows   which   you   can   attend   and  hear   from  many  leading  financial  organisations  first  hand. Page 34


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Wealth tax in 2012 and going forward by David  Franks,  Blevins  Franks  Financial  Correspondent. Wealth  tax  has  been   changing  one  year  to  the  next,  and  there   are   more  changes  to  come  next  year.    It  is  hard  to  keep  up  with  it  all   so  here  is  a  summary  of  how  it  works  this  year.     If   the   total   chargeable   wealth   of   your   household   amounts  to  less   than  €1.3m  you  do  not  have  any  wealth  tax   liability.    If  your  wealth   exceeds  this  threshold,  only  the  first  €800,000  is  tax  free. Your  total   wealth   tax  bill  this  year   is  now   based   on  the  tax   bands   and  rates   in  place  up  to  2010.     They  range   from   0.55%   for   wealth   between   €800,000   and   €1,310,000   up   to   1.8%   for   wealth   over   €16,790,000.  

M. Hollande’s  succession  tax  reforms  have  also  been  approved  by   parliament,   as   has   the   introduction   of   social   charges   on   income   and  gains  made  from  property  owned  by  non-­‐residents.     Next   year   is  expected  to  bring  new  top  rates  of  income  tax,  plus   a  reform  on   how  income  from  capital  (so  bank  interest,  dividends  etc.)  is  taxed.     Summarised   tax   information   is   based   upon   our   understanding   of   current  laws  and  practices  which  may  change.     Individuals  should   take  personalised  advice. To  keep  in  touch  with  the  latest  developments  in  the  offshore  world,   check  out  the  latest  news  on  our  website  www.blevinsfranks.com.   (See  our  advert  below)

When these   rates  were   last   in  use   there  were  restrictions   on   the   amount   of   combined  taxes  an   individual  could   pay   on   his  income.     There  are  no  such   restrictions  this   year,  which   means  that   wealth   tax   burdens  are  higher   than   ever  before.     Even  those   with   wealth   just  above  the  threshold  will  see  a  14%  rise. Since  wealth  tax  returns  have  already  been  submitted  this  year,  you   will   pay   the   difference   between   the   old   and   new   rates   as   an   “exceptional   contribution”.     You   will   be   advised   accordingly  and   have  to  pay  it  by  15th  November. This   contribution   is   an   exceptional   measure   for   2012.     The   government   is   planning   a   structural   reform   of   the   tax   in   2013.     More  details  are   likely  to   be   included  in  within  the  framework  of   the  2013  Finance  Bill.

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NEW GOVERNMENT TAX by David  Hardy CHANGES During  his  presidential  campaign  François  Hollande  vowed  to  balance   the  French   economy  by  2017.   Now   that  his  socialist  party  have  won   majorities  in  both  the  National  Assembly  and  the  Senate,  there  is  little   to  stand  in  his  way  of  implementing  in  full  his  pre-­‐election  manifesto   commitments. The   first   raft  of  measures  came  into  force  following  the  passing  into   law   of   the   Finance   (Amendment)   Act   2012   (‘Loi   de   Finances   Rectificative  2012  (2)’)  in  the  middle  of  August  and  the  next  stage  of   the  government’s  fiscal  programme  will  be  revealed  in  the  Finance  Bill   for   2013  which   will   be   announced   towards  the  end   of   September   2012. The  new  law,  however,  did  announce   three   important  changes  which   may  affect  many  people. WEALTH  TAX   The   changes   brought   in   last   year   by  the  Sarkozy  government   have   partially  been  reversed  and  whilst  the  threshold  remains  unchanged  at   €1.3m,  the  bands  used  to  calculate  the  tax   due  are  the  same  as  those   used  last  year; 0.55% • €800,001  to  €1,310,000   • €1,310,001  to  €2,570,000     0.75% • €2,570,001  to  €4,040,000     1.00% • €4,040,001  to  €7,710,000     1.30% • €7,710,001  to  €16,790,000     1.65% 1.80% • Above  €16,790,000     This  has  been   called  an  ‘exceptional’  tax  for  2012,  in  respect  of  which   bills  will   be  sent  out  in  early  October,  and  which   leads  us   to  believe   that  a  further  review  of  this  tax  will  be  announced  in  the  future. INHERITANCE  TAX The  amount  that  can  be  left  tax-­‐free  to  each  child  by  each  parent  on   death  has  been  reduced  from  €159,325  to  €100,000. The   same   reduction   also   applies  to   the   amount   that   can   be  gifted   during  a  parent’s  lifetime  without  an  immediate  tax  charge,  with  such   gifts  now  renewable  every  fifteen  years. Furthermore,  in  the  event  of  death  during  the  fifteen  year  period  after   the  gift,  the  value  of  the  gift   will  be  included  in  the  deceased  parent’s   estate  for  inheritance  tax  purposes. Seeking  ways  to   invest  that  help  reduce  future  inheritance  tax  bills  is   now  even  more  important.   ‘SOCIAL  TAXES’. It  will   come  as  a  surprise  to  nobody  that   the   previous  government’s   plan  to  increase  ‘social  taxes’  (“Contributions  Sociales”)  on  investment   income  and  gains  to  15.5%  has,  unsurprisingly,  been  maintained! For  those  not  living  permanently  in  France,  there  is   one  change  that   has  attracted  a  lot  of  attention;  the  decision  to  impose  ‘social  taxes’,  at   15.5%,  on  French  property  income  earned  by  non-­‐residents,  on  both   rental  income  and  capital  gains. As  a  result   of   these  adopted   tax   changes  and   with  the  prospect   of   additional   tax  changes  to   come  it  is  recommended  you  review  your   situation  ensuring   you  maximise  all   available  options  to   mitigate  the   potential  impact  of  these  tax  changes.  

For a  full  list  of  our   advertising  rates,   please  phone  for   an  advertising  pack  or   download  from  our   website. Tel:  05  49  70  26  21

David Hardy  is  Regional  Manager  for  Poitou-­‐Charentes  for  Siddalls   France,   who  have  been  providing   specialist  independent  financial   advice  to  the   British  community   in  Poitou-­‐Charentes   since  1996.   Telephone:  05  56  34  71  77,  bordeaux.office@siddalls.net

www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

President Hollande's tax changes ratified by the French National by Trevor  Leggett,  Chief  Executive Assembly On   the  16th   August  2012  the   French  Assemblée  National   ratified   President  Hollande's   new   tax  and  financial  proposals.     These  have   created   much   media  interest   in   the  French   property  market   and   will  be  of  interest  to  readers  of  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’. When  he  came  into  power,  President  Hollande  vowed  to  raise  state   spending  by  €20bn  over   his  first  five  years,  as  an  example  you  may   remember  that  he  pledged  to  hire  60,000  new  teachers.     France  consistently  tops  the  polls  of   having  the  "highest  quality  of   life  in  Europe"  and  unrivalled  healthcare  and  education  systems  are   the  bedrock  of  this  quality.    Indeed,   this  state  spending  is  why  our   lives  here   in   France   are   so   attractive  and   the   reason   that   40,000   overseas  buyers  bought  a  property  here  last  year. Most   of   the   policies   brought   into   place   simply   bring   European   owners   of   real   estate   in   France   into   line   with   current   French   residents.     Where   this  is   the   case  you   could  say  that   it's   probably   long  overdue.

Tax on  "non  resident"  property  owners  in  France

These apply  from  January   1st   2012.     Total   tax   liability   on   rental   income   has   increased   by   15.5%   up   to   35.5%.   However,   for   UK   citizens,  some  of   these  charges  can  be  offset  due  to  the  France/UK   double   tax   treaty   -­‐   it   is   essential   to   get   professional   advice   to   determine  the  level  of  your  individual  exposure. The  tax  on  property  gains  has  increased  to   34.5%  (from  19%)  for   EU   residents   but  deductions  can  be  made  for   every  year  of  ownership   after   the  first   5   years   (years  6-­‐17  give   2%  reductions,  years  18-­‐24   give  4%  reductions  and  years  25-­‐30  give  8%  reductions). French   notaires   have   been   told   to   deduct   the   tax   directly   upon   completion  of  the  house  sale. There  is  still  a  question-­‐mark  over  the  fact  that  this  tax  was  originally   drafted   as   a  social   security  charge   ("CSG   RDS")   but   is   now   being   called  a  gains  tax.  The  European   courts  ruled   that  it  is  not  legal  for   a   member  state  to   charge  a  resident  of  another  member   state  social   security  charges.  However,  because  of  the  subtle  change  in  wording   this  will  not   stop   the   government   implementing  the  tax   -­‐   which,  in   any  case,  is  only  equal  to  that  paid  by  French  residents  so  seen  as  fair   in  its  application.

Wealth tax

French wealth   tax   is   calculated   on   January   1st   each   year   and   is   payable   by  those  French   residents   with   assets   worth  over   €1.3m.   Returns   have,   of   course,   already   been   submitted   for   2012   but   President   Hollande   has   introduced   a   one-­‐off   "exceptional   contribution"  where  individuals  pay  the  difference  between  the  old   &  new  rates. The  tax  is  based  upon   the  wealth   of  the  household  and  unmarried   couples  living  together  are  treated  as  one  household.      Don't  forget   that   the   market   value  of  your   principal   residence   in   France  if  it   is   your   main   residence,   can   be   reduced   by   30%   for   wealth   tax   purposes. Clearly,  readers   should   seek  professional   tax  advice  based  upon   their  individual  circumstances.   Trevor  Leggett   is   Chief   Executive  of  Leggett   Immobilier.  You  can   access  all  the  local  Leggett  Immobilier  property  listings  and  articles   at  www.frenchestateagents.com/poitou-­‐charentes-­‐property.

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The Deux-Sèvres Monthly - October 2012  

English language magazine for the Deux-Sèvres and surrounding areas in France.

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