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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Welcome!

to the new-look colour magazine... Issue 19: September 2012. Well, it’s been hard work - but we’ve got there in the end - a full colour magazine! Hope you like it?

As I sit typing this late on a Sunday night, I’m dreaming of a quiet day relaxing and reading my ever increasing pile of books...but with the Trade Fair (Foire Commerciale AngloFrançaise) fast approaching, I guess that will have to wait until after the event! I’m preying for some dry, sunny weather on Saturday 8th September and a steady stream of visitors throughout the day; meeting their local businesses and enjoying the food and entertainment. I hope to see many of you there! Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or Tel: 05 49 70 26 21.

à plus, Sarah.

Annual Subscription. If   you   would  like  to  receive  a  copy  of   ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’   magazine  by  post  each  month,  please  complete  this  form  and  send   to  La  Bartière,  79130  Secondigny.  Please  enclose  a  cheque  to  cover   postage  for  the  year. 28€  within  France,  18€  to  addresses  in  UK. (Unfortunately  the  cheaper  ‘printed  papers’  rate  cannot  be  applied   to  addresses  within  France,  only  when  sending  abroad)   Full  Name: Postal  Address: Postcode:

Country:

Tel: Email: Please make  cheques  payable  to  SARAH  BERRY.

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

© Sarah  Berry  2012.    All  rights  reserved. Material   may   not   be   reproduced   without   permission.    While   care   is   taken   to   ensure   that   articles  and   features   are   accurate,   Sarah   Berry   accepts  no   liability   for   reader   dissatisfaction.    The   opinions   expressed   and  experiences   shared   are   given   by   individual   authors   and   do   not   necessarily   represent   the   views   or   opinions  of  the  publisher. Please   ensure   you   verify   that   the   company  you  are   dealing   with   is  a   registered   trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The   Deux-­‐Sèvres   Monthly>>   est   édité   par   Sarah   Berry,   La   Bartière,   79130,   Secondigny.  Tél:   05  49  70   26   21.     Directeur   de   la   publication   et   rédacteur   en   chef:   Sarah   Berry.   Crédits   photos:   Sarah   Berry,   Clkr   et   morgeufile.com.   Impression:   Raynaud   Imprimeurs,   zone   industrielle,   BP13,   79160,   Coulonges-­‐ sur-­‐l’Autize.    Dépôt  légal:  septembre   2012  -­‐  Tirage:  5  000  exemplaires.    Siret:  515   249  738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

CONTENTS

What’s On.......................................................................................................4 Getting  Out  &  About......................................................................................6 Hobbies,  Clubs  &  Associations.....................................................................12 Take  a  break..................................................................................................13 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness..............................................................................14 Our  Furry  Friends..........................................................................................16 The  Great  Outdoors......................................................................................18 French  Life,  Food  &  Drink.............................................................................20 French  Adventures.......................................................................................24 Motoring.......................................................................................................25 Communications...........................................................................................26 Building  &  Renovation..................................................................................29 Business,  Finance  &  Property.......................................................................34

THIS MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS   79  Renovations........................................................................................30 A  La  Bonne  Vie  (Restaurant)................................................................... 20 Abattage  Service..................................................................................... 23 Abordimmo.............................................................................................39 Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)......................................................... 25 Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  D/Glazing).............................2 AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)................................................................... 31 Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)......................................................... 29 Andrew  Longman  (Plumber)...................................................................29 Andrew  Quick  Building  Services............................................................. 31 An  English  Nursery  in  France  (Garden  Centre).......................................19 Antiquites  Decoration  &  Galerie  du  309................................................ 6 Architect  anglais  en  France  (Vaughan  Abbott)...................................... 31 Art  Course,  Josie  Bounds........................................................................ 9 Blevins  Franks  Financial  Management  Ltd............................................. 35 Cafe  Cour  du  Miracle.............................................................................. 22 Café  des  Belles  Fleurs............................................................................. 20 Chris  Bassett  Construction..................................................................... 32 Chris  Dwyer  (Handyman)....................................................................... 30 Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)......................................... 6 CSB  Construction.................................................................................... 30 Cut  46  (Hair  Salon).................................................................................. 15 Dave  Bowring  (Electrician)..................................................................... 32 D  J  Maintenance  (Handyman)................................................................ 30 Dave  Rosenberg  (Carpenter/Joiner)....................................................... 30 David  Watkins  (Chimney  Sweep)........................................................... 32 deVere  Group  (Financial  Advisors)......................................................... 37 Energie-­‐79............................................................................................... 29 Fresco  Interiors  (Interior  Design)............................................................33 Garage  Planchet  (Renault)......................................................................26 George  Rayner  Computers..................................................................... 26 Hair  by  Janet........................................................................................... 15 Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers)........................... 32 Homes  in  France  (Estate  Agent)..............................................................39 Insink  Plumbing...................................................................................... 29 John  Etherington  (Home  and  Garden)................................................... 18 John  Snee  (Groundworks  &  Septic  Tanks).............................................. 34 John  Spray  Maçonnerie  (Stonemason).................................................. 32 Julie’s  Cleaning  Services......................................................................... 37 Keith  Bassett  General  Building  Services................................................. 31 La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier)....................... 33 La  Grande  Galerie................................................................................... 6 La  Joie  de  Vivre....................................................................................... 7 Le  Forgeron  (Ornamental  Ironwork).......................................................32 Le  Logis  (Rare  Breed  Pigs  in  France)....................................................... 21 Leggett  Immobilier.................................................................................. 38 Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort  (Horse  Riding  School  &  Livery)........................ 16 Man  &  Van.............................................................................................. 26 Michael  Glover  (Plasterer,  Renderer  &  Tiler)......................................... 32 Michael  Hobson  (Painter  &  Decorator).................................................. 33 MKR  Mobile  Beauty................................................................................ 14 MS  Electrique  (Electrician)..................................................................... 33 Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances............................................................ 26 Nathan  Foster  Building  Services............................................................. 31 Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology)...................................................14 Phil  Savage  (General  House  Repairs)......................................................33 Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire)............................................................... 34 Plombiere  Anglais  en  France  (Plumber)................................................. 29 Poitou  Property  Services.........................................................................37 Premier  Autos  -­‐  Mike  Lane  (Mechanic).................................................. 25 R&A  Services  (Renovation)..................................................................... 30 RDK  Roofing  &  Building  Services............................................................ 32 Red,  White  &  Blue.................................................................................. 22 Restaurant  des  Canards.......................................................................... 22 Rob  Berry  (Plasterer).............................................................................. 33 Robert  Walker  Plomberie  (Plumbing,  Heating,  Air  con)........................ 30 Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)................................ 27 Satellite  TV  (Nigel  Gubb)........................................................................ 26 sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Groundwork  &  Construction).................................33 Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)................................................................... 36 Soul  to  Sole  Holistic  Therapy.................................................................. 15 Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)................................................ 34 Steve  Enderby......................................................................................... 33 Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation).......................................... 8 The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre................................................25 The  Market  (Luché-­‐sur-­‐Brioux).............................................................. 7 Total  Renovation  Services  (Michael  Dominey)....................................... 29 Trisha  Mobile  Hairdresser................................................................. 15 VMP  (Windows  &  Doors)........................................................................2 Page 3


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

What’s On... September 2012 1st September  -­‐  4th  Annual  Produce  Show From   10am   at   Logis   du   Thail,   nr   St   Aubin   le   Cloud.   Email:ljdp@hotmail.co.uk 1st  September  -­‐  Bilingual  Quiz  with  meal At   ‘The   Market’,  Luché  sur   Brioux.     For   more  details   please  see   advert  on  P.7. 7th  September  -­‐  Jazz  Blues  Night At  A  La  Bonne  Vie  Restaurant  from  7.30pm.  See  ad  on  P.20. 8th  September  -­‐  The  DSM  Trade  Fair/Foire  Commerciale At  La  Salle  Alauna  21,  lac  des  Effres,  79130  Secondigny.   10.30am   to   6pm.  45+  exhibitors,  live  music,  Fish  &  Chips,  Bacon   butties,   bar,   refreshments,   cakes,   demonstrations,   pony   rides,   bouncy  castle...and  lots  more!  Contact  Sarah  on  05  49  70  26  21. 9th  September  -­‐  Fun  Dog  Show At  St   Pardoux,  79310  from  10am.  Dog  classes,  assorted  trade  &  craft   stands,  have-­‐a-­‐go  archery,  fish  n’chips  +  more.  See  P6.  for  details. 13th  September:  French  conversation  class At   the  Language  Centre,  The  Market,  Luché  sur  Brioux.     See  advert   on  P.7. 14th  September:  Music  Quiz At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    See  P.20. 15th  &  16th  September:  Patrimoine 15th  September  -­‐  Autumn  Vegetable  Show  &  Competition At  the  Salle  des  fetes,  Chatain.     Categories  will  include  vegetables,   fruit,   flowers,   jams,   chutney,   cakes   and   children’s   section.     Refreshments  available.    For  more  info   contact  Susan  Brice  on   05   49  87  60  21. 15th  September  -­‐  Make  Your  Own  Cards With  The  Craft  Cabin,  at  The  Market,  Luché  sur  Brioux.    See  details   on  P.7. 15th  September  -­‐  Live  Music  with  G.P.S At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    See  P.20.  for  more  info. 20th  September  -­‐  Band  In  The  Attic Performing  at  A  La  Bonne  Vie  Restaurant.  See  advert  on  P.20. 28th  September:  Music  Quiz At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.    See  P.20. 26th  September  -­‐  Demonstration  enabling  self-­‐medication  in  Equines. At   Les  Ecuries  du  Saumort.    Please  call  05  49  05  30  75  for   more   informalon.   30th  September  -­‐  Big  Book  Fayre Over   3000   books   in   English.   At   Paperback   Jan’s,   Ferrier-­‐   en-­‐ Parthenay.  See  P.6. 22nd  &  23rd  September  -­‐  Relais  de  la  Vie La  Ligue   Contre   le  Cancer/Cancer   Support   Deux   Sèvres.  24  hour   rally  at   Melleran   in   memory  of   those   that   lost   their   battle   with   cancer.  (www.relaispourlavie.net/deux-­‐sevres) 23rd  -­‐  30th  September  -­‐  Cancer  Support  Awareness  Week. Eve nt s   t h ro u g h o u t   D e u x-­‐ S è v re s .   Fo r   d eta i l s   e m a i l   ivan7thelma@wanadoo.fr   24th  September  -­‐  Coffee  Afternoon. At   Vue  de  Vallée,  Le  Bernerie,  85120,  St   Hilaire  de  Voust.  2pm  to   4pm.  For  map  email  robbell16@orange.fr.  In  aid   of  Cancer  Support   Deux  Sèvres.

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

What’s Coming Up... 5th -­‐  7th  October  -­‐  Hope  Association  Book  Sale 10am  to  3pm   at  The   Salle  des  Fetes,  Clussais   la  Pommeraie,   79190.  See  PX  for  more  info. 6th  -­‐  14th  October  -­‐  Pomm  ‘Expo,  Secondigny This  years  theme:  ‘Water’.  More  info  next  month. 7th  October  -­‐  Fetes  des  Plantes Around  the  Chateau  grounds,  Bressuire.   10am  -­‐  6pm.    Please   see  P.X  for  more  details. 8th  &  9th  October  -­‐  Exposition  de  champignons. At  La  Courde.  See  P.X  for  more  details.

Monthly services   in   the   English   speaking  Anglican   Church   in   Deux-­‐Sèvres Jassay The   Chaplaincy   of   Christ   the   Good   Shepherd,   Poitou-­‐ Charentes,    has  a  Home  Group  Service  at  Jassay    commencing  at   11.00am  on  every  2nd   Sunday  in   the  month.  It   is   held   at   the   home   of   Ann   White,   a   warm  welcome  awaits  everyone  for   a   time  of  worship  and  fellowship. St Leger The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also  holds  services  on  the  1st  Sunday  of   each  month  at  10.30am   at  St  Leger  near   Melle.  After  each  service,  tea  or  coffee  is  served   and  an  opportunity  to  meet  other  people  in  the  area. Parthenay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also  holds  services  on  the  4th  Sunday  of  each  month  at  10.30am   in   the   Presbytery   Rooms,   rue   de   la   Citadelle,   Parthenay,   opposite   St   Croix   Church.   After   each   service,  tea   or   coffee   is   served   and   everyone   is   invited   to   a   'bring   and   share'   lunch.   Further   details  about  venue  and  services  consult  our  website  on   www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com

Monthly services  in   the   English   speaking   Anglican  Church  in  the   Vendée: Puy de Serre All   Saints,  Vendée  holds  two  services  each  month,   on   the  2nd  and   4th   Sundays  at   the  church   of   St.  Marthe,   Puy   de   Serre,  at   11am.     After   each  service,  tea  and   coffee  is  served  in  the   parish  room  and   everyone  is  invited  to  a  ‘bring  and  share’  lunch. Other  services  are  held  in   the  west  of  the  Vendée,  in  La  Chapelle   Achard  and  La  Chapelle  Palluau.     For  details  of  these,  please  check   the  website:    www.AllSaintsVendee.com.

A VERY  WARM  WELCOME  awaits  you  at  ESCOVAL   (The  English  Speaking  Church  of  the  Valley  of  the  Loire).     Communion  Services  are  held  on  the  3rd  Sunday  of  each  month   at   La  Chapelle  de  la  Bonne  Dame  de  Ranton  at  11.30am  followed  by  a   Bring  and  Share  lunch.   Full   details   of   how   to   find   us   may   be   found   on   our   website   at:   www.escoval.org   or   please  telephone   us   at:  05  49  66  79   14.     Our  GPS  address  is  46˚59'25.30  N    0˚02'06.22  W.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY                                                                                              

                                                                         

Open 6-8p                                    La            Vendee  Chippy m                                                          Traditional  Fish  &  Chips  in  France!

Paperback Jan Books  in  English

1st Sept:      Cafe  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole.  10am-­‐12.30pm 1st  Sept:    Garden  &  Produce  Show,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud.  1-­‐5pm 2nd  Sept:  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  2pm-­‐4pm 4th  Sept:    Pizzeria  Resto  Bar,  Bressuire.  2.30pm-­‐4.30pm 5th  Sept:    Cafe  Cour  de  Miracle,  Vouvant.  2.30pm-­‐4.30pm   6th  Sept:    Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud.  2pm-­‐5pm 6th  Sept:    Bar  La  Cabane  de  Vouhé,  Vouhé.  6.30-­‐8pm 7th  Sept:      Le  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges  sur  l’Autize.  4pm-­‐6pm 8th  Sept:      ‘The  DSM’  Trade  Fair,  Secondigny. 9th  Sept:      Fun  Dog  Show,  St  Pardoux. 13th  Sept:  Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie.  2pm-­‐5pm 14th  Sept:  Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay.  11am-­‐4pm 27th  Sept:  Joie  de  Vivre,  Moncoutant.  2pm-­‐5pm 30th  Sept:  Big  Book  Fayre  11am-­‐4pm For  more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

+ a

little something extra...

Anyone who fancies seeing their writing prowess in print, could think about writing a book review for the spot on Page 11: ‘YOUR Book Reviews’. Sarah is always looking for budding authors to write a piece about 150 words long, describing their take on a particular book. I am offering a prize of one free book to anyone who is successful in having their review printed.

Wednesdays (Sept 5th, 12th, 19th, 26th) Bar ‘Auberge le St Vincent’, St Vincent Sterlanges Thursdays (Sept 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th) Bar ‘La Rando’, Mervent. Fridays (Sept 7th, 14th, 21st & 28th) Bar ‘Au Bon Coin’, Thoursais Bouildroux For more  info  please  email:  lavendeechippy@hotmail.fr

Open 6-8p m

Fish 4 Chip Fish, Chips & mushy peas!

Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket) Tel: 06 37 53 56 20, or visit: www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

Reel Fish & Chips Traditional English style Fish & Chips

To find  out  the  latest  information  try:   www.vide-­‐greniers.org  or

5th Sept: The Canteen, Etusson. 18H30 - 21H00 7th Sept: Bar Tabac PMU, Bouille-Loretz. 18H30 - 21H00 9th Sept: Fun Dog Show, St Pardoux 12H30 - 14H30 14th Sept: Bar Tabac, Genneton 18H30 - 21H00 15th Sept: Cafe des Sports, l’Absie + Fayre 18H30 - 22H00 19th Sept: The Canteen, Etusson. 18H30 - 21H00 20th Sept: St Martin de Sanzay 18H30 - 21H00 30th Sept: Jan’s Big Book Fayre, La Ferriere - - 12H30 - 14H30

www.rendezvousduchineur.unblog.fr

Tel: 06 04 14 23 94, or visit: www.reelfishandchips.net

There are  lots  of  Vide  greniers  taking  place   around  the  region.

Local Markets Tuesdays:

Wednesdays: Thursdays: Fridays: Saturdays:

Sundays:

• Lencloitre (1st Monday in month) (dept.86) • Lezay • Coulonges-sur-l’Autize • Thouars • Parthenay • Sauzé Vaussais • Niort • Thouars • Melle • • • • • •

Chef Boutonne Airvault Niort, St. Maixent l’École Fontenay le Comte Neuville (dept.86)

Mr T’s Friterie Plat à Emporter Traditionnel Britannique

With regular venues at:

• Beauvoir-sur-Niort • Loulay • Melle

• St. Hilaire de Villefranche • St. Jean d’Angély

See www.frying2nite.com for details or call 06 02  22  44  74

Photo: Lisa Roberts

Mondays:

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2012 (remaining): Thursday 1  November........... All  Saints’  Day  (La  Toussaint) Sunday  11  November............ Armistice  Day  (Jour  d’Armistice  1918) Tuesday  25  December........... Christmas  Day  (Noël)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Getting Out & About...

page 66 Page


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

THE HOPE  ASSOCIATION

HELPING ANIMALS  IN  NEED

THREE  DAY  BOOK  SALE  to  be  held  at  the   SALLE  DES  FETES,   79190  CLUSSAIS  LA  POMMERAIE   (D45  Sauzé  Vaussais  to  Lezay  Road)

FRIDAY  5th,  SATURDAY  6th  &   SUNDAY  7th  OCTOBER Doors  open  10am  to  3pm.    

Lotto prizewinner at the Strawberry Afternoon Tea party. The first prize for the lotto was presented to the winner by local artist, Mr H Dwight, who donated the painting for the Strawberry Afternoon Tea event in aid of Cancer Relief and Breast Cancer at The Market, Luché sur Brioux. More of Fred's paintings can be viewed and purchased at The Market.

THOUSANDS OF  ENGLISH  AND  FRENCH  BOOKS   FOR  JUST  1  EURO  EACH.   BRIC  A  BRAC~JULES  HALL  WITH  HER  LOVELY  SCARVES  AND   SPICES~EDDIE  GRIFFEE  WITH  HER  AMAZING  SELECTION  OF   GREETINGS  CARDS~LAURA  WALKER  SHOWING  HER   STUNNING  HAND  MADE  JEWELLERY~RAFFLE ~REFRESHMENTS  WITH  YUMMY  HOME  BAKED  CAKES ~ENGLISH  FISH  &  CHIPS~BACON  BUTTIES  and   much  much  more  to  enjoy! ALL  MONEY  RAISED  FROM  THIS  EVENT  WILL  GO  TO  HELP   ANIMALS  IN  NEED  AND  SUPPORT  OTHER   ANIMAL  ASSOCIATIONS If  you  have  books  to  donate,  please  email:      

givebooks4hope@gmail.com      

Visit our  website  www.hopeassoc.org

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

English words in the French language?

by Sue  Burgess

Surely not,  I  hear  you  say.  Mais  oui  !    Here  are  some  English  words   that  you'll  often  hear  on  the  streets  of  Deux-­‐Sèvres. • «Le  week-­‐end»:  The   French   have   actually  used   this  term  since   the  1920s.  You  may  also  hear • «partir  en   week-­‐end»  to  mean  going  away  for  the  weekend.  Note   that  «le  week-­‐end»    has  a  hyphen!   • «Un   leader»:   You   can   talk   about   «un   leader   sportif»   or   «un   leader  politique». • «Cool»:    If  you  like  something:    «C’est  cool  !» • «Surbooké»:   If   you're   very  busy,   you   are   «surbooké».     «Je   ne   peux  pas  cette  semaine,  je  suis  surbooké»  .

Vocabulary /  Vocabulaire English   words   used   in   French   and   found   in   Larousse   French   dictionary. English  word  used  in  French Traditional  French  Word Le  week-­‐end  

La fin  de  la  semaine

Le brainstorming  

Le remue-­‐méninges

Le barman  

Le serveur  au  comptoir

un best-­‐seller  

Un gros  succès  commercial

bluffer  

tromper par   des   faux-­‐semblants,   par  des  bluff

Law nº   94-­‐665   of   the   4th   August   1994   relating  to   the  use   of   the   French  Language  is  better  known   as  the  Toubon  law.     Toubon  was  at   that   time  Minister   of  Culture.  The   law  has   three   objectives   :     to   enrich   the   French   language,   to   make   the   usage   of   the   French   language   compulsory,  to  defend   French   as  the  official  language  of   the  French  Republic.

le boss

chef, patron

un check-­‐up  

un bilan  de  santé

le fast-­‐food

la nourriture   cuite/preparée   rapidement

le ferry

shortened  form  of  le  ferry-­‐boat

The law   primarily   wanted   to   ensure   the   use   of   the   official   traditional  French  words  rather   than  all  the  anglicisms  which  were   creeping   into   the   French   language.   However,   the   law   was   considerably   watered   down   after   an   appeal   before   the   Conseil   Constitutionnel  who  declared  that   the  law  was  contrary  to   the  right   to  free  thought  and  expression  which  is  so  important  in  the  French   constitution   and   declared   that   the   law   could   only   regulate   the   choice  of  language  in  public  services.  

le hot-­‐dog  

un sandwich   à   la   saucisse   de   francfort  

une interview    

un entretien

un job

un travail   rémunéré   souvent   temporaire

le know-­‐how

le  savoir-­‐faire  les  connaissances

un leader  

un chef,  la  personne  à  la  tête

le marshmallow    

la guimauve

le marketing  

le mercatique

un penalty  

un  pénalité

le roller  

le patin  à  roulettes

faire du  shopping  

courir les  magasins

un thriller

un film  d’épouvante

le toast  

le pain  grillé

Several English  words,  such   as  those  given   above,     therefore  have   their  rightful   place  in   the  French  dictionary.  Others  are  commonly   used  without  in  fact  being  officially  part  of  the  French  language. To   be   sure   your   French   is   up-­‐to-­‐date   and   not   «dépassé»   or   «démodé»,   here   are   some   commonly   used   English   words   you'll   hear  on  the  street  but  won't  find  in  the  dictionary...  yet! • «Yes»:  Don't   be   surprised   if   someone   replies   to   your   question   with   «Yes».   It's   very   popular   among   younger   generations   especially  to  show  enthusiasm. • «News»:   If   you   want   to   catch   up   with   a   friend,  you   can   say:   «Donne-­‐moi  de  tes  news.»

‘The DSM’ Monthly Photograph Competition

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY UP

DAT

Notes from the North

About this course:

What will   be   learnt   during   the   course,   what   are   the   learning   goals?  You   will   learn  more   about  the  work  of  Henri  Matisse  and   Vincent  Van  Gogh  whilst  enjoying  the  opportunity  to  work  in  their   style.  It's   a  great   way  to  pick  up  painting  techniques   and  increase   your   knowledge   of   art   history   with   artist   and   lecturer   Josie   Bounds.   What  level  is  the  course  and  what  skills  or  knowledge  are  needed   before  enrolment?  All  levels.  Some  experience  of  painting  may  be   useful  but  not  a  requirement.   What   opportunities  for  further  learning  and   progression   routes   does   the   course   offer?   Further   reading   and   gallery   visit   suggestions.   Subject  areas: Art   History,  Appreciation   Of   Art   /   Specific   Artists,   Painting   (Art),   Drawing  (Art). Materials: Note  pad  and  pen,  Internet  access.

About the artist:

I studied  Fine  Art  at  The  University  of  Northampton  and  graduated   in  2008   with  a  BA  (First  Class  Honours)  in  Fine  Art.  I  am  passionate   about   all   aspects   of   art   especially  painting,  printmaking   and   art   history.   I   get   my   inspiration   from   many   places   and   carry   a   notebook  with   me   to   sketch   and   write   down   my  ideas,   as  I  am   afraid  they  will  float  away  as  quickly  as  they  arrive.  There  are  many   artists  I  admire  throughout  the  19th,  20th  and   21st  centuries,  for   example   Van   Gogh,   Henri   Matisse,   Gerhard   Richter   and   Ian   McKeever. Following  my  degree   I   have  been   lecturing  fine  art   at   University   College   Milton   Keynes   and   in   that   time   my   work   has   been   exhibited  with  other  artists  and  in  solo  shows.

August is  a  quiet   month   for   the  Northern   Section   of   the  Poitou-­‐ Charantes  Linazay  Branch   of  the  RBL.    Many  of  us  have  friends  and   family  visiting,  or   even  taking  breaks  ourselves.     During  this  time   we  are  also  aware  that  many  British  Veterans  and  their  families  still   need   our   help,  and   this   is  our   main   reason   for   holding  functions   and   events,  to  fill   the  coffers  for   the   welfare  work  that   is   carried   out  locally  and   in  the  UK.    The   RBL   in  France   is  very  busy   with   its   welfare  work,  and   here  in  Poitou-­‐Charantes  we  have     caseworkers   who  respond   to   requests  for   aid,  not   only  financially  but   also  by   offering  the  hand  of  friendship,  where  and  when  needed. In   the   coming  month  the   Northern  Section  of  the  Branch   will   be   attending  the  Liberation  Parade  in  Parthenay  on  6th  September   at   18.00   hrs.     Our   stand   will   be  at   ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’  Trade   Fair   in   Secondigny   on   the   8th   September,   and   finally   on   30th   September,  representatives  will     be   at   Paperback  Jan’s   “Big  Book   Fayre”   in   Le-­‐Ferrier-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  and   will   run   the  Horse   Racing,   tombola   and,  once  again,  our  representatives  will   be   there  should   you  wish  to  join  us.   Our   plans   for   the   future   are   being   formulated   as   I  write  this  piece  and   look   to   be   interesting,   with   two   trips   to   a  vineyard   on  the   edge   of   the   Loire   region,   and   looking  even   further   ahead   to   our   Christmas   lunch   and   the   Branch   AGM   in   Linazay.     Not  to  mention  the  most   important   event   in   the   RBL   calendar   –  the  launch   of  the  POPPY   APPEAL  on  the  14th  October,  2012. We   are   always   pleased   to   welcome   if   you   would   like   to   become   a   please  come   and   visit   us   at   one  of   also  have  a  look  at  our  website.

new members,   and   member   of     the  RBL   the  events  above,  and  

One final   note:    the  second  prize  from  the  British   Day  has  yet  to  be   claimed,   the   wining   number   was   92,   if   you   have   that   number   please  contact  us.   Terri  Laverick,  PRO  Northern  Section.

Currently I   am   exploring   how   to   achieve   a   black   matt   velvety   surface,   and  how  the  relationship  of   this  surface  responds  to   one   with   opacity   and   transparency,   like   Pierre   Soulages   black   has   become  the  basis  of  my  palette,  my  exploration  of  one  colour  is  an   investigation  of  values  changing  a  surface.   For  further  information  please  contact  Josie  Bounds.  Tel:  05  49  06   58  89  or  email:  josiebounds1@me.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Three Plus One - the scoop!

what type  of  music   you  are  going  to  perform.  (i.e.  Blues,  Jazz,  Rock,   Pop,  Soul  music).

‘Three Plus One’ will be one of two bands playing for us at ‘The Deux-Sèvres Monthly’ Trade Fair on the afternoon of 8th September. Here, Trevor shares all with us!

We perform  60s   Pop   music,  primarily  because  we  are  all  of  an   age   that   were  around  at   that  time,  plus   the  majority  of  our  audiences   are   also  around   the   age   that  remember   and   enjoy  the   music   we   play.  

So who are Three Plus One?

Jim and   I  met  in     2003.    Jim  lived  close   by  and   we  soon  realised  we   shared  the  same  interests... Jim  has  played  with  several  top  name  bands  in  the  UK,  both  as  bass   and   lead   guitar   and   has   played   with   a   number   of   top   named   professional  artists  too. At   first,  Jim   found   it   difficult   to   find   like-­‐minded   musicians   who   were   prepared   to   play  for  the  love  of  music   and  enjoy  playing  in   rehearsal  bands  and  not  just  for  the  money.     I  have  played  bass  for  50  years  in  all  sorts   of   bands  in  the  UK.    Pop,   country,  blues  and  the  music  I  love  most  is  60s  soul   music.  The  last   band   I  played  with   before  I  came  to  France  was  a  15   piece  60s  soul   band  with  a  full   6  piece  brass  section,  3  female  singers,  a  male  front   man,  keyboards,  drums  and   3  guitars.   If  anyone  has  seen  the   film   ‘The  Commitments’  you  will  know  what  I  mean. Our   first  Band  in  France  was  “The  French  Connection”  which     I'm   sure  many  of   you   will   be  familiar   with.  I  was  the  original  founder   and   worked   with  them  in  the  early   years  getting  established.    But   as   with   all   bands   there   were  some   conflicts   of   opinion   and   Jim,     our  then  drummer  Richard  and  I  went  our  separate  ways.     French   Connection   are  still  playing  today  and  we  are   all  still   on  good  terms   and  still  go  to  each  others  gigs.   Jim   and   I   met   Mike   and   formed   an   acoustic   band   doing   small   quieter   gigs,  playing   50s/60s   early   blues   music   in   a   band   called   ‘Troubladour’.    We  still  do  the  occasional  venues.   We  met  Helen  and  Geoff  earlier   this  year   who  are  now   the  other   members  of  our  new  band,     ‘Three  Plus   One’.    They  came  to  live  in   France   after   travelling   in   and   around   Spain   and   Portugal   occasionally  singing  in  bars  and  hotels  and  charity  venues,  but  have   now  put   down   roots  in   France.  Helen   has  many   years   experience   singing   with   bands   in   the   UK   since   the   early   70s   and   Helen’s   husband  Geoff’s  roots  are  with  folk  music.   Although   we   now   use   some   backing   tracks   to   enhance   our   p e r fo r m a n c e s ,     fo r   additional   sounds   like   brass,   piano,   and   other   s p e c i a l   e f fe c t s ,   t h e   majority   of   music   played   is  by  the  band.      

What do you do to prepare for a Gig?

To turn  up  and  play  looks  easy  but  what  goes  on  behind  the  scenes   is  quite  a  lot   of  hard  work  by  all  bands  to  make  the  evening    a  great   gig.   Initially,   buying   the   gear.   Guitars   range   from   £100   to   £1000.   Amplification  is  very  expensive  too,  a  good  PA  system  could   set  you   back  £700  plus.    Then  the  guitar  amplification  can   be  £1000   plus.   Drums   are  expensive   also,  often   £1000  plus  for   a  decent   kit   with   some  cymbals  alone  costing  over  £1000. The   average  band   standing  on   stage   could   well   have   equipment   worth     over  £5000.  Having  the  gear   is  great   but  then  you   have  to   practice   and   that's   the   hard   bit,  also   knowing   what   to   play  and  

We practice   twice  a   week  for   around   3  hours  each  time,  running   through   new  numbers,   perfecting  and   tweaking  old  numbers  and   putting  forward  new  ideas  for  songs  to  make  the   evenings  go  with   a  swing.     We  do  two,  one  hour  sets  with  around  35   songs  in  total,   but  we  can  do  more  if  required.   The   same   preparations   go   into   performing   at   small   private   functions  as  well  as  for  the  larger  venues. ‘Three   Plus   One’   will   put   everything   into   making   the   evenings   entertainment  enjoyable  as  well   as  afternoon  BBQs,  Weddings,  or   parties. To  contact  the  band  phone  Trevor  on  05  49  64  57  17  or  Jim  on     05  49  72  81  56  to  discuss  your  requirements. We  look  forward  to  helping  you  have  a  great  night.

Through the Lens Group The ‘Through   the   Lens   Group’   was   formed   in   2007   by   a   number   of   people   interested   in   photography   living   in   the   Vendee  and  Deux-­‐Sèvres. The   Group   currently   meets   on   the   last   Monday   in   each   month   to   discuss   various   topics  relating   to   photography.     In   order   to   encourage   members   t o   u s e   their   cameras   and   improve   their   photography,   we   hold   a   monthly   competition   which   is   judged   informally   within   the   group.     Recent   topics   covered   were   ‘water’  and   ‘people’  and  topics  scheduled  for  the  next  few  months   include  ‘black  and  white’,  ‘shapes  and  textures’  and  ‘after  dark’. We  can  also  provide  information  and  assistance  for  those  taking  up   the   hobby   for   the   first   time,   or   those   wishing  to   improve   their   skills.  In  addition,  trips  to  places  of  photographic  interest  are  also   arranged  on  a  regular  basis. In   recent   years   we  have   exhibited   our   work  in  the  Café  Cour   du   Miracle   at   Vouvant   and   held   exhibitions   in   Bazoges-­‐en-­‐Pareds,   Vouvant  and  Bressuire. So  if  you  are  thinking  about  taking  up  a  new  hobby  in  photography,   or   wanting   to   know   more  about  the  subject,  then   why  not  come   along  to  one  of  our   monthly  meetings.  Being  such  a  friendly  group   we  don’t  even  ask  you  to  pay  to  join.     For  further  information  contact  : Ian  Gawn:  02  51  00  84  52          or      Brian  Preece:  05  49  72  09  94

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY It’s hard   to   become   a   successful   author,  but   local   writer   Alison   Morton  has  done  just  that,  successfully  publishing  several  titles. We   are   thrilled   to   print   a   series   of   articles   written   by  Alison   to   help  all  you  budding  authors  out  there....here’s  the  first.

You’ve written your novel. What next?

cowboys out   there   on   the   publishing   frontier,   so   I   strongly   recommend  you   read  The  Independent  Publishing  magazine  online   at   http://mickrooney.blogspot.fr/p/author-­‐solution-­‐services.html     which   lists   and   reviews   the   good,   the   bad   and   the   really   too   horrible  to  describe. This  is  a   brief  overview.  Next  time,  I’ll  look  at  preparing  your  book   before  you  think  of  uploading  or  sending  it  off  to  an  agent.

Anybody who  completes  a  novel,  be  it  romance,  thriller,  historical,   science-­‐fiction,  crime  or   adventure   deserves  a  round  of  applause   for  the  sheer   hard  work   of   writing  it.  Generally  70-­‐100,000  words   long,   a   novel   takes   at   least   four   to   six   months  to   draft,  another   three  to  revise   and  a  further   three  to  polish.  And   that’s  if   you’re   doing  it   full-­‐time.  Normal   people  have  jobs,  children,  parents  and   lives  so  slog  on  for   years,  grabbing  a  few   precious  hours  when  they   can.   But  now  you’ve  completed  your  manuscript,  what  are  you  going  to   do   with   it?   Not   everybody  wants   to   publish.   Some   writers   take   enjoyment   from   the   process   of   constructing   and   writing   a   story,   others  write  it   for   family  and  friends.  But  many  have  a  desire  to  see   it  in  print   and  these   days,  digital   form.  It’s  the  most  thrilling  feeling   in   the   world   to   hold   a   copy   of   the   book  you’ve   written   in   your   hands. Today,   we’re   lucky   to   have   many   choices:   print,   e-­‐book,   formal   publication  through  an  agent   and   publisher,  DIY  or  self-­‐publishing,   assisted   publishing  and  partnership  publishing.  And  hybrid  and  co-­‐ operative  publishing  are  new  kids  walking  onto  the  block.   Traditionally,  a  writer  polishes  up  their  book,  runs  it  past  members   of   their   writing   group,   or   association,   asks   another   author   to   critique  it  and  then  submits  the  final   version  to  a  literary  agent  to   request   representation.  If   the   agent   takes   a   writer   on,  they  start   the   job   of   finding   a   publisher,   and   then   handle   all   business   arrangements   including   rights   and   royalties   and   negotiating   contracts   and   overseas   deals.  The   writer   then   divides  their   time   between   publicity   and   promotion   for   that   book  and   writing   the   next  one. As  it  becomes  increasingly  harder  to  be  accepted  by  an   agent,  and   with   publishers   no   longer   accepting   fiction   direct   from   authors,   writers  are  seeking  other  ways  to  publication.  Some  choose  the  full   DIY  route:  paperback  copies  printed  via  CreateSpace,  Lulu   or   other   POD   (Print   On   Demand)   companies   plus   an   e-­‐book   version   uploaded  direct  on  to  Amazon  for   Kindle  readers  and  Smashwords   for   Apple  iBookstore,   Barnes   &  Noble,   Sony   Reader   Store,   Kobo,   etc.  Authors  and  publishers  retain  full  control  over   how  their  works   are  published,  sampled,  priced  and  sold.  If  an   author  wants  to  give   it  away  for   free,  they  have  that  choice.  But  it’s  up  to  the  author  to   format  their  book,  design  a  cover  and    acquire   an   ISBN  number  so   their   book   can   be   distributed   through   retail   channels.     I   recommend   reading   Catherine   Ryan   Howard's   Self-­‐Printed:   The   Sane  Person's   Guide  to   Self-­‐Publishing  which  is  an   excellent  guide   for  both  print  and  ebook  DIY  publishing.   Two  things  are   indispensible  to   make  your   self-­‐published  book  of   the   same   high   standard   as   a   traditionally-­‐published   book:   firstly,   commissioning   a   structural   editor   who   will   look   at   the   content,   style  and   narrative   development   and  then  a  copy  editor   who  will   proof-­‐read   it;   secondly,   having   a   professionally-­‐designed   cover.   Graphic   designers   who   specialise   in   book   covers,   along   with   editors,  are  taking  on  much  more  work  from   self-­‐publishers   as  the   sector   grows.   And   so   are   author   service   companies   who   can   provide   a  range   of   support   from   simple  proofreading  though   to   managed   publication   and  book   marketing.  But   there  are   a  lot   of  

Alison Morton   writes   alternative   history   thrillers,   blogs   about   writing  and   Romans  at  http://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  and   is  a   member  of  the  Romantic  Novelists’  Association  and  the  Society  of   Authors.

YOUR Book Reviews... A  big  Thank  you  to  Lesley  Fraser  for  this  month’s  book  review. ‘My Dear, I wanted to tell you’ by Louisa Young In a bag of books loaned to me by a friend I chanced upon this book by Louisa Young, and am so pleased to have done so. In this moving story set in World War 1, Louisa Young tells of the terrible dilemmas and mental anguish suffered by not only the men who faced the ultimate sacrifice, but of characters she has brilliantly created from different classes and backgrounds, both male and female. The central story tells of the love between two young people who have to face the trauma and shocking reality of a terrible war and the poignancy and courage of how they choose to deal with the hand they have been dealt. In Nadine and Riley the author offers two really memorable and admirable individuals. She has also communicated with great clarity historic facts, details and descriptions. A World War I story is never going to be a lighthearted read but despite the theme I found it a positive one on several levels and thoroughly enjoyed the story due to Louisa Young’s really fascinating characters. It was definitely one of those I couldn’t put down as I was so anxious to know the outcome, and I can’t recommend it highly enough!

We would  love  to  show  more  of  YOUR  Book  Reviews.  If  you  would  like  to  share  one  with  us,   please  send  it  on  an  email  to:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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Hobbies, Clubs & Associations... The Filling  Station  Poitou-­‐Charentes On  Thursday  September  13th   2012,  we  are  meeting  at  The  Little   Stone   Church,   14b   Avenue   de   d’Hôtel   de   Ville.   79110   Chef   Boutonne,  Deux-­‐Sèvres. • Rev  Val  Inglis-­‐Jones  ~  speaking  on  PRAYER • 3pm  Workshop • 7pm  Worship  Celebration Drinks  and   cakes  will   be  available  before  the  evening   meeting.   ALL   WELCOME.   Interested   to   find   out   more?  Please  view   the   website:  www.thefillingstation.org.uk    or  locally   contact    Mike   Willis  05  49  87  89  16.  michael.willis@sfr.fr

Book Group....meeting 2nd Thursday of the

month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information.

Association Meridien Green We are  an   Anglo-­‐French   group   which  was  founded   in   2001   for   mutual  understanding  of  each  other's  language   and  culture.  We   meet  twice  weekly  in   the  Salle  des   Associations  in  St   Coutant,   79120.     The   best   way  to   find  out   more   is  to  visit  our  website  -­‐   www.meridiengreen.asso.fr  or  contact  Maureen  Dalby:   05  49  29  94  50. The  name   of   our  group   comes  from  the  fact   that  St   Coutant   is   on  the  Greenwich  Meridian!

CRAFT CAFE  CREATIF

If you enjoy sewing, knitting, crochet or any crafts, you are invited to bring along your current project to our venue in L’Absie and join a like-minded group of women, for friendship and to exchange ideas over a cup of tea. For further information contact: knight.margaret@orange.fr.

Anyone for  Tennis?

Tennis players   wanted,   reasonable   standard,   Secondigny  area.  Contact  Mick  Morris  on  05  49  65   17  16  or  email  mimorris@live.fr  

Language Group You  speak  french  (un   peu),  I  speak  english  (a  little  bit),  why  don't   we  meet  up  to  improve  each  language? One  hour  per  week  could   be  good  timing,  by  phone  or  for  coffee   mornings. I'm  retired,  living  in  Niort. Please  call  at  06  73  70   14  21  or  send   email  for  more  details:  joseph.aubineau@laposte.net.

Alone in  France?

We are  a  group   of  people  living  alone  in  the  L'Absie  area  who   meet  regularly  for   coffee  and  lunches.    We  meet  on  the  1st  and   3rd   Tuesdays   at   11am   for   coffee   at   the   Pause  cafe  in   L'Absie.     Our   lunches   are   at   different   venues   each   month.   There's   a   warm  welcome  if  you'd  like  to  join  us.   More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  4713.

Interlude16. An association offering ‘Leisure & Culture for all’. Lots of regular events organised. www.getogether-france.org

Secondigny Running Club... Put the bounce back in your step. Join our friendly and supportive running group. All abilities welcome. Email Kelly for more details: kellyencezelle@hotmail.co.uk

Anyone in   the   Le   Busseau   area   interested   in   Scalextric   racing   for   fun?  I  had  a  set   for   my  65th.  birthday,  but   playing   on   your   own  is  getting  boring!   Maybe  meet  once  a  month   for   a   bit   of   fun   and   a   beer?   Please   phone  Dave   Lowe   on   0549042198  or  email  dave4lowe@yahoo.co.uk Franglais  Thouars The   Thouars   ‘Franglais’   group,   (a   member   of   l’   Association   du   Centre   Socio-­‐Cultural   de   la   Communauté   de   Communes   du   Thouarsais)     meets   every  Wednesday  from   19.30h   to  21.00h,  in   the   Association’s   centre   at   7   rue   Anne   Desrays,   Thouars,   for   conversation  in  English  and  French. We   welcome   those   of   all   nationalities   who   would   like   to   participate.  Either  come  along  to  see  us  one  evening,  or  contact  us   at:  Mobile:    06  52  21  92  34  ~  Email:    jcbed@orange.fr

Please see website www.interlude16.org for more information.

2nd Sunday Motorcycle Club has a new club website! Check it out: www.2ndsundayclub.fr If you would like to attend our coffee mornings please contact us via the website........ New members always welcome!

The Harmonics based  in  the   Salle   d'Annexe   behind  

the mairie   in   Civray   are   looking   for   singers.   We   meet   each   Wednesday  from  2.00pm  to  4.00pm.  No  experience   necessary  just  a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.   We   sing   all   sorts   of  music,   from   stage   and   screen,   gospel,   classical,   country   songs,   madrigals   and  in  several   languages,  whatever   the  music  dictates.   We   support   charities  by   donations  or   by  participating   in  their   events  by   singing   for  them  and  each  year  we  hold  our  own  annual  concert.   We  are  a  small  and  friendly  group  who  would  love  to  meet  you.  

Contact: Dolly  Ait  Boualou:05  45  22  89  32 email  sylvia.murray@wanadoo.fr or Margaret  Gomersall  on   05  49  48  09  02,  email:  margaretgomersall@sfr.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Take a Break... Down: DSM Easy  Crossword! 1.   The  rear  part  of  a  ship  (4) 2.   Fisherman  (6) 3.   To  a  severe  or  serious  degree  (7) 4.   Mediterranean  island  (6) 5.   Hand   shears   for   cutting   sheet     metal  (5) 6.   Narrow  channel  of  the  sea  (6) 7.   Positioned  in  the  middle  (8) 12.   A   lorry   equipped   to   hoist   and   pull     wrecked  cars  (3-­‐5) 14.   Own  up  (7) 16.   Territory   over   which   rule   or   control     is  exercised  (6) 18.   The   essential   nature   of   a   person   or     group  (6) 19.   Road  surface  (6) 20.    Very  thin  (5) 23.   A  solemn  declaration  (4)

Across: 1. Has   the   use   of   sea’s   turbulence,     ends  up  in  maximum  security  (4,2,6) 7.   Clam  ate  urchin!  A  case  for  a     part-­‐timer?  (7) 9.   American   soldier   reversing   in   vehicle     goes  up  in  smoke!  (5) 10.   An   Irishman   with   energy   can     become  head  (4) 11.   Loud   monarch   involved   with     exceptional  dentist  (8) 12.   Very   crowded,   so   got   ready   to     leave?  (6) 14.   One   not   fully   qualified   drops   metal     off  inside  (6) 17.   Getting  off  a  vehicle   without  article     is  illuminating  (8) 19.   Rip  appears  as  result  of  upset  (4) 22.   Lost,   confused,   took   drug,   finally     nicked!  (5) 23.   Unusual  form  of  rabies  takes  time  to     get  householders  (3-­‐4) 24.   One   car   design   modified   for   not     achieving  top  speed  (2,6,4)

Down: Toughie Crossword! 1.   Keen   and   well   dressed,   but   can   be     grating  on  the  ear?   (5) 2.   Train  sloppily  in  football  club  with     desperate  result  (7)   3. Main   part   of   church   altered   in     cavernous  chimney  construction  (4) 4.   Anointing   following   13   down’s   final     refuge  act  in  passing  (7) 5.   More   than   one   below   par   finds     refuge  in  Southsea  Glee  Club  (5) 6.   Native   of   the   isles;   one   who   needs     good   housekeeping   to   get   to   south     coast  resort  (6) 8.   Sounds   like   the   correct   way   to     perform  a  ceremony?  (4) 12.   Apparently,   eastern   European   has     refined  manners?  (6) 13.   Drastic   result   of   short   time   in     former  regiment  (7) 15.   Lift   obtained   from   new   tee   in     unfamiliar  vale  (7) 16.   Wader   materialises   when   tide   is     heard?  (4) 18.   Force   applied   to   kind   of   horse     provokes  cry  of  pain  (5) 20.   Early,   before   this,   is   one   who   is     conscientious  and  merit’s  a  step  up  (5) 21.   Five   hundred   on   spot   for   absolute     beginning  (4)

Sudoku Corner... Easy

www.sudokupuzz.com

Hard

With thanks  to  M.Morris

Please see  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr  for  answers

Across: 8. Proprietor  (5) 9.   Largest  river  in  Asia  (7) 10.   Loud,  confused  and  empty  talk  (7) 11.   Folded  fabric  (5) 12.   Unlimited,  unending  (8) 13.   Heavenly  body  (4) 15.  Not  on  target  (4) 17.   Of  many  different  kinds  (8) 21.   Ballroom  dance  (5) 22.  A  very  intense  fire  (7) 24.   Dry  Italian  red  wine  (7) 25.   Elegant  and  stylish  (5)

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Health, Beauty & Fitness... By Terry Ryan

Taijiquan :  aka  Tai  Chi  Quan  (pronounced  :  tie  chee  chew  an)  is  well   known  as  an  ancient  system  of  movement,  originally  developed  in   China  as  a  martial  art.   Today  it  is  practised   by  many  people  for  the   health  benefits  that  it  can  bestow. From   a  casual  glance,  it   would   appear  to   be  simply  a  sequence  of   (usually)  slow  movements  that  link  one  posture  to  the  next  :

You could  be  forgiven  for  thinking  that   it  looks  so  slow,  relaxed  and   gentle,   that   its   health   benefits   would   be   negligible…but   you   couldn't  be  further  from  the  truth!   The   very   fact   that   the   movements   are   slow   requires   you   to   be   more   attentive   to   your   balance.    During   the   transitions  between   one  posture   and  the   next,  most  of  your   body  weight  will  be  borne   by   one   leg,   so   your   legs   muscles   will   feel   like   they've   been   exercised.   The  deep  abdominal  breathing  which  accompanies  the   relaxed  movements   helps  to  promote  the  flow  of  well-­‐oxygenated   blood  through  the  body  …  an  essential  requirement  for  health.   In  Chinese  terms,  your  chi  would  flow  throughout  your  body! The  benefits  of  Taijiquan  however  aren't  only  physical;  your   mind   will  become  fully  engaged  in  the  movements  as   you  become  more   and  more  relaxed  and  less  stressed. So,  perhaps  you'll   agree   that   Taijiquan   can   benefit   your   balance,   joints,  muscles  and   circulation  etc   as  well   as  reduce   the   tensions   within  your  body  and  your  mind.  

Satyananda yoga classes offer postures, breathing techniques, meditations and relaxation,taught by a bloke, for all, yes it is for us hardy creatures too! If you have discomfort in your body, find it difficult to move the breath to your abdomen, seem to live with your thoughts past and future and at times have areas of dullness that seem to last etc. We bend, stretch, twist and experience the body and it's energies... learn to be still, to move the breath, to be able to watch - Come and feel how these ancient teachings work to create  an easier flow in body, mind and emotions. Annual fee 68 euros

Although at   first   you'll   probably   find   that  your   movements   will   be   a w k w a r d   a n d   uncoordinated,   that   y o u r   b r e a t h i n g   i s   unsynchronised   etc.   gradually   you'll   find   t h a t   t h e s e   w i l l   disappear   and   your   m o v e m e n t s   w i l l   b e c o m e   m o r e   controlled  and  elegant   whilst  your  mind  will  become  more   relaxed. If   you'd   like   to   verify  these   claims  for  yourself,  why   not   try  the   beginners  classes! New  Taiji  classes  for  beginners  will   be  starting  in   September   2012  in  Bressuire.     Please  see    www.chentaiji-­‐fr.com  or  phone   me  on  05  49  65  60  34  for  further  details.

Classes start Thursday 6th September at ‘Maison pour tous’, L’Absie. 2.30pm - 4pm Contact Rysz for more info: 06 42 35 97 11

Visit our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Love Your Feet

by Suzanne  Thorne

Love them  or  hate  them   they  support  the  whole  of   our  body   weight   and   contain   more   sensitive   nerve   endings   than   anywhere  else  in  our  body.   The  skin  on  our   feet  is  thicker   than  anywhere  else  on  the  body  and   can   become   cracked   and   dry  and  sometimes   infected   but   with   a   few  simple  ‘steps’  we  can   help  keep   our   feet   looking  and  feeling   great. Just   by   doing   a   couple   of   simple   exercises   will   help   ease   the   tension  and  ache  in  feet  and  legs: • Roll  a  ball  back  and  forth  under  each  foot.  Do  this  sitting  at  your   desk. • Rotate  each  foot  ten  times  to  the  right  and  then  back  to  the  left. • Just   going  up   on   to  your   toes   and   back  down   again   takes   the   tension  from  legs  and  feet. • Next  fill  a  bowl  with  warm  water  (not  hot)   and  add  a  few   drops   of   aromatherapy  essential  oil   such  as   lavender  for  relaxation  or   tea  tree  which  is  anti-­‐fungal  and  anti-­‐bacterial.  Adding  half  a  cup   of  milk  to  the  water  helps  to  further  soften  hard  skin.   • Gently  exfoliate  the  dead  skin  around  the  heels  and  under   the   foot   where  hard  skin  may  have  formed  using  a  pumice  stone.  If   you  are  diabetic  or  have  circulatory  problems  you  should  always   check   with   your   health   practitioner   before   doing   this.   Remember  the  hard  skin  has  taken  time  to  develop  and  likewise   it   will   not   disappear   immediately   but   within   a   couple   of   feet   treats  like  this,  you  will  see  and  feel  the  difference. • Use   a   foot   scrub   and   massage   well   into   each   foot   and   rinse   thoroughly. • Dry  your   feet   ensuring  you  dry  in  between  the  toes  as  not  drying   properly  can  cause  fungal  infections. • Finally  massage  some  foot  balm  all  over   each  foot.  By  now  your   feet  should  already  be  looking  smoother  and  feeling  great. Independent  Consultant  Neal’s  Yard  Remedies Tel:  05  49  26  27  74  ~  www.blush-­‐rush.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Our Furry Friends... APPEAL

This is  Max,  a  very  friendly  young  Cocker  Spaniel  cross

Equine Rescue France Max is  a  lovely,  young  (about  18  months)  old  Cocker  Spaniel  cross   with  a  Red  Setter.     He  is  a  very  affectionate  dog  and  loves  nothing   better  than  to  play  all  day  long.     He  needs  a  family  friendly  home  with  the  company  of  another  dog   and   a   large   safe  enclosed  garden.  Max   is  very  good   with  people   and   gentle   with   children,   he   is   one   of   those   dogs   who   is   non-­‐ aggressive,  loves  his  food   and  at  the  end  of   the  day  collapses  in   a   big  red  heap  sound  asleep. Max  loves  travelling  in   a   car   and  is   learning  all  the  time.  You  could   not  find  a  nicer   animal  to  adopt.  We  do  not  know  what   he  is  like   with   cats,  but   he   is   young   enough   to   be   taught   to   leave   them   alone.    He  walks   well  on  the  lead  and   will   benefit  from  going  to   Puppy  classes. Max  has  been  castrated,  vaccinated  and  microchipped  and  we  are   asking  for  a  donation  to  cover  his  veterinary  costs.

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF. Please contact the Equine Rescue on Tel: 05 49 48 27 91 or visit our website www.equinerescue.org

HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF is  open   to   anyone   with   an  equine   interest.    You  do  not   need  to  own  a  horse!    We   meet  about   once  a  month  for   talks,   visits  etc.    Interested?

Useful website for LOST cats

He is   currently   being   fostered   in   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres   near   Sauzé-­‐ Vaussais  and  if  you  would  like  to  meet  him,  please  contact  Siobain   on  05  49  27  26  20  or  email  siobain.duckworth@wanadoo.fr  

Do you have an adorable furry friend? Then why not make him/her famous for a month?! Send us a photo and short comment to be featured here....

just for fun..

Spencer

We recently lost our beautiful grey, tabby cat ‘Spencer’ and someone suggested I post details on a website for lost cats in case someone had found him. www.chat-perdu.org Unfortunately our story doesn’t have a happy ending, but I wanted to share this website in case anyone has need for it, either now or in the future. It’s a very user-friendly site (all in French) and for both LOST and FOUND cats. There is also a similar site for dogs, www.chien-perdu.org

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Animal magnetism

by Nigel  Franks

Either you've   got  it  or  you  haven't.  I  reckon   we've  got  it...

We planned  to   get   away  in   July:  just  a   mid-­‐week   i n   a   holiday   park.   The   Friday   a‚ernoon   before   our   departure   we  had  to  deliver   a  cat  that  had  been  adopted.  On  the   way  we   saw  a  rather   unkempt   hen  pecking  by  the  side  of  the  road.  She   was   obviously  in  poor   condilon,  but  we  couldn't  stop  because  of   the  traffic. A‚er   delivering  the  cat   we  returned  by  the  same  route  and   sure   enough  the  hen  was  slll  there.  We  picked  a  safe  place  to  stop   and   a„empted  to  catch   her.  That   was   quite   easy  as  she  was  limping.   So  we  took  her  home. We  examined  her   to  make  sure  that  she  had  no  signs   of  injury  or   disease   and   put   her   in   a   spare   room   in   our   hen   house   for   quaranlne.   She  immediately  started  ealng  and  I  don't  think  she   stopped  for  3  days. That   evening   we  went   out   for   dinner  and   a‚er   the  meal,  on   the   way  home,  on   impulse,  I  didn't   take   the  usual   route.  When   we   reached   a  roundabout  we  saw   a   ki„en   standing  in  the  road   and   some   others   on   the   verge.   So   of   course   we   had   to   stop.   We   always   have   cat   and   dog   food   in   the   car,   so   we   put   some   crunchies   down   which   the   ki„ens   immediately   went   for.   This   made  them  easy  to  catch,  especially  as  they  were  quite  tame.  Of   course   we  didn't   have  a  cat  basket  in  the  car,  so  a  “Bag   for   Life”   was  pressed  into  service. Next   day  the  ki„ens  went   for   their   obligatory  stay  in   a  fourrière   and   we   took   the   hen   “Tracey”   to   the   vet   for   a   check   up;   She   confirmed   what   we   already   suspected,   that   Tracey   was   an   escapee  ba„ery  hen  from  a  truck  on   the  way  to   slaughter.  In  case,   you're   not   aware,  ba„ery  hens  are  generally  slaughtered  before   they   are   a   year   old,  because   they  have  a  season   when   they   lay   less,   which   means   that   it's   cheaper   for   the   farmer   to   slaughter   them  and  start  with  a  new  batch.  Tracey  was  limping  because  she   had  broken  her  leg  whilst  in  the  ba„ery  farm  and  it  had  healed  by   itself. Sunday  dawned  overcast,  drizzly  and  cool.   This  didn't   put   me   off   going  for  a  walk  in  the  a‚ernoon  and  I  was  rewarded  when  a  few   lmid   rays   of  sun   peaked   through   the   clouds.   A‚er   about   9  km   and  I'm  within   200m  of  my  car   when   I  nolce   a   small   hedgehog  

brought it  back  to   the  car   and   took  it   home  in   my  trusty   “Bag  for   Life”.

Tracey

Once home   Google   supplied   the  diagnosis:  hypothermia.   It   had   been   sunning   itself   in   an   a„empt   to   warm   up.   Google   also   supplied   feeding  and   care  instruclons.   To   get   some   idea   of   it's   age  to  determine  it's  food  requirements  I  weighed   it.  About   100g:   so  on   solids.   Solids  turned  out  to  be  lns  of  ki„en   food  and   then   puppy  food. This  was  the  evening  before  we  were  due  to  go  on  holiday  so  too   late   to   arrange   alternalve  care   for   “Harley.  So   Harley  came  with   us   on   holiday.   Two   things   we   learnt   about   hedgehogs   very   quickly...   the   “hog”   part   of   their   name   comes   from   the   noises   they   make.   And   when   you   change   their   diet   they   make   really   smelly  poo. Seven   weeks  later   and   Harley  is  a  mighty  370g  .   We're  going  to   progressively  introduce   him  back  to  the  wild  and  let   him  go   when   he's  about  600g,  so   we  keep  handling  to  the  minimum.  Just  take   him  out  of  his  cage,  weigh  him  and  put  him  back. Meanwhile   the   ki„ens   are   doing  well   in   a  foster   home   and   are   available  for  adoplon,  and  two   weeks  ago  Tracey  laid  her  first  egg   since  we  found  her.

Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 06 48 68 40 37

Email: nala85480@hotmail.com www.nosamislesanimaux.com

Harley

sunning itself   in   the   middle   of   the   track.   Humm   that's   a   bit   dangerous  if   a   cyclist  comes  along.  So  I  picked  it  up   and  put  it  to   one  side  of  the  track.  I   walked   on  a  few  metres  and   looked   back   at   it.  It   hadn't  moved.  I  also  realised  that  it  hadn't  even  curled  up   when  I  picked  it  up.  That  can't  be  right  so  I  went  back,  picked   it  up   again  and  

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

The Great Outdoors... Other news... We  have  started  weaning  the   gorgeous  little  rabbits  ready  for  sale,   They  are  so  cute  and  friendly.    We  are  also  excited  to  have  found  an   Owl  in  one  of  our   barns.  It’s  a  Barn  Owl  and  don’t  know  if  it  has   a   mate.  We  did  see  one  in  the  garden  last  year   and  often  have  heard   its  call  at  night.

Life on the Farm...

We had   another   French   Student   (Antoine)   who   lives   in   Gabon,   Africa  come  to   stay  recently    and  he  helped  us  make  a  new  chicken   house  for   Fred  (our   Rhode  Island  Red)  cockerel  and  his  two   wives.   Antoine   also   helped   us  convert   and   paint   the   old   chicken   house   and  made  a  big  run  for  our  four  new  geese. by  Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

As they  say   time   flies   when   you’re   having   fun   and   we  have   been  having  a  great  time  here  on  the  farm. The   first   of   our   bronze   turkey  poults   have   arrived   which  we  will   fatten  to   be   ready  for   the  Christmas  market.   We   have  had   some   reserved  already  for   Christmas  but   we  still   have  some  availability.     It   seems  a  long  way  off  but  the  way  this  year  is  going  it  will  be  on  us   before  we  know  it.    As  they  say  the  early  bird  catches  the  worm  but   in  our  case  the  early  bird  catches  a  tasty  free  range  turkey  for  their   Christmas   dinner   at  a  price   you   wont   believe.  Give  us   a  call   if  we   can  help.

It doesn’t  look  like  we’ll  be  getting  much  fruit  from  the  orchard  this   year.    The  blossom  was  blown  from    the  trees  just  after  it  appeared.   Such   a   shame  as   we  love  to   make  our   own  chutneys   and   jams   as   well   as   giving   the   excess   to   the   pigs.....oh   well,   there’s   always   next  year! Next   month   we   will   tell   you   all   about   our   beautiful   new   Chamois  goats.     Bye for now.

When our   duck   called   Dave   (who   turned   out   to   be   a   girl)   disappeared,  we  feared   the  worse.  Then  one  day  out   of   the  daisy   bush   she  popped,  waddled  over  to  get  some  food  and  a  quick  drink   and  back  into  the  daisies.    Yes  you’ve  guessed  it,  she  had  a  clutch  of   eggs  she  was  sitting  on.    She  is  now  a  proud  mum  of  6. Bianca   the   bantam   who   was   playing   mum   to   a   duckling   called   Chuck,   who   is   now   twice  the  size   of   her,  has   gone   broody   again.   This  time  she  has  chosen  chicken  eggs  to  sit  on.     More  chicks  and  two  ducks   have  arrived.  They  were  hatched  in  the   incubator.   It’s  really   strange  to   hear   them   cheep,  cheeping  even   though  they  are  still  in   the  egg.    It’s  time  already  to  say  goodbye  to   the  8  of  the  ducks,  they  will  be  heading  off  to  the  abattoir  soon.     We   said   “no   more”   but   couldn’t   resist   buying   two   more   Gloucestershire   Old   Spot   piglets   called   Curly   &   Wurly.   They   are   really  great  piglets  and  will  produce  great   pork  and  bacon  ready  for   Christmas.     They  have    settled  in  very  quickly  and  are  loving  being   free  range  with  lots  of  fresh  grass  and  room  to   run  and  play.    We  do   have  to  be  careful  they  have  enough   water  to   wallow  in  as  they  can   suffer  with  sunburn.  

Peter &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

Its’ nearly  time  for   two   of   the  others  to   “go”   and  we  will   also   be   cooking  a  whole  pig  in  a  pit  like  the  ‘Maoris’  do  for   a  special  party.   Unfortunately  we  can’t  get  banana  leaves  from  Super  U  so  will have  to  wrap  it  in  silver  foil  and  hessian  before  slow  cooking  in  a  pit   for   12  hours.   It’s  delicious   and  will  be  a  great  centre   piece   for   our   party   with   about   70  or  so  friends   and  family.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

THE AMATEUR GARDENER

by Vanda Lawrence

After all   that   wet   weather   isn't   it   lovely   to   see   the   sun?     Unfortunately,   the   rain   took   its   toll   and   lots   of   plants/veggies   suffered,   but   by  the  same  token   there   were   other   plants   which   seemed  more  than  happy  with   the   damper  conditions.    For   now   though   we  can   see   that   the  summer   bedding  and   perennials  are   beginning   to   slow   down.     Time   to   lift   the   annuals   which   have   finished  flowering  and  prepare  the  soil   for  winter  flowering  plants.     Cut  back  the  perennials  -­‐  in  some  cases  it  will  be  necessary  to  lift   and   divide  congested  clumps.    The  resulting  plants  that  you  have   no  room  for  can  always  be  passed  on  to  friends  and  neighbours.     Continue  to  feed  dahlias  fortnightly  with  liquid  fertiliser   to  produce   good   blooms   and   build   up   strong   tubers   for   subsequent   years.     Start  planting  daffodils  and  other  narcissus,  crocus,  iris,  lilies  etc  for   your  spring  displays  in  pots  and  borders. If   you   plan  to  plant   new  trees  or   shrubs   this  autumn,   or   need  to   move   shrubs   which  have   outgrown   their   space,  it's   time   to   start   preparing  the  soil  now  so  you  will  be  ready  to  plant  during  showery   weather.    The  same  thought  applies  if  you  are  planning  to  plant   a   new  hedge. There  is  always  something  to  do  in  the  vegetable  garden:     • Continue   to   lift   and   store   carrots,   potatoes,   beetroot   etc   and   plant  your  spring  cabbages.     • Céleri-­‐rave  can  be  lifted  as  required  during  this  month  but  by  the   middle   of  next   month  you  should   dig  the  last   of   them  up   on   a   nice  dry  day  so  they  can  sit   in  the  sun  for   a  few  hours.    Remove   leaves  and  store,  root  down,  in  boxes  of  sand  in  the  cave. • Sweetcorn  will  be  ready  now.    If  the  discarded  parent  plant  is  still   healthy   it  can   go   onto   the   compost   heap,  but  if   there  are   any   signs  of  disease   burn  the  plants  -­‐   the   resulting  ash  will   be  rich  in   potash  and  is  good  for  the  soil  around  your  fruit  trees. • Sow  autumn  spinach  now  (eg  Géant  d'Hiver)  for  cutting  any  time   during  November-­‐March. • Leeks  can  be  sown  up  until   mid-­‐September.     'Blaugruner  Winter'   or  'Verina'  for  example.    No  need   to  lift  and  store  them;     at  the   end  of  October  protect  the  soil  around  each  one  with  a  covering   of  about  20cm  of  dead   leaves  -­‐  you  will  then  be  able  to  dig  them   up  easily,  even  on  frosty  days. • A   second   sowing   of   sprouts   can   be   made   now   for   harvesting   next  March/April.    They  should  be  fine   so  long  as  we  don't  have   an  extremely  harsh  winter. • Parsnips  can  be  sown  now  ready  to  harvest  next  spring. • Calvo   nero,  also  known   as   black  cabbage   or   Tuscan  kale  can  be   planted  now.    A   very  versatile  vegetable  which   can  be  used  in   soups   but  is  equally  good   in  salads.     A  source   of  lutein,  vitamins   K,  A  &  C  and  significant  amounts  of  manganese,  copper,  calcium,   iron,  B  vitamins  &  with  plenty  of   fibre  -­‐  me  thinks  we  should  all   give  this  a  go! It's  also   a  busy  time  in  the  fruit   garden,  picking,  storing,   freezing,   bottling,   jam   &   chutney  making   ...   the   list   goes   on.     Sloes   are   plentiful   this  year.     You  can  make  Sloe  Gin   of  course,  but  Sloe  jam  is   said  to  be  delicious  and  with  a  tartness  very  much  like  blackcurrant   jam. Hopefully  we  shall  find  time  to  fit  in  some  of  these  gardening  jobs,   but   be   sure   to   make   time   to   sit   in   your   garden   and   enjoy   the   sunshine.                    See you next month ...

Contact ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

FÊTE DES PLANTES SUNDAY 7th OCTOBER CHATEAU GROUNDS, BRESSUIRE 10.00am – 6.30pm. Following the  success  of  the  first  Fête  des  Plantes   held   in   October   last   year   the   second   event,   organised   by   the   Rotary   Club   of   Bressuire   in   collaboration   with   «Les   Automnales   de   Bressuire»,   will   be   held   in   the  Château   grounds   at   Bressuire  on   Sunday  7th  October  between  10.00am  and  6.30pm. The  entry  fee  is  3€  (free  for  those  up  to  17). There   will   be  numerous  plant   stalls,   owned   by  both   English   and   French   nurseries,   providing   plants   for   sale   and   offering   their   advice.     In   addition   to   numerous   plant   stalls   there   will   be   a   number   of   other  attractions  including: An  exhibition  of  scarecrows A  photo  exhibition  in  the  Château  rooms Childrens’  entertainments Talks   on   restoration   of   the   château   and   the  municipal   gardens   within  the  château  grounds. • Various  food  and  drink  outlets   • • • •

P a t r i c i a B e u c h e r,   journalist,   broadcaster   a n d   g a r d e n i n g   a u t h o re s s ,   w i l l   b e   present  and  offering  her   observations  and  advice   as   to   how   to   avoid   stress  in  the  garden. For  further  information   Fête de plantes 2011 please  contact:     06  80  73  19  05

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Life, Food & Drink... Vive la Difference

by Gilly  Hunt  

Many of   us   when   we   move   to   France   miss   the   buzz   of   a   busy   shopping   centre,   the   crowds   of   people   (yes   some  of   us   do   miss   crowds)   and  the  enjoyment   of   sitting  in   a   cafe  and   watching   the   great  and  the  good  go  by,  armed  with  shopping  bags. Of  course  we  have  shopping  centres  here  in  the   Deux-­‐Sèvres,  but   they  are  not  quite  the  same.    However,  on  a  recent  trip  to  Poitiers   centre  I  was  amazed  at  how  much  it  had  changed  since  my  last  visit   some   18   months   previously.     The   centre   is   now   car   free   as   are   many   of   the   streets   leading   up   to   the   main   square.     The   atmosphere   of   the  centre  is  now  one  of  a  chic  café  culture  rather   than  an  old  town  square.     There  are  many  “one  off”  clothes  shops   and   also  a  small  shopping  centre   and   a  department   store  –   so  if   you   are  feeling  the   need  for  some  retail  therapy  along  with  a   busy   atmosphere  then  this  could  be  the  answer.    Whilst  I  know  Poitiers  is   not  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres,  it  is  only  just  over  the  border  in  the  Vienne. With   our   summer   visitors   we   have   been   enjoying  visiting   places   and  seeing  them  with  new  eyes.  I  think  we  all  become  rather  blasé   about  the  lovely  area  in  which  we  live.     The  markets  are  just  a  way   of  life,  and   we  forget   how  wonderful  they  are,  the  sounds,  smells   and   colours   of   the   markets,   even   more   vibrant   in   the   summer   months  –  we  are  all  truly  lucky  to  enjoy  this  on  a  weekly  basis.     I  love  visiting  markets  whether  it  be  Thouars,  Parthenay,  Lencloitre   or   Saumur  to  have  a  wander  around,  taste  some  local  produce  and   then  while  away  an  hour   or   so   drinking  coffee  watching  the  world   go  by;  in  my  view  a  perfect  way  to  spend  a  morning  and  quite  often   bumping  into  friends  as  well   to  add  to  the  pleasure   of  the  whole   experience.     One   of   the  things   that   are  great   to   buy  at   markets  is   bread   and   cakes.  There  seems  to  be  a  greater   choice  than   in  the  supermarkets   and   as  you  visit  markets  in   different  towns  and  areas  you  can   try   and   then  buy  the  local   specialities.    Each   area  has  its  own   special   bread,  sometimes  even   specific   to  the   Boulangerie.     Believe   me,   the  person  who  once  told  me  that  there  was  a  universal   charge  for   a   baguette  could   not   have   been   more   wrong   –   the   price   varies   hugely.     For   those  of  us  who  do  not  eat  all   of  our  baguettes  on   the  day  of   buying,   have   you   tried   having   it   for   toast   the   next   day?     Sliced   lengthwise   and   popped   in   the   toaster   (although   it   can   easily   become   stuck,   so   do   not   leave   unattended   or   you   might   be   meeting  your  local   fireman!)  ,  it   really  is  yummy.    Especially  when   eaten  out  in  the  garden  with  a  nice  cup  of  tea. On   the   weekend   of   15   &  16th   September   do   not   forget   that  it   is   Patrimoine,   which   means   that   many   chateaus   and   places   you   normally  have  to   pay  for   will   be  free.     There  are  also   many  other   historical  buildings  open  with   many  having  guided  tours.    Check  out   your  local  paper  or  Mairie  for  information  in  your  local  area. Vive  la  Difference.  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A pig for everyone September is  upon  us  and  for  many  pig  keepers  who  have  raised  their   pigs   over   the   spring  and   summer,   thoughts   will   be  turning  towards   the  delicious  final  product! You  might  think  that  pork  from  any  kind  of  pig  tastes  the  same  –  a  pig   is  a  pig  isn’t  it?  Yes  –  but   only  in  the  same  way  that  a  Rolls  Royce  and   a  Lada   are  both   cars.     Berkshire  piglets   can  be   raised   to   slaughter   weight  more  quickly  than  other   types  of  pig,  produce  a  delicious  layer   of  fat   and  therefore  excellent   pork  loin  and  belly  and  let’s  not  forget   their   chubby  rears   that   produce  a  first   class   gammon.     If   bacon   is   more  your   thing,  consider   one   of   our   Tamworth   crosses,  bred   for   length  but  still  with  that  key  layer  of  Berkshire  flavour. However,  the   glory  of  the  pig  is  that  whatever   breed  you  decide  on,   you   can   still   end   up   with  delicious  pork   and   bacon   from  the  same   animal.  If  you’re  worried  about  how  much  room  a  butchered  pig  will   take  up  in  your  freezer,  to  give  you  some  idea,  half  of  a  65kg  pig  will   fill  two  large  Super  U  carrier  bags. For   those  of  you  that  have  raised  weaners,  you   will  know   that  what   you   put   into   the   pig  is   key   and   the   results   are   obvious   when   the   carcass   comes   back  from  the   abattoir.     A   well   fed  and   well   looked   after   pig  will  produce   the  best   pork  you  have  ever   tasted.  The  only   way  to  know  is  to  try  it  yourself. Our   Family  Pig  Experience  Days  have   been  a  real   highlight  for   us  this  year   -­‐   one  family  that   came,  returned  home   with   three   Berkshire   piglets   to   rear   themselves  and  a  Gloucestershire  Old   Spot  that  they  had  butchered  with  us   -­‐  ready  for  their  freezer.

Reader’s Restaurant Reviews

Thank you   to   Martin   &   Pamela   Hole   for   this   month’s   Restaurant   Review:   Auberge   du   vieux  pont,   2   rue   du   vieux   pont,  79600,  Saint  Généroux. We were taken to this Auberge two years ago to celebrate our French neighbour’s birthday. It was good then and we decided to go back there in August with our friends to check it out, now it is under new management. Saint Généroux itself, just north of Airvault, is worth a visit, for its Pont Roman over the River Thouet and for one of the oldest churches in the Poitou, dating back to the 10th century. Christine and Ulrich Imbert, the new owners, were very welcoming. It was a lovely sunny day so we chose the terrace over the spacious inside dining room. Menus varied from the menu du jour at €10.90 (Assiette de cruditées, caille aux amandes, fromage, dessert, ¼ vin) to those at €19.50, €24.50 and €26.90. My wife saw the crème brulée on the €19.50 menu, so there was no contest for her! Our friend saw the aile de raie aux càpres, so that was her decided. We chaps were left with no choice but to follow the same menu but with the rumsteck. Entrées were salade de chèvre chaud and salade de poulet, both substantial starters! Apparently, the skate wings were absolutely delicious and as for the steak, well, medium was actually pink for once! The desserts were equally good, the crème brulée and the tarte au citron being excellent. Full marks to Ulrich! The wine was extra but good and reasonably priced. The service from Auberge du vieux pont Christine was great and very friendly. There was a reasonable choice of menus even though there was not a vast choice of dishes within each. However, the quality was excellent and all in all this was a restaurant that we would recommend for a ‘value for money’ meal in a delightful setting.

Right: Mastering the butcher's knot at one of our Family Pig Experience Days

As the   centre   of   British   rare   breed   pigs   in   France,  at   Le   Logis   you   can   see  many  different  Pedigree  breeds  of   pig  in  action  and  make  your  mind   up  as   to   your  favourite.     Whether   it’s  the  Berkie  with  its   cute  face  and   white  socks,  or   the   Gloucester   Old  Spots  with  their  floppy  ears,  or  the  rare  Oxford  Sandy  &  Black  an   old-­‐fashioned  Plum  Pudding  pig    –  we  have  something  to  appeal  to   everyone.

Oxford Sandy & Black gilt at Le Logis

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Village Diaries

by Jacqueline  Brown.

Summer is   a   perfect   time   for   a   foodie  like  me  to  be  living  in  rural   France.     In   addition  to   our   over-­‐ productive   courgette   patch,   the   markets  are  full   of  seasonal  fruit   and  vegetables  and  there  are  the   village   fêtes.     We   are   lucky   enough   to   live  in   a   small   village   that  has  a  big  social  scene  where   every   month   from   April   to   September   there   is   some  sort   of   event.     The   themes   are   always   different,   but   one   thing   that   remains  the  same  is  that  the  shared   meal  is   always  an  important   part.     The   main  event  of   the  year,  in  July,  is  held  in   the   woods,  “If  you  go   down   to   the   woods   today,  you’re  sure  of   a   big   surprise”   always   comes   to   mind   as   tucked   away  down   a  narrow   lane   and   totally   hidden   from  view,  over  400  people  gather  to  enjoy  an  afternoon  of   eating,  drinking  and  dancing.    The  long  trestle   tables  are  set   up  in   the   dappled   shade   and   ‘personalised’   as   we   all   bring   our   own   plates,  cutlery,  glasses   and  some  of   us,  tablecloths   and  cushions   too.    It   is  a   leisurely  event   of   five  courses,  interspersed   with   the   dancing   and  drinking,  and  it  is  not  uncommon  to  still  be  there   at   dusk.    The  menu  has   been  tried   and  tested   over  many  years  and   starts   with  half  a  Charentais   melon  filled  with  Pineau,  followed  by   slices   of   jambon   de   pays   with   butter.     The   main   course   is   a   barbequed  steak,  cooked   ‘à  pointe’   (medium  rare)   with   mojette   beans  and  green  salad.    Then  there  is   a  choice   of  cheese,  an   ice   cream,  coffee  and  a  digestif.    The  food  is  good  and   the  atmosphere   jovial.     It  is  a  great  ‘bringing  together’  event,  the  village  councillors,   the  farmers,  the  holidaymakers,  and  family  and  friends,  local  and   from  afar,  all  let   their   hair  down   and   have  fun.    The  noise  of  400   chattering  voices,  the  music;  think  1980’s  disco  with  hits  like  Y  Viva   Espana,   Ra   Ra   Rasputin   and   Dancing   Queen,   the   smell   of   the   steaks   cooking,   everyone   is   in   party   mood   and   our   woods   are   buzzing! The  August  event  is  our   Family   Fun   Day   and   picnic   in   the   park   w h e re   ga m e s   l i ke   petanque,   badminton,   t a b l e   t e n n i s   a n d   cricket   are   available   for  children   of  all  ages.     The   trestle   tables   are   again   set   up   in   the   shade,   but   this   time   everyone   brings   their   own   food   to   eat   together.     No   matter   how   inventive   I  am   with  our  picnic,  our  French  friends  always  seem  to  do  it  bigger  and   better.     The   afternoon   ends  with   a   Franco/Brittanique  petanque   tournament  and  lots  of  laughter. Just   before  La  Rentrée  we  have   an  evening  randonée  followed  by   Moules  et   Frites  to   end  the  summer.     At   least   with   this  one  we   have  walked  off  a  few  calories  before  tucking  into  the  meal. Even  if  all  we  do  on  a  summer   weekend  is  visit  a  brocante  or  vide   grenier,  I’m   sure  to  come   home  with   some  mismatched  old  plates   that  are  just  perfect  for  serving  salads  or  vegetable  dishes.    Food  is   never  far  from  thought. Follow  Jacqui’s  blog  at  hYp://www.frenchvillagediaries.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

September’s Recipe:   Monkfish   with  lime   and  chilli   sauce. Ingredients: • 4  x  115g/4oz  monkfish  fillets • 25g/1  0z  rice  four  or  cornflour • 6tbsp  vegetable  or  groundnut  oil • 4  garlic  cloves,  crushed • 2  large  fresh  red  chillies,  deseeded  and  sliced • 2  tsp  palm  sugar  or  soft,  light  brown  sugar • juice  of  2  limes • grated  rind  of  1  lime • boiled  rice,  to  serve Method:-­‐ Toss  the  fish   in  the  flour,  shaking  off   any  excess.    Heat  the  oil  in   a   wok   and   fry   the   fish   on   all   sides   until   browned   and   cooked   through,  taking  care  when  turning  not  to  break  it  up. Life  the  fish  out  of  the  wok  and  keep  warm.     Add  the  garlic  and   chillies  and  stir-­‐fry  for  1-­‐2  minutes,  until  they  have  softened. Add   the  sugar,  the   lime  juice  and   rind   and  2-­‐3  tablespoons   of   water  and  bring  to  the  boil.     Simmer  gently  for  1-­‐2  minutes,  then   spoon  the  mixture  over  the  fish.    Serve  immediately  with  rice. RESTAURANT REVIEWS... If you have positive restaurant experiences to share, we would love to print them here. Please email to: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr for inclusion into future issues.

1855 and all that…

by John  Sherwin

Napoleon III   was   the   nephew   of   the   real   Napoleon.  He   was  known   for   an   enthusiastic   foreign  policy,  with   sell-­‐out  gigs  in  Austria,  the   Crimea,  and   China,  but   dismal   performances   in   Korea,   Japan,   Mexico   and   (doh!)   Prussia.   Back   home,   he  stirred   up   the   economy   and   started  the  modernisation  of  Paris. But  that’s   neither  here  nor   there;  for   us  wine   buffs,  his   contribution   to   history   remains   to   this   day.  The   Universal   Expo   of  1855   invited   the  great  and  the  good  from  the  known  world   to  Paris  for  a  bonanza  trade  fair   from  May  to   November   (and   you   thought   the   Olympics   was   never-­‐ending?).   It   was   decided   that   many   of   the   finest   Bordeaux   wines   should   be   served   to   visiting   royalty   and   other   dignitaries  –  but   how  could  foreigners  be  expected  to  understand   the  quality  of  what  they  were  drinking?  So,  Napoleon  III  ordered   the  compilation  of  the  first  in  the   ‘For  Dummies’  series  –  the  1855   classification  of  the  wines  of  Medoc  and  Graves. This  classification   listed   61   of   the   leading  wines   from   Bordeaux,   ranking  them  from  ‘First  Growth’  to  ‘Fifth  Growth’.  This   listing  was   based   on   market   price.   Of   course,   market   price   was   based   on   reputation   and   perceived   quality,   but   first   and   foremost,   the   chateaux  were  listed  in  descending  order  of  spondulicks  –  from  the   most  expensive   ‘First  Growths’  to   the  least  pricey  ‘Fifth  Growths’.   (‘Growth’   or   ‘Cru’   in   French   simply   means   ‘category’   in   this   context.)    No  wine  gurus  in  those  days,  just  good  old  market  forces. Given  that  this  antique  has  been  changed  only  once  (in  1973  when   Mouton-­‐Rothschild  was  correctly  elevated   to  First  Growth)   and  will   never   be   changed   again,   does   it   still   have   any   relevance   at   all?   Amazingly,  yes.  No-­‐one   would   seriously  argue  that   Lafite,   Latour,   Margaux,  Mouton-­‐Rothschild   and  Haut-­‐Brion  should  be  considered   as   anything   other   than   First   Growth.   OK,   some   Chateaux   from   Second   to   Fifth  Growths  are  slightly  mis-­‐ranked,  but  by  and   large   the  big  picture  is  still  valid. Given  that  it’s  set   in  stone,  does  it  have   any  use  at  all?   Times  and   winemakers  change,  parameters  of  quality  shift,  surely  it  becomes   of  less  and  less  interest?  Quite  so,  to   an  extent.  But  to  adopt  such   a   modern-­‐day,  gung-­‐ho,   iconoclastic   approach   ignores   on   the   one   hand  the  importance  of  tradition   and  on  the  other  the  pragmatics   of   the   market.   A   winemaker   who,   by   general   wine-­‐world   recognition,  is  rated  below  where  he  should   be,  would  simply  give   a   Gallic   shrug   if   asked   if   it   bothers   him.  On   the  one  hand   he   is   proud   to   be   part   of   an   historic   classification;   on   the   other,   he   knows  that   his  peers  and   the  wine  consuming  public   know  where   his  true   worth  lies  –  which  is  to  say,  he  might  be  Fifth  Growth,  but   he’s  commanding  Second  Growth  prices. The  system  also,  of  course,  has  its  snob  appeal.  The  more-­‐money-­‐ than-­‐sense   brigade,   like   the   poor,   will   always   be   with   us.   Their   cellars   would   recoil   at   the   presence   of   anything  less   than  a  First   Growth  of  impeccable  vintage.  Well,  let  them  go  their  yellow-­‐brick-­‐ road  way.   In  the   second  part   of   this   article,  next  month,  I  explain  how  you  can   enjoy  Bordeaux  wines  from  classified  vineyards  at  a  proper  price.

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours Email: johnsherwin@orange.fr ~ www.french-wine-tours.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Adventures... I first   met   Sally  at   a  singles  night   in   2004.  She  was  single  after   a   messy  divorce  and  I  was  a  widower  having  lost  my  wife  in  a  tragic   road  accident.    We  soon  became  very  close  and  Sally  brought  me  to   France  to  meet  one  of  her  sons   and  his  family  who  lived   at  St  Paul-­‐ en-­‐Gatine. Sally  had   always  loved  France  but  my  only  experience  had   been   a   trip   to   Calais   and   a  pilgrimage  to  Lourdes  when  I   was  a  teenager.   However,  I  fell  in  love  with  it  and  to  cut  a  long  story  short  we  both decided   to   retire   and   then   bought   the   first   house   we   saw   that   week. We  moved  in  August  2005.  The  house  was   an  old  farmhouse  2kms   outside   Secondigny  and   just   habitable.   We   didn't   sell   my  house   back  in  Wells,  Somerset  straight  away  as  we  needed  a  fall-­‐back plan  in  case  Sally,  myself  or   my  12  year  old  daughter  Jazmine  could   not  settle.     None  of   us  really  spoke  French,  my  only  claim  to  fame   was  an  ‘O’  level  50  years  ago!      Of  all  of  us  I  think  Jazzie  was  the bravest,  starting  college  about  2  weeks  after  arriving  here. While  we  were  waiting  for  the  sale  to  go  through  we  came  up  with   a  5  year   plan.  With  the   help  of  Sally's  son  Andy  we  were   going  to   renovate  our  farmhouse  in  5  years,  simple  as  that.    Oh  and  we  got married  a  month  before  we  moved.  We  were  advised  that  because   of  the   inheritance  laws  in   France  it  was  a  good  idea.  A  marriage  of   convenience! In  the  November  of  the  year  we  moved  Sally  began  to  get  itchy  feet   and  did  a  bit  of  research   to  see  if  there  were  any  Line  Dance  groups   she  could  join.  She  had  been  a  teacher  in   England  for  a  number   of   years.  She  was  contacted  by  an  English  lady  who  said  that  she  and   a   group   of   other   ladies   went   to   a   French   group   and   wondered   whether  Sally  could  perhaps  give  them  a  bit  of  extra  tuition.   Sally   went  to   the   Salle   de  Fete  in   Glenay   and   an  association   was   formed   with   Sally   as  their   instructor,  not   quite   what   she   had   in   mind! The   renovations   progressed   well   and   after   about   18  months   we   had  2  bedrooms  and  a  new  bathroom  sorted.  When  we  viewed  the   house   we   planned   to   turn   an   old   room   at   the   rear   into   a   2   bedroomed   gîte   but   by  now  we   were   having  second  thoughts  as   there  seemed  to  be  a  lot  of   them  close  by  and   in  an  area  of  France   that  wasn't  particularly  common  for  tourists.   One   day  we  were  looking  at  the  room  and  I  had  an  idea  to  turn  it   into  a  dance  studio.   Sally   was  all  for   the  idea  and  decided  to  look   into  setting  up  her  own  business  teaching  dance.     After  a  lot  of  red   tape   and   form   filling   ‘Mustang   Sallys’   was   born   as   a   Micro   Entreprise.     We  finished  renovating  the  studio  and  ended  up   with   a   65  sq   m.  sprung  chestnut   floor.  Sally  opened  for   business   in   April   2007. We  had  a  bit  of  a  hiccup   just  after   this  when   I  was  diagnosed  with   bladder  and   prostate   cancer,  but  after   a  very  worrying  18  months   when  everything  that  could  go  wrong  did,  I  was  eventually  given the  all   clear.    I  have  to   say  that   I  have  nothing  but   praise  for   the   French  Health  system. Business   progressed   well   and   fame   spread   so   much   so   that   our   local   Maire  asked   Sally  if  she  would  provide  the  entertainment   for   Friday  night  during  Pomme  Expo  at  The  Salle  Alauna.  It  ended  as  a very  successful  evening  and  was  asked  back  again  for  the  next  year. We   then   had   a   call   from   the   Care   Home   in   Secondigny  asking  if   Sally  would  do  the  entertainment  for  their  Family  Day.    During

the preparatory  discussions   it   came   out   that   I   was   a   Catering   Manager   for   a   group   of   care   homes   in   a   former   life  and  a   plan  was   hatched  for  me  to  prepare   and   cook  an   English   meal   for   the   80   residents   and   staff.   Both   events   were   Above: Sally and her team at the amazing   successes   and   we   were   Pomme Expo in 2008 asked  back  to  do  the  same  again  the  next  year.   In  fact  Sally  now  goes  in  each  Wednesday  to  do  chair   dancing  with   the  residents  and  I  cook  an  English  meal  for  them  every  6  months. Come  the  end  of  2010   we   had   finished   the   renovations  and  guess   what?  It   had  only  cost  us  twice   what   we   had   budgeted   for!     By   now   we   had   accumulated   quite   a   menagerie,   2   donkeys,   20   sheep,   5   pigs  and  numerous  chickens,  ducks   and  guinea  fowl.  Self   sufficient  in  meat,  eggs  and  vegetables.  Wow  the  real  “Good  Life”.

Above: Sally’s dance studio, before and after the renovation

As for  Mustang  Sallys,  it  still  continues   to  grow,  dancing  to   popular   music  rather  than  just  country.    With  her  abilities  in  movement  and   dance  and  her  passion  for  Latin  music  it  has  inspired  Sally  to introduce  Deux-­‐Sèvres   to   SALUMBA!  DANCERISE   TO   LOSE   A   SIZE,   MOVE  YOUR  BODY  AND  FEET  TO  THE  RHYTHM  OF  THE  LATIN  BEAT. She   will   be  launching  this  new   branch   of   her   business   with   a   20   minute   taster   session  at   ‘The   Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’  Trade  Fair,   at   2.30pm   on  8th   September,  and  starting   sessions  at   Les  Ourieres  on   Thursday  mornings  at   10.30.     They  will  be  an  hour   long  and  cost   5   euros. We   feel   that   we   have   now   integrated   well   into   our   local   community,  our  French  has  improved   beyond  recognition,  Jazzie  is   off  to  Strasbourg  Grande  Ecole  in  September  and  life  really  couldn't get  much  better.    Well...  maybe  the  weather  could  improve. I  will   always   remember   what   someone   said   to   me   just   after   we   moved  here     “Two  things  have  shocked  me  about  France,  first   how   friendly  and   helpful  the  French  are  and  secondly  how  b****y  cold   the  winters  are”.

The move  to  France  was  one  of  the  best  decisions  of  our  lives. Sally  &  John  Lanario.     Tel:  05  49  64  92  33  ~  Email:mustangsallys.fr@hotmail.com Thank you to Sally & John Lanario for sharing their story with us.....If you would like to share your ‘French Adventure’, please email your story to us for consideration. For more information, please visit the ‘Written Contributions’ page on our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Motoring... Bugatti Bug!

by Helen  Tait-­‐Wright

Generally speaking,  I  am  not  a  great  lover  of  French  cars.  There  are   however  two   notable  exceptions.  If  I  win  the  Euromillions  tonight   (it’s  Friday  as  I  am  writing)   pretty  close  to  the  top  of  my  things  to   spend   the   money   on   is   a   car   which   is   as   impractical   as   it   is   beautiful,  as   challenging   to   drive   as   it   is   evocative,   and   rare   as   hen’s  teeth! I  speak  of  the  Bugatti  Type  35C.   I  mean,  any  Type  35  would   do,  I’m  not   fussy,  but  a  35C   would  be   the  best.   The  Bugatti  company  was   founded  in   1909  in   the  Alsace   region  of   France  (which  was  at  the  time  the  territory  of  the  German  Empire)   by  the  Italian  Ettore  Bugatti.     Ettore   was  the  son  of  an  important   Art   Nouveau   furniture   and   jewellery  designer,   and   his   cars   are   famous   as   much   for   their   beauty   as   their   exquisite,   precision   construction  and  their  excellent  racing  pedigree.   It   was  a  Bugatti   car  that   won  the  first  ever  Monaco  Grand  Prix.    The   most   successful   racing  model   made   by  Bugatti   was  the  Type   35,   which   won   over   1,000   races   in   its   time,   averaging   14   wins   per   week  at   the  height  of  its   success,  from  both  the  works   team  and   privateer   racers.   It   was   the   first   vehicle   to   feature   the   famous   Bugatti  arch-­‐shaped  radiator,  and  is   regarded  by  many  as  the  most   beautiful   pre-­‐war   racing   car   as   well   as  probably  being  the  most   successful  racing  car  ever  constructed. The  Type  35  was  introduced  in  1924  to  take  advantage  of   a   new  2   litre  racing  class,  and  made  it’s  debut  at  the  Grand  Prix  de  Lyon.   The   design   of   the  car   had   many  innovative   features   including   a   hollow  front   axle  to  reduce  weight  and  solid  alloy  wheels,  at  a  time   when  wire  wheels  were  normally  fitted. This   car   could   achieve   110mph  and   was   designed  on  lightweight   principles,  when   the   commonly  accepted  belief   was   that  heavier   cars   held   the   road   better.   The  combination   of  the  featherweight   chassis  and  low  center   of  gravity  make  these   relatively  diminutive   GP  cars  extremely  manouevrable,  especially  on  short  tracks.  It  was   this   versatility   of   the   chassis   that   enabled   the   car   to   compete   successfully  in   long  distance  road   races  and   hill   climbs  as   well  as   Grand  Prix,  and  achieve  so  many  wins.   In  short,  the  Type  35  would  make  the  Bugatti   name  a  legend.    Over   the  years  various  derivatives  of  the  model  were  made,  but  the  35C   is  unique  in  the  fact   that  it  featured   a  supercharger  on   the   straight   8   cylinder   engine,   giving  an   output   of   nearly  128hp   and   a   top   speed  of  around  125mph.  Incredible   for  the  1920‘s.  It   was  a   35C   that  won  the  French  Grand  Prix  in  both  1928  and  1930. Only  50  examples  of  the  35C   left  the  factory!  As  you  can  therefore   imagine,   the   remaining   cars   fetch   incredibly   high   prices   today,   ranging  between   600,000  Euros  and  two   million  Euros  depending   on  the  provenance   of   the  car.     Despite  this  many  remaining  Type   35   Bugattis  are   still   raced   today,  and   the   Circuit  des  Remparts  in   Angouleme,   14   -­‐   16   September  is   a   great   place   to   see   them  in   action! PS.  I  didn’t  win  the  lottery! Photo: www.ultimatecarpage.com

Contact Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

How to speed up your PC

need to  activate  it.    It  is  quite  straight  forward  to  do  just  follow  the   instructions  that  come  with  the  software.  

Part 11:  Re-­‐loading  /  re-­‐installing  Windows  XP  Drivers,  Programs   and  Data Last   month   we   got   to   the   position   where   we   had   loaded   and   installed   Windows   XP   on   your   PC.   This   month   we   are   going   to   reload  the  rest  of  the  information  that  makes  the  PC  yours.

My preference  is  to  load   the  Anti-­‐Virus  and   Anti-­‐Spyware  programs   first.     This   will   give   you  protection  for   when   you   go   on-­‐line   to   the   internet.   You   will   need   to   do   this   throughout   the   re-­‐installation   process,  as  many  programs  check  for  updates  as  part   of  the  loading   process.

These items   should   be  loaded  in  a  logical  sequence  to  ensure   that   you  have  all   of  the  features  you  need.  I  strongly  suggest   that  you   create  or   update  the  checklist   I  suggested  in  part  9  in  July,  listing   what  you  need   to  load,  in  the  sequence  you  need  to  load  it,  after   reading  this  article.  

You may   have  also  received   Application  programs  with   any  device   you  have  connected  to  your  PC,  such  as  a  DVD  or  CD   burner,  then   you  may   have  something  like  "Nero"   or   "Easy   DVD/CD  Creator"  to   burn   or   copy   CDs   and   DVDs,   or   with   your   Sat   Nav,   Mobile   telephone,   printer   etc.     You   should   load   these   next.     Some   programs  may  be  downloaded  rather  than  come  on   disk;  once  you   have   got   the   anti-­‐virus   and   ant-­‐spyware   programs   installed   you   should  be  totally  safe  to  do  these  re-­‐installations  next.

by Ross  Hendry

The sequence  should  now  be  load  the  Drivers   first.    These  are  the   bits   of   program   code   that   let   Windows   interact   with   the   various   devices  on/in  or  connected  to   your   PC;  these  include  the  graphics   card,  network  card,  sound  devices,  and  other  features  on  the  main   board  of  the  PC,  plus  your  printer,  scanner,  camera  and  or  webcam,   sat  nav,  mobile  telephone  and  any  other  devices  you  may  have.   Always   load  the  drivers  that   came   with   your   PC  first.  This  should   ensure  that  all  of  the  devices  on  the  PC  work,  such  as  the  network   or  WiFi   adaptor.     If  either  one  of  these  is  not  installed  you   will  not   be  connected   to   the   internet.  If   you   are  using  WiFi   to  connect  to   your   Livebox  or   other   modem  router  remember   you   will   need  to   put  in  the  Security  code  when  you  first  connect  to  the  router. Once  you  have  installed  all  of  the  Drivers  you  should  have  all  of  the   components   on   the   PC   working,  the   screen   should   look  normal   (this  means   correct  resolution  and  icons  and   text   the   size  you  like),   you   should   hear   sounds   from   your   speakers,  the   printer   should   have  printed  a  test  page  (if  not  check  that   now).    You  should  also  be   able  to  get   on  the  internet.  If  so,  you  should  activate  the  Windows   operating  system  and  follow  the   instructions.     If  the   automatic  on-­‐ line   attempt   fails   just   telephone   the   service   and   follow   the   instructions,  if  you  are   challenged   simply  state  that,   "this   copy  of   Windows  is  not   running   on   any  other   PC   and   that   you   have   just   completed   a  reload",  the  operator  will   then  issue  you  another  code   to   activate   Windows.   Once   again   just   follow  the  instructions  and   you  will  be  fine.

Finally, you   are   ready  to  reload  all   of  the  data  you  have  on   to   the   freshly  loaded   PC.    Use  Windows  Explorer   to  help  you  do  this.    I  like   to   have  two   small   Windows  Explorer   windows  open,  the   one   on   the  left  the  source  device,  say  a  USB   stick  and  the  right  hand  one,   showing   the   destination   folder   for   the   data   you   are   re-­‐loading.     Take  your  time  and  copy  the  folders  and  files  in  batches.     Do  not  try   to  do  them  all   in   one  go.  Make  sure  that  you  put   documents  and   document   folders   into   the   ‘My   Documents’   folder,   pictures   and   picture  folders  to  ‘My  Pictures’  and   so  on  -­‐  it   makes   life  so  much   easier  when  you  come  to  try  to  find  things. Good  luck,   and  be  patient.     This   process  may  take   several   hours.   You   are   also   bound   to   receive   many   updates   for   Windows   and   other   programs   over   the  next   few  days   -­‐   this   should   ensure   that   you  have  the  latest  versions  of  Windows  XP,  drivers  and  programs.   Next   Month   we  will   look   at   loading   Windows   7   from  scratch   all   being  well. Ross   Hendry   is   the   proprietor   of   Interface   Consulting   and   Engineering,   who  has   over  42  years  experience  in   Communications,   Computer   Technology   and   Direct   Marketing.(See   advert   below   for   more  information).

Now the  Drivers  are  loaded,  you  need  to   re-­‐install  the  Application   programs  that  you  use.  This  is  normally  from  the  discs  that  you  got   when   you   purchased   the   software.   To   do   this   follow   the   instructions  that  came   with   the  software.  A  good   example  of   this   would  be  your  Anti-­‐Virus  Programs  or  Microsoft  Office,  this  suite  of   programs  includes  Word,  Excel,  PowerPoint,  Outlook,  Publisher  and   many  more.     Some   of   these  programs  will   need  a  code   or   serial   number   to   run   and  in   the   case   of   Microsoft   Office   you   may  also  

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres

Bu- Cel

A-Z of the Communes of the by Sue  Burgess Deux-Sèvres.

CELLES-SUR-BELLE Celles-­‐sur-­‐Belle is  situated   between   Niort   and   Melle.   Since  2009   Celles  has  had  more  inhabitants    (who  are  known   as  Celloises  and   Cellois)  than  Melle.    

LE BUSSEAU Le Busseau  is  situated  on  the  road  from  Niort  to  l'Absie,  just  on  the   Deux-­‐Sèvres  /  Vendée  border.   The  nearest   villages   to   Le  Busseau   are   Marillet   ,   Scillé   ,   La   Chapelle-­‐Thireuil   ,  Saint-­‐Hilaire-­‐de-­‐Voust   and  Faymoreau.

Celles-­‐sur-­‐Belle is  situated  on  one  of  the  roads  (the  Via  Turonensis)   to  St  Jacques  de   Compostelle   (Santiago   da  Compostella),  between   Poitiers   and   La   Gironde.     Celles-­‐sur-­‐Belle   is   situated   on   the   old   N148   road  which   joined  Sainte-­‐Hermine  to  Etagnac   through  Niort   and  Melle.  This  road  has  been  renumbered  as  the  D  948.  

The commune   of   le   Busseau   has   31   lieux   dits   and   hamlets:     La   Baubière,  La  Blinière,   La   Boissière,  La  Bourtière,   Bretignolles,  Les   Broises,   La   Chauvière,   La   Coutancière,   L'embranchement,   Le   Fougeroux,   Les   Frênes,   La   Girardière,   La   Givrelière,   La   Grange   Burgaud,   Les   Granges,   La   Guérinière,   La   Haute   Bourtière,   La   Jaguignière,  La  Landremière,  La  Lizabère,  La   Ménantelière,  Le  Peu,  Le   Plessis,  La  Pouge,   La   Réortière,   La   Rousselière,   Le   Suchaud,   Les  Terrières,  La  Trépinière,  La  Tutière,  La   Touche  Allerit,  La  Vezallière. The   mathematician   François   Viète     (1540-­‐1603),  who   developed   new   algebra   lived   in   Le   Busseau   where   his   father   was   the  “notaire”. Left:  Coat  of  arms  of  François  Viète       The   Michenot   group   has   two   main   types   of   economic   activity   –   distribution  of    drinks  to   wholesalers  and  stockage.  There  are  four   sites  in  France  :     Paris,   Lyon,  Chouze  sur  Loire  (37)  and   Le  Busseau   group  also  has  something  else  to  offer  :  Le  Cellier.  In  this  wine  cellar   you   can   find   some  of   the   greatest   wines   of   France   :     Bordeaux,   Burgundy,...  but  also  wines  from  lesser  known  vineyards.   CAUNAY Caunay   is  situated   close   to   Pers,  Vanzay,  Mairé-­‐Levescault,  Pliboux   and  Clussais-­‐la-­‐Pommeraie.  It  has  163  inhabitants.   A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • The  Church The   romanesque  church  is   dedicated   to   Saint   Peter.  You  enter   the   church   through  a  gothic   style  side  doorway.   The   nave   was   damaged   during   the   wars  of  religion.     The  light  enters  the   vaulted   apse   through   decorated   glass.  The   top   parts  of  the  columns   are  sculpted  with  a  variety  of  themes   –  birds,  chimaera  ….    Several  tombs   with  epitaphs   on  them  can  be   found   in  the  stone  slabs  of  the  nave.   In  1998  and  1999  the   little  church  of     Caunay   was   lucky   enough   to   be   decorated   with   6   magnificent   stained   glass   windows.   These   original   pieces   of   artwork   are   by   Pierre   BOUTIN,   a   former   gynaecologist   and   mid-­‐wife   who   developed   a   passion   for   stained   glass   work  when   he  retired.   He   remembered  the  holidays  he  used   to  spend  at  his  grandmother's  in   Caunay.    

The river  Belle,  a  tributary  of  the  Boutonne  crosses  the  commune. A  legend  tells   us  that  the  first  pilgrimage  to  Notre-­‐Dame-­‐de-­‐Celles   was   made  in   in  507,  by  the   king   Clovis   after   his  victory  over   the   Wisigoths   at   Vouillé.,  Notre-­‐Dame-­‐de-­‐Celles   was   a   priory   of   the   abbey  of   Lesterps  in  the  Limousin.  It  became   an  abbey  in     1137.   Between  1460-­‐1477,  king  Louis  XI  rebuilt  the  abbey  which  was  later   destroyed   in   1568   by   the   protestants.   Louis   XI     made   several   pilgrimages  to  the  abbey,  in  particular  on  Sunday  22  April   1470     to   celebrate  Easter.  The  architect   François   le   Duc   known   as  Toscane   restored  the  abbey  in  1669. Since   1973,  the  communes  of   Montigné   and  Verrines-­‐sous-­‐Celles   have  been  associated  with  Celles-­‐sur-­‐Belle. A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • The  Royal  Abbey  of  Celles-­‐sur-­‐ Belle   dating   from   the   XIIth   century.   • The  12th  century  romanesque   style   church   which   was   later   rebuilt  in  a  gothic  style. • The   ‘Maison   du   protestantisme   poitevin’,   museum  of  protestant  history  at  Beaussais. • La   talle   à   teurtous   (The   Chestnut   Tree   that   belongs   to   everybody).  A   “talle”  is  a  chestnut   tree  that   has  been  greffé  to   produce  chestnuts.   This  one  gives  its  name  to   the  spot  where  it   can   be  found  in  the  hamlet   of   la   Revêtizon.   The   main   trunk  which   at   1,80m   from   t h e   g r o u n d ,   h a s   a   circumference  of  more  than   7  metres,  has  been  dead  for   some   years.   But   two   off-­‐ shoots   which   surround   it   have  given  it  a  new  life.  The   w h o l e   t h i n g   h a s   a   circumference  of  11,65m.   Famous  people  with  a  connection  to  the  commune: Charles-­‐Maurice  de  Talleyrand-­‐Périgord, the  abbot  of  Celles  Abbey. The   actor   Robert   Dalban   was   born   in   Celles   as   were   certain   members  of  the  music  group  Trip  Transfert.

More ‘A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.’ next  month...

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Building & Renovation...

Short editorials  can  be  offered  to  advertisers,   free  of  charge.

ARTISANS &  TRADESMEN... Do  you  have  any  top  tips  you  can  share  with  our  readers?       We  would  love  to  include  them  in  this  section!

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For more  details,  please  see  the  ‘Written  Contributions’  page   on  our  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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Business, Finance & Property... Ask Amanda.

With summer  coming  to  a  close  many  ex  patriots   will  have  said  goodbye  to   friends  and  family  who   have   visited   over   the  last   few   months,  or   have   waved  guests  goodbye  for  those  involved  in   the   tourism  industry.

mornings in   La  Grande   Galerie   in   Civray.   You   can   also   send   your   enquiry  to  “Ask  Amanda”  on  the  contacts  below  and  I  will  be  happy   to  help  where  I  can. Amanda  Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

Autumn often   finds   us   with   a   little  more  “me   time”  and  provides  an  opportunity  to   look  back   on  what   we  have  achieved  and   plan  ahead   for   next  year  and  beyond.   Whilst   you   look   around   the   house   and   garden   to   see   what   maintenance   is   needed   before   winter   arrives,   or   maybe   aim   to   shed   a  few   pounds  after   showing  your   guests   the   abundance   of   fine  food  and  wine  the  region  has  to  offer,  do  not  forget  that  your   financial  wellbeing  is  just  as  important  as  your  health  and  home. Why  not  use  the  next  month  or   so  to  have  a  free  financial  review  to   ensure  that  your  French   adventure  continues  smoothly,  with  as  few   unforeseen   bumps  in  the  road  as  possible?     Whether  you  want  to   look   at   proposed   changes   in   legislation   the   new   French   Government   are  proposing  or  review  any  investments  you  hold  to   ensure   they  are   as   tax   efficient   as   they  can   be,   I   am  more   than   happy  to  sit  down  with  you  and  review  your  situation. The  review  also  covers  inheritance  planning  and  pension  options. For   those  who  would  like  an  informal  chat  or  have  a  quick  question   which  I  may  be  able  to  help  you  with,  I  have  a  stand  at  ‘The  Deux-­‐ Sèvres   Monthly’   Trade   Fair   on   Saturday   the   8th   September   in   Secondigny    “Look  out  for   the  Spectrum  IFA  Group  Banners”  -­‐  I  will   be   next   to   Currencies   Direct.   I   can   also   be   found   most   Tuesday   page 34


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How is your wealth management strategy holding up? by Bill  Blevins,  Blevins  Franks  Financial  Correspondent.

The investment   and   general   wealth  management   landscape  has   changed  considerably  over  the  last  decade  or  two.     The  credit  crunch  had  a  dramatic   impact.    Economic  growth  stalled.     Bank  interest   rates  plummeted   to   record   lows.     Long  established   banks  collapsed.     Stockmarkets  became  volatile.    And  now  we  have   the  Euro  crisis  and  austerity  measures  to  deal  with.

arrangements and   advise  you   on   how   to   protect   and   grow   your   wealth;  to  legitimately  mitigate  the  amount  of  tax  that  you  pay  and   control   when   and  where  you  pay  it;  to   ensure  your  wealth  will   be   distributed   on   your   death   according   to   your   wishes   and   with   as   little   inheritance   tax   as  possible,  and  to  protect   your   investments   from  institutional  failure. Ask  an  experienced  wealth  manager   like  Blevins   Franks  for   advice   on  your  situation  and  investment  and  tax  planning  objectives.     To  keep  in  touch  with  the  latest  developments  in  the  offshore  world,   check  out  the  latest  news  on  our  website  www.blevinsfranks.com.   (See  our  advert  below)

All this   has   brought   renewed   emphasis   on   wealth   preservation.     Many  investors  today  are  concerned   with  maintaining  the  value  of   their  money  over  the  long  term.    It   is  important   to,  with  the  help  of   a   wealth   manager,   devise   a   strategy   across   your   savings   and   investment   portfolio   that   employs   asset   allocation   and   diversification   to   reduce   risk.     This   strategy   should   be   based   on   your  specific  investment  objectives.     At   the  same   time,   we   have  been   faced   with   rising   taxes,   here  in   France   and   elsewhere,   and   the   global   crackdown   on   offshore   banking.    Banking  secrecy  is  fast  being  consigned  to  history. The   impact   of  taxation   on   savings   income  and  investment  growth   has   become  a  bigger   issue.    What   matters,  after   all,  are  after-­‐tax   returns.     Your  financial  planning  strategies,  therefore,  require  both   investment  expertise  and  tax  expertise.     In   view   of   all   these   changes   and   the   complex   world   we   find   ourselves  in  today,  wealth   management  advice  is  more  important   than   ever   before.     A   wealth   manager   will   review   your   current  

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French Tax – Top Tax Tips

by David  Hardy With  the  current,   ever-­‐changing  worldwide  economy,  fluctuating   stock  markets   and   interest   rates   it   is  not   easy   to   keep   track  of   what  is  happening  and  the  effects  on  your  money. However,   there  is  one  thing  that  is   a  certainty  -­‐   we  all   have  to  pay   tax.  The  French  taxation  system  is   different  to  what  you  are  used  to   in  the  UK  and  there  are  some  important   facts  to  know  before  you   make  the  move  to  France,  or  if  you  are  already  living  in   France  and   are   now   classified   as   a   'French   resident'   and   therefore   liable   for   French  taxes.    Siddalls  have  put  together  a  quick  guide  to  French  tax   to  help  you  reduce  your  tax  liability  -­‐  5  Top  Tax  Tips  for  UK  residents   moving  across  to   France  and  5  Top  Tax   Tips  for  British  people  who   are  now  living  in  France. Five Tax Tips for UK Residents moving to France:

1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

Before you  leave  make  sure  you   complete  the  Inland  Revenue   Form  P85  to  inform   the  Inland  Revenue  of  the   date  you   leave   the  UK.    They  will  finalise  your  tax  affairs. Obtain   a  forecast   from   the   Dept   Work  and   Pensions  of  your   entitlement   to   a   State   Pension   and   if   you   need   to   make   additional  Class  3  Contributions  to  obtain  your   full  entitlement   (www.thepensionservice.gov.uk).   Note   however,  that   anyone   retiring  after  2010  may  get  a  pleasant  surprise.  The  qualification   for   a   maximum   pension   reduces   from   40   years   full   NI   contributions  to  30  years.  Do  not  overpay! Consider   taking   any   tax   free   cash   commutation   from   your   pensions   whilst   a   UK   resident.   Since   the   start   of   2011   lump   sums   taken   from   a   UK   pension   scheme   are   now   taxable   in   France. The  tax  benefits  of  holding  stocks  and  shares,  ISAs  and  cash  ISAs   will  no  longer  be  available  to  you  once  you  are  French   resident.   You  should   therefore  consider   realising  any  gains,   free  of   UK   income  or  capital  gains  tax,  before  you  make  your  move.  There   are  re-­‐investment   options  available  through  other   deposit  and   investment   products   which   are   more   tax-­‐efficient   for   French   residents. There  is   no  substitute   for  taking  advice   from  qualified  advisers   who  are  regulated  in  the  UK  by  the  Financial  Services  Authority   and   are  familiar   with   taxation  and   investments   in  France  and   the   EU.   This   is   to   ensure   you   are   taking   advantage   of   all   windows   of   opportunity   ie   maximising   your   French   IHT   exemption  limits  whilst  still  a  UK  resident.

Five Tax Tips for UK Tax Residents in France: 1. On becoming  a  French   tax   resident   it   is   your   responsibility   to   make  yourself  known  to  the  tax   authorities  and  to  declare  fully   your   income,  capital  gains  and  wealth.  Once  you  have  made  your   first   return  they  should  automatically  send  you   a  form  in   future   years. 2. Ensure  you  each  top  up  to  the  maximum  your  tax  free  accounts   which   are   Livret   A   (€15,300)   and   a   Livret   de   Développement   Durable  account  (€6,000). 3. Take   steps   to   keep   your   taxable   income   to   the   minimum   by   placing   surplus   funds   in   tax   efficient   investments.   Investment   income  is  liable  to   income  tax,  social  charges   and  if  you  do  not   qualify   may   be   also   liable   to   contributions   to   the   French   healthcare  system. 4. French   inheritance   tax   may   not   be   as   bad   as   you   fear.   The   allowances  for   assets  passing  to  children  may  be  lower   than  the   UK,  but  so  are  the  rates.  There  are  ways  of  reducing  and  possibly   removing  any  liability  to  French  gifts  tax   and  inheritance   tax   on   assets  passing  to  children. 5. "Do   as  the   French   do".  They  take  active   and   sensible  steps   to   avoid  unnecessary  taxation.  Seek  advice  from  persons  authorised   in  France  who  have  access  to  a  variety  of  solutions  and  not  just   one  product.

David Hardy   is  Regional   Manager   for   Poitou-­‐Charentes   for   Siddalls   France,   who   have   been   providing   specialist   independent   financial   advice  to  the  British  community  in  France  for  the  last  15  years.   If   you   wish   to   discuss   your   own   financial   planning   requirements   in   more  detail,  please  contact  David  on  05  56  34  71  77.

For a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,  please  phone  for   an  advertising  pack  or  download  from  our  website. Tel:  05  49  70  26  21 www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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International buyers see France as a safe haven by Joanna  Leggett  Marketing  Director A   hearty   “bonjour”   from   the  Leggett   team   in   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres.     We   are  delighted   to   take   over  this   regular   slot   from  Peter  Elias   and   hope  we   can  continue   bringing  you  interesting  comment  on   the  local  and  national  property  market. The   2012  "Investing  &  living   abroad"  survey  by  BNP  Paribas  has   just  been  published  and  this  year  the  report  has   been  extended  to   look   at   the   impact   that   the   internet   is   having   on   the   buying   process. It   was  no   surprise   to   see  the   headline   figure   that  the  number   of   overseas  buyers  in  France  fell  by  7%   last  year  (from  42,057  sales  to   39,160).    Before   you   start   feeling  too   sorry  for   we   estate  agents   though   you   should  realise  that   the   average  purchase   price   saw   a   significant  jump  of  12%  up  to  €265,000.    Indeed  last  year  Leggett   Immobilier   saw   a   39%   increase   in   transaction   numbers   which   indicates  a  most  pleasing  growth  in  our  own  market  share.

tour” of  many  of  our  houses  for  instance)  and  we  are  always  aware   that  it  will  be  consumers  who  drive  the  market,  not  agents! Ultimately  though,  the  most   comforting  line  in   the   report   comes   towards  the   end  -­‐  where  BNP   Paribas  say  "Le  marché  immobilier   Francais  reste  une  valeur   sure"   which   needs   no   translation.    The   halfway  mark  of   2012   saw   that  our   agency  has  seen  a  growth  in   transaction  numbers  of  9%  (year   on  year)   and   that  we  are  selling   larger  properties  at  higher   prices.  Both  of   these  things  seem  proof   that   international  buyers  do  indeed  see   France  as  a  safe  haven  in   these  uncertain  times. You  can  access  all   the  local  Leggett   Immobilier   property   listings  and   articles  at  www.frenchestateagents.com/poitou-­‐charentes-­‐property.

The BNP  Paribas  figures  show  that   French   expatriats  are  now  the   biggest   "overseas   buyers"   and   that   the   UK   dropped   from   representing   11%   of   the   market   to   9%   -­‐   there   was,   however,   a   marked   increase   in   buyers   coming  from   Switzerland   and   Russia.     There   are   no   real   changes   in   the   most   popular   regions   and   departments   within  France  but  there   is  certainly  a  clear   change  in   the   attitude   that   investors   have   towards   the   French   real   estate   market  in  comparison  to  other  countries. The   research   shows   that   61%   of   respondents   haven't   thought   about   investing  in  another  country  (compared  to  54%  in  2011)  and   97%   of  respondents   said   that  they  saw  the  long  term  investment   potential   in   France   as   very   good   (37%)   or   quite   good   (60%).     Encouragingly   91%  of   respondents  were   happy   with   the  level   of   service  they  received  from  their  estate  agents. What  will   be  interesting  to  follow  is  the  rise  in  popularity  of   "geo-­‐ localisation"   -­‐   or   in   layman’s   terms   the   ability   to   see   the   exact   address  of   a  property.    BNP  Paribas  say  that   97%  of  buyers   would   like  to  see  this  so  that   they  can  view  the  house  on  satellite  imagery   such   as  Google  Earth.    Agents  are  sure  to  resist  this  and   the  culture   of  only  giving  approximate  locations  is  deeply  ingrained  both  here   in   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres   and  throughout   France  -­‐   this   could   well   be   a   case   of   the   immovable   force   meets   the   unstoppable   object   so   expect  fireworks  in  the  coming  years.  Leggett  Immobilier  are  at  the   forefront   of   this   technological   change   (we   now   offer   a   “virtual  

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The Deux-Sèvres Monthly, September 2012  

English language magazine for the Deux-Sevres and surrounding areas in France.

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