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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Welcome! to Issue 24 of

‘The DeuxSèvres Monthly’ magazine.

We   have   another   packed   issue   for   you   this   February,  with  many  new  advertisers  and   some   interesting  articles  to  keep  you  informed.    I  hope   you  enjoy  it. It  may  be  a  little  chilly  outside,  but  it’s  important   to   keep   occupied   through   the  winter   months.     There’s  only  so  much  TV  that  one  can  watch,  so   this  may  be  the  perfect  time  to  resurrect  a  hobby  of  old.    Take  a  look   at   our   Hobbies,   Clubs   &   Associations   information   on   page   6   and   perhaps  you  can  get   involved  and  meet  some  new  people  at   the  same   time. Enjoy  yourselves  and  stay  warm!

à plus, Sarah.

Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or Tel: 05 49 70 26 21.

Annual  Subscription. If   you   would  like  to  receive  a  copy  of   ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’   magazine  by  post  each  month,  please  complete  this  form  and  send   to  La  Bartière,  79130  Secondigny.  Please  enclose  a  cheque  to  cover   postage  for  the  year. 28€  within  France,  18€  to  addresses  in  UK. (Unfortunately  the  cheaper  ‘printed  papers’  rate  cannot  be  applied   to  addresses  within  France,  only  when  sending  abroad)   Full  Name: Postal  Address: Postcode:

Country:

Tel: Email: Please  make  cheques  payable  to  SARAH  BERRY.

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

©  Sarah  Berry  2013.    All  rights  reserved. Material   may   not   be   reproduced   without   permission.    While   care   is   taken   to   ensure   that   articles  and   features   are   accurate,   Sarah   Berry   accepts  no   liability   for   reader   dissatisfaction.    The   opinions   expressed   and  experiences   shared   are   given   by   individual   authors   and   do   not   necessarily   represent   the   views   or   opinions  of  the  publisher. Please   ensure   you   verify   that   the   company  you  are   dealing   with   is  a   registered   trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly>>   est   édité   par   Sarah   Berry,   La   Bartière,   79130,   Secondigny.  Tél:   05  49  70   26   21.     Directeur   de   la   publication   et   rédacteur   en   chef:   Sarah   Berry.   Crédits   photos:   Sarah   Berry,   Clkr   et   morgeufile.com.   Impression:   Raynaud   Imprimeurs,   zone   industrielle,   BP13,   79160,   Coulonges-­‐ sur-­‐l’Autize.    Dépôt  légal:  fevrier  2013  -­‐  Tirage:   4  500  exemplaires.     Siret:  515  249   738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

CONTENTS

What’s  On.......................................................................................................4 Hobbies,  Clubs  &  Associations.......................................................................6 Getting  Out  &  About......................................................................................7 Take  a  Break..................................................................................................14 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness..............................................................................16 Our  Furry  Friends..........................................................................................17 The  Great  Outdoors......................................................................................20 French  Life,  Food  &  Drink.............................................................................22 French  Adventures.......................................................................................26 Motoring.......................................................................................................27 Communications...........................................................................................29 Building  &  Renovation..................................................................................30 Business,  Finance  &  Property.......................................................................36

THIS  MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS  

A  La  Bonne  Vie  (Restaurant)...................................................................... Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)............................................................ Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  D/Glazing)............................... AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)...................................................................... Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)............................................................ Andrew  Longman  (Plumber)..................................................................... An  English  Nursery  in  France  (Garden  Centre)......................................... Arbrecadabra.com  (Tree  surgery)............................................................. Blevins  Franks  Financial  Management  Ltd................................................ British  Mobile  Mechanic  (John  Purchase)................................................. Burg  European  Removals  (Dog  Food  supplies)......................................... Cafe  Cour  du  Miracle................................................................................. Café  des  Belles  Fleurs................................................................................ Caniclôture  (Hidden  fencing)..................................................................... Chris  Bassett  Construction........................................................................ Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)............................................ Consultus  Care  &  Nursing  Ltd................................................................... Cottage  Services  (Garden  Maintenance).................................................. Currencies  Direct  (Money  Transfers)........................................................ Cut  46  (Hair  Salon)..................................................................................... Dave  Bowring  (Electrician)........................................................................ Delux  Canine  Hotel.................................................................................... D  J  Maintenance  (Handyman)................................................................... David  Watkins  (Chimney  Sweep).............................................................. deVere  Group  (Financial  Advisors)............................................................ Electricien  Anglais  en  France..................................................................... Energie-­‐79.................................................................................................. Fresco  Interiors  (Interior  Design).............................................................. George  Rayner  Computers........................................................................ Glynn  Chubb  (Carpenter  /  Joiner)............................................................. Hair  by  Janet.............................................................................................. Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers).............................. Hatton  Building.......................................................................................... Heather’s  Pet  Care  Services....................................................................... Home  Installation  (Shaun  Grice)............................................................... Insink  Plumbing......................................................................................... James  Harris  (Plasterer)............................................................................. John  Etherington  (Home  and  Garden)...................................................... John  Snee  (Groundworks  &  Septic  Tanks)................................................. John  Spray  Maçonnerie  (Stonemason)..................................................... Julie’s  Cleaning  Services............................................................................ La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier).......................... La  Joie  de  Vivre.......................................................................................... Leggett  Immobilier.................................................................................... Le  Relais  Délice  (Restaurant)..................................................................... Leahrno’s  Siberians  (Dog  Food  supplier)................................................... Man  &  Van................................................................................................. Mark  Sabestini  Renovation  &  Construction.............................................. MB  Plumbing  &  Building  Services............................................................. Michael  Glover  (Plasterer,  Renderer  &  Tiler)............................................ Michael  Hobson  (Painter  &  Decorator)..................................................... ML  Computers........................................................................................... Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances............................................................... Nathan  Foster  Building  Services................................................................ Needa  Hand  Services................................................................................. Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology).................................................... Pascale  Matéo  (French  Lessons)............................................................... Pascale  Terry  French  Tuition...................................................................... Pause!  Cafe  l’Absie..................................................................................... Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire).................................................................. Poitou  Property  Services........................................................................... Polar  Express  (Frozen  Foods)..................................................................... R&A  Services............................................................................................. RDK  Roofing  &  Building  Services............................................................... Restaurant  des  Canards............................................................................. Rob  Berry  (Plasterer)................................................................................. Robert  Walker  Plomberie  (Plumbing,  Heating,  Air  con)........................... Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)................................... Satellite  TV  (Nigel  Gubb)........................................................................... sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Groundwork  &  Construction)................................... Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)...................................................................... Simon  The  Tiler.......................................................................................... Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)................................................... Steve  Enderby............................................................................................ Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation)............................................ Taylor  Electricté......................................................................................... The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre................................................... Top  Hat  Quizzes......................................................................................... Total  Renovation  Services  (Michael  Dominey)......................................... Tracey  Bowring  (Hairdressing  &  Nails)...................................................... Traducteurs  Assermentés  sarl  (Sworn  Translators)................................... Trisha  Mobile  Hairdresser.......................................................................... Val  Assist  (Translation  Services)................................................................ VMP  &  Steve  Reid  (Windows  &  Doors).................................................... Vendee  Pools.............................................................................................

22 27 2 33 34 35 21 21 36 27 17 24 22 18 33 7 2 21 36 16 31 18 32 33 37 30 35 31 30 32 16 31 33 18 32 35 32 21 34 32 36 31 7 38 24 17 27 33 35 32 31 30 28 33 32 17 11 11 25 34 38 25 32 33 25 2 35 29 30 34 37 35 37 31 10 31 27 7 34 16 11 16 10 2 40

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

What’s On... February 2013 1st  February  -­‐  Quiz  and  Curry  Night At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    See  advert  on  P.22  for  details. 4th  February  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Limalonges See  www.tophatquizzes.com  or  advert  on  P.7  for  more  information. 7th  February  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Chef  Boutonne See  www.tophatquizzes.com  or  advert  on  P.7  for  more  information. 7th  February  -­‐  Quiz  &  Fish  and  Chips At  Bar  La  Cabane  de  Vouhé,  Vouhé.  6.30pm-­‐8pm. 13th  February  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Aigre See  www.tophatquizzes.com  or  advert  on  P.7  for  more  information. 14th  February  -­‐  Trader’s  Day At  Pause!  Café  L’Absie,  2pm-­‐5pm.  See  advert  on  P.25  for  information. 14th  February  -­‐  4L  Trophy  Race  leaves  Poitiers Student   Rally  Challenge  in   aid   of  Moroccan   schools,  sets   off  from   Poitiers.    Further  information  can  be  found  in  the  article  on  P.28 14th  February  -­‐  Valentine’s  Evening  Menu At  A  La  Bonne  Vie  Restaurant,  Le  Beugnon.    Please  see  advert  on  P.22. 14th  February  -­‐  Valentine’s  Night  with  Live  Music At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    See  advert  on  P.22  for  more  details. 14th  February  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Champniers See  www.tophatquizzes.com  or  advert  on  P.7  for  more  information. 14th  February  -­‐  Valentine’s  meal  with  Live  Jazz At  Restaurant  des  Canards,  Chef  Boutonne.    Please   see  advert  on  P. 25  for  further  information. 26th  February  -­‐  Free  Financial  Surgery  with  Amanda At   ‘Open   Door’,  Civray.     Please  find  more   information   in   the   ‘Ask   Amanda’  section  on  P.37 27th  February  -­‐  PC  Course.  ‘Organise  Your  Data’ A   PC   course   covering   how   to   organise   your   data   will   be   held   at   Pause!  Café,  L’Absie.  For  more  information,  or  to  book,  please  email:   rs.hendry@gmail.com. 27th  February  -­‐  Meeting  about  Seasonal  Work  in  the  area At  Maison  de  l’Emploi,  Parthenay,  2pm-­‐5pm.    See  information  on  P.7

What’s Coming Up... 12th  March  -­‐  Keeping  Safe  from  FIRE Presentation   held   at   the   Parthenay  Fire   Station,  starting  at   3pm.     Please  find  more  information  on  P.5

Monthly  services  at  the  English  speaking  Church  in  Deux-­‐Sèvres Jassay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,     has  a  Home  Group   Service  at  Jassay    commencing  at  11.00am  on   every  2nd  Sunday  in  the  month.   It   is   held  at   the   home  of  Ann   White,  a  warm  welcome   awaits  everyone  for   a  time  of  worship   and  fellowship. Chef Boutonne The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ   the   Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also   holds  services  on  the  1st  Sunday  of  each  month  at  10.30am   during  the   winter   in   the   Little   Stone   Church   at  Chef   Boutonne.   After  each  service,  tea  or  coffee   is  served  and  an  opportunity  to   meet  other  people  in  the  area. Parthenay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ   the   Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also  holds  services  on   the  4th   Sunday  of  each   month  at  10.30am   in  the  Presbytery  Rooms,  rue  de  la  Citadelle,  Parthenay,  opposite   St   Croix  Church.  After   each   service,  tea   or   coffee  is   served  and   everyone  is  invited  to  a  'bring  and  share'  lunch. For   further   informafon   about   locafon   of   churches   and   about   what   else   is   happening   near   you,   please   take   a   look   at   our   website   www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com   or   contact   us   at   office.goodshepherd@orange.fr Monthly  services  in   the   English   speaking   Anglican  Church  in  the   Vendée: Puy de Serre All   Saints,  Vendée  holds  two  services  each  month,   on   the  2nd  and   4th   Sundays  at   the  church   of   St.  Marthe,   Puy   de   Serre,  at   11am.     After   each  service,  tea  and   coffee  is  served  in  the   parish  room  and   everyone  is  invited  to  a  ‘bring  and  share’  lunch. Other  services  are  held  in   the  west  of  the  Vendée,  in  La  Chapelle   Achard  and  La  Chapelle  Palluau.     For  details  of  these,  please  check   the  website:    www.allsaintsvendee.fr A  VERY  WARM  WELCOME  awaits  you  at  ESCOVAL   (The  English  Speaking  Church  of  the  Valley  of  the  Loire).     Communion  Services  are  held  on  the  3rd  Sunday  of  each  month   at   La  Chapelle  de  la  Bonne  Dame  de  Ranton  at  11.30am  followed  by  a   Bring  and  Share  lunch.   Full   details   of   how   to   find   us   may   be   found   on   our   website   at:   www.escoval.org   or   please   telephone   us   at:  05   49   66   79   14.     Our  GPS  address  is  46˚59'25.30  N    0˚02'06.22  W.

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Local Markets • • Tuesdays: • • • Wednesdays: • Thursdays: • • Fridays: • • Saturdays: • • • • Sundays: • • •

Benet (dept.85) Lencloitre (1st Monday in month)(dept.86) Lezay Coulonges-sur-l’Autize Thouars Parthenay Sauzé Vaussais Niort Thouars Melle Chef Boutonne Airvault Niort Coulon St. Maixent l’École Fontenay le Comte Neuville (dept.86)

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2013

Photo: Lisa Roberts

Mondays:

Monday  1st  April.............. Wednesday  1st  May.......... Wednesday  8th  May......... Thursday  9th  May............. Sunday  19th  May.............. Monday  20th  May............. Sunday  14th  July............... Thursday  15th  August....... Friday  1st  November......... Monday  11th  November... Wednesday  25th  December.

Easter  Monday  (Lundi  de  Pâques) Labour  Day (Fête  du  travail) Victory  in  Europe  Day  (Fête  de  la  Victoire) Ascension  Day (Ascension) Pentacost (Pentecôte) Pentacost (Lundi  de  Pentecôte) Nafonal  Day  (Fête  Na;onale  de  France) Assumpfon  of  Mary (Assomp;on) All  Saint’s  Day (Toussaint) Armisfce  Day  (Armistace  1918) Christmas  Day  (Noël)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY                                                                                                

                                                                           

Paperback  Jan Books  in  English

1st  Feb:     Bar  de  la  Paix,  Thouars.       12.00  -­‐  2pm 1st  Feb:     Le  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize.    4  -­‐  6pm 3rd  Feb:     Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  .  2  -­‐  4pm 7th  Feb:     Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud.  2  -­‐  5pm 7th  Feb:     Bar  La  Cabane  de  Vouhé,  Vouhé.  6.30  -­‐  8pm* 8th  Feb:     Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay.  11am  -­‐  4pm 9th  Feb:     Cafe  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole.    10.00am  -­‐  1pm 14th  Feb:     Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie.    2-­‐  5pm 22nd  Feb:     Le  P’tit  Bar  Boucard,  Ménigoute.    4pm  -­‐  6pm 28th  Feb:     La  Joie  de  Vivre,  Moncoutant.    2pm  -­‐  5pm *+  Quiz  &  Fish  and  Chips

For  more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

Mr T’s Friterie Plat à Emporter Traditionnel Britannique

With regular venues at:

• • • •

Open 6.30

-8.30pm

* Aulnay    (Open  from  6pm)          •        Matha                                                                                           Beauvoir  Sur  Niort • St  Hilaire  de  Villefranche Gourville                     • St  Jean  d’Angély Loulay See  www.frying2nite.com  for  details  or  call  06  02  22  44  74 *  Please  note  Winter  opening  hours

Reel Fish & Chips Traditional English style Fish & Chips

We  have  no  Fish  and  Chips  venues  this  month.  Instead  we  will   be   delivering  ‘The  DSM’  to  the  following  places  for   collection  at  any   time  during  the  month. *Bar  Tabac  PMU,  Bouille-­‐Loretz     *Shopi  -­‐  Argenton  Les  Vallees.         *Bar  'au  bon  accueil',  St  Martin  de  Sanzay   *Bar  Tabac  -­‐  Genneton  

Tel: 06 04 14 23 94, or visit: www.reelfishandchips.net

                                     La            Vendee  Chippy                                                          Traditional  Fish  &  Chips  in  France! Now  Under  New  Management.   Venues  resuming  Wednesday  6th  March  at  St  Vincent   Sterlanges  &  Friday  8th  March  at  Thouarsais  Bouildroux. For  more  info  please  see  their  website:  

www.lavendeechippy.com

O

pen 6-8pm Fish 4 Chip Fish, Chips & mushy peas! Reopens Monday 25th Feb! Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket)

Tel: 06 37 53 56 20, or visit: www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

Association Amities Etambe et Tembe A Friendship Association forging links between Brion pres Thouet (in Deux Sevres) and Kwa-Mazambane (a village in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa) to develop mutual understanding, cultural exchange and the promotion of each country with the other. The 2013 AGM is being held in the Mairie at Brion pres Thouet at 7pm on Friday the 8th February. (on Route D938 between Thouars and Saumur). All those interested are welcome to attend. For more information contact the President: Stephen Bourne Tel : 05 49 67 75 84

Cancer Support in Deux-Sèvres Cancer support aims to improve the lives Of people affected by cancer. Don’t worry alone, pick up the phone. For Further information contact: June Searchfield: Tel: 05 49 64 59 96 or email: junesearchfield@gmail.com We are here for you and your Family

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Hobbies, Clubs & Associations... LA  CHAPELLE  GAUDIN  CRAFT  GROUP

We  are   a  small  group   of   ladies   who   are  keen  to   meet   other   like   minded   people   to   form  a   craft   circle.     All   crafts   are   welcome  -­‐   needlecraft,  paper  craft  -­‐  anything  goes! If  you  are  interested,   please  contact  HELEN   AURELIUS  HADDOCK:   helen.aurelius@gmail.com  or  join  us  on  FACEBOOK Association Meridien Green We   are   an   Anglo-­‐French   group   which   was   founded   in   2001   for   mutual   understanding   of   each   other's   language   and   culture.   We   meet   twice   weekly   in   the   Salle   des   Associations   in   St   Coutant,   79120.     The   best   way   to   find   out   more   is   to   visit   our   website   -­‐   www.meridiengreen.asso.fr  or  contact  Maureen  Dalby:   05  49  29  94  50.  The  name   of  our  group  comes  from   the  fact  that  St   Coutant  is  on  the  Greenwich  Meridian!

Alone  in  France? We  are  a  group  of  people  living  alone   in  the   L'Absie  area  who  meet   regularly  for  coffee  and  lunches.    We   meet   on  the  1st  and  3rd  Tuesdays  at  11am   for  coffee  at  the  Pause  cafe  in   L'Absie.    Our  lunches  are  at  different  venues  each  month.  There's  a   warm  welcome  if  you'd  like  to  join  us.   More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  47.

Franglais  Thouars The   Thouars   ‘Franglais’   group   meets   every   Wednesday   from   19.30h   to   21.00h,   in   the   Association’s   centre   at   7   rue   Anne   Desrays,  Thouars,  for  conversation  in  English  and  French. We   welcome   those   of   all   nationalities   who   would   like   to   participate.  Either  come  along  to  see  us  one  evening,  or  contact  us   at:  Mobile:    06  52  21  92  34  ~  Email:    jcbed@orange.fr Secondigny Running Club... Put the bounce back in your step. Join our friendly and supportive running group. All abilities welcome. Email Kelly for more details: kellyencezelle@hotmail.co.uk

Book  Club  Thouars.    Do  you  enjoy  reading  a  cracking  good  story?   And  talking  to  others  about  it?  Do  you  live  in  north  79,  south  49   or  north  86?  Come  along  to  our  new  book  club..... Contact  Alison  Morton  at  info@bookclubthouars.fr  for  more  details.

Open Door Lending Library Over 7000 fiction and non-fiction books and DVDs Open Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 10h00 to midday at 18 rue Pierre Pestureau, Civray (86400) Individual membership 6€, family membership 10€ www.opendoor-civray.com

Book Group....meeting 2nd Thursday of the

month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information. The  Filling  Station  ~  Poitou-­Charentes  and  Vendée The   Filling   Station   is   a   network   of   local   Christians   of   all   denominations   who   meet   together   regularly   for   spiritual   renewal  &  evangelism  purposes.    ALL  WELCOME. Please   see   our   website   for   details   of   spring   programmes   www.the?illingstation.org.uk  or   locally   contact   05  45   29   58  91   or  email  jackie.james46@yahoo.com.

2nd Sunday Motorcycle Club www.2ndsundayclub.fr If you would like to attend our coffee mornings please contact us via the website........New members always welcome!

The Harmonics   Singing   Group.   Based   in   the   Salle   Le   Tallud   Boules   en   bois   are   offering   sessions   every   Wednesday   from  16h   to  18h  from   April  through   to  September   2013  at   the  parc  de  Loisirs,  Le  Tallud.    Everyone   is   welcome  to   come   and   play   or   learn   the   game   of   boules   en   bois.   We  have   all  the   equipment,   just  turn  up   for   half   an   hour   or   more   for   a   bit   of   exercise   and   socialising.   Details   from   Rosemary   Williamson   rw.williamson@orange.fr Beginnersʼ Dance lessons: Rock ʻnʼ Roll: Fridays at 8pm. Cha Cha Cha & Waltz: Mondays at 7pm Salle Leo Lagrange in Parthenay. For details of other classes and social events contact: parthenay.rocknrolldance@gmail.com or call Chris on: 05 49 94 20 23 Through the Lens Group Local photography group who meets on the last Monday in each month to chat about all things photography! New members welcome. For further information contact: Ian Gawn: 02 51 00 84 52 or Brian Preece: 05 49 72 09 94

I  speak  English  and  4  other  European  languages   (all  self   taught)   and   I   am  looking   for   somebody  to   speak   face   to   face   and   by   telephone  to  practice  my  English.    I  live  in  Chauray,  79180 Please   contact   me   by   email:   wladimir.zandt@orange.fr.   or   by   telephone:  06  47  33  74  34. International  journalist,  Consultant  for  unemployed  seniors  and  professional   speaker.

d'Annexe  behind  the  mairie  in  Civray.  We  meet  each  Wednesday  from   2.00pm   to  4.00pm.   No   experience   necessary   just   a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.   We   sing   all   sorts   of   music   and   in   several   languages,  whatever   the  music  dictates.  We   are   a  small   and  friendly   group  who  would  love  to  meet  you. Contact:  Dolly  Ait  Boualou:  05  45  22  89  32  or  sylvia.murray@wanadoo.fr   or  Margaret  Gomersall  on  05  49  48  09  02  or  margaretgomersall@sfr.fr

Les Amis Solitaires We  are  a  group  of  people   living  alone  in  France.    We  meet  up   for   coffee  mornings  from  11am. 1st  Tuesday:  The  Gallery,  Civray  (coinciding  with  market  day). Every  2nd  &  4th  Thursday,  The  Lemon  Tree,  Sauzé  Vaussais. Every  3rd  Thursday,  Le  Bistrot  Centrale  in  Ruffec.     More   details   from   Gwen   Shepherd   05   49   87   91   79   or   email   gwanshep@gmail.com A R E  Y O U A M O D E L R A I L W A Y ENTHUSIAST? If so, join a group of like-minded modellers who meet on a monthly basis to visit members' layouts and swap information. We are based on the Deux-Sevres/Vendee border but also have members in the Vienne and Charente. If you are interested please contact Gerry Riley for more information on 05 49 63 34 01. Rubber Bridge:would any of you bridge players out there in the Deux-Sèvres, be interested in making up an occasional 4? Email David Rowe: djfrowe@hotmail.com or' phone 05 49 63 26 57.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Getting Out & About...

Frankton Trail.

We   reported   in   our  November  2012   issue   that   Eric   Edwards   and   Craig   Moore   were   to   walk   the   escape   route   of   Maj   HASLER  RM  &  Mne  SPARKS  of   "Cockleshell   Heroes"   fame  to   commemorate   the   70th   anniversary   of   the   raid   on   German   ships  in   Bordeaux  Harbour  in   1942  and   to   raise  funds  for  The   Poppy  Appeal. The  walk  of  160kms  was  completed  successfully  on  the  actual   dates  of   12-­‐18th   December  from  Blaye  in   Aquitaine   to  Ruffec   in   the  Charente.     Eric  Edwards,  the   Chairman   of   the  Linazay   Poitou-­‐Charentes  Royal  British  Legion,  writes:     “Craig  and  I  had  been   planning  this  event   for   18  months  and   the   execution  of  the  walk  pleased  us  in  many  ways.    First  and   most   importantly   was   the   large   amount   of   money   our   sponsors  raised   for  the   Poppy  Appeal   and   for  this   we  thank   everyone   who   contributed,  in   excess  of   £2,200   (2,700€)   has   been  raised  to  date.   Secondly,  we  augmented   the  profile  of   the  daring  of  this  raid   and  also   the  outstanding  bravery  of  those  French  civilians  who   assisted  not  only  HASLER  &  SPARKS  but  countless  other  Allied   Servicemen   escaping  through   occupied   France  during   WWII.   Thirdly,   we   enjoyed   meeting   many   people   along   the   way   associated   with   the   communities   through   which   the   route   passes  and   being   introduced  to   the  relatives  of   some  of  the   French   patriots   who   were   taken   and   never  seen   again   as   a   direct   result  of  their  intervention  in   helping  our  two  escapees.     We   derived   a   great   deal   of   personal   satisfaction   at   having   achieved  our  goals  for  such  good  causes.”

For  a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download   from  our  website:   www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

The   web   site   www.frankton-­‐trail.com   remains   active   for   another  12   months  where  full   details  of  the  walk  along   with   updated   day-­‐by-­‐day  photo-­‐journal,  press   cuttings   and  credits   pages  can   be  found.    If  you  would  like  to  make  a  donation  to   the   Poppy   Appeal   in   support   of   this   event,   methods   of   payment  are  given  on  the  welcome  page  of  the  web  site.

Page 7


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Clear  Your  Clutter  For  Charity ‘A  Great  Big  Bring  &  Buy  Sale’

La  Ferriére-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  12th  May  2013  

Anyone   involved   with   a   charity,  in   whatever   capacity,   will   know   only  too  well   the  one   constant   consideration  is  how  to  raise  more   funds.    A  jumble  sale  here,  a  raffle  there,  sponsorship  for  bike  rides   or   sitting  in   a  bath  of  cold  baked   beans,  it’s  all  been  done  before  –   so   –   how   about   something   a   bit   different,   like   one   big   event   involving   lots   of   charities   all   together,  in   the  same   place   at   the   same  time? Clear  Your  Clutter  for  Charity  is  just  that,  this  is  the  plan... Although  basically  a  huge  jumble  sale,  each  registered  charity  will   set   up  their  own   stall   selling  whatever   jumble  they   want   to,  then   the  general  public  arrive  having  cleared  their  clutter,  and  brought  it   with   them   to   donate   to   a   charity   of   their   choosing.     Having   divested  themselves  of  their  clutter,  (and  feeling  very  pleased  with   themselves)  they  then  have  a  good  look  around  and  buy  someone   else’s.   Thus   supporting   the   recycling  system,  helping   charities  to   benefit  and  hopefully  have  a  fun  day  out  into  the  bargain. There   will   be   entertainment,   simple   playground   games   egg   &   spoon   race,   3  legged   race,  sack  and  wheelbarrow  races,  anything   that   is   good   for   a  laugh   and   costs  little   to   set   up,  a   tug   of   war   would  be  good  if   someone  can  supply  a  long  enough   rope,  who   knows   if  it   carries  on   raining  like  it   has  been  there  may  even   be   mud  wrestling!! Businesses  wanting  to  sponsor  the  games  will   be  most  welcome,   as  will  suggestions  and  ideas  to  enhance  the  experience.   There   will   be   refreshments,   fish   &   chips   and   a   bar   along   with   familiar  stalls  from  previous  events.   The   plan   is   still   a   work  in   progress,   but   if   you   would   like   your   charity  to  be  a  part  of  this  event  please  contact   me,  Jan   Smith  on   paperbackjan@gmail.com.  You   can  book  your   place  early  to  avoid   disappointment  or  just  contribute  your  ideas  and  suggestions.

W INNER!

I   would  like  to  say  a  big  thank  to  for  all   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’   magazine   readers  who  voted  for  my  picture  of  the   Barn  Owl  to  win  Reader's  Favourite   Cover   Photograph  2012.

I  moved   to   the  Deux-­‐Sèvres  region   one   and   a  half   years   ago,  after   spending   4   years  living  in  Crete,  Greece.   Photography   has   been   a   passion   of   mine   for   over  twenty  five  years  starting   with   an  old   Zenith   35mm   film  camera   given  to  me  by  my  uncle.    Everyone  said   I  had   a   natural   flair   for   it   after   winning  a  couple   of   local   Cornish   photo  competitions.    I  took  my  first   wedding  at  the  early  age  of   15   for  my  Aunt. I  continued   taking  photos   throughout   my  military  career   where  I   learnt   to   process  photos  in  a  dark  room  and   had  the  opportunity  to   take   pictures   in   all   kinds   of   circumstances.     Now   we   are   in   the  

presents ‘CALENDAR  GIRLS’   by  Tim  Firth  at  Secondigny  &  La  Châtaigneraie  2013. After   holding   auditions  for   our   next   production   -­‐   Calendar  Girls  -­‐   the  Director  Tony  Murdoch  told  me  that   “following  the  extremely   successful  auditions,  I  am  delighted  to  report   that  we  now  have   a   very   strong  cast   of  14   actors.     We   also   have  a   most   enthusiastic   and   inspirational   back-­‐stage   crew,  who  are   fired  up  and   ready  to   get  going  with  this  wonderful  play”. We  are  well   on  the  road   towards  completing  our   planning  for   the   Calendar   of   the   Reaction   Theatre   'CALENDAR   GIRLS'   and   have   received  sponsorship  of  3,250€  towards  its  cost  and  are  hopefully   more  than  halfway   there.  Several   sponsors  have   already  pledged   amounts,  one   of   these   larger  sponsors  being  BLEVINS  FRANKS  of   Niort.   If   we   cover   the   full   cost   of   all   calendar   printing,   the   full   calendar   proceeds   will   go  to  Leukaemia  and  Lymphoma   Research.   The  plan  is  to   have  the  calendar   printed  and   ready  for  sale  before   the  night  of  the  first  performance  of  the  play  at  Secondigny. The  Art  Scene As   Tony  mentioned,  stage-­‐work  is  now  underway  with  Sue  Daniels   our  Stage  Design  Director   using  members  of  Reactions  ‘Art   Scene’   to  help  make  the  dozens  of  sunflowers  needed  for  the  production.     ‘Art  Scene’  members  have  also  created   a  number   of  poster  designs   for  the  production  and   Tony  will   be   asked   to   choose  the  one   he   wants  for  the   publicity.     During  January  the   art  group  were  shown   how  to  use  oil  paints  by  one  of  our  members  (Marlene  Broadhead)   and   in   February   I   will   be   demonstrating   pastels   and   giving   members  the  opportunity  to  try  them  for   themselves.    For  our  less   experienced  members  we  are  doing  more  instruction  in   the  art   of   pencil  drawing. For   any  further  information,  please   contact   John  Blair   by  email:   johnblair@btopenworld.com  

digital  age,  this  is  a  lot   easier  as   you  can   see  what  you  have  taken   immediately.  If  you  do  not  like  it,  just   delete.  The  only  disadvantage   and  I  know  we   all  do  it,  is  taking  too  many  pictures  which  we  have   to  trawl  through  to  get  the  best  ones. I  am   always   looking  for   new   and   different   projects   including   weddings,   real   estate,   web   pictures,   pet,   family,   babies   &   birth   portraits.     If  you   wish   to   see   more  of   my   work  I   have   selected   a   few   examples   for   your   perusal   via   the   address   below,   any   positive   feedback  or  queries   can   be  made   on  my  Facebook  page. www.facebook.com/JonCrockerPhotography  

Above: Jon Crocker, Winner of the Reader’s Favourite Cover Photograph 2012, with prize.

page 88 Page


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

“It is expecting too much of anybody to be able to speak French and fly by night” Another Second World War Lysander operation in DeuxSèvres by Tony Barrett. In   my  article  in   the  November   2011   edition   of   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’  magazine   I  related  the  story  of   Robin   Hooper’s  ill   fated   Lysander   landing   during  ‘Operation   Scenery’  on   the   night   of   the   16/17th   November   1943   and  subsequent  pick-­‐up  a   month  later  in   Operation  Scenery  II. The   previous   year   1942,   another   161   Squadron   operation   had   taken  place  in  the  north  of  Deux-­‐Sèvres. Guy  Lockhart  first  joined  the  RAF  in  October  1935.  He   was  granted   a  short  service  commission   as  Acting  Pilot  Officer  and  sent  to  No  2   Flying  School   at   Digby   the   following   month.   In   October   1936   he   was  posted  to  65   Squadron   and  in  March  1937,  to  87   Squadron   at   Tangmere  flying  the  Hawker  Fury.    In   July  1937  the  squadron   was   moved  to  Debden  and  re-­‐equipped  with  Gloster  Gladiators. In  May  1938  Lockhart  was  involved  in  a  low-­‐flying  incident  at  Stoke-­‐ on-­‐Trent  Municipal  Airport  at  the  Empire  Air  Day  Flying  Display  that   resulted  in  a  court   martial.  He   resigned  his  commission  in  August   and  became   a  flying  instructor   with  the  West  Suffolk  Aero  Club.  In   1939  Lockhart   re-­‐enlisted  with  the   RAFVR   as  a  Sergeant   Pilot  and   after  ITU,  joined  7  (later   57)  OTU  flying   Miles  Master  trainers  and   Spitfires.   In   June   1941   he   was   posted   to   602   Squadron   flying   Spitfires.    Later  the  same  month  he  was  transferred  to  74  Squadron   and  on  7  July  1941,  was  shot  down  over  France  in  Spitfire  W3317. He  evaded   capture  and  returned   to   the   UK   in   October   1941.  The   following  month  he  was  posted  to   138  Squadron   as  a  Pilot   Officer   (on  probation)  and   in  February  1942,  transferred   to   the   new  161   Special  Duties  Squadron,  flying  the  Westland  Lysander.

Heavy   cloud   cover   prevented   pin-­‐pointing   his   position   as   they   crossed  the  French  coast  and  Lockhart  flew  on  instruments  until  he   reached  the  river  Loire  at   about   23:30  hrs.  He  then  turned  east  to   Saumur   before   turning   south   for   his   target.     On   receiving   the   correct  signal  from  the  ground  and   responding,  he  landed  in   the   ‘Roi   de   Coeur’  field   north-­‐west   of   St   Leger   de   Montbrillais   near   Tourtenay,   Deux-­‐Sèvres   at   23:45   hrs.     He   landed   close   to   the   landing  lights  and   applied  full  brakes  but  the  aircraft  still  ran  on  and   fell   into   two   troughs   of  ploughed  ground.  On   turning  the  aircraft,   he  sank  up  to  the  wheel  spats  and  despite  applying  full   power  was   unable   to   extricate  himself.     He   sent   ‘Remy’  to   get   help   and   the   reception   party  pulled  the  aircraft   around   until   Lockhart   was  able   to   taxi   to   firmer   ground.   Two   passengers   (The   future   Minister   Christian   Pineau   alias   ‘Garnier’   and   Francois   Faure   alias   ‘Paco’)   climbed   on   board   and   Lockhart   took   off   again   after   seventeen   minutes  on  the  ground. Precautions  had   been   taken  by  Dr.  Daniel   Bouchet  by  keeping  the   roads  between   Thouars  and  Tourtenay  guarded   by  armed  men  to   ensure   the   operation   was   not   compromised  by  the   arrival   of   the   Germans. Visibility   was   still   very   restricted   by   clouds   and   it   wasn't   until   shortly  before  the  English   coast   that  it   cleared  enough  to  make   a   safe  landing  at  Tangmere,  touching  down  at  01:45  hrs.  

Below: Drawn by one of the agents (Joe’s) in 1943, it translates roughly as ‘To avoid a rugby scrum, separate arrivals and departures.

161   (Special   Duties)   Squadron   was   a   highly  secretive   unit   of   the   Royal   Air   Force   tasked   with   missions   of   the   Special   Operations   Executive  during   the  Second  World  War.  Their  primary  role  was  to   drop   and   collect  secret   agents  and   equipment   into  and  from  Nazi-­‐ occupied   Europe.     Guy  Lockhart  prepared  his  Lysander   V9367  (MA-­‐ B)   for   takeoff   from   R.A.F   Tangmere   at   21:25   hrs   for   ‘Operation   Baccarat   ll’  his   passenger   for   the  outward  leg  of   the  journey  was   Gilbert  Renault-­‐Roulier,  code  name  ‘Remy’,  one   of   de  Gaule’s  best   intelligence  officers.  In  fact   the  landing  zone  had   been  chosen  by   ‘Remy’   himself   and   named   ‘Roi   de   Coeur’   at   St   Leger   de   Montbrillais  near  to  Tourtenay  in  the  department  of  Deux-­‐Sèvres. For  the  pilots  all  the  male  agents  were  known  as  ‘Joe’s  and  ‘Janes’   for  the  female  agents  as  a  security  measure.

Above: Lysander Mk.lll (SD) MA-B. V9367 flown by Guy Lockhart on the 26/3/42 *Wing Commander Hodges was quoted as having said: “It is expecting too much of anyone to be able to talk French and fly by night.

Page 9


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Fickle Adjectives

by  Sue  Burgess

There   are   a   number   of   French   adjectives   which   have   different   meanings   depending   on   where   they   are   placed.   Generally   speaking,   when   the   adjective   is   in   front   of   the   noun,   it   has   a   figurative   or   subjective   meaning,   whereas   the   adjective   which   follows  the  noun  has  a  literal  or  objective  meaning.

Tricky  Fickle  Adjectives  Quiz Match   each   English   expression  with  its  correct   French   translation   and  watch  out  for  the  answers  next  month. Remember:  before  =  figurative! 1.  A  tall  man

A  un  grand  homme B  un  homme  grand

«Un   maigre   repas»   is   a   skimpy,   meager   meal   but   «un   garçon   maigre»   is   a   skinny  boy.     «Un   modeste   repas»   is  a  small,  simple   meal  but  «un  homme  modeste»  is  a  modest,  humble  man. «Un  méchant  cigare»  ,  something  from  a  cartoon  strip  perhaps,  is  a   great   big  cigar,  whereas  «un  homme  méchant»    is  a  mean  or   cruel   man.    «Le  même  jour»  is    the  same  day  but  «le  jour  même»    means   the  very  day.

2.  A  disgusrng  place

A  un  sale  endroit B  un  endroit  sale

3.  The  lonely  man

A  le  seul  homme B  l'homme  seul

4.  The  poor  (penniless)  boy

A  le  pauvre  garçon B  le  garçon  pauvre

Several  adjectives  concerned  with  time  change  their  meanings  in   a   similar  way.    Take  «la  semaine  prochaine»   which  means  next   week.   «Je  pars  en  vacances  la   semaine  prochaine»  (I'm   going  on  holidays   next  week),  but  «la  prochaine   semaine»  means  the  next  week  in   a   series,  the  following  week.  «La  semaine  dernière  je  travaillais»  (last   week  I  was  working)  but  «la  dernière  semaine  de  décembre  j'étais   en  vacances»  (I  was  on  holiday  during  the  last  week  of  December). This   is   «le   premier   problème»   the   first   problem,   so   there   will   probably  be  others.  But  «le  problème  premier»  is  the  fundamental,   basic  problem.

5.  The  poor  (pirful)  boy

A  le  pauvre  garçon B  le  garçon  pauvre

6.  The  blasted  /  damned  object

A  l'objet  sacré B  le  sacré  objet

7.  The  sacred  object

A  l'objet  sacré B  le  sacré  objet

8.  The  fundamental  quesron

A  la  première  quesron B  la  quesron  première

Is  my  house  old?  «une  maison  ancienne»?  or  is  it  the  house  where  I   lived   before   «mon   ancienne   maison»   (my   former   house).   And   whichever   it   is,  is   it   clean?  «une   maison   propre»   or   is  it   my   own   house  «ma  propre  maison»?    «Une  sale  ville»  is  a  nasty  town  but   «une  ville  sale»  is   just  a  dirty  town.     «Vilains  mots»  are  bad  words   but  «un  garçon  vilain»    is  an  ugly  or  naughty  child. The  list  goes  on,  but  instead  of  me  boring  you  with  more  examples,   why   don't   you  have  a  go   at  the  Tricky  Fickle  Adjectives  Quiz?  (see   opposite).

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

The Pommeraie Players Christmas  came  a  little  early  this  year   for   55  families  in  need  in  the   Sauzé-­‐Vaussais   area.   Having   made   a   profit   on   their   first   production,  the   Pommeraie   Players   theatre   group,  based   at   the   Salle  de  Fetes  at  La  Pommeraie,  had  500€  to  donate  to  charity.

A Festive Christmas for children in Niort Hospital.

Having  discussed  various  options,  it  was  decided  to   investigate  the   Resto  du   Coeur   in   Sauzé-­‐Vaussais,   as   local  charities  were  few  and   far  between.    We  discovered  that   the  families  would  arrive  at  the   Maison  de  Solidarite  to   collect  provisions  for  healthy  meals  for   one   day  each  week.    As   Christmas  is  a  time  for   children,  the  president,   Mme  Marie-­‐Claire   MONTENY  and  Mme   La  Croix,  with   whom  we   had  been   liaising,  suggested  that  we   could  buy  a  christmas  log  for   each   family   and   some   sweets   and   chocolates   for   the   children;   there   were   some   strange   looks   in   Super   U   as   a   trolley   load   of   sweets  and  chocolates  were  scanned  at  the  till! The   charity  was   delighted  with   the   gift,  as   since  their   inception,   no-­‐one  had  ever   done  such  a  thing.    The  Pommeraie  Players  were   delighted   as   they   had   found   a   worthy   home   for   their   surplus   money,   and   reporters   from   ‘La   Nouvelle   Republique’   and   ‘Le   Courrier   du   l’Ouest’  were  there   to   record   the   event   for   the   local   papers. The   Pommeraie  Players  will   be  performing  their   next  production,   "All   at   sea   with   Ramiro   and   Juillet",   at   the   salle   de   fetes   in   La   Pommeraie  on  the  15th  and  16th   of  March  2013  at  8.00pm.    Doors   open   at  7.00pm   with   a  bar  before  the  production  and  during  the   interval.   Tickets   are  7€  and   can   be   bought   on  the   door,  or   from   committee  members.(see  website:  www.pommeriaeplayers.com)   Come   along   and   have   a   great   time.   Rehearsals   take   place   on   Wednesdays   at   7.30pm;   anyone   interested   in   joining   as   a   performer,   musician   or   backstage,   should   come   and   see   us   on   rehearsal  nights.

Above: The bikers of the Second Sunday Motorcycle Club handed over cheques to the Paediatric service of the Niort Hospital for the children’s Christmas.

On   the   20th   December,   English   accents   resounded   in   the   paediatric   service   of   Niort   hospital.  They  were   from   the   Second   Sunday  Club  members  who  have  come  to  donate   300€  and   games   for  the  hospital  children.     These  British  motorcycle  addicts  set   up   their  association   in  this  region   three  years  ago  and  are  frequently   gathering  to  ride.    One  of  them,  Adrienne   Lecoeur,  explained:  “At   Easter  and   Christmas,  we  usually  have  a  sharing  auction  for  needy   children.   We   have   mobilized   our   network,   in   particular   for   tombola,  and  we  are  very  pleased   today  to  be  able  to  donate  the   hospital  these  small  gifts”. The   educative   and   medical   teams   were   also   pleased.   The   conditions  were  met   for   the  children   to   spend   the  best   possible   Christmas  Eve.  The  previous  day,  a  children’s  story  show  presented   by  artist  Thierry  Beneteau  and  his  partner,  had  filled  the  young  and   their  family  with   wonder,  offering  a  few  hours’  break  from  hospital   life.   On   the  24th   December,  Santa   Clause  in  person  paid  a  visit  to   the  children  on  the  ward.  We  can  only  imagine  their  excitement!

The   Second   Sunday   Motorcycle   Club   can   be   contacted   via   their  website:  www.2ndsundayclub.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Fire Safety in the Home

by John Hoyland.

Hello  to   you   all  again,  John  Hoyland  here.   Having  bashed  your  brains  on  Fire  Safety  I   thought   I   would   give   you   some   information   regarding   the   Fire   Service   here  in  France. I  am  sure   many  of  you  have  some  grasp   as   to   who,   what   &   where   the   Centre   Secours   is.     You   may  know   a   Sapeur-­‐ Pompier  personally.    So  how  are  they  organised?     As   in   the   UK   they   are   directly   controlled   by   the   Ministère   de   l’Interieur   (now   Ministry   of   the   Environment   in   UK).   Day   to   day   running  &  budget  controls  filter  down  to  Conseil  d  Administration.    In   Deux-­‐Sèvres  the  SDIS79  as  it’s  known  (Service  Departmental  Incedie   Secours)   is  controlled  at  Chauray,  on  the  outskirts   of  Niort.  This  has   administration,  training  school,   stores   &   control   room.     The  Chief   Officer   is   Colonel   Patrick  Marand.     The   operational   sections   are   divided  into  2  groups,  North  at  Parthenay,  South  at  Niort. Each   group   has  a  command  &  training  structure  with  responsibilities   for  overseeing  the  number  of   stations  in  their  area.  The  department   has  6  companies   who  support  the  outlying  stations  with   specialist   equipment  &  vehicles  at   incidents.    This  is   a   major  logistical  part  of   the   Activities   at   Chauray,   (ie.   servicing,   replacements,   new   equipment  etc.)     For  instance  there  are  over  100  resuscitation  units   carried,  all  of  which  require  testing  &  replacing  from  time  to  time.    If   you   compare   it   to   the   UK   it’s   like   the   NHS   trusts   &   Fire   Service   combined! In   a  survey  carried   out   by  the  EU,   98%  of   the   French   were  very   happy  with  the  service,  UK  96%  .    This  compares  with  Police  at  60%   &  the   legal   profession   at   just  45%.     There   is   an  excellent  support   network  throughout   the   service,   this   ranges  from   Amicles,  Retired   Association   &   the   Young   Cadet   scheme,   all   of   which   have   departmental   &   national   recognition.   For   example,   when   the   pompiers  come  around  at  the  end  of  the  year   with  their   calendars,   ALL  monies  collected  go  into  the  central  fund  for  service  members  &   their   family’s   support,   this   being   the   equivalent   to   the   UKs   Fire   Fighters  Charity. In   2010   the   then   president   Nicholas   Sarkozy   opened   the   New   National  Fire  College  at  Aix   en  Provence.     This  college,  similar  to   the   long   established   UK  one   at   Moreten   in   Marsh  Gos,  covers  Officer   training,  teaching  &  all  other  aspects  of  the  job.    This  college  is  now   part  of  a  European  network,  all  working  together.    You  can  be  sure   that  in  France,  in  particular  the  Deux  –Sèvres,  the  staff  who  serve  are   experienced  &  well  informed.

News  from  the  Pays  de  Gâtine!  by Julia Salvat In   ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly’  January  edition   there   were  three   mentions   of   the   Pays   de   Gâtine’s   website   (www.gatine.org),   it   therefore   seems  appropriate   to   describe   in   a   little  more   detail   what  the  site  offers  for  English  visitors. In  my  initial  working  contract  it  very  clearly  stated  that  'The  Pays'   wanted  to  put  together  a  document  to  help   guide  newcomers  to   the   area,   hence   the   title   ‘Guide   for   Newcomers’.   Back   in   2003/2004   many   people   who   had   just   moved   over   to   France   came   into   the   office  with   a  whole   range  of   questions.   I  made   a   note  of  them   all   to   help   me  produce   written  responses   for   the   website.   I   also   asked   Town   Halls   and   French   public   offices   to   contribute  ideas  and  so  the  guide  expanded.   As  it   says  on  the  first  page  “the  guide   has   been   put   together  to   help  you  navigate  your  way  through  local  bureaucracy  and  obtain   the  answers  to   your  questions  ....”.      The  guide  doesn't   try  to  give   you  all   the  answers  (personal  circumstances   means   the  answers   will   be   many   and   varied)   but   rather   to   point   you   in   the   right   direction   so   you   can   speak   to   the   people   who   know   and   hopefully  can  make  your  life  a  little  easier. The   subjects   covered   are   varied   and   include   French   Social   Assistants,   Public   Libraries,   Building  &   Renovation,   Employment,   Taxes,   Setting   up   a   Business   or   Tourist   Accommodation   and   Schooling.   Each   section   has   been   specifically   written   for   the   guide,  often  by  the  French  offices  concerned  and  then  translated   into  English.   Informing   newcomers   to   the   area   that   the   website   and   guide   existed  led  to  the  printing  of  post  cards  which  have  been  put  in  as   many  public  places  as  possible. We   are   now   busy   updating   the   guide   (any   suggestions   welcomed).  It's   a  long  process  and  we're  hoping  it   looks  a  little   jazzier   and   proves   to   be   easier   to   use   (thanks  to  my  French  colleague  Jérôme).  

Julia  SALVAT,  Pays  de  Gâtine.     Tel:  05  49  64  25  49  ~  Email:  julia.salvat@gatine.org Website:  www.gatine.org

Next   month   I  will   go   into   things  a   bit   more   including  Evacuation   planning  for  homes  etc.    If  you  have  any  problems,  please  contact   me  via  this  magazine.  

This  is  equal  to  85%  volunteers  

This  is  equal  to  28%  volunteers  

For  a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download   from  our  website:   www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY More  from  local  writer  Alison  Morton...    Please  see  back  issues  of   ‘The  DSM’  if  you  would  like  to  see  previous  articles.

Selling your book - the paper version

One  of  the  areas  where  boundaries   between  traditional,  DIY  and   assisted   self-­‐publishing   are   dissolving   is   that   of   marketing   and   selling   books.  Unless  you  are  already  a  famous  author,  a  star  chef   or   ‘off   the   telly’,  traditional   companies  are  unlikely   to   spare   the   budget  for  more  than  a  six  week  publicity  push. If   you   are   represented   by   an   agent,   a   good   one   will   support   opportunities  for  you,  but  the  majority  of  authors  have  to  muck  in   and   market   their   own  books.  Some  publishers  run   joint   blogs  to   which   all   their   authors   contribute;   but   many   don’t   have   the   resources  or  time. If  you  self-­‐publish,  you  are  definitely  the  one  who  does  the  work!   Traditionally  published   books   are  sold   into   bookshops   as  part   of   the   publishing   deal.   Nothing   sells   books   like   physical   shelf   presence.     And     your   book  could  be  in  hundreds  of  outlets.  But   even   the   bigger   shops  can  only  stock  100,000  titles  and   200,000   are  published  annually.    If  new  arrivals  don’t  sell  well  within  a  few   weeks,  they   are  sent   back  to   the  publisher   who   may  wholesale   them  out  to  remainderers,  or  pulp  them. Self   publishers   with   a   professional,   well-­‐written   book  may  have   better   luck  with  independent   retailers,  and   not   just  bookshops.  If   your   book  has  a  historical  or  local   theme,  shops  attached   to  visitor   attractions  here   may  be  happy  to  sell   it;  Anglophone   visitors  may   just  make  that  impulse  buy!    Similarly,  a   shop,  bar  or   café   popular   with   local   British   residents   is   another   outlet.  If   you   have  strong   links   with  your  former   home  town,  try  an   independent   bookshop,   garden  centre  or  National  Trust  shop  nearby. Keep  an  information  sheet  with  you  at  all  times  with  the  following   details:  book   title,  author   name,   a  one-­‐liner   with   the   crux   of   the   book’s   plot,   a   paragraph   expanding   that   (maximum   10   lines),   mentioning   the   chief   character   and   their   dilemma,   a   second   paragraph  about  you,  ISBN  number  and  how  to   order.    A  photo  of   you   and  an  image  of  the  book-­‐jacket   add  significantly,  as  does  the   whole  printed  in  colour.    And  proof  read   it  ten  times;  a  mistake  on   your   information   sheet   will   destroy   your   credibility.  Approaching   any   retail   outlet   with   this   sheet   in   your   hand   will   immediately   make  you  look  more  professional. Always  have  a  copy  of  your  book  with  you,  in  the  car  or  your  bag,   and   take  every  opportunity  to   chat  to  people  about  it.  You   could   have  an  instant  sale!    Selling  a  book  personally  is  very  rewarding;   the   buyer   may   do   you   the   best   favour   by   recommending   it   to   someone  else.

YOUR  Book Reviews... "Here   you   are,   Mum   -­‐   take  these  two   books   back   to   France   with   you.   I   think   you'll   enjoy   them".     Actually,   looking   at   the   Stles,   I   probably  wouldn't  have  picked   either  of  them   from  the  shelf  in  the   book  shop  but  what  a  big  mistake  that  would  have  been.    These  are   two   books  which   are   so   very   different   from   each   other   but   both   had  me  enthralled  from  the  first  page... by  Hannah  Somm ‘The 5 People you meet in Heaven’ by Mitch Albom is so completely different to anything I have read before. It is about an elderly gentleman who died in a tragic accident trying to save a young child from harm. With his last breath he feels two small hands in his, then nothing. He wakes up in the afterlife where he meets again 5 people who had shaped his life in ways he had not realised. And the child? Did he save the child? You will have to read the book to find out! The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins Each year 12 boys and 12 girls are chosen to compete in a live TV show called 'The Hunger Games'. There is one rule: kill or be killed - there can only be one winner. The stor y follows the trials and tribulations of one of the competitors, Katniss Everdeen, and is so full of suspense it is hard to put down. The whole concept is unbelievable, but being set in the near future you find yourself almost believing the story as it unfolds page by page. When I reached the end of the book it was to find that it is book one of a series of three and that there is a film too. I have since spoken to someone who didn't enjoy the film but loved the books, so you will have to make up your own minds on this one. ('Catching Fire' is book two and 'Mockingjay' is third in the series).

We  would  love  to  show  more  of  YOUR  Book  Reviews.  If  you  would  like  to  share  one  with  us,   please  send  it  on  an  email  to:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Consider   showcasing  your  book  on  your  website  or  blog.  You  don’t   have   to  set  up  a  full  e-­‐commerce  website;  use  a  link  to   a  payment   service  like  PayPal  which  also  processes   credit  cards.  Or  you  could   provide   a  click  through   link  to   an   electronic  retailer,  such   as   the   biggest  bookshop  in  the  world,   Amazon.  It  sells  mainstream,  self-­‐ published,  small   press,  hardback,  paperback  and   e-­‐books.  And  if   you   decide  to  sell  an  e-­‐book  version  of  your  work,  then  this  is  the   place  to  start. But  that’s  for  next  month... Alison  Morton  writes  alternate  history  thrillers,  blogs  about   wriIng  and  Romans  at  hKp://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  and   is  a  member   of  the  RomanIc  Novelists’  AssociaIon   and  the   Society   of   Authors.     Her   debut   novel,   INCEPTIO,   will   be   published  in  March  2013  by  SilverWood  Books.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Take a Break... DSM  Easy  Crossword Across: Down: 8.   One   stop   of   a   series   for   ascending   1.   Quickly!  (abbr)(1,1,1,1)   or  descending  to  a  different  level.  (5) 2.   A  fast  gait  of  a  horse.  (6) 9.   A  resident  of  Birmingham.  (7) 3.   Small  bomb  that  is  thrown.  (7) 10.   A  pale   lager  with  a  strong  flavour  of   4.   King  of  the  Fairies  (6)   hops.(7) 5.   Stew  that  is  thickened  with  okra  pods.  (5) 11.   A  French  hat.  (5) 6.   An  animal  organism  in  the  early  stages   12.   Bold,  with  contempt.  (8)   of  growth.  (6) 13.   Harbour.  (4) 7.   Person  who  makes  a  will.  (8) 15.  Ready  to  be  eaten  or  used.  (4) 12.   To  water.  (8) 17.   A   person   who   investigates   news   14.   North  African  country.  (7)   stories.  (8) 16.   On  time.(6) 21.   Evil  spirit  or  ghost.  (5) 18.   Motor.  (6) 22.   Reasons  for  taking  acfon.  (7) 19.   Inelastic  tissue  that   connects  muscle  to   24.   Tropical  storm.  (7)   bone.  (6) 25.   A  company  of  singers.  (5) 20.   Circulating  body  fluid.  (5) 23.   Painful.  (4)

Down: Toughie  Crossword 1.   How   far   ahead   to   be   in   city     marathons?  (7) 2.   A  number  tee  off  with  a  strange  grin.     (7) 3. To   down   a   tot   before   upsetting   the     French  is  definitely  not  off  the  wall.  (5) 4.   Goes  with   extreme   application   of  last     rites  (7) 5.   To  state   one’s  beliefs  is  nothing  before     long.  (5) 6.   Be  anxious  about  one’s  family?  (5) 9.   Resign   over   collapse   of   seating     arrangement?  (5,4) 14.   City   has   right   to   include   Hollywood     home  to  get  clearness  at  last.  (7) 15.   Works  between   bard’s   loves  and   lost     play  title.(7) 16   Order   needed   to   keep   poultry   in   line?     (7) 19.   Written   work   sounds  like  South  Africa     initially.  (5) 20.   Welsh   river   poetically   below   the     others?  (5) 21.   Ban   about   religious   education   can   be     prickly.  (5)

Sudoku Corner... Easy

www.printfreesudokupuzzles.com

Hard

With  thanks  to  M.Morris

Please  see  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr  for  answers

Across: 7.   Manages  to  stretch  toe  around  new     gun,  but  some  language  results.  (6) 8.   Game   bird   has  right   to   be   a   long     range  marksman.  (6) 10.   Unusual  bird  of  prey  found  in  front  of     National   Trust   proves   to   be   very     graceful.(7) 11.   Stylish  dance  embraced  by  the  many     noble  spartan  gods.  (5) 12.   Appropriate  backing  for  crowd.  (4) 13.   Fit   negative   into   earth;   that   will     keep  your  head  warm!  (5) 17.   Take   evasive   acOon   if   duel     rearranged  to  follow  direcOon.  (5) 18.   The  weight  of  the  empty  vehicle  is     split,  we  hear.  (4) 22.   Given  time,   the  oracle  will  keep  you     on  course.  (5) 23.   After  series  of  battles,  rugby   player     becomes  wizard.  (7)   24.   Clever   product   of   unusual   taste     enveloping  kind  of  turn.  (6) 25.   Queen   reverses   into   farm   building,     leaving  us  fruitless.  (6)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres A-Z of the Communes of the by  Sue  Burgess Deux-Sèvres. LA CHAPELLE-SAINT-LAURENT The   commune  is  situated  on   the  main   D748   road   linking   Bressuire   to   Niort   and   on   the   old   railway   line   from   Bressuire  to   Parthenay.     La  Chapelle-­‐ Saint-­‐Laurent   was   inhabited   in   prehistoric  times   and  the  discovery  of   numerous  tools   in  the   Eastern  part  of   the  commune  proves  this. T h e re   a re   to d ay   a b o u t   1 8 4 8   inhabitants   or   «Chapelais»,   as   the   people  of  la  Chapelle-­‐Saint-­‐Laurent  are  known  and  they  sometimes   welcomed   pilgrims   as   early   as   the     XIII  century.     Unlike   many   parishes   around,   la   Chapelle-­‐Saint-­‐Laurent   (where   in   1561   the     Huguenots  burnt  the  priest  in  the  church)  has  never  been  home  to   many  protestants. During  the  revolution,  some  peasants  went   to   fight   with  the  royal   Catholic   army.  Their   lands  were   left   abandoned   and  their   houses   and   farms   were   burnt   down   in   January   1794   by   Prévignaud's   soldiers.     In  1802   the  mayor   of  la  Chapelle-­‐Saint-­‐Laurent,   Jacques   Grimaud,  asked   the   sous-­‐préfet  for  the  authorisation  to  create  four   new  fairs,  2  in  the  town  itself  and  2  at  Pitié.  As   he  had  no   answer   that   year,   he   asked   again   the   following   year   but   this   time   accompanied   his   demand   by   a   gift   of   butter.   His   request   was   accepted.   A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • The   Basilica   Notre-­‐Dame   de   Piti.  The   building  of  which  was   started  in  1891,  is  a  well-­‐known   place  of  pilgrimage.  The  Basilica   stands  on   an  old  celtic  site.    The   three  sources  (les  trois  sources)   are  not  clear   and   are  mixed   up   with   local   legends.   Certain   legends   relate  the  discovery  of   a   statue   by   a   local   farmer.     Venturing  into  the  bushes  for  a   moment   to   spend  a  penny,  he  is   supposed   to   have   found   the   statue  in  a  niche  in  an  old  wall.   He  took  the  statue  to  the  parish   church  to  keep   it   safe   and  was   surprised  to  find  it   in  the  niche   again   the  next   day.     After   this   had  happened  three  times,  a  new  chapel  was  built. The   sanctuary   grew   in   importance   during   the   Vendée   wars.   Notre-­‐Dame-­‐de-­‐Pitié   was   considered   by   the   rebels   as   one   of   their  protectors.    The  Republicans,  therefore,  tried  unsuccessfully   to  burn  the  chapel  down  several  times.  In  the  first   half  of  the  XIX   century  the   chapel   appeared   to   be  in  a  bad  state   of   repair   and   not  really  adapted  for   the  religious  offices  that  were  held  there.   The  new  curate,  Father  Laurentin,  planned  to  replace  the  modest   sanctuary   by   a   vast   church   which   would   be   a   centre   of   pilgrimage.  The   first   stone   of   the   current   building   was   laid   in   1891.  

La Chapelle St Laurent

• Étang   des   Mothes,   Étang   Olivette,   Étangs   de   Courberive,   des   Rataudières  -­‐    magnificent  ponds. • The  rock  called  the  Rock  of  the  Virgin  (Chiron  de  la  Vierge),   • The  Devil's  claws  (les  Griffes  du  Diable)  and  the  Footstep  of  the   Virgin  (le  Pas  de  la  Vierge)  can  be  seen.   • The  Cats'  Stone,   (le  Timbre  aux  Chats)  where   according  to   local   legend,  cats  got  together   on  the  eve  of  Carnaval  (Mardi  Gras)  for   a   meal   given   by  the  devil.  This  was  an   ancient   celtic  site  which   was  supposed  to  be  connected  with  the  devil,  in  contrast  to  the   Rock  of  the  Virgin   which   was  a  Christian  place.  A  cross  has  been   erected  recently  opposite  the  Cats'  Stone. The   legend:   at   la   Chapelle-­‐Saint-­‐Laurent,  that   is  to   say  at   the   place   known   as   «l'Humeau-­‐Robinet»   at   the   crossroads   of   the   road  from  Pitié  to  Moncoutant,  the  old  road  to   Pugny  and  a  little   lane  from  where  the    «Timbre  aux  Chats»  can  be  seen.    There  on   the  night  of   Mardi-­‐Gras  (Shrove   Tuesday),  all  the  local  tom  cats   used  to  meet  for  a  huge  meal  attended  by  a  devil.  Legend  has  it   that  any  local   farmer  who  interrupted  the  meal   would  be  ripped   to   pieces   by  the   cats'   claws   and  devoured.     Local  farmers  who   tried   removing   the   stone   were   so   troubled   by   concerts   of   miaowing  cats  that   they  had   to   take  the  stone  back  in   order  to   get  a  good  night's  sleep.  In  recent  times  «le  Timbre  aux  Chats»   has   disappeared  on  two  occasions.  It  was   put  back  in   its  original   place  when  the  people   who   “borrowed”  it  suffered  some  sort  of   terrible  event  or  problem.   • Le  Pas  de  la  Vierge.     The  Virgin's  Footstep   is  a  huge   granite  rock,   150  metres  in  circumference  and  about  1.50m  at   its  highest  point.     'The   Virgin's  Footstep”   is  in   the   centre   of   the   rock.     There  are   several  legends  about  the  rock.  One  says  that  the  Virgin  was  being   chased   by  the  Devil.     She  saw  the  rock  and  rested  one   foot  on  it.   Then   just   as   the   Devil   was   about   to   grab   her,   she   raced   off   shouting   “pitié”   (pity).   The   Devil   grabbed   the   rock  with  so  much  force   that   his   claws   made   three   long   scratches  in   it.

Commune  website:  www.lachapellesaintlaurent.fr Photos: courtesy of the Diocèse de Poitiers

More  ‘A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.’ next  month...

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Health, Beauty & Fitness... St Valentine’s Hair and Beauty Special

Want  to  unleash   your   inner  bombshell   with  a  hot  new  look  just  in   time  for  Valentines  Day?    Samantha  and  Emma  are  here  with  some   simple  Valentines  tips....

Samantha says...

This  Valentines  Day  Samantha  recommends  adding   a   beautiful  rose   blusher  to   your   cheeks.  “This  will   add   an   irresistible   rosy   glow.   After   applying   your   foundation  and  lightly  set  it   with  powder,  simply  just   do   a   big   fake   smile   in   your   mirror   and   sweep   the   blush   over   your   cheek   bones.   (Be   sure   to   always   blend  over   gently  with  your   powder   brush   so   there   are  no   strong  lines.)     To   finish   this   look   I   would   maximize   your   lashes  by  adding  a  coat  of  black  voluming  mascara  and  glide  a  high   shine   gloss  all   over   your   lips.     You  will  look  and   feel  so  fresh  and   radiant.

Emma says...

“For   your   hair  this  Valentines  there  are  plenty   of  romantic  styles  which  are  feminine  and  flirty   yet   very  easy  to   do.     Formal   up-­‐do's   give   a   sense   of   romance   as   they   are   naturally   associated  with   the   kind  of  styles  worn   on   a   glamourous  or  special  occasion. Medium  to   Long  hair  styled  in  waves  or   curls  gives  a  sexy  tousled   look.  It’s   not  too  complicated  or  time  consuming,  all  you  need  is   a   good  curling  iron  and  curl   lots  of  one  inch  sections.  High  volumised   ponytails   are  also  a  quick  and  easy  fun-­‐do  to  have.  You  can  loosen   it  up  and  make  it  messy  which  also  gives  a  cute  girly  look.

Advert Size A or B, only 38€ per month or from 33,33€ per month for 12 months.

My  Valentine’s  ‘must  have’  would  be  a   spritz  of  fragrance  just  to   make   you  feel   ultra  romantic.  Yves  Rocher   -­‐  Eau  design   parfum   Iris  Noir.”

Products  that  give  shine  and  a  glossy  look  will  add  some  freshness.   Why  not  add  a  fun  flower   or   a  bit  of  sparkle  to  make  you  feel   that   extra  special." Emma    recommends:  Babyliss   Pro-­‐rebel  porcelain  conical  curling   wand.  They  come  in  3  different  sizes  depending  on  the  size  of  the   curl  you  want.  Available  online. Charente  Hair  &  Make  Up Tel:  05  45  31  56  93  /  06  50  04  37  30 www.charentehairandbridal.com

For  a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download   from  our  website:   www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Classes at ‘Maison pour tous’, L’Absie. 7pm - 8.30pm and Salle de millenaire, rue saint roch, Largeasse. 7pm - 8,30pm Contact Rysz for more info: 06 42 35 97 11

Alternative  Weight  Loss • Learn  self  hypnosis  for  weight  loss  and  confidence • Take   the   test   that   identifies   which   glands   are   effecting   your  weight  gain • Learn  ideas  to  increase  lymphatic  drainage  of  the  body • Learn   simple   exercises   to   do   at   home   to   activate   your   metabolic  glands My  one  to   one   consultation   offers   all   of  the   above,  come   and   see   me  in   February  for   an  MOT!     Call   Pam   Irving   for   details.  (see  advert  above).

Our Furry Friends... Phoenix  Association

www.phoenixasso.com   www.facebook.com/PhoenixAssociationFrance    

AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION...

GONZO 2 year old Boxer X Bullmastiff

Small colour advert only 34€

Registered charity to help abused and abandoned animals in France.

Gonzo  is  a  real  live  wire  who   loves   to   bounce   and   play,   and   who   is   gentle   and   affectionate  with   his  Phoenix   Foster  Carers. He’s   not   a   beginner’s   dog  and   needs   an   owner   experienced   in   powerful   breeds   and   who   can   cope   with   his   40kg   of   energy!   Gonzo   needs   to   know   his   place   in   the   pack,   as   true   to   the   Bullmastiff  breed,  he  can  be  guarding  of  his  own   people  and  wary   of  strangers.  He  gets  on  really  well  with  other   dogs,  but  NOT  with   poultry! If   you   think   Gonzo   would   like   to   join   your   pack,   then   please   contact   his   Carer,   Patricia,   on   05   53   50   40   76   or   email:   baerloo@orange.fr For   other  Phoenix  animals  available   for  adoption,  please  check   out:  www.phoenixasso.com  or  our  Facebook  page  at: www.facebook.com/PhoenixAssociationFrance

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Bergerac   SPA   strengthens   its   ties   with   Phoenix  Association  in   order  to  improve   animal  welfare  in  the  Dordogne. Since  its  inception,   Phoenix   Association  has  been  working  with   the   Bergerac  SPA  (Sauvegarde  et  Protection  des  Animaux).  This  link  has   strengthened  even  further  since  the  arrival  of  SPA  newcomer,  Aurélie   Letellier,  who  joined  the   organisation   in  July  2012. In   this  interview   with  Richard  Johnson  from   Phoenix   and   Aurélie   Letellier   from   the   SPA,  we   discover   how   this   union   is   having   an   impact   on   animal   welfare  in  the  Dordogne: Aurélie,  it   seems  that   your  arrival   has  made  quite  an  impact.  Can   you   tell   us   more   about   your   background   and   how   you   came  to   work  for  the  SPA  in  Bergerac? Aurélie:    Following  my  Master’s  degree  in  International   Business,  I   spent  some   time  in   South  Africa,   where   I  became   heavily  involved   with   The   Lucky  Lucy  Foundation,   who  help   severely   neglected  and   abused   animals   in   Cape   Town.   Since   my  involvement   there,   the   numbers   of  adopted  animals  per   week  rose  from  one  to  two,  to  six   to  seven.  However,  I  really  wanted  to  return  to  France,  so  I  contacted   Président  Carrard,  from  the  Bergerac  SPA,  and  here  I  am. So,  what  specific  tasks  have  you   completed  since  your  work  at  the   SPA  began,  Aurélie? Aurélie:   Well   firstly,   I   have   been   supporting   Phoenix   in   their   campaign   for   sterilisation.   The   SPA   is   starting   to   realise   the   advantages  of  sterilisation  in  controlling  animal  suffering. I   have   also   re-­‐vamped   the   SPA   Bergerac   website   and   created   a   Facebook  page.  I’ve  also  been   establishing  contact   with   the   local   press  in  order  to  increase  awareness  and  to  raise  the  profile  of  the   SPA.   And   lastly   but   not   least,   I   have   been   getting   to   know   the   people  at  Phoenix. Tell   us,  what  are  the  advantages  of   the  two  organisations  working   together? Richard:   We   all   want   to   re-­‐home   animals   and   to   improve   their   welfare.  Each  organisation  has  its  own  networks  and   resources,  and   by  combining  these,  we  are  stronger. Aurélie:   Thanks   to   their   huge   network   and   reputation,   Phoenix   provides  us   with  a  large  number  of  adopting  families.  Additionally,   through  their  foster   homes,  Phoenix  helps  us  re-­‐home  those  animals   that  we  might  otherwise  struggle  to  find  homes  for,  that  is  the  older   animals,   or   those   with   special   needs   or   behavioural   issues   that   require  time  and   patience,  that  are  much  better  suited  to  a  ‘normal’   family  environment  of  a  foster  home. Have   there   been   any   measurable   impacts   of   the   new-­‐found   relationship? Aurélie:   It’s   early   days   yet,   but   preliminary   figures   show   that   adoptions   for   August   and   September   2012,   compared   with   the   same  period   in   2011,   are  up   by  70%   for   dogs  and   19%   for   cats.   Also,  thanks  to  the  website,  in  October  2012,  dogs  claimed  back  by   their  owners  increased  by  33%  compared  with  October  2011,  and   cats  by  a  staggering  200%! Richard:   We’re   really   thrilled   with   this   –   this   is   remarkable   progress.  There  is  no  reason  why  our  own  Members  and  followers   shouldn’t   be  looking  at   the  animals  available  for   adoption   at  our   partner,  the  SPA,  as  well  as  those  in  our  own  foster  homes.   For  all  Contact  Details: SPA  de  BERGERAC Aurélie  Letellier:   06  88  94  40  25 contact@spa24bergerac.org www.spa24bergerac.org www.facebook.com/spa24bergerac

PHOENIX  ASSOCIATION Richard  Johnson: 05  53  54  94  81 www.phoenixasso.com www.facebook.com/ PhoenixAssociationFrance

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

APPEAL Milo is an 8 week old border collie puppy who is an absolute darling. He has a calm nature and is very much a people dog, he prefers to play with you rather than his siblings. He appears to   be non dominant and is submissive with adult dogs but not scared or timid, just a quiet lad.   Beautiful looks,  brown and white, not a solid brown, he has colour change to the tips and he   has the most beautiful eyes.

MAYDAY MES AMIS Mayday Mes Amis  has  been  formed  to  help  animals  in  need  in   l'Absie  and  the  surrounding  area.   For  more  information  please  email:  jill.zub@sky.com.

Equine Rescue France

MILO

Milo will be fully vaccinated and chipped before rehoming and a donation on adoption will apply to cover costs incurred by the Hope Association. If you're interested in offering Milo a forever home please contact linda.burns4hope@gmail.com or use the contact from the Hope Association's website, www.hopeassoc.org.

6 x Tourterelles / White Doves Free to a Good Home Can deliver 10 miles radius of La Chataigneraie or L’Absie. Tel: 05 49 63 01 18

Free  to  a  Good  Home

Toby   is   a   5yr   old   Labrador   cross,   neutered   and   chipped,   free   to   good   home.  He  spends  his  time  alone  as  his   french   owner   is   too   ill   to   look   after   him   and   he   is   lonely   and   needs   a   companion.  He  loves  people,  children   and  cats,  he   has  so  much  love  to  give.     Lives  dept.  79  near  Bressuire.   Please  call  Pam  05  49  65  55  25.

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF.

Please contact Equine Rescue France via their website www.equinerescuefrance.org HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF  is  open  to  anyone  with  an  equine  interest.     You  do  not  need  to  own  a  horse!    We  meet  about  once  a  month   for  talks,  visits  etc.    Interested? Contact Jo Rowe on: 05 49 64 22 67 or

email: willjo@live.co.uk.

Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 07  70  31  54  59  ~  

Email: nala85480@hotmail.com www.nosamislesanimaux.com

L’Association   Galia   is   a   recognized   public   utility   aiding   the   adoption   of   dogs   in   the   shelter   of   Fontenay   Le   Comte.     We   help   dogs   out   of   impound,  found  stray  or   abandoned  to   find   new   families. Refuge  de  l'association  Galia Chemin  des  perchées  (ancienne  déchetterie),  85200  Fontenay  Le  Comte Tel  :  02  51  52  06  19  or  06  28  18  13  72,  association.galia@orange.fr http://association-­‐galia.forumactif.com

Family   with   garden   needed   for  little  abandoned  kitten...

Now  sterilised,  this  little  female   kitten   is   between   7-­‐8   months   old   and   a   bundle   of   energy.   She   has   now   learned   to   play   and   cannot   stop!   Currently   living   in   Vernoux-­‐en-­‐Gatine   until   a   forever   home   can   be   found.   If  you  can  help,  please  email:  franklin3@aliceadsl.fr

PASTIS,   a   7   year   old   male   English   Setter,   is   available  for  adoption.

Refuge  SPA  de  SAINTES route  des  GAUTHIERS,   17100  SAINTES Tel:  05  46  93  47  65  ~  www.spa.de.saintes.free.fr/

He   is   a   lovely   dog,   very   cuddly,   very   obedient   and  well  educated  but  he  no  longer  supports  the   refuge!    He  needs  a  garden,  and  a  family  life. Our   refuge   is  open  every  day,   even  on  Sundays.   14h00  to  18h00 Tel:  05  46  93  47  65    or  06  98  38  97  98

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

The Great Outdoors... properly  or   is   always  ill.     Peggy’s   remaining  six   piglets  are  doing   well  and  because   of  the  small  number  mum   has  plenty  of  milk  for   them  all.

Life on the Farm...

by  Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

It   may  seem  a  bit   odd  reading  about   our   Christmas  arrivals   in  the   February   magazine  but  Peggy  held   on  until   the  23rd  December  to   have   her   piglets   so   we  missed   the   magazine  deadline  to  tell  you   what  had  been  happening  here  on  the  farm! 23rd  December   2012  –   I  checked  the  sheep  at  about  7.30am.  We   had   kept   the   ewes   in   overnight,   not   only   because   we   were   expecting  lambs  anytime  but  also  because  the  ground   was  still   so   wet  underfoot  and  sheep  do ��not  like  wet  ground.    When  I  checked   on  Luna  again  at  9.30am  she  was  the   proud  mum  of  two.    Two  boys,  one   black   face   and   feet   like   Beavis,   his   Suffolk  dad,  and  the  other   white,  like   mum.     You   may   recall   when   Luna   had   her   twins   last   year   she   hadn’t   enough  milk  for  two  and  we  had   to   bottle   feed   one.   Well   the   same   happened   again   this   year   but   we   decided   to   leave   them   both   with   mum  and   to   offer   a  bottle  to  both   lambs  as  a  top  up   to   mum’s   milk.     Luckily  we   only  had   to  do   this   for   Above: n and one of the about   a   week   as   mum’s   milk   new lamJe bs supply   seems   to   have   increased   and  both  lambs  are  doing  well. We   were   still   checking   the   lambs   before   bedtime   on   the   4th   January  when   Jen   noticed   Texie   was   in   labour.     Sheep   are   very   quiet   when  in  labour  and  giving  birth.  This  is  because  sheep  often   give  birth  outside  and  any  noise  could  attract  a  fox  who  would  steal   and   kill  the  new  born.     Anyway,  I  popped  in  for  the  torch  and   came   back   to   find   Jen   with   her   sleeves   rolled   up   having   helped   Texie   deliver   her   huge  5.6kg  lamb.  Last   year   we  bottle  fed  a  lamb   who   was  a  quad  and  who  at  two  weeks  old,  was  only  3.2kg.   So  back  to  the  23rd... After  Luna’s  lambs   had   arrived  off  I  went  to   pick  up  my  two  sons   and  their  partners  from  the  airport.     I  arrived   back  in   the  afternoon   just   in   time   to   see   Peggy   deliver   her   long   awaited  piglets.     As  Peggy  lay  there  giving  birth  we  quickly  gave  the   piglets   a  rub  and  a   clean  to  make  sure  they  were  ok  –   the  first   six   were   fine   but   then  one  was   delivered   still   born   and   despite  our   attempts   to   revive  it,  it  was  too  late.     The  last   piglet   we  thought   was  also  dead  but  we  took  it  inside  and   got  it  breathing,  Keira  our   black  Labrador  did  a  great  job,    but  sadly  it  died  two  days  later. It’s   very  sad  to   lose  an   animal  but  where   there  is  livestock  there   will  always  be  some  that  are  just  not  strong  enough  to  make  it.    It’s   natures  way  of  dealing  with  either  the  very  weak  or  in   some  cases,   youngsters   who   have  failed  to  develop  properly  in  the   womb.    We   have  had  instances   in  the  past  where  we  have  fought  hard   to  keep   a   young   animal   alive   only  to   find   later   on   that   it   doesn’t   grow  

Above: 3 of Peggy’s piglets...

Remember   the   chicks   we   mentioned   last   month?   Well   they  are   doing  really  well  despite  being  hatched  so  late  in  the  year. Grass  is  in   short  supply  at  this  time  of  the   year  so  we  supplement   feed  for   the  sheep  with   hay  and  granules.  I’m  sure  you  will  have   heard  of   the   saying  “the  grass  is  always   greener  on  the  other  side”   well  for  our  sheep  the  “other   side”  was  our  next  door  neighbour’s   field!     They  made   a   small  hole  in  the  fence  and  the  usual   naughty   lambs  led  the  way.    Of  course,  once  all  the  smaller  sheep  had  gone   through   the   fence   the   gap   was   now   big  enough   for   the   bigger   sheep   to   also   get   through,   and   one   after   the   other   they   all   followed.     Thankfully  a  shake  of   the  feed  bucket  was  enough  to  get   them  to  come   back  into   our   field  and   a  quick   repair   has   proved   effective  in  keeping  them  where  they  should  be. Finally  we  have  succumbed   and  treated  ourselves   to  a  new   puppy.   We  have  been  very  close  a  few  times  but  we  have  finally  taken  the   plunge.     She  is  a  Gordon  Setter  crossed  with  an  English   Setter  and   is   a  lovely  puppy  with  lots  of  spirit.     It   took  her  less   than  a  day  to   settle  in   and   already  she  goes  through   the   night.    Our   other   two   dogs  are  gradually  coming  to  terms  with  the  new  arrival. It   looks  as  though  we  are  heading  for  a  cold   snap  over  the  next  few   days   so   the   order   of  the   day  is   to   chop   some  more   firewood  to   keep   us   all   warm.     Once  the  ground  dries  out   we  will  be   looking  at   putting  up  our  new  poly-­‐tunnel  and  getting  the  potager  ready  for   this  year’s  fruit  and  vegetables.    I  am  still  searching  for  that  elusive   tractor  to  make  life  easier  in  the  garden.... Take  care  over  the   next  few  weeks,  I  am  sure  it   will  get   colder  and   we   will   see  some  of   the  white  stuff   before  too  long.     Stay  warm   and  dry  and  we  will  be  back  with  more  new  additions  next  month.  

Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

THE AMATEUR GARDENER

by Vanda Lawrence

Well,  here  we   are  again  -­‐   the   New  Year  is  over  and  we  are  ready  to   get  back  into  routine  in  the  garden  with  masses  of  jobs  to  be  done. • Feed  established  fruit   trees  -­‐  now  is  the  best  time  as  it  will  provide   a  boost   when   the   trees  come  into   leaf  again  and  is  less  likely  to   have   been   washed   away   through   the   soil   during   earlier   winter   rains.   For   information,   Nitrogen   promotes   leaves   and   vigorous   growth;  Phosphorus  encourages  roots,  fruit  &  healthy  growth  and   Potassium  is  necessary  for  good  fruit   colour,  flavour  and  fruit-­‐bud   development. • Spray  peach  trees  with  a  copper  fungicide  to  prevent  leaf  curl. • Cut  back  Wisterias  this  month  but  delay  if  we  have  frosty  weather. • Prune  Clematis:   -­‐Spring  &   winter-­‐flowering   clematis  flower   on  previous  season's   wood   and   only   really  need  to  be   pruned   if   they  have  outgrown   their   space.    If   you   wish   to   tidy  the   plant   or   reduce  size,   do   so   immediately  after  flowering. -­‐Early  large-­‐flowered  clematis,  flowering   in  May/June,   should   be   dealt  with  in  February/March  -­‐  just  cut  out  dead  and  weak  stems. -­‐Later  flowering  hybrids  are  the  easiest  to  deal  with.  In  February/ March  start  at  the  base   of  each  plant   and   work  upwards  to   find   the  2nd  pair  of  live  buds.    Prune  just  above  these. • Tree  pollarding  &  coppicing  can  be  undertaken  in  February/March.   Pollarding   means   pruning   back   to   the   trunk   or   stem   while   coppicing  means  pruning  close  to  the  base  of   the   plant.    We  can   coppice  to  ensure  willows  and  dogwoods  produce  a  fresh  crop  of   bright   stems  -­‐  shorten  the   stems   to   within   2"-­‐  3"  of  the  ground   before  the  leaves  appear  in  late  February-­‐early  March. In   the  vegetable   garden,  continue   to   dig,  weed   and   fertilize   then   cover   with  plastic  sheets  to  help   warm  the  soil  ready  for   planting.     Now  is  the  time  to  decide  what  you  will  plant.     New  gardeners  -­‐  why   not  make  a  list  of   the  fruit  &  veg  you  buy  during  the  next  few  weeks   so  you  will  know  exactly  what  to  plant.     It's  easy  to  get  carried  away   and   choose   vegetables  which   look  lovely  in  the  garden   but   which   nobody  in  the  household  likes  to  eat!    Also  remember  it's  better  to   plant   several  short  rows  at  staggered  intervals   so   that  as  one  row  is   cropped  and  eaten,  the  next  row  will  become  ready  to  eat. Potato  tubers  are  in  the  garden  centres  &  supermarkets  now.    Store   them  in  one  layer  in  boxes  in  a  light,   frost-­‐free  place  to  encourage   chitting.     Once  they  have  sprouted   they   can  be  planted   any  time   from  January-­‐April. One  of  our  friends  always  sows  his  Mange-­‐tout  peas  in  January,  even   though  the   recommended  time  is  February-­‐March.    He  believes   he   gets  stronger  plants  this  way  -­‐  worth  a  try? Garden  ponds  need  to  be  checked  now  too.    If  there  are  any  leaks  or   cracks  which   need   repairing,   now   is   the   time  to  do   it,  before   the   water-­‐lilies  and  marginals  start  to  wake  up  and  most  certainly  before   the   frogs,   toads   &   goldfish   start   spawning,   in   case   it   becomes   necessary  to  drain  the  pond  in  order  to  complete  the  task. Not  much  space  now  to  cover  my  favourites  in  the  garden   -­‐  fragrant,   flowering   shrubs.     But   at   the   moment   we   have   Sarcococca,   otherwise  known  as  Christmas  or   Sweet  Box,  with  glossy  leaves,  little   white  flowers  &  beautiful  fragrance.     When  the  flowers  fall  there  are   small   black  berries  to   decorate  the  shrub.     Others  are  Daphne  Odora     and  Hamamelis  mollis  (Chinese  Witch   hazel).    Plant   near   your  back   door,  or  if  that's  not  possible  why  not   plant  in  a  tub  which  you  can   move  closer  to  the  door  when  in  flower.

Whatever you do though, enjoy your garden - see you next month ....

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

French Life, Food & Drink... French Village Diaries by  Jacqueline  Brown. Having  been  lucky  enough   to  spend   some   time   with   family   in   the   UK   recently,  I  couldn’t   help   but   notice   that   in   terms  of   food  portions  and   drink  sizes  everything  seems  to  be   super-­‐sized  in  comparison  to  what  I   am  now  used  to  here  in  France.  

It   started   on   the   ferry   where   we   always   treat   ourselves  to   a  coffee.   In  France  I  am  used   to   sitting  in  a   bar   and   being   served   un   café   allongé,  a   single   shot   of   coffee   topped  up   with  a  little   hot   water,  served   black,  in  a  small   cup  and   usually  costs  just   over  a  euro.    Add  a  square  of  dark  chocolate  on  the   side  and  you  have  my  perfect  coffee. On  board  the  P&O  ferry  I  arrived  at   the  Costa   Coffee  counter  and   was  confronted   by  an  enormously  long  menu  list,  just  for  a  cup  of   black  coffee.  Thankfully  my  regular  traveller  husband  was   on  hand   to  place  the   order,  two   regular  Americano’s,   while  I  stood  staring   at   the  meaningless  jumble  of  words   in   front   of  me   –   he   likes  to   refer  to  it   as  my  ‘rabbit  in  the  headlights  look’.    After   a  modest  wait   we  were   presented  with  two  huge   buckets  of  coffee,  to  which  my   first   reaction  was   ‘these  are  regular?’   It  was  at   this  point  that   he   whisked  me  back  to  our  seats,  muttering  something  along  the  lines   of  ‘you  don’t  get  out   much,  do  you’  and  the   reality  of  having  left   my  French  rural  bubble  hit  me.   As   a   self   confessed   foodie,   you   would   think   that   the   more   food   the   better,  and   in   my   youth   this   was  certainly  very  true,  but  France   has  changed  me.    She  has  refined   my  palette,  introduced  me  to  new   taste  sensations  and  has  taught  me   ‘less  is  more’.    One  of  the  things  my   Mum  and   Dad   love  to  do   is  lunch   out   at   their   local   Carvery   where   the  selection  of   traditional  Sunday   roasts  available  should  be   enough   to  have  an  ex-­‐pat  like  me  salivating   at   the  door.  However,  plates   piled   high   with   four   different   roast   meats,   mashed   potatoes,   roast   potatoes,   carrots,   red   cabbage,   leeks,   swede,   peas,   cauliflower,   stuffing,   Yorkshire   puddings   and   gravy  is  now  way  too  much  for  me.  A  simple  ‘Menu  du  Jour’,  with   a   salad  to  start,  followed  by  a  meat  dish  with  rice  or  potatoes  and  one   vegetable   and   then   a  modest   slice   of   tart   seems  so   much   more   appealing.  Even  more  so  when  a  small  glass  of  wine  comes  included   in  the  price  of  the  meal  but  in  the   UK   I  struggled  to  get  served  with   anything  smaller   than  a  175ml   glass   of   wine.  This  not  only  cost   a   small  fortune,  but  that  much  wine  at  lunchtime  was  enough  to  finish   me  off  for  the  rest  of  the  day! There   are   always   lots   of   articles   in   the   UK   media   about   the   escalating  problems  of  obesity  and  the  health  risks  associated  with   it.  Surely  the  simple   answer   is  to  cut   down   on  portion  sizes,   enjoy   the  flavours  and  embrace  the  less  is  more  principle.

All  of  Jacqui’s  favourite  recipes  can  be  found  on  her  website   http://www.frenchvillagediaries.com.

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

One-armed paleontologist seeks wine trip... by  John  Sherwin. Let’s  face  it,  the  only  good   thing  about   February  is   that   it’s  not  thirty-­‐one  days  long.  Twenty-­‐eight  grim,   grey,  grizzly  days  are  quite   enough  to  be  going  on   with.     But  not  to  worry,  it’s  hard  to  keep  a  wine  guy   down  and  I’m  here  to  spread  good  cheer.    This  is  the   time   to   day-­‐dream,   to   get   a   little   misty-­‐eyed,   to   think  of  red  wine  and  blue  skies,  to  rustle  maps  by  a   log  fire,  in  short,  it’s  the  time  for  some  serious  holiday  planning! Time  was  when  the  idea  of  a  holiday  centred  on  a  beach  or  a  pool  or   a  ski   slope,   but   these  days  there  are  themed   holidays   oozing  from   every  pore  of  the  tourist  industry.  So  many  possibilities.  An  over  60,   one-­‐armed   palaeontologist   looking   for   an   assisted   dig?   Certainly   madam,  we  have  just  the  package.  Sir  is  looking  for   a  walking  tour  of   the  Alps  for  unmarried   tattoo  artists?  Come  right   on   in.  No,  I  haven’t   googled  them,  but  I  bet  if  I  did  I’d  find  something  like. Why  not   make  life  easy?  You’re  in  France.  You’re   not   more   than   a   couple  of  hours  drive  from  Bordeaux.  You  don’t  need  a  calculator  to   solve   that   equation  –  go  on  a   wine  trip.  I  help  folks   less  fortunate   than   you   (ie  those  who  don’t  live  in  France,  close  to  Bordeaux)  to   visit  vineyards   throughout  our   fair   land,  but   as  you’re   reading   this   mag,  let’s  concentrate  on  what  might  make  sense  for  a  Deux-­‐Sèvrian.

Timing  is  important.     (1)  Avoid  public  holidays.  When  I  say  this  to  

my  overseas  friends  they  immediately  assume  that  I’m  warning  them   off  crowded  wineries:  au   contraire,  the  winemakers  will  be   sensibly   off   enjoying   themselves   like   everyone   else.     (2)   Avoid   Sundays,   reasons  as  above.      (3)  Don’t  even  try  to  rouse  anyone  at  lunchtime.  

How   long?     Well,  I  won’t   talk  about  pieces  

of   string,   but   it   depends   on   what   you’re   looking  for.  Are   you   wanting   to   buy   some   reasonably   priced   wine   from   a   particular   area?     Then  a  day  or  two  might   do.  Do   you   want   an   understanding   of   a   sub-­‐region   –   Médoc,  St   Emilion   etc?  Then  2  to  3  days.  An   overview   of   the  area  –   Médoc,   St   Emilion,   Sauternes,  Entre-­‐Deux-­‐Mers?   Five   days  to   a   week.  The   most  important   thing   is  to   go   at   your  own  pace.

Time  of  year?    For  me,  a  vineyard  is  a  thing  of  beauty  at  any  time  of  

year:   the   starkness   of   winter;   the   promise   of   spring;   the   bumptiousness  of  summer;  the  sighs  of  autumn.  Romanticism  aside,   August   is   best   avoided   as  all   France,  including   winemakers,   go   on   holiday.    Harvest-­‐time  also,  as  all  hands  will  be  needed  in  the  fields,   not  pouring  dainty  tastings  for  thee  and  me.  Harvest  in  Bordeaux  is   typically   mid   to   end   September,   but   all   depends   on   the   year’s   weather.

How  to  make  contact?  Now  we’re  getting  to  the  pointy-­‐end,  the  bit  

that   would  put   most  people  off.    The   obvious   answer   is  to  get  in   touch   with  me!    But  if  you  must  go  it  alone,  look  at  www.bordeaux-­‐ tourisme.com  to  get  some  idea  of  what’s  around.  If  you  have  specific   chateaux  in  mind  google  them  and  pick  up  the  phone.  The  reference   book  I  use  is  Le  Guide  Bettane  &   Dessauve  des  Vins  de   France.  This   gives  contact   info   and   when  chateaux   are   open   for   wine   visits,  as   well  as  wine  reviews.  Very  nifty.

What   to   expect?  One  advantage   of   visiting  Bordeaux   chateaux   is  

that  most  are  medium  to  large  and  therefore  will  probably  have  staff   who   can   handle   visits   in   English.   Other   wine   regions   –   Alsace,   Languedoc-­‐Roussillon,   Provence   spring   to   mind   –   you’d   probably   have  to  dust  off  your   French.  So  let’s  assume  a  largish  chateau  with   whom  you’ve  booked  a  visit  in  English.  Groups   are  rarely  more  than   eight   but   you  might   get  lucky  and  be  with   only  a  couple  of  others.   There’s   no   set   routine,   but   the   visit   will   normally   include   an   introduction  of   the  chateau  and  its  history,  perhaps  a  brief  look   at   the  vineyard,  a  walk  through  the  areas  where  the  grapes  are  received   at   harvest,   the   press,  the  fermenting   vessels,  the  caves  full   of   oak   casks   where   the   wine   is   matured,   then   the   tasting.  All   this   is   of   course  accompanied  with  explanation  of  the  process,  and  questions   are  always  welcome.  Expect   to  spend   about  45  minutes  to  an  hour   for  the  whole  visit.  Some  visits  are  free,  but  these  days  most  charge,   typically  €10  to  €15.  Even  when  the  visit  is  free,  don’t  feel  obliged  to   buy  anything  –  unless  of  course  you  want  to. A  couple  of   chateaux  which  would  give  you  a  good  entrée  into   the   wonderful   world   of  chateaux   visits  are   Lynch-­‐Bages   in   the  Médoc   and   Figeac   in   St   Emilion.   Google   them   (I’m   not   doing   all   your   legwork),  call,  make  an  appointment,  go,  enjoy,  discover   the  wonder   of  wine  where  it’s  made  and  in  the  company  of  those  who  make  it.   Or  call  me…

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours. Tel: 02 51 66 14 85 Email: johnsherwin@orange.fr ~ www.french-wine-tours.com

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Colour Advert Size A only 38€ per month or from 33,33€ per month for 12 months.

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RESTAURANT REVIEWS... If you have positive restaurant experiences to share, we would love to print them here. Please email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr for inclusion into future issues.

Fabulous New Restaurant Awaits You! If   you're   looking   for   a  new   eatery,  or   perhaps  a   new  venue   for   a   family   occasion,   you   will   be   pleased   to   read   about   L'Étable   Gastronomique,  run   by   Scottish   husband   &  wife  team,  Charlie   &   Elaine  Watt. Situated   in   a  beautiful,  rural   location  in  Augé,  this  wonderful  new   restaurant   offers   seasonal,  fresh   and  homemade  food   in   a   warm   and  cosy  atmosphere.    L'Étable   Gastronomique's  restaurant  caters   for   24   covers   during   the   winter   months,   extending   onto   the   outdoor   terrace   with   approximately   40   covers   in   the   warmer   months.    The  beautiful  view  is  the  perfect  window  of   relaxation  for   diners  and  there  is  also  the  opportunity  to  walk  the  grounds  after   you've  eaten.

Following  their   highly  successful   James  Bond   themed   New   Year's   Eve  party  (with  roulette  table  of  course!),  future   plans  start  on  the   14th   February   with   a   Valentine’s   Night   Dinner   (reservations   required).     In   the   warmer   months,   intentions   include   open-­‐air   theatre   and   themed   nights,   and   throughout   the   year,   weddings,   birthdays  and  family  celebrations. So  why  not  reserve  a  table  and  try  it  for  yourself?     Open  Friday,  Saturday  and  Sunday  lunchtimes,  12-­‐2pm  and  Friday   and  Saturday  evenings,  6.30-­‐8.45pm.

L'Étable  Gastronomique

La  Veille  Ferme  du  Monteil,  79400,  Augé. Tel:  05  49  28  21  48  ~  www.etablegastronomique.fr

Ex-­‐hotel   owner,   Charlie,   works   Front   of   House   serving   the   customers   whilst   Elaine   is  busy  behind   the  scenes   preparing  and   cooking   the   tasty  dishes  on  offer.    Elaine  prides  herself   on   great   tasting   British   food   with   a   'twist'   of   French   cuisine,  which  has  already  proven  a  hit  with  the  locals. Newly  opened  on  Christmas  Day  2012,  Charlie  &  Elaine's   first  day  was  a    great  success…. “We have recently eaten at the new restaurant in its lovely setting in Augé. The food was gourmet with an excellent wine list (and we have eaten all over the world). The ambience was welcoming and relaxing. We would thoroughly recommend this restaurant – not to be missed.”

Above: Outside Dining

Above: Inside

the restaura

nt

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French Adventures... Black  Cat  afternoon

2010  was  the  turning  point  for  us.    January  23rd  to  be  exact. I  was  at  Aviemore,  Scotland,  for  the  annual  sled  dog  race,  the  biggest   in  Europe  with  over  200  mushers  entered.     I  was  in  “C”  class  (4  dog),   and  had  tried  for   years  to  win,  coming  2nd  seven  times.     Today  was  my   day  -­‐  we  finally  won  and  it  was  time  to  move  on.  I’d  now  done  it  all,   including   breeding   World   Championship   winning   sled   dogs,  so   had   nothing  to  prove  anymore.    We  already  had   our   property  in  Cheffois,   bought  in  2010,  so  the  move  was  on.     It  would  be  tough   to   leave,  we   both  had  good  well  paid  jobs  and  great  friends. Cherry  (my  partner   of   28  years)  was,  and  still   is,   an  award-­‐winning   freelance  Landscape  Designer  (Hampton  Court   Medal  winner   twice)   and  would  carry  on  her  business,  both  in  England  and  France,  whilst  I   would  do  whatever  came  along. I  was  a  successful  Landscape  manager,  having  worked  on  some  huge   and   prestigious   contracts   over   the   years,   including   The   Millenium   Dome  (now  the  O2  centre),   Tate  Gallery,   refurbishment   of  Battersea   Park,  T5   Heathrow,  and  the  icing  on   the  cake,     Euro  Disney  Paris   in   1991,   where   I   was   in   charge  of   40   French   paysagistes   landscaping   ‘Adventure   Land’  with   only   a   spattering   of   the   language.     Not   an   experience  to  be  missed! I  had  previously  lived  in  France   (Marseille)  in  1974  for  a  month   whilst   hitch-­‐hiking  around  Europe.   (my  mother   called  me  a  hippy  drop-­‐out,   it’s  now  called   a  gap  year   experience...   born  too   soon  I  suppose).     I   returned  in  Oct  1976  for  the  Vendage  in  Gascony,  and  took  my  team  of   4  Siberians  to  the  Alps  (Meribel,  Nancy  la  Croix,  Saint  Gervais  and  La   Grand  Bernand  )  in  January  2003  for  an  8  day  sled  race. Over  the  years,  through  my  work  with  the  dogs,  I  had  the  privilege  to   be   asked   by   the  BBC  to  open  the   ‘Children  in  Need’  programme  at   Basingstoke   ice  rink  by  transporting  Sally  Taylor  of   Meridian  TV  onto   the  ice  with  my  4  dog  sled  team.    That  led  a  few  years  later  to   a  15   minute   TV  programme  for   an  up  and  coming  Wildlife  TV  presenter   Chris  Packham,  teaching  him  dog  sledding  on  the  Goodwood  Estate,   West  Sussex.     In   2009,  in   Aviemore,   I  earned  my  Blue  Peter   badge   teaching   the   new   presenter,   Helen   Skelton,   how  to  win   a   dog  sled   race,   and   finally   the   crème   de   la   crème,   being   involved   in   the   filming   of   “Tomb   Raider”   at   Pinewood   s t u d i o s   w i t h   my   n o w   increased   6   dog   team.   This   was  pre   Angelina   Jolie  being   the   big   star   she   is   today.   I   remember   clearly   standing   Above: Filming with Helen Skelton next  to   her  on  set  and  asking   a  mate  standing  next   to  me,  which  one  she  was?  Big  elbow  in  the  ribs   and  a  red  face  followed  my  gaff!!

Terrier,  the  2   tortoises  and  the  remnants  of  what  couldn’t  fit  into  my   van. I   travelled   down   to   Newhaven   on   Wednesday   10th   August,   late   evening,  to  catch  “the  midnight  ferry  to  Cheffois”    (Make  a  good  song   title  that,  think  a  bit!!!!)  Go  through  customs  etc  with  a   whinging  cat   and  5  miserable  dogs  and  prepare  for  the  crossing. Cherry  arrived  on   Saturday  13th,  once  the  house  was  legally  handed   over,  and  now,  here  we  are....  Freezing!!!!!!!      I  suppose,  like  most  new   arrivals,  we  had  bought  an  un-­‐modernised  house,  and  even  though  we   have  the  basics,  we  don’t  yet  have  a  log  burner!    That  will  come  next   year  with  the  barn  conversion. And  what  of  the  dogs?    They  are  fine.    4   brand   new   kennels   and   a   lovely   converted  small   barn,  which  is  my  dog   food   prep-­‐area,   is   testament   to   that.     Well   it   would   be,   but   it   is   at   the   moment   doubling   up   as  an   overnight   sleeping   quarter   for   our   7   Siberian   husky  puppies.    These  were  born  on  4th   November   (1   day  after   my   60th),  and   will   be   going  back  to   England   (Bets-­‐y-­‐ Coed  actually  in  Wales)  to  a  friend  who   Above: One of the seven Siberian husky puppies. has    bought  the  whole  litter. Given  that  these  pups  are  now  attempting  to  eat  me  out   of  house  and   home,  it  was  with  some  luck  that  I  ran   into   a  lady  called  Bernadette   (also  a  scouser)  at  a  dog  show  in  St.  Pardoux  in  September,  which   I’d   read  about  in  this  very  magazine. Coincidences  continue  to   play  a  huge  part  in  my   life,  even  now.  Not   only  was  she  a  rep  for  the  dog  food  I’d  used  in  England,  CSJ,  but  there   was  an  opening  for  a  rep  in  the  Vendée. So  here  I  am,  supposedly  recently  retired  and  looking  at  some  ”joie  de   vie”   in   sunny  Vendée,  now   becoming     self  employed,  (via  the   auto   enterpreneur   scheme)   and   at   the   moment   working   7   days   a   week   building  kennels,  landscaping  the  garden,  revamping  the  garage  into   a   studio  for  Cherry,  being  driven  mad  by  the  Huskies  and  the  8  week  old   feral  black  cat,  Merlot,  that  we  have  just  acquired.     What’s   that   old   saying  about  black  cats,  luck  and  crossing!

Contact Jimmy on: Tel:06 40 59 80 18 / 02 51 51 14 37 Email: iamthedogrunnerbryde@aol.co.uk Please also see advert on P.17. Left: Winning the race in Aviemore Scotland.

The  highlight  of  the  3  weeks   filming  though  was  being  asked  by  the   BBC  to  take  my  team  round  the  ice  tunnel  set  so  they  could  get  some   action  shots.  I  did  the  filming  brilliantly  (fell  off  out  of  shot  though)  and   was  seen  on  Boxing  Day  being  introduced  on  the  telly  by  Rolf  Harris  for   the  programme  Vets  in  Action  who  supplied  the  veterinary  care  on  set.     Being  seen  on  the  box   by  some   20   million,  can’t   be  bad  for  “a  scally   from  the  little  fishing   port  of   Birkenhead”   as  Paul   O’Grady  describes   our  mutual  hometown. Still  back  to  the  mundane,  the  Move... Cherry   was   organising   most   of   the   packing,   putting   30   years   of   belongings  into  boxes  with  labels  on  them,  like  kitchenware,  bedroom   1  etc.  Cherry  was  to  follow  2  days  later  with  her  dog    Wizzy,  the  Border   Page 26


THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Motoring... Porsche 911 – the Marmite of cars? by  Helen  Tait-­‐Wright

Let  me  say  at  the  outset  that  I  love  911’s  and  I  love  Marmite,  but  I   suspect  that   the  people  reading  this   will  be  divided  on  the  subject.   Even  our  household  is  divided!  Chris  hates  911’s  (and  Marmite!) My  love  affair   with  the  911  really  blossomed  after  seeing  the  rather   dodgy  film  “Condorman”  on  a  school  trip  to  the  cinema.  In  the  film,   the  superhero  is  pursued  through  the  mountains  by  a  group  of  glass   eyed   assassins  driving   black  911’s.  Sadly  the  cars  are  destroyed  in   the  film,  but   for  me  the  fascination  of  the  curvy  little  cars  has  never   gone  away. The  911  was  first   seen  in  1963  at  the  Frankfurt  Motor  Show  and  was   the  replacement  for  the  Porsche  356,  an  equally  gorgeous  car,  which   co-­‐incidentally  stars   in  one  of   my  favorite  films,  Top  Gun.    The  car   was  originally  called  the  901,  but   the  French  were  the  reason  behind   the  change  to  911,  as  Peugeot  argued   that  they  had  exclusive  rights   to  car  names  formed  by  three  numbers  with  a  zero  in  the  middle. Production  of  the  911  began  in  September  1964. One   of   the  distinguishing  features   of   911s  until   1998  was  the  rear   mounted   air-­‐cooled  engine.     This  is  one   of  the   things  that  opposers   of   the   911   cite   when   they   say   “its   just   a   Volkswagon   Beetle   on   steroids”,  as   that   layout   was   indeed   originally   used   in   the   Beetle,   which  was  indeed  designed  by  Ferdinand  Porsche. Over  the  years  the  basic  911  has  undergone  many  transformations,   but  the  iconic  shape  is  still  recognisable  in  2013,  50  years  after  it  was   first   seen.  As  well  as  being  a  successful  road-­‐car  model,  the  911  has   excelled  in  motorsport. It   has  been   modified  by   private  teams  and  by  the  factory  itself  for   racing,   rallying   and   other   forms   of   automotive   competition.   It   is   among  the  most  successful  competition  cars  ever.    In  the  mid  1970s,   naturally  aspirated  911  Carrera  RSRs  won  major  world  championship   sports   car   races   such   as   Targa   Florio,   Daytona,   Sebring   and   Nurburgring,   even   against   prototypes.   The   911-­‐derived   935   Turbo  also  won  the  coveted  24  Hours  of  Le  Mans  in  1979. In   1998,   the   famous   aircooled   engine   was   replaced   by   a   water   cooled   model,  and  the  bodyshell  had   its  first  overhaul.  This   was  an   important   move  for   Porsche  as  their   sales   had  collapsed  after   the   boom   period   in   the   early  80’s   and   they   needed   to   attract   new   buyers  with  a  more  technologically  advanced  model. Purists  will  argue  that   this  new  car,  also   known  as  the  996,  is  not   a   true  911,  but  it   ensured  the  survival   of  one  of  the  most  famous  car   nameplates  ever. Twice  in  my  life  I  have  had  enough  cash  in  my  hand  to  purchase  one   of  these  wonderful   cars,  and   on   both   occasions   I  bought   a  house   instead.  I  won’t   make  that  mistake  a  third  time!    So  which  one  would   I  choose?     Obviously  it  would  have  to  be  black,  and  really  as  close  to   the  cars  in  that   film  that  started  it  all  .......  complete  with  80’s  whale   tail!    Which  only  goes  to  prove  you   can  take  the  girl  out  of   the  80’s   but  you  can’t  take  the  80’s  out  of  the  girl! Contact  Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org.

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MCS RACING

Hi  again!    If  you   have  been  reading  these  articles  over  the  past  two   months,  you   will   know   that  our   car   was  needing  a  Rally  Controle   Technique   before   setting   off   on   the   race.   My  co-­‐pilot   (who   has   never   driven   the   car   before!)   and   I   drove   over   240km   to   the   outskirts  of  Bordeaux     in  order   for  the  car  to  be  checked  over.    We   had   to   wait   for   others  to   be  seen  first,   as  it  was   a  first   come  first   served  basis. There   were   lots   of   checks   underneath   the  vehicle  and   we  have  a  list  of  things   still  to   do   in   preparation  before  leaving   on  the  14th   February.     The  good   thing   was   that   we   drove   the   round-­‐trip   (nearly   500km)   in   one   go   without   breaking  down,   which  is   the   furthest   I   have  driven  the  car  since  owning  it! We  met  lots  of   other  students  who  are   also   going   to   do   the   Rally,   some   in   particular   that  live  in   Toulouse  but  go  to  Lycee  at  Poitiers.    As  we   were   from  the   same  area,  we  drove   back  together   as  practice   of   driving  in  convoy. The  target  of  this  charity  event  is  to  help  the  Moroccan  children  by     taking  50kg  of  materials  (such  as  books,  pens,  pencils  etc.  and   a  full   sports  bag)  to  the  schools. We  are  struggling  to  find  any  help  with  sponsorship  or  donations  to   and  if  you   are  of  a  mind  to  help  a  charity  event  we  would  be  most   grateful.    Donations  of  any  size  will  be  gratefully  received. Keenan  Dominey, MCS  RACING,  8  rue  de  la  Violette  ,  Chaignepain,  79190  Les  Alleuds Tel  :  06.29.72.33.94  ~  05.17.23.13.43 Email:  mcs-­‐racing@sfr.fr

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Communications... Pictures.    Now  just   to   confuse   everybody,  cameras  are  rated  by  

Understanding Your PC ? Size  Matters  -­‐  All  About  Capabilities

by  Ross  Hendry

I  am  often  asked  “How  many  pictures  will   fit   on   a  PC?”  or  “How   many   songs   or   films   can   I   put   on   a   CD?”   and   other   similar   questions,  so    hopefully  this  article  may  answer  such  queries.

Bits  and  Bytes.  

Most   manufacturers   use   the  Byte  as  the  unit   to  advise  you  of  the   capability/capacity   of   your   PC.   For   example,   your   PC   has   4   Megabytes  (4MB)  of  RAM  and   a  500  Gigabyte   (500GB)   hard  disk   drive,  or   a  USB   memory  stick   has  4  Gigabytes   (4GB)  of  space.    In   these   terms  a  Byte  represents   one   character   i.e.  "a"   or   "4",  or   a   symbol  such   as  "@".  Each  character  is  made  up  of  8  binary   digits,   known  a  bits.     Bits  are  normally  represented  by  a  "b"  and  Bytes  as  a   "B". A  byte  is  very  small  in  computing  terms  and  normally  you  will  hear   of   kilobytes  (kB),  Mega  Bytes  (MB)   and   Giga  Bytes  (GB).  These  are   simply  multiples  of  the   humble  Byte,  so  1  kilobyte   is  1,024  Bytes  -­‐   normally   referred   to   as   one   thousand   bytes;   a   1   Megabyte   is   1,048,576  -­‐  normally  referred  to  as  one  million  Bytes;  a  Gigabyte  is   1,073,741,824   or   one   thousand   Megabytes   and   1   Terabyte   is-­‐   1,099,511,627,776   Bytes,  or   one  thousand  Gigabytes    (1,024  GB),   or    one  million  Megabytes      (1,048,576  MB).! Armed  with  this  knowledge  you  simply  now  need  to  know  how   big   any  object   you  want  to  store  is  and   you   may  calculate   how  many   you  can  store.  

Music.    How  much  data  (number   of  Bytes)   is  there  in  a  pop  song  

or   album  of  songs?    The  best  way  to   calculate  this  is  by  time,  so  for   the   average   quality   song/piece   of   music,   each   minute   is   approximately  .918  Megabytes,  just  under  1MB.     So   a  45  minute  album  is   .918  x  45   =  41.3  MB,  for   simplicity  I  use   one   Megabyte  per   Minute   so  I  would  over   estimate   to   45MB   per   album  containing  10  songs.    Here  is  a  handy  table  to  help  you  : Albums  or  Songs  on

1  GB

1  GB

1  GB

1  GB

Bit  Rate  (kbps)

128

192

256

320

Hours  of  music

18.66

12.5

9.33

6.5

No  of  Albums  @  45mins/album

24.9

16.6

12.4

9.9

No  of  Songs  @  3:30  mins/song

319

213

159

127

The  bit   rate   above  refers  to  the  quality  of  the   digital  music  recording,   the  more  kbps  the  better  the  sound  quality.  

mega  pixels. Pixels  are  used   to  describe  the  resolution  of  an  image,   whereas  bytes  are  used  to   describe  a  measure  of  data.    Clearly  the   more  Megapixels,  the  higher   quality  the  image  will  be.  Mega-­‐  is   a   prefix  used  to  describe  how  much  of  them  there  are  (1  million).   I  find  it  easier  to  use  the  following  table  for  pictures  : Megapixels

1  GB

2  GB

4  GB

8  GB  

16  GB

32  GB

4

580

1,160

2,320

4,640

9,280 18,560

6

326

652

1,304

2,608

5,216 10,432

8

290

580

1,160

2,320

4,640

9,280

12

163

326

652

1,304

2,608

5,216

16

145

290

580

1,160

2,320

4,640

Simply  check  the   number   of   Megapixels   your   camera   is  rated   at   then  multiply  up.    So   a  12  Megapixel   rated  camera   will   take  163   pictures  to  a  Gigabyte  or  16,300  per  100  Gigabytes  of  Disk  space.

Films   or   Video.     Once   again   the   way  the   film   is   recorded  will  

determine  the  quantity  you   may  store.   If  you   are   talking  about   a   film  like  you   would  see  in  the  cinema,  these  may  be  anything  from   600GB   to   several   GB,   depending   on   the   format.   I   regularly   download   movies   that   are   around   700MB,   they  are  created   this   size  to   fit   on   a  CD.  These   are  .avi  type  files   and  I   find   the   quality   excellent.     I   also   have   many   that   are   1.4GB   -­‐   the   difference   in   quality  does  not  improve  that  much. The   newer   HD   movies   tend   to   be   a   minimum   of   1.4GB   per   90   minute  movie.    If  you  want  the  highest  quality  (for  example  Blu-­‐ray)   then   I  have   calculated   the   average   size   will   be   around   25GB   to   27GB.  These  would  be  for  full  1080p  resolution   HD  movies.  If  you   work  on  25Gb   for  your   calculations  you   should  be   fairly  accurate;   the   smallest   Blu-­‐ray  I  have  seen   is  around   14GB   and  the  largest   is   50GB. I   hope   this   helps   and   if   you   would   like   any   further   info   on   this   matter   you  could   always  send  me  an   email   and  I'll   do   my  best  to   help. Ross   Hendry   is   the   proprietor   of   I n t e r f a c e   C o n s u l t i n g   a n d   Engineering,   who   has  over   42  years   experience   in   Communications,   Computer   Technology   and   Direct   Marketing.   (See   advert   below   for   more  information).

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Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Building & Renovation... Our  home  is  our  safety  and  comfort   zone  during  the  winter  months.     It   needs   to   be   kept   warm  and   safe  but   power   cuts  seem   to   be   a   regular  occurrence  across  the  regions,  caused  by  external  or  internal   circumstances. In  the  event  of  external   forces   such  as  maintenance  or   fault  to   the   incoming  supply,  lightning,  high   winds,  flooding  or   storms,  there  is   very  little  that  can  be  done  to  prevent  this  other  than  BE  PREPARED!   Keep  in   a  safe  place  torches,  candles  &  matches  where  they  can   be   easily  located  in  the  event  of  a  power  cut,  along  with  blankets,  hats   and   scarves!     A  power   cut   from  external   forces  can   last   up   to   24   hours,  sometimes  longer. To  avoid  power  cuts  from  internal  circumstances,  being  aware  of  the   following   and   acting  on   them  accordingly  will   promote   safety  and   limit   further   serious   outcomes.     A   power   cut   can  be  caused   by   a   blown  light  bulb  or  lamp.    This  can  be  remedied  by  you  by  keeping  a   selection  of  bulbs  and  lamps  in  the  house.    Before  replacing  the  bulb,   make  sure  the  switch  is  in  the  off  position.  If  the  switch  remains  on,   heat  can  build  up  quickly  and   the  bulb  will   be  too   hot  to  handle!    If   the  fuse  continues   to   blow  or  trip  when   reset  or  replaced,  you  will   need  to  contact  a  qualified   electrician.       Always  replace  a  fuse  with   one  of  the  same  rating.  Fuses  are  designed  to  protect  the  size  of   the   cable  and  loading  purposes.  The  wrong  sized  fuse  could  lead  to  cable   damage  and  possible  fires.  

flex   -­‐   the  main  part  is  the  lead.    The  flex  used  in  appliances  is  suited   to  the  power   drawn   from  the  mains  to  operate  it.    The  thickness  of   the  flex  is  compatible  to  the  current  used.    Bent  and   twisted  flex  will   eventually  split  to  expose  the  inner  cores.  This  is  no  longer  safe.    Do   not   tape   or   cover   exposed   wiring.   Flex   should   be   replaced   by   a   qualified  electrician,  or  equipment  disposed  of. If   using  extension   leads   to   accommodate  British  appliances,  make   sure  they  are  ‘surge’  protected.     A  surge  protected   extension   lead   will  ensure  that   the  fuse   in  the  extension  lead  is  ‘blown’,  averting   a   surge  to  your   equipment  and  damaging  your  PC,  telephone  or   other   appliance  connected   to   your   extension   lead.       If   you  are   using   a   coiled  extension  lead,  make  sure  it   is  unravelled.  A   lot   of   heat  can   build  up  in  a  coiled  lead. Check  where  your  electrical  supplies  are  and  that  they  can  be  turned   off  if  need  be.

Be  aware  of  your  earth  spike.  Do  you  have  one?  Is  it  rated   properly?     Earthing   is   the   most   important   part   of  your   electrical   installation;   without  appropriate   earthing  your  home   and  occupants  could  be  in   serious  danger,  particularly  when  using  faulty  appliances. Check  electrical  appliances  regularly.  Most   items  are  well  protected   from   basic  electrical  dangers  as  in  shock  or  overheating.     Check  the   Page 30


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Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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ARTISANS  &  TRADESMEN... Do  you  have  any  top  tips  you  can  share  with  our  readers?       We  would  love  to  include  them  in  this  section! For  more  details,  please  see  the  ‘Written  Contributions’  page   on  our  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Short  editorials  can  be  offered  to  advertisers,   free  of  charge. Please  call  Sarah  to  find  out  more. Tel:  05  49  70  26  21 Page 34


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ball  valve.............................. basin..................................... bath....................................... boiler.................................... boiler  flue............................. burner,  gas............................ burner,  oil.............................. butane  (gas).......................... cistern.................................. conduit.................................. connector............................. to  drain................................. drainage  system................... drainpipe............................... flange.................................... flux......................................... gas,  refillable  boule............. gas  regulator........................

vanne    (f) lavabo  (m);  cuvette  (f) baignoire    (f) chaudière    (f) carneau  de  chaudière    (m) brûleur  gaz    (m) brûleur  fioul    (m) butane    (m) citerne    (f) gaine    (f) joint    (m) vider    (v) système  de  drainage    (m) tuyau  d’écoulement    (m) collet    (m) flux  décapant    (m) bouteille  gaz  rechargeable    (f) détendeur    (m)

joint,  copper........................... joint  with  olive,  compression...... leak;  leakage.......................... macerator............................... manhole.................................. water  meter........................... pipe........................................ pipe  cuuer.............................. overflow  pipe........................ to  plumb................................. pressure  reducing  valve........ pump,  heat.............................. sewer..................................... shower  tray............................ sink......................................... tap.......................................... valve....................................... waste  pipe..............................

raccord  cuivre    (m) raccord  á  olive    (m) fuite    (f) pompe  de  relevage    (f) regard    (m) compteur  d’eau  froide    (m) tuyau  (m);  canalisaAon    (f) coupe-­‐tube    (m) tuyau  de  trop-­‐plein    (m) plomber    (v) détendeur  (m) pompe  á  chaleur    (f) égout    (m) receveur  de  douche    (m) évier    (m) robinet    (m) soupape    (f) canalisaAon  vidange    (f) Page 35


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Business, Finance & Property... Understanding Risk by  Bill  Blevins,  Financial  Correspondent,  Blevins  Franks

One of the greatest issues which investors face is understanding risk. Many investors only focus on investment risk and fail to consider other types of risk that could affect their capital and which can be planned for. What type of risk do you need to be aware of? Capital risk:

e risk that prices will fall and your original investment will decline in value. Market risk: e possibility that market volatility will negatively effect your investments. Credit risk: e risk that a borrower will default. Institutional risk: e risk that the financial institution managing your money will fail. Currency risk: e possibility of loss by not considering your spending currency. Liquidity risk: e possibility that you may not be able to sell your assets when you need the money, or that you will have to sell in a depressed market. Inflation risk: e chance that your capital will decline in value as rising prices shrink the value of the currency it is invested in. It is important to consider whether you will make ‘real’ returns above inflation. If not, you are effectively losing money.

Very low risk investments may protect you from market risk but will expose you to inflation risk. You need to compare risk against risk (there is no such thing as ‘zero risk’) and establish which one represents the greatest long-term threat. en work to suppress it by accepting the lesser risks. e risk of doing nothing: Often, the greatest risk for investors, particularly those who rely on their savings in retirement, is doing nothing. Leaving all your savings on deposit and withdrawing the interest as income, exposes the capital value to inflation. e buying power of your money will be reduced over time. Take expert advice from a wealth management firm like Blevins Franks on suitable strategies for your specific, personal, circumstances, time horizon and objectives.

To keep in touch with the latest developments in the offshore world, check out the latest news on our website www.blevinsfranks.com

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Ask Amanda. “How can I plan my inheritance whilst living in France?”

In  France  inheritance   tax  (“IHT”),  is   known  as   succession   tax.   If   you   die   as   a   resident   in   France,   it   is   payable   on   all   of   your   assets.     However,  for   non-­‐residents   succession   tax  is   payable  only  on  assets  located  in  France. The   succession   rules   are   very  different   from  what   we   may  have   experienced   in   the  UK   and   can   be   affected   by   whether   you   are   married   or   have   a   PACS   in  France  or   whether   you  have   children   from  a  current   or   previous  marriage   or   relationship.   The   French   Government   has   recently   reduced   the   death   duty  allowance   to   100,000  Euros,  increasing  the  number   of  families  who  will  now  be   liable. With  careful  planning  you  can  maintain  a  level  of  control  with   how   your   estate  will   be   distributed.     For   example  last   month  I  wrote   about   Assurance   Vie’s   and   how   money   in   an   Assurance   Vie   is   exempt  from  the  rules   of  succession.  Under   an   Assurance  Vie  it   is   also  worth  noting   that  the  first  152,500  Euros  is  free  from  French   succession   tax.    (30,500  Euros  if  you  take  out  a  policy  after  the  age   of  70). This  is  just  one  example  of  how  careful   financial  planning  can  help   your   future   arrangements.   If   you   would   like   to   discuss   your   personal  family  situation  I  am  more  than  happy  to  help  you?   You  can  contact   me  via  email  or  telephone  on  the  details  below,  or   why  not  pop  in  to  see  me  at  one  of  my  free  financial  surgeries?    I   offer  a  free  financial  surgery  at  ‘Café  des  Belles  Fleurs’   in  Fenioux   each   Thursday  10.30   till   14.00  (except   when   they  are  closed   the   end  of   February)   and   I   am  pleased   to   say   that   I   shall   be   at   the   ‘Open  Door’  in  Civray  on  the  last  Tuesday  of   each  month  26th  Feb,   26th  March. Amanda  Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com or “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Will the profile of house-buyers change in the Deux-Sèvres in by  Trevor  Leggett,  Chief  Executive 2013? As  we  said  in  the  last   issue  of  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’,  we  saw   around   650,000  houses  sold  on  this   side  of   the  channel  last   year.     Those  overseas  visitors  who  have  bought,  have  either   been  at   the   top   or   bottom   ends   of   the   market.   At   the   bottom   end   we   continued  to  see  a  steady  stream  of  enquiries  in  cheaper  areas  like   the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.     Similarly  the  top  end  of  the  market   never   really   went  away  and  we  saw  plenty  of  demand  for  prime  property  in  the   Alps  and  on  the  Cote  d’Azur. Upmarket  estate  agent   Knight   Frank  has   a   name   for   these  super   rich  buyers,    they  call  them   UHNWI’s.    It  stands  for  Ultra  High  Net   Worth   Individual   and   you   need   over   $100  million   in  the   bank  to   qualify. However,   we   have  noticed   that   buyers   haven’t   necessarily  been   these  incredibly  rich  people.    Rather,  we  have  seen  the  return   of   the  British  “middle  class”.    In  PACA  they  may  have  millions  to  spend   but  in   the  Deux-­‐Sèvres  and  its  near  neighbours,  their  budgets  have   been  between  €250-­‐450,000  and  it’s  great  to  see  them  returning. This  is  the   kind   of   buyer   profile   that   has  traditionally  driven   the   property  market  on  this  side  of  the  channel  –  typically  retirees  who   come   in   search   of   a   less   stressful  pace   of   life  and   a  respite  from   cloudy  skies  and  crowded,  but  failing  high  streets.    However,  this   buyer  profile  is  changing  too. Last  year   we  saw   a  trend  towards   younger   buyers,  with   plenty  of   families   opting   to   move   to   France.     Our   agents   now   need  to   be   ready  and  able  to  advise  on  putting  families  into  the  French  system   and   we  need  to  put  clients  in   touch   with   our   local  contacts  from   doctors  &  dentists  to  plumbers  and   roofers.     We  also  need  to  have   a  large  portfolio  of  suitable  properties  to  offer  these  new  buyers.     It   stands  to  reason  that  larger  families  need  a  bigger  property  than   a   retired  couple.     Families   tend   to   like   being  in   the   middle  of   the   action  with  good  schooling  and  plenty  of  things  for  the  children  to   do  at  the  weekend. It’s   now  easier   for   young   parents   to   make   a  living  over   here  and   they  are   happier   than   they  used  to   be  in   leaving  family   behind.   Flights   into   Nantes   &   Poitiers   mean   that   getting   to   Niort,   Parthenay,  Bressuire   and  other   towns  is  pretty  easy.     Add  in   the   TGV  and  the  A83  &  A10  motorways  and  it’s  not  such  a  wrench  to   move  your  family  to  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.

Advertise  your   Private  House  Sale From 10€ per month Please send details by email for inclusion into the next issue.

Tel:  05  49  70  26  21

www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Let’s   hope   that   this   is   a   trend   that   continues   throughout   the   coming   years.   Seeing   families   come   into   the   department   and   boosting   local   schools,   shops,   restaurants   and   businesses   would   certainly  be  seen  as  a  positive  by  the  local  community. Allez  les    «  classes  moyennes  –  et  la  bourgeoisie  »  ! Leggett  Immobilier  is  one  of  the  leading  estate  agents  in  France.   You  can  access  all  their  local  property  listings  and  articles  at www.frenchestateagents.com/poitou-­‐charentes-­‐property.

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr Page 38


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The Deux-Sèvres Monthly' magazine February 2013