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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Welcome! to Issue 26 of

‘The DeuxSèvres Monthly’ magazine.

Well  I  don’t  know  about  you.....but...I’m  tired  of  all   this  rain!    Last  month  it  felt   as  if  the  weather  had   turned   to   Spring,   but   since   then   it’s   taken   a   definite   turn  for  the  worse  -­‐  although  thankfully   we   haven’t   had   the   ‘white   stuff’   that   other   countries  have  seen!    I  do  hope  it  will  settle  soon,   so  we  can  start   to   venture  out  a  little  more   and   see  this  beautiful  country  we  call  ‘home’. Due  to  our  expansion,  we’ll  be  exploring  into  the  Vendée  a  lot  more  now   and  welcome  any  ideas  or  events  happening  in  the  coming  months  for  us   to  research  for  inclusion  in  our  new  magazine,  ‘The  Vendée  Monthly’.   Thanks   to   all   for   your   continued   support   and   let’s   keep   our   fingers   crossed  for  some  drier,  sunnier  weather  soon!

à plus, Sarah. Email: info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or Tel: 05 49 70 26 21.

Emergency Numbers: 15 SAMU, Medical 17 Gendarmes, Police 18 Pompiers, Fire

112 European emergency 113 Drugs and alcohol

CONTENTS

What’s  On.....................................................................................4 Hobbies,  Clubs  &  Associations.....................................................6 Getting  Out  &  About....................................................................7 Take  a  Break...............................................................................16 A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.................................17 Health,  Beauty  &  Fitness............................................................18 Our  Furry  Friends.......................................................................19 The  Great  Outdoors...................................................................21 French  Life,  Food  &  Drink...........................................................25 French  Adventures.....................................................................27 Motoring....................................................................................28 Communications........................................................................30 Building  &  Renovation...............................................................32 Business,  Finance  &  Property.....................................................37

THIS  MONTH’S  ADVERTISERS  

79  Renovations.....................................................................................................36 A  La  Bonne  Vie  (Restaurant)................................................................................ 25 Ace  Pneus  (Tyre  Supplier  &  Fitter)...................................................................... 27 Affordable  UK  Designs  (Kitchens  &  UPVC  D/Glazing)......................................... 2 AKE  Petits  Travaux  (Builder)................................................................................ 33 Alan  Pearce  (Plumbing  &  Heating)..................................................................... 35 Andrew  Longman  (Plumber)............................................................................... 35 An  English  Nursery  in  France  (Garden  Centre).................................................... 23 A.P.S.  Automobiles  (FORD  Garage)...................................................................... 21 ARB  French  Property............................................................................................ 40 Arbrecadabra.com  (Tree  surgery)........................................................................ 23 Art  &  Design  Courses........................................................................................... 11 Assurances  Maucourt  /  GAN............................................................................... 37 Blevins  Franks  Financial  Management  Ltd.......................................................... 37 Blue  Bicycle  B&B  /  Chambre  d’Hôtes.................................................................. 37 British  Mobile  Mechanic  (John  Purchase)........................................................... 29 Café  des  Belles  Fleurs.......................................................................................... 26 Caniclôture  (Hidden  fencing)............................................................................... 19 Chris  Bassett  Construction.................................................................................. 33 Christies  (English  Book  Shop  and  Tea  Room)...................................................... 7

...continued.   Cottage  Services  (Garden  Maintenance)............................................................ 23 CSB  Construction................................................................................................. 33 Currencies  Direct  (Money  Transfers)................................................................... 38 Cut  46  (Hair  Salon).............................................................................................. 18 Cyane  Electric  Water  Conditioners..................................................................... 11 Dave  Bowring  (Electrician).................................................................................. 36 Dave  Rosenberg  (Carpenter  &  Joiner)................................................................ 33 David  Watkins  (Chimney  Sweep)......................................................................... 32 DJ  Jeff  (Professional  DJ)....................................................................................... 8 D  J  Maintenance  (Handyman)............................................................................ 36 Electricien  Anglais  en  France.............................................................................. 36 Energie-­‐79........................................................................................................... 35 Fresco  Interiors  ................................................................................................... 9 Garage  Planchet  (Renault)................................................................................... 29 Gardening  &  Cleaning  Services  (Dean  Smalley).................................................. 39 George  Rayner  Computers.................................................................................. 31 Glass  2  France...................................................................................................... 32 Hallmark  Electronique  (Electricians  &  Sat.  Engineers)........................................ 36 Homes  In  France  (Tony  Murdoch)....................................................................... 43 35 Insink  Plumbing................................................................................................. .. 33 James  Harris  (Plasterer)....................................................................................... 23 John  Etherington  (Home  and  Garden)................................................................ 34 John  Snee  (Groundworks  &  Septic  Tanks)........................................................... 36 John  Spray  Maçonnerie  (Stonemason)............................................................... 42 Julie’s  Cleaning  Services....................................................................................... 12 La  Deuxieme  Chance  (Annie  Sloan  chalk  paint  supplier).................................... 42 Leggett  Immobilier.............................................................................................. 22 Le  Logis  (Rare  Breed  Pigs).................................................................................... 7 Le  Petit  Cadeau.................................................................................................... 37 Le  Petit  Logis  (B&B  and  Chambre  d’Hotes)......................................................... 38 Le  Tour  de  Finance............................................................................................... 19 Les  Deux  Chênes  Cattery..................................................................................... 41 L’Immobilier  de  l’Autize....................................................................................... 28 Man  &  Van........................................................................................................... 25 Mad  Hatter’s  Kitchen.......................................................................................... 32 Mark  Sabestini  Renovation  &  Construction........................................................ 35 MB  Plumbing  &  Building  Services....................................................................... 33 Michael  Glover  (Plasterer,  Renderer  &  Tiler)...................................................... 31 ML  Computers..................................................................................................... 28 Mutuelle  de  Poitiers  Assurances......................................................................... 32 Nathan  Foster  Building  Services.......................................................................... 36 Needa  Hand  Services........................................................................................... 18 Pamela  Irving  (Massage  &  Reflexology).............................................................. 13 Pascale  Matéo  (French  Lessons)......................................................................... 34 Philip  Irving  (Mini  Digger  hire)............................................................................. 34 Phil  Savage  (General  House  Repairs).................................................................. 42 Poitou  Property  Services..................................................................................... 25 Polar  Express  (Frozen  Foods).............................................................................. 29 Premier  Autos  (Mechanic).................................................................................. 33 R&A  Services........................................................................................................ 10 Reflets  de  campagne........................................................................................... 26 Restaurant  des  Canards....................................................................................... 2 Rob  Berry  (Plasterer)........................................................................................... 30 Ross  Hendry  (Interface  Consulting  &  Engineering)............................................. 18 Sandy  G  (Hairdresser).......................................................................................... 31 Satellite  TV  (Nigel  Gubb)...................................................................................... 34 sarl  Down  to  Earth  (Groundwork  &  Construction)............................................. 39 Siddalls  (Financial  Advisors)................................................................................. 36 Simon  The  Tiler.................................................................................................... 38 Spectrum  IFA  Group  (Amanda  Johnson)............................................................. 35 Steve  Enderby...................................................................................................... 30 Sue  Burgess  (French  Courses  &  Translation)....................................................... 35 Taylor  Electricté................................................................................................... 29 The  English  Mechanic  &  Son  -­‐  Tony  Eyre............................................................ 7 The  Market.......................................................................................................... 34 Total  Renovation  Services  (Michael  Dominey)................................................... 18 Tracey  Bowring  (Hairdressing  &  Nails)................................................................ 13 Val  Assist  (Translation  Services)........................................................................... 2 Steve  Reid  (Building  &  Renovation)..................................................................... 12 Vendée  Houses.................................................................................................... 44 Vendée  Pools.......................................................................................................

©  Sarah  Berry   2013.     All   rights  reserved.    Material   may   not   be   reproduced  without  permission.    While   care   is   taken  to  ensure  that  articles  and  features  are  accurate,  Sarah   Berry   accepts  no  liability   for   reader  dissatisfaction.     The   opinions  expressed   and  experiences   shared  are   given  by  individual   authors  and  do  not  necessarily  represent  the   views  or  opinions  of  the  publisher.    Please  ensure  you  verify  that  the  company  you  are  dealing  with  is  a  registered  trading  company  in  France  and/or  elsewhere. <<The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly>>  est  édité  par  Sarah  Berry,   La  Bartière,   79130,   Secondigny.   Tél:   05  49  70   26  21.    Directeur  de  la  publication  et  rédacteur  en  chef:  Sarah  Berry.   Crédits  photos:  Sarah  Berry,   Clkr   et   morgeufile.com.  Impression:  Raynaud  Imprimeurs,  zone  industrielle,  BP13,  79160,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize.    Dépôt  légal:  avril  2013  -­‐  Tirage:  5000  exemplaires.    Siret:  515  249  738  00011  ISSN:  2115-­‐4848

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

What’s On... April 2013 1st  April  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Limalonges See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 3rd  April  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Chef  Boutonne See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 4th  April  -­‐  English  Books,  Quiz  +  Fish  &  Chips At  Bar   la   Cabane   de  Vouhé,  Vouhé.    From  6.30pm.  See  Paperback   Jan’s  dates  on  P.5  for  details. 5th  -­‐  21st  April  -­‐  Group’Art  Exhibition At  the  Temple  de  Chauray.  Mon-­‐Fri  15h-­‐19h,  Weekends  11am-­‐  7pm 5th  April  -­‐  Phoenix  Cards  &  Gifts. New  Spring  brochure  available,  4-­‐6pm  at  the  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges-­‐ sur-­‐l'Autize.   For   a   catalogue   or   info   about   joining   the   Phoenix   team,  contact  Della  James  05  49  05  78  61 6th  &  7th  April  -­‐  Fils  en  Folie.  Exhibition  and  Sale.   Créatrices   de   Broderie.   Cross   stitch,   patchwork,   Hardinger,   Swiss   Embroidery  and  more.  Place  Socio-­‐culturelle,  Place  des  Halles,  Sauzé-­‐ Vaussais  79190.  Open:  10am-­‐6pm.  Over   30  contributors.  FREE  ENTRY,   Workshops,   Demonstrations,  Raffle.  Snacks   &  lunch   available.  Info:   Sylvie.creation79@gmail.com  (Fr)/  annettedavid@wanadoo.fr  (En) 9th  April  -­‐  Le  Tour  de  Finance,  Niort. See  advert  on  P.38  for  more  details. 10th  April  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Aigre See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 10th  April  -­‐  Finding  Work  in  the  Gatîne Presentation  by  Pays  de  Gatine,  9.30am-­‐12pm,  See  poster  on  P.12 11th  April  -­‐  Top  Hat  Quiz  &  Curry  at  Champniers See  www.tophatquizzes.com  for  more  information. 12th  April  -­‐  Spring  Dance  in  aid  of  All  Saints  Vendée At   the   Salle  municipale,  St   Maurice  le   Girard,  starting  at  7.30pm.     Call  Jenny  on  02  51  51  23  62  for  tickets.  (10€  each).   12th  April  -­‐  Quiz  Night At  Camping  le  Moulin,  Chef  Boutonne.     Food  available.    Please  see   advert  on  P.26  for  information. 13th  April  -­‐  The  Market  Re-­‐opens At  Luché  sur  Brioux.    See  advert  on  P.7 13th  April  -­‐  Live  Music  with  ‘KADER’ At  Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux  at  8pm.    See  advert  on  P.26 17th  April  -­‐  Mind,  Body  &  Soul Pause!  Cafe  L’Absie  will  be  hosting  the  first  of  a  regular  ‘Mind,  Body   &   Soul‘   afternoons   from   2pm-­‐5pm.   Come   and   join   expert   therapists   for   what   is   sure   to   be   a   popular   event.   For   more   information  e-­‐mail  mail@pause-­‐cafe-­‐labsie.com. 19th  April  -­‐  Mexican  Themed  Evening At   A  La  Bonne  Vie,  Le  Beugnon.  With  entertainment  from  Memory   Lane.    Please  see  advert  on  P.25. 24th  April  -­‐  PC  Course  “Free  Stuff  from  the  Internet"   At  Pause!  Café,  L’Absie.    Please  contact  Ross  on:  rs.hendry@gmail.com 25th  April  -­‐  Reaction  Theatre  performs  ‘Calendar  Girls’ At  Le  Petit  Theatre,  Secondigny  at  8pm.    Please  see  more  info  on  P.14 26th  April  -­‐  Reaction  Theatre  performs  ‘Calendar  Girls’ At  Le  Petit  Theatre,  Secondigny  at  8pm.    Please  see  more  info  on  P.14 28th  April  to  5th  May  -­‐  Music  in  the  Gatîne  Music  Festival 28th  April,  Bruno  Cocset,  5pm  at  St   Loup  Church.  For   information   &  reservations  please  call:  05  49  70  81  92

Monthly  services  at  the  English  speaking  Church  in  Deux-­‐Sèvres Jassay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ  the  Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,     has  a  Home  Group   Service  at  Jassay    commencing  at  11.00am  on   every  2nd  Sunday  in  the  month.   It   is   held  at   the   home  of  Ann   White,  where   a   warm  welcome   awaits   everyone  for   a   time   of   worship  and  fellowship. Chef Boutonne The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ   the   Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also   holds  services  on  the  1st  Sunday  of  each  month  at  10.30am   during  the   winter   in   the   Little   Stone   Church   at  Chef   Boutonne.   After   each   service,   tea   or   coffee   is   served   and   there   is   an   opportunity  to  meet  other  people  in  the  area. Parthenay The  Chaplaincy  of  Christ   the   Good  Shepherd,  Poitou-­‐Charentes,   also  holds  services  on   the  4th   Sunday  of  each   month  at  10.30am   in  the  Presbytery  Rooms,  rue  de  la  Citadelle,  Parthenay,  opposite   St   Croix  Church.  After   each   service,  tea   or   coffee  is   served  and   everyone  is  invited  to  a  'bring  and  share'  lunch. For   further   informabon   about   locabon   of   churches   and   about   what   else   is   happening   near   you,   please   take   a   look   at   our   website   www.church-­‐in-­‐france.com   or   contact   us   at   office.goodshepherd@orange.fr Monthly  services   in  the   English  speaking  Anglican  Church  in  the   Vendée: Puy de Serre All   Saints,  Vendée  holds  two  services  each   month,  on  the   2nd   and   4th  Sundays  at  the  church  of  St.  Marthe,  Puy  de  Serre,  at  11am.    After   each  service,  tea  and  coffee  is  served  in  the  parish  room  and  everyone   is  invited  to  a  ‘bring  and  share’  lunch. Other   services  are  held  in  the   west   of   the   Vendée,  in   La   Chapelle   Achard  and  La  Chapelle  Palluau.    For  details  of  these,  please  check  the   website:    www.allsaintsvendee.fr A  VERY  WARM  WELCOME  awaits  you  at  ESCOVAL   (The  English  Speaking  Church  of  the  Valley  of  the  Loire).     Communion  Services  are  held  on  the  3rd  Sunday  of  each  month   at   La  Chapelle  de  la  Bonne  Dame  de  Ranton  at  11.30am  followed  by  a   Bring  and  Share  lunch.   Full   details   of   how   to   find   us   may   be   found   on   our   website   at:   www.escoval.org   or  please   telephone   us  on:   05   49  66   79   14.     Our  GPS  address  is  46˚59'25.30  N    0˚02'06.22  W.

Mondays:

What’s Coming Up... 28th  April  to  5th  May  -­‐  Music  in  the  Gatîne  Music  Festival 4th  May,  6.30pm  and  8.30pm  in  Airvault  Museum:  Schubertiades  1  &  2 5th  May,  Collégiale   de  St  Marc  la  Lande  at   17h:Damien  Guillon  and   the  Banquet  Céleste. 2nd  May  -­‐  Fresco  Interiors  Shop  Opening At  9  rue  du  duc  D’Aquitaine,  Vouvant.  See  advert  on  P.9 5th  May  -­‐  Canal  Creepers  New  Orleans  Jazz  Band  Apero  Concert In  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’autize  at  6pm.    More  details  P.8 5th  May  -­‐  Cerizay  Male  Voice  Choir  Concert At  the  Church  St  Maurice  des  Noues,  La  Chataigneraie  at  3pm.  See  P9 12th  May  -­‐  Clear  Your  Clutter  for  Charity At  Paperback  Jan’s,  La  Ferriere-­‐sur-­‐Parthenay.  See  more  details  on  P.5

• • Tuesdays: • • • Wednesdays: • Thursdays: • • Fridays: • • Saturdays: • • • • • • Sundays: •

Benet (dept.85) Lencloitre (1st Monday in month)(dept.86) Lezay Coulonges-sur-l’Autize Thouars Parthenay Sauzé Vaussais Niort Thouars Melle Chef Boutonne Airvault Niort Coulon St. Maixent l’École Fontenay le Comte Neuville (dept.86)

Photo: Lisa Roberts

Local Markets

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Mr T’s Friterie

Open 6.30

-9pm

• Rouillac  Foire  (27th  month)        H      ilaire                      de  Villefranche • Aulnay    (Open  from  6pm)        •          St   • St  Jean  d’Angély • Gourville                     • Loulay +  Bar  le  Saint  Martin  BRUX,  3  &  17  April • Matha Reserve  with  Bar  05  49  53  62  84 With regular venues at:

See  www.frying2nite.com  for  details  or  call  06  02  22  44  74

Reel Fish & Chips Traditional English style Fish & Chips

Weds 3rd April -  The Canteen, Etusson Friday 5th April -  Bar Tabac, Bouille-Loretz Weds 24th April - The Canteen, Etusson Thurs 25th April - St Martin de Sanzay Friday 26th April -  Bar Tabac, Genneton

18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00 18H30 - 21H00

Tel: 06 04 14 23 94, or visit: www.reelfishandchips.net

                         

Paperback  Jan Books  in  English

3rd  Apr:     Café  Cour  du  Miracle,  Vouvant.  2.30pm-­‐4.30pm 4th  Apr:     Bar  le  Palais,  St  Aubin  le  Cloud.  2pm  -­‐  5pm 4th  Apr:     Bar  La  Cabane  de  Vouhé,  Vouhé.  6.30pm  -­‐  8pm* 5th  Apr:     Bar  de  la  Paix,  Thouars.       12pm  -­‐  2pm 5th  Apr:     Le  Tipsy  Bar,  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize.    4pm  -­‐  6pm 7th  Apr:     Café  des  Belles  Fleurs,  Fenioux.  2pm  -­‐  4pm 11th  Apr:    Pause!  Cafe,  L’Absie.    2pm-­‐  5pm 12th  Apr:     Jan’s  home,  La  Ferrière-­‐en-­‐Parthenay.  11am  -­‐  4pm 13th  Apr:     Cafe  Le  Chauray,  St  Maixent  l’Ecole.    10am  -­‐  1pm 25th  Apr:     La  Joie  de  Vivre,  Moncoutant.    2pm  -­‐  5pm 26th  Apr:    Le  P’tit  Bar  Boucard,  Ménigoute.    4pm  -­‐  6pm *+  Quiz  &  Fish  and  Chips

For  more  info  contact  Jan  on: 06  08  30  73  29  or  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com

‘A  Great  Big  Bring  &  Buy  Sale’

La  Ferriére-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  12th  May  2013  

More  news  from  Clear  Your  Clutter  for  Charity ...  12th  May!

• Wednesdays (Apr 3rd, 10th, 17th & 24th) Bar ‘Auberge le St Vincent’, St Vincent Sterlanges • Thursdays (Apr 4th, 11th, 18th & 25th) Bar ‘La Rando’, Mervent.

The   list   of   stall   holders   is   growing   and   the   people   offering  to   donate   things  to  sell   are  very  happy  to   help.    The  British   Legion   are   providing   a   tombola,   a   stall   of   goodies   to   sell,   plus   refreshments  and  cakes.  Hope  Animal  association   have  agreed  to   come   along,  and   the  day  wouldn’t   be  the  same   without   Haley   and  Andy’s   Reel  Fish  &  Chips,  or  Gaereth’s  British  Beers.     Lots  of   folk  are   coming  to   sell   their   own   clutter   and   will   be  happy  to   donate   a  percentage  of   the   day’s  takings   to   a   charity   of   their   choice.  

• Fridays (Apr 5th, 12th, 19th & 26th) Bar ‘Au Bon Coin’, Thoursais Bouildroux

For  more  info  please  see  visit  website:   www.lavendeechippy.com

Open 6-8p

Fish 4 Chip Fish, Chips & mushy peas!

                                                 

Clear  Your  Clutter  For  Charity

                                                         La  Vendée  Chippy                                                          Traditional  Fish  &  Chips  in  France!

                                                                                               

m

Mondays: Bar Tilleuls, Champniers (near Civray) Tuesdays: Sauzé-Vaussais (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Wednesdays: Chef Boutonne (near Chateau) Thursdays: Sauzé-Vaussais - Lunch times. (Main square & can be eaten in local bar) Fridays: Mansle (Car park of Simply Supermarket) Tel: 06 37 53 56 20, or visit: www.mobilefishandchipsfrance.com

Now  is  the  time   to   enrol   your   charity  into  this  fun  day  of   fund   raising,  or  book  a  place  for   yourself,  you  can  join  in  with  the  fun   in  lots  of  ways  so  please  contact  me. My  local  infant  school  has  shown  an  interest  in  the  event  and  are   rehearsing  a  little  song  or  dance  (they  haven’t  decided  which  yet)     to   be   performed   on   12th   May.     We   are   also   looking  for   other   folks  who  would   like   to   perform  a  bit  of   an  ‘exhibition’   piece,  if   you   play   an   instrument,   can   sing,   dance   or   something   else   to   inspire  us,  and  would  like  to  showcase  your  talents  please  get  in   touch. Paperback  Jan  email:  paperbackjan@gmail.com  or   telephone  06  08  30  73  29

The National Holidays, Religious and Feast Days 2013 Monday  1st  April.............. Wednesday  1st  May.......... Wednesday  8th  May......... Thursday  9th  May............. Sunday  19th  May.............. Monday  20th  May............. Sunday  14th  July............... Thursday  15th  August....... Friday  1st  November......... Monday  11th  November... Wednesday  25th  December.

Easter  Monday  (Lundi  de  Pâques) Labour  Day (Fête  du  travail) Victory  in  Europe  Day  (Fête  de  la  Victoire) Ascension  Day (Ascension) Pentacost (Pentecôte) Pentacost (Lundi  de  Pentecôte) Nabonal  Day  (Fête  Na<onale  de  France) Assumpbon  of  Mary (Assomp<on) All  Saint’s  Day (Toussaint) Armisbce  Day  (Armistace  1918) Christmas  Day  (Noël)

Classes at ‘Maison pour tous’, L’Absie. 7pm - 8.30pm on Thursdays & Salle de millenaire, rue saint roch, Largeasse. 7pm - 8,30pm on Wednesdays. Contact Rysz for more info: 06 42 35 97 11

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Hobbies, Clubs & Associations... Book  Club  Thouars.    Do  you  enjoy  reading  a  cracking  good  story?   And  talking  to  others  about  it?  Do  you  live  in  north  79,  south  49   or  north  86?  Come  along  to  our  book  club..... Contact  Alison  Morton  at  info@bookclubthouars.fr  for  more  details.

Cycling  Group Do  you  enjoy  cycling?     I  am  a  keen  cyclist  and  looking   for   others   to   meet   up   with   me   for   outings   once   or   twice  a  week.    Purely  for  leisure  and  very  informal  with   a  coffee  stop  en  route.  I  live  at  Pamplie,  near  Secondigny. Contact:    steve.coupland@hotmail.com    /  05  49  28  24  06

Cancer Support in Deux-Sèvres

Cancer support aims to improve the lives Of people affected by cancer. Don’t worry alone, pick up the phone. For Further information contact: June Searchfield: Tel: 05 49 64 59 96 or email: junesearchfield@gmail.com We are here for you and your Family

Open Door Lending Library Over 7000 fiction and non-fiction books and DVDs Open Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 10h00 to midday at 18 rue Pierre Pestureau, Civray (86400) Individual membership 6€, family membership 10€ www.opendoor-civray.com

Book Group....meeting 2nd Thursday of the Alone  in  France? We  are  a  group  of  people  living  alone   in  the   L'Absie  area  who  meet   regularly  for  coffee  and  lunches.    We   meet   on  the  1st  and  3rd  Tuesdays  at  11am   for  coffee  at  the  Pause  cafe  in   L'Absie.    Our  lunches  are  at  different  venues  each  month.  There's  a   warm  welcome  if  you'd  like  to  join  us.   More  details  from  Frank  05  49  69  80  47.

Franglais  Thouars The   Thouars   ‘Franglais’   group   meets   every   Wednesday   from   19.30h   to   21.00h,   in   the   Association’s   centre   at   7   rue   Anne   Desrays,  Thouars,  for  conversation  in  English  and  French. We   welcome   those   of   all   nationalities   who   would   like   to   participate.  Either  come  along  to  see  us  one  evening,  or  contact  us   at:  Mobile:    06  52  21  92  34  ~  Email:    jcbed@orange.fr

Association Meridien Green We   are   an   Anglo-­‐French   group   which   was   founded   in   2001   for   mutual   understanding   of   each   other's   language   and   culture.   We   meet   twice   weekly   in   the   Salle   des   Associations   in   St   Coutant,   79120.     The   best   way   to   find   out   more   is   to   visit   our   website   -­‐   www.meridiengreen.asso.fr  or  contact  Maureen  Dalby:   05  49  29  94  50.  The  name   of  our  group  comes  from   the  fact  that  St   Coutant  is  on  the  Greenwich  Meridian! Le   Tallud   Boules   en   bois   are   offering   sessions   every   Wednesday   from   16h   to  18h   from  April  through  to  September   2013  at   the  parc   de   Loisirs,   Le   Tallud.    Everyone  is  welcome  to   come   and   play   or   learn   the   game   of   boules   en   bois.   We  have  all  the  equipment,  just   turn   up   for   half   an   hour   or   more   for   a   bit   of   exercise   and   socialising.   Details   from   Rosemary   Williamson   rw.williamson@orange.fr

The Harmonics   Singing   Group.   Based   in   the   Salle  

d'Annexe  behind  the  mairie  in  Civray.  We  meet  each  Wednesday  from   2.00pm   to  4.00pm.   No   experience   necessary   just   a   willingness   and   commitment   to   learn.   We   sing   all   sorts   of   music   and   in   several   languages,  whatever   the  music  dictates.  We   are   a  small   and  friendly   group  who  would  love  to  meet  you. Contact:  Dolly  Ait  Boualou:  05  45  22  89  32  or  sylvia.murray@wanadoo.fr   or  Margaret  Gomersall  on  05  49  48  09  02  or  margaretgomersall@sfr.fr Through the Lens Group Local photography group meets on the last Monday in each month to chat about all things photography! New members welcome. For further information contact: Ian Gawn: 02 51 00 84 52 or Brian Preece: 05 49 72 09 94

month from 3pm at Christies Tea Room & Bookshop, Gençay, 86160. Take a look at the Book Group page on the website: www.chezchristies.com for more information. The  Filling  Station  ~  Poitou-­Charentes  and  Vendée The   Filling   Station   is   a   network   of   local   Christians   of   all   denominations   who   meet   together   regularly   for   spiritual   renewal  &  evangelism  purposes.    ALL  WELCOME. Please  see  our  website  for  details  of  meetings  and  spring   programmes  www.the@illingstation.org.uk  or  locally  contact   05  45  29  58  91  or  email:jackie.james46@yahoo.com.   Next  Meeting:  11th  April,  Chef  Boutonne  79110.

2nd Sunday Motorcycle Club www.2ndsundayclub.fr If you would like to attend our coffee mornings please contact us via the website........New members always welcome! Rubber Bridge:would any of you bridge players out there in the Deux-Sèvres, be interested in making up an occasional 4? Email David Rowe: djfrowe@hotmail.com or' phone 05 49 63 26 57.

Les Amis Solitaires We  are  a  group  of  people   living  alone  in  France.    We  meet  up   for   coffee  mornings  from  11am. 1st  Tuesday:  The  Gallery,  Civray  (coinciding  with  market  day). Every  2nd  &  4th  Thursday,  The  Lemon  Tree,  Sauzé  Vaussais. Every  3rd  Thursday,  Le  Bistrot  Centrale  in  Ruffec.     More   details   from   Gwen   Shepherd   05   49   87   91   79   or   email   gwanshep@gmail.com A R E  Y O U A M O D E L R A I L W A Y ENTHUSIAST? If so, join a group of likeminded modellers who meet on a monthly basis to visit members' layouts and swap information. We are based on the DeuxSevres/Vendee border but also have members in the Vienne and Charente. If you are interested please contact Gerry Riley for more information on 05 49 63 34 01. Secondigny Running Club... Put the bounce back in your step. Join our friendly and supportive running group. All abilities welcome. Email Kelly for more details: kellyencezelle@hotmail.co.uk

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Getting Out & About... Le Petit Cadeau

If   you're  looking  for  a  special  gift  for  a  birthday,  wedding,  new  baby  or   even  if   you  like  to   treat  yourself  every  now  and  then,  come  along  to  'Le  Petit  Cadeau'.    It  may  have  just  what   you're  looking  for!     Gifts  for   all   occasions  and  ages,  quality   gift  wrap  and  a  selection   of   English  cards  at  reasonable  prices. My  name  is   Carol,  I  am  originally  from  Manchester  in  the   North  of  England   but  have  lived  in  Parthenay  for   almost  2   years.   Before  that   I  lived   in  Brittany  for   7  years   with   my   husband  and  3  daughters,  where  we  ran  two  gites. After   finishing   a   renovation   project   and   when   my   youngest   daughter   started   at   primary  school   this  year,  I   decided   it   was   high  time   for   me  to  return  to  work.    But   what   to   do?     Although   I  can   speak   some   French,  it   isn't   perfect,  so  paid   employment  is  difficult  to  find.  So  I  had  an   idea  for   a  small   gift   shop,  something  that   I  thought   was   missing  from  the  area. After   5   months  of   planning,   'Le   Petit   Cadeau'   has   now   come   to   fruition.   It   stocks   a   wide   variety   of   gifts   from   jewellery   to   designer   handbags,   bath   and   beauty   products   and   unique  gift  ideas,  all  beautifully  gift  wrapped  if   required. Please   come   along   to   take   a   look   and   say   hello...you  can  find   us  next   to  Cap   Pizza  at  39   rue   Jean-­‐Jaurés,   Parthenay   (close   to   the     parking  at  place  de  la  Saunerie).

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Canal  Creepers  New  

Orleans  Jazz  Band in  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize

Lovers  of  New  Orleans   jazz  have   a   treat   in   store   for   them  on   Sunday   5   May   when   the   Canal   Creepers   New   Orleans   Jazz   Band  comes  to  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐l’Autize  as  part   of  the  La  Rochelle   Dixie  Jazz  Festival. There  will   be  a   New   Orleans  style  parade  from  the  church  to   the  château  between  11h   and  midday;  and   it  will  be  followed   by   an   apero   concert   at   l’Espace   Colonica   starting   at   6pm.     Entrée  for  the   concert  is  8€.  Reservations  are  advisable  for   this   Concert  Exceptionnel  and   can   be  made  by  telephone:  05  49   64   24  24. The  Canal  Creepers  will  be  on  their  way  back  to  Sweden  having   been  in  La  Rochelle  from  30  April   to   4  May,  and  before  that  in   the   annual   ‘French   Quarter   Festival’   in   New   Orleans   at   the   beginning   of   April   to   which   they   have   been   specially   invited   these  last  ten  years.    We  let  them  tell  you   about  themselves  in   their  own  words. “The  Canal   Creepers   New  Orleans   Jazz   Band  was  formed  near   Stockholm   twenty   years   ago   by  some   of  us  who   enjoyed   and   played  this  lovely  music  when  we  were  young  (or  younger!)  and   have  never  ceased  to  adore  –  it  is  really  true  that  love   does  not   tarnish!    A  witty  member  of  the  band  once  jokingly  renamed   an   old   nearby   waterway   the   ‘Mississippi   of   the   region’  and   this   canal  inspired   the  first   part   of  the  band’s  name  (also  and   with   more  than   one   glance  at   the  ‘Canal  Street   Blues’  composed  by   the   great  King  Oliver).    But  you  may   ask  why  ‘Creepers’?    Well   we  simply  needed  another  word  beginning  with  ‘C’. We  play  the  original  jazz  from  the  good   old  days,  music   which   makes   you   really   happy,  swinging   so   hard   you   simply   have  to   move   your  feet!       We  know,  because  we   have  performed  in  lots   of  places;  at   festivals,  restaurants,  pubs   and  parties  in  Sweden   and  in  the  USA,  Italy  and  France. Our   greatest   source  of  pride  and   joy  is  the  invitation   we  have   received  annually  for   more   than  ten   years  to  participate  in   the   ‘French   Quarter   Festival’   in   New   Orleans,   Louisiana,   the   ‘Birthplace  of  Jazz’.     During  the  festival   we  perform  in   the   big   Kick-­‐Off   Parade,   on   the   international   stage,   and   also   daily   at   Fritzel’s   Jazz   Club   on   Bourbon   Street.     We   were   even   once   invited,   as   the   first   foreign   band   ever,   to   participate   in   the   ‘Battle   of   Bands’.     Moreover,   the   old   city   itself,   its   magic   atmosphere,  its  skillful  and  friendly  musicians  and  ‘all  that   jazz’   constitute   a   wonderful   experience,   not   least   when   the   inhabitants  of   New   Orleans  dance  and   prance   in  the  street  to   our   music!       We   are   happy  beyond   words  to   go   there   every   spring  and  intend  to  continue  these  trips  as  long  as  possible” And  so  that  you  know   what   a   treat   there   is  in  store,  jazz   lovers   can  visit  their  site  www.canalcreepers.se  and  listen  to  them  play   and  see  photos  of  their  participation  in  previous  festivals  in  New   Orleans  and  La  Rochelle. Prepared  by:   Barrie  HILL,  4  rue  de  la  Garmitrie,  Fougères,  79160  BECELEUF 05  49  04  33  02  /  06  31  12  46  61  /  email:  barrie.hill@orange.fr Painting: Canal Creepers à côte du marché à La Rochelle pendant un parade by Barrie Hill

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Come and Sing the Hymns you love across South West France Cast   your   mind   back   to   all   those   glorious   traditional  hymns  you  enjoyed   in  the  past.  Gems   such   as  ‘Onward   Christian   Soldiers’  or   ‘Guide   me   O   thou  Great  Redeemer’  a  favourite  of  Welsh  rugby  fans. How  would   you  like   to   come  and   immerse  yourselves  into   the   British   choral   tradition   and   have  a  really   good   sing!   The  many   Anglican  churches  from  the  Poitou-­‐Charentes  in  the  west  to  Pau   in   the   south   and   from   the   Atlantic   to   Cahors   in   the   Tarn   will   reverberate  to   the  glorious  sounds   of   those   traditional   hymns   during  the  week  of  8th  April. Not  formal   services  but  simply  a  selection  of  hymns  interspersed   by   lighthearted   readings   or   poems.   Some   will   feature   choirs,   others   musicians  and   others  well   known   personalities   who  will   make  it  all  happen.  Good  opportunities  to   meet  new  people  and   to  find  out  about  the  local  social  and  church  community  events.   In   the   Poitou-­‐Charentes:   La   Rochefoucauld   (16)   and   Jarnac   (16)    will  both  be  participating  on  Thursday  11th  April    at  6pm.   Come  and  have  fun  singing  the  hymns  you  love! For  further  details  of  the  Songs  of  Praise  evening  nearest  to  you,   please   visit   the   Chaplaincy   web   site:   www.church-­‐in-­‐ france.com  or  contact  Kate  at  katetwoplus@yahoo.co.uk

Cérizay Male Voice Choir to perform joint concert with Choraline in the Vendée. New   choristers   of   any   nationality   are   always   welcomed   by   Céridièse.      Céridièse  is  a  mixed  choir  which  was  founded  in  1999   in  Cérizay  and  currently  consists  of  61  choristers. The  quality  of  the  male  voices   in  the  group  inspired  the  creation   of  the  male  voice  choir   five  years  ago.     Under   the   professional   directorship  of   Gérald  Martin,  this  choir  has  gone  from   strength   to  strength.    The   group   is   composed   of   11  tenors,  3     baritones   and  5  bass.      The  programmes  they  perform  are  varied,  ranging   from   Gregorian   chants   and   sacred   music   through   to   extracts   from  operatic   songs,   Russian   folk   songs   and   negro   spirituals  in   English. The  male  voice  choir   meets  on   a  Monday  evening  at   6.30pm  in   the   salle   Pérochon,   avenue   du   Gal.   Marigny,  in   Cérizay  for   a   2   hour   practice.     The   choir   has  the  sound   of   a  traditional   British   male  voice  choir   about   it.    So   far   there  is   just   one   English  bass,   with  many  choristers  speaking  welsh. At   their  next  concert,  on  5th  May,  starting  at  3pm  the  male  voice   choir   will   be   performing   with   Choraline,  a   mixed   choir   from   la   Châtaigneraie,   in  the  church  of  St   Maurice   des  Noues   over   the   border   in  the  Vendée.       All  proceeds  from  the  concert   will  go  to   the  Parkinson’s  Association. For  further  information  contact  Bernie  Salter  on  05  49  80  19  72

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Coulonges-sur-l’Autize has its own Aladdin’s Cave!

Are  you  looking  for   that  special   gift  for  any  occasion;  Easter,  Birthday,  Christmas,  or  perhaps  some  unusual  decoration   or  piece  of  furniture  to   make  your   home  more  alluring?     Then  look  no  further...and  please  step  inside  our   Aladdin's  Cave  -­‐  Reflets  de  Campagne,  in  Coulonges-­‐sur-­‐   L’Autize. Here   we   have   a   warm   friendly   relaxed   atmosphere,   the   boutique   displaying  a  huge  range  of  original   homeware,  scented   products,  and   beautiful  furniture. The   shop   has  been   open   for   just   over  7  years  and  was  born  out  of  a   passion   of   the   owner,   Mme   Nathalie   Guinyard.     Its  popularity   has   spread  far   and   wide  through   word   of   mouth,   with   customers   visiting  from  Paris,  Bordeaux,  the   Vendée,   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres,   and   beyond. We   exhibit   over   5000   different   articles,  our  main  suppliers  being   ‘Comptoir   de   Famille’,   ‘Jardin   D’Ulysse’,  and  ‘Country  Corner’.     We   also   have  a  huge  selection  of  tea   available   in   100gm   and   50gm   sachets,   all   natural   and   free   from   additives,   supplied   by   ‘Comptoir   Francais  du  Thé’. Last   year   we   extended  our   premises  and  we  now  have   a  very  attractive  showroom   on   the   first   floor   displaying   a   large   selection   of   furniture   and   soft   furnishings. Our  emphasis  is  on  browsing  and  taking  time  to  choose.     We  don’t  offer  pressure,  just  help  and  ideas,  and  if  you  choose  not  to  buy  we  look   forward  to  seeing  you  in  the  future.    Our  service  is  important  to  us  and  therefore  we  want  you  to  be  happy,  so  browse  to  your  heart’s  content!     We  are  French  and  English  speaking.

COLOUR with Rupert & Leo !

busy designing more pictures to Rupert & Leo Roxburgh-Abbs have been A selection of pictures can be er. East colour! This time something for www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr downloaded and printed from our website:

Have Fun!

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Shaping the Unbounded by Josie Bounds

“Shut  your  eyes  and  see,”  as  James  Joyce  puts  it  in   the  first  chapter   of   Ulysses.  There   are  various  ways  of   seeing,   we   can   see   in   the   light,  or  in  the   dark,  with  our  eyes  open  or  with  them  shut.  Artists   who  decide  to  use  abstraction,  all  demand  a  special  kind   of  seeing   from  the  viewer. Art   has   constantly   moved   the   boundaries,   challenging   religion,   politics,   society   and   culture,  going  beyond   the  limits  of   ordinary   experience,   obscuring   meanings,   bringing   new   ways   of   looking,   feeling,  experiencing  and   understanding  to  the  viewer.  Aesthetics   for  artists  underpin  principles  behind  their  work,  what  is  exciting  is   the   way   in   which   branches   of   philosophy,   religion,   culture   and   politics   are   stripped   and   represented,   questioning   our   belief   systems. We  the  viewers  become  part   of   the   artist’s   journey,  bridging  the   gap  between   process   and  product.  The  artist’s   intention  through   realisation  is   a  creative  act,  creating  a  gap,  which  leaves  the   artist   unable   to   express  fully   their   intention,  a  gap   that  is  filled  by  the   viewer.  Art   resides  not  in  the  mind  of  the  artist  or  in  the  object,  but   in  the  mind  of  the  viewer.  For   example,  just  as  the  taste  of  wine  or   bread   exists  not  in  the  vintner  or  baker  or  in  the   bottle  of  wine  or   the  bread,  but  in  the  one  who  drinks  the  wine  and   eats  the  bread.   The  shift  between  artistic  processes  has  had  a  profound  effect  on   the  relationship  between  not  only  the  artist   and  their   work  but  on   the  artist’s  relationship  with  their  audience. Piet   Mondrian’s   manifesto   was   born   of  an   alliance  of  aesthetics,   mysticism  and  spirituality.  A  basic  component  to  Mondrian’s  vision   was   the   metaphysical   maps   he   used.   Mondrian   developed   his   plastic   language   through   his   abstraction,   depicting   what   he   described  as   true  nature.  He   used  abstraction   as  a  vessel   to  carry   the  viewer  to  their  destination.  We  could  argue  that  Mondrian  was   reminding  us,  the  viewers,  of  what  we  have  forgotten,  like  a  call  for   action,   offering  us   a   transient   experience   of   intensity,  wakening   thoughts   and  feelings,  old   longings  and  remorse.  Lipsey  describes   these  thoughts  and  feelings  as  “a  blend  of  hope  and  remorse  -­‐   a   sign  that  one  has  encountered  the  spiritual  in  art”.   To   illustrate   this   point   we   can   trace   Mondrian’s   journey   from   representation   to   what   he   described   as   “the   true   divinity   in   nature”   through   his   tree   series   1908   to   1913.   Mondrian’s   path   rejects  the  use  of  depiction  and  realism  through  his  tree  series;  he   starts  with   a  tree   then  proceeds  to  eliminate  the  tree  outline  and   contours,  ending  up  with  a  composition  of  lines  and  colour.  

Piet Mondrian, Red Tree 1908.

Piet Mondrian, The tree 1911-1913.

Piet Mondrian, Grey tree 1911

Piet Mondrian, Composition 1913

Page 11


THE DEUX-SĂ&#x2C6;VRES MONTHLY

Comings and Goings!

by Sue & Rik Newell

La  Deuxième  Chance,  stockists   of   Annie  Sloan  Chalk  Paintâ&#x201E;˘   can   now  be  found  at  Le    Bois    de  MessĂŠ,  79120  MessĂŠ. After  searching  for   a  more  prominent  spot  from  which  to  run  our   business,  a  shop  front  on  a  high  street,  Le  bois  de  MessĂŠ  found  us!     Sometimes  that  is  how  it  is.    House  hunting  can  be  so  difficult,  so   in  a  fit  of  madness,  Sue  made  offers  on  all  the  properties  on  our   shortlist. So  -­â&#x20AC;?  a  quiet  hamlet  setting  it  is,  a   full   scale   renovation   (see   photo   left),  we  will  be  busy,  but  we  will   continue  to  be  available  for  paint   sales,   and   courier   service   deliveries,   and   one   day   we   will   have   a   fabulous   new   shop   and   workshop. We  are  also  excited   to  announce   we   will   have   a   Paint   Depot   in   Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Absie,   79240.   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;La   Deuxième   Vieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  opening  April  2nd  by  our  good  friend  Linda  Philips,  will  have  a   basic   stock   of   colours   and   waxes.     We   will   replenish   stocks   monthly  and  also   drop   off  pre-­â&#x20AC;?booked  paint   orders.  Visit   her   for   furniture  to   upcycle  or  ready  painted.  Watch  out  for  full  details  of   opening  hours  or  ring  us  for  details. Painted   furniture   workshops   will   also   continue,   either   at   your   home   or   at   venues   around   the   Deux  Sevres   and  Vienne.     Check   out  our  website  at   www.ladeuxiemechance.com  for  more  details.     We  have  to  keep  you  painting!

   

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                 !  "  # So  with  thanks   to  all  our  customers,  for  their  brilliant  support,  we   venture  into   our   new  project.  Drop  by   and  see   us   soon,  wear   a   hard  hat  and  bring  your  working  clothes,  flask  and  sandwiches!

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For  the   faint   hearted,  follow  us  on  facebook  or  via  our   blog!   Watch   our   progress   and   choice   of   colours   as   the   whole   house   gets   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deuxième  Chanceâ&#x20AC;?!

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With  holes  in  every  roof,  hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hoping  April  has  no  showers!  

Page 12


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Take It or Leave It

by  Sue  Burgess

There  are   five  French  verbs  that  mean   to  leave:  partir,  s'en  aller,   sortir,   quitter,  and  laisser.     These   all   have   different   meanings,  so   how  do  we  know  which  one  to  use?

Vocabulary  /  Vocabulaire  :  Expressions  with  prendre passer  prendre  quelqu'un      

to  go  pick  someone  up

prendre  l'air    

to  get  a  breath  of  fresh  air

prendre  bien  la  chose  

to  take  something  well

prendre  une  décision

     to  make  a  decision                        

prendre  feu  

to  catch  fire

prendre  fin  

to  come  to  an  end

prendre  le  frais

to  get  a  breath  of  fresh  air

S'en   aller  is  more  or  less  interchangeable  with   partir,  but   it   has   a   slightly  informal  use:  to  go  away/off.     It   can  also  mean  to  retire  or   to  die.    «Je  m'en  vais,  salut!»    (I'm  off,  bye!)    «Va  t'en!»    (Go  away!)

prendre  froid  

to  catch  a  cold

prendre  garde    

to  be  careful,  watch  out

Sortir  means  to  go  out,  to  get  out  of  something,  to  get  out  of  an   enclosed   space   or   to   get   something  out   -­‐   it   is   the   opposite   of   entrer  (to  enter).     «Je  sors  ce  soir»  (I'm   going  out  tonight),  «Il   doit   sortir   la   voiture   du   garage»   (He   has   to   get   the   car   out   of   the   garage).

prendre  à  gauche/droit

to  turn  le€/right

prendre  goût  à  quelqu'un    

to  take  a  liking  to  something

prendre  mal  la  chose

to  take  something  poorly

prendre  la  mer  

to  set  sail,  to  put  out  to  sea  

Partir   means   to   leave   in   a   general   sense   -­‐   it   is   the   opposite   of   arriver   (to   arrive).     Partir   cannot  be  followed   by  a  direct   object;   however,  it  may  be  followed   by  a  preposition  :  So   you  can't  say  «Je   pars  la  maison»  but  you  can  say  «je  pars  de  la  maison». Partir   conveys   an   intention   of   going   somewhere.   It   is   often   followed  by  «pour».    «Je  pars  pour  l'école»  (I'm  off  to  school) In   addition  partir  can   be  a   euphemism  for  death:  «Mon  mari  est   part»  (my  husband  passed  away).

Quitter   means   to   leave   someone   or   something   -­‐   it   must   be   followed   by   a   direct   object.   It   often   indicates   a   prolonged   separation.  «Ils   quittent   la   France»  (They're   leaving  France),     «Il   quitte  sa  femme»  (He's  leaving  his  wife).     The  only  exception  to  the   rule   that   quitter   must   be  followed   by   an   object   is  when   on   the   phone  :  «Ne  quittez  pas»    (Don't  hang  up). Laisser  means   to   leave   something   in   the   sense   of   not   taking   it   with/for  oneself  :  «J'ai  laissé  mon  sac  chez  Luc»    (I   left  my  bag   at   Luc's   house),   «Laissez-­‐moi   du   gâteau!»   (Leave   me   some   cake!).   Laisser   can   also   mean   to   leave   someone   alone:   «Laissez-­‐moi   tranquille!»  (Leave  me  alone!). The  English  verb  to  take  has  several  French  equivalents. Prendre  is  the  general  all  purpose  French   equivalent  of  to   take.     It   is   used   to   talk   about   taking   something   from   a   place   or   from   someone,  taking  (having)  something  to  eat  or   taking  a  certain  size   (of  clothes   /   shoes)  :  «J'ai  pris  le  livre  sur  la  table»  (I  took  the  book   from  the  table),  «je  prends  un  sandwich,  s'il  vous  plaît»  (I'll  have   a   sandwich,  please),  «il  prend  une  taille  14»  (he  takes  size  14). Amener  means   to   take   someone   or   something   with   you.   «   J'ai   amené  mon  frère  à  la  fête»  (I  took  my  brother  to  the  party).

End

Small Colour advert only 34€ Page 13


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

News  from  the  Pays  de  Gâtine!  by Julia Salvat presents ‘CALENDAR  GIRLS’   by  Tim  Firth  at  Secondigny  &  La  Châtaigneraie  2013. I   must   start   with   an   apology   because   I   submitted   the   wrong   production  dates  in  the  last  issue  of  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’,  all  my   fault   and  I  am  very  sorry  if  this  has   caused  any  inconvenience.     The   dates  and  times  below  are  accurate.     Due  to  the  high  demand  for  tickets  we  have  now  opened  the  bookings   facility  so  that  you  can  order   your  tickets  either  online  or  by  telephone   with  immediate  effect.   Due   to   holiday   planning   we   have   had   to   change   the   telephone   number,  but  the   online  booking  remains  the  same.    You  can  be  sure   that  if  you  want  to  come  and   see  ‘Calendar  Girls’  we  will  make  every   effort   to   ensure   you   get   a   seat.     Dates,  times   and   places   of   the   performances  are  as  follows:-­‐ • Secondigny  Le  Petit  Theatre   Performances  on  Thursday  25th  &  Friday  26th  April  at  8pm  and   a  matinee  performance  on  Saturday  27th  April  at  2.30pm. • La  Chataigneraie  Theatre   Performances  on  Friday  3rd  &  Saturday  4th  May  at  8pm. Tickets  can  be  booked  via  email  on  reaction.tickets@yahoo.fr    or  by   telephone,  please  ring  Maureen  Murdoch  on  05  49  77  23  54. L’Ecu  restaurant  in  Secondigny  is  providing  a  Theatre  Special  dinner  for   12€  for  a  choice  of  plat  and  dessert  on  Thursday  25th  and  Friday  26th   before   the   evening  performances,   but   you   will   need   to   book  and   quote  “Theatre  Special”  on  05  49  63  29  94. The  Calendar  Girls  Calendar By  the  time  this  magazine  hits  the  shelves,  the  Calendar  Girls  calendar   should  be  printed  and  ready  for  its  launch  in  early  April  2013.    A  great   deal  of  hard  work  has  been  completed  by  many  people;  the  ladies  in   the  calendar  have  been  extremely  enthusiastic,  the   photographs  are   excellent  -­‐  all  we  need  now  to  make  our  calendar  a  major  success  is   for   you  to   buy  as  many  copies  as  possible.    They   will  make  a  great   present  for  your  family  and  friends.   Thanks  once  again  to  our  many  sponsors  and  remember  ALL  proceeds   from   the  sale  of  the  calendar  will   go  to  the  Leukemia  &  Lymphoma   Research   Foundation   in   the   UK   and   La   Fondation   de   France:   La   Recherche  contre  Leucemie  et  Lymphome  here  in  France.

Sesng  Up  or  Running  Tourist  Accommodauon. If   you   have   set   up   or   are   thinking   of   setting   up   tourist   accommodation   you   might   like   a  bit   of   expert   advice  and   the   office   to   contact   would   be   ‘Tourisme   en   Gâtine’.     Based   in   Parthenay  and   also   manning  the   tourist   offices  in   the  area  are   a   competent  team  of  experts. They  will   help,  free   of   charge,  by  explaining   what   you   need  to   take   into   consideration  and   their   services  include:   visits   to   help   on   the   technical   side   before   starting,   an   explanation   of   the   administrative   procedures,  the  possible  public  grants  and  quality   charters.     Whether  you  are  thinking  of  Gîtes  or  B&B  (Chambre  d’hôtes),  you   would  need  to  declare  them  at  your   local  town  hall.      Gîtes  can  be   star   graded  and  to  do  this  you  would   have  to   get   in   touch   with   ‘Tourisme  en  Gâtine’  or  ‘Gîtes  de  France’  in  Niort.    However,  you   will  be  charged  for  this  service.     When  thinking  of   campsites,  it   would  be  best  to   talk  through  the   possibilities  with  the  experts  to   see  which  sort  you   would  like  to   set   up   and   run.     They   can   be   for:   tents,   caravans,   leisure   residential   parks,   mobile   homes   and   light   holiday   homes.     However  in   today’s  market,  original  ideas  seem   to  attract   more   people.     Even   if   you   are   already  set   up   you   might   like  to   know  how  to   promote   your   business  to  the  French   market   and   what   kind   of   promotional  events  the  tourist  department  go  to. The   Tourism   en   Gâtine’s   office   has   just   reprinted   its   annual   brochure  and  copies  can  be  found  at  the  Office  de  Tourisme,  rue   Vau  St-­‐Jacques,  Parthenay.   For  those  of   you  who   are   already  up  and  running  you   might   like   to  know  that   you  can  pick  up  any  new  brochures   for  the  coming   season  on  : 2nd   April   2013   from   14h00   –   17h30   at   L’Acclameur,   50   rue   Charles  Darwin,  79000  Niort.     Tourisme  de  Gâtine  :  05.49.64.98.60.  

Julia  SALVAT,  Pays  de  Gâtine.     Tel:  05  49  64  25  49  ~  Email:  julia.salvat@gatine.org Website:  www.gatine.org

The  Art  Scene The  art  group  has  been  heavily  involved  in  assisting  with  the  Calendar   Girls   production   and  we   have  been  joined  by  many  of  the   theatre   group  members,  who  do  not  normally  join  us  on  a  Friday  morning,  all   sharing  the  workload.  That  is  what  the  Theatre  group  is  all  about  -­‐  well   done  everyone. Finally  a  personal  thank  you  from  me  to  the  art  group  for  managing  so   well  while  I  am  stuck  in  this  hospital  bed  recovering  from  a  major  knee   operation  –  AH,    I  hope  they  don’t   manage  too  well  they  might  not   want  me  back!! PS.  I  don’t  like  grapes,  unless  they’re  crushed  and  I   don’t  like  flowers,  you   can’t  eat  them  but  I  love   Cadburys   whole  nut  chocolate,  just  in  case  you   were  wondering....

For   any  further  information,  please   contact   John  Blair   by  email:   johnblair@btopenworld.com  

Page 14


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY More  from  local  writer  Alison  Morton...    Please  see  back  issues  of   ‘The  DSM’  if  you  would  like  to  see  previous  articles.

How to Launch Your Book

In   the   last   two   articles,  I   outlined   how   to   sell   your   book,   both   printed   and  electronic   versions.  But   the   milestone   event   is  your   book  launch,  especially  if   it’s  your  first.    “But  I’m  not  famous”,  “It’s   only  my  little  family  memoir”  or   “Nobody  will   want   to  buy  it”  are   some  excuses  I’ve   heard  for   not  having  a  launch.     The  newest   one   is  “It’s  only  an  ebook”.    Sorry,  not  good  enough. You’ve   slaved   away,   often   over   years,   dedicating   all   your   spare   hours,   thinking  about   the   book   when   not   writing  it   and   you’ve   finally  got  there.  Of  course,  you  need  to  celebrate! A  launch   doesn’t   have   to   be   a  Foyles  Literary  Lunch,  nor   does  it   have  to  be  in  a  bookshop,  nor  need   hundreds  of  attendees.    It  can   be  a  simple  drinks  evening  at  home  with   a  few  informal  words  and   a  nod  to  a  pile  of  your  books.     Make  sure  you  line  up  a  friend  who   can  take   the  cash.     A  writer   friend  of  mine  booked  a  double  table   at  his  local  pub,  invited  a  few  friends  and  ended  up  speaking  to  the   whole  pub  and  selling  over  a  hundred  books.    Plus  it  was  reported   in  the  local  paper  which  prompted  more  sales. Other   possibles,  especially  if   your   book  relates   to   the  place,  are   tourist   bookshops,   hotels,   boats,   club   venue,   museum,   friend’s   garden,  art  gallery,  community  centre  –   in  short,  anywhere  where   potential  buyers  might  gather. Refreshments?   Soft   drinks   or   tea/coffee   should   be   laid   on,  but   most   launches   feature   wine   or   fizz.  We’re   lucky   being   near   the   Loire  Valley  with  both  almost  on  tap.     Crisps  and  nuts  (or   trays  of   hors  d’oeuvres  if  you  can  run  to  that)  are  always  welcome. So  what  happens  at  a  launch? Some   are   like   standard   parties   –   milling,   lurking,   laughing,   but   centred   around   the   author   and   the   book.   The   emphasis   is   on   celebration  and   relaxation.   A   five   to   ten   minute  pause   will   allow   the  author  to  thank  everybody,  and  the  publisher  and  agent  to  say   a  few   words.   Then   attendees  can   buy   copies  and   queue  for   the   author  to  sign  them. A   more   structured   launch,   sometimes   called   ‘An   evening   with   (name   of   author)’   is   ticketed   –   usually   at   a   modest   amount   redeemable  against  the  cost  of  the  book.     Attendees  are   offered   a   glass  of  wine,  fizz  or  soft  drink  on  arrival.    After   five  or  ten  minutes’   mingling,  they  sit  down  to  listen  to  the  author  give  a  talk  for  25-­‐30   minutes   which  will  probably  include  an   excerpt   or   two  from  their   book.   A   question   and   answer   session   follows,   then   buying   and   signing  and  a  little  more  mingling. “But  what  if  I  publish  ebook  only?” Both   types   of   launch   can   be   adapted,  but   make   sure   you   have   something  for   people  to  take   away  with  them  such  as  bookmarks   with   buying  links.  If  you  print   them  with  uncoated   paper   on   the   reverse,   you   can   sign   the   back.   An   alternative   is   the   digital   signature   service   Authorgraph   (www.authorgraph.com).   Make   sure  your  bookmark  mentions  this.   And,   finally,   get   somebody   else   to   take   plenty   of   photographs   especially   of   you   holding   your   book,   or   high   resolution   printed   image   if  an   ebook.     You  can   then   use   these  photos   to   publicise   your  book  further!   Next  month,  the  real  secret  to  selling  more  books... Alison  Morton  writes  alternate  history  thrillers,  blogs  about   wri^ng  and  Romans  at  h_p://alison-­‐morton.com/blog/  

SUMMER MARKET SUNDAY JUNE 9th

Organised by Aidez Association (Terves)

Salles des Fetes St Germain-de-Longue-Champs Open from 13:00 -18:00 Good variety of 30 plus stalls Red White and Blue, Plants, Honey, Iceland Frozen foods, Books, Curry experience, RBL with Tombola, Ceramic Pots, Avon, Jewellery, Bags, Cake Stall and Refreshment area. Money raised will benefit local French Charities

Entrance Free of Charge

Combined  Services  Support  Group  (CSSG)

by Terri Laverick

A  few  former  members  of  the  Northern  Section  of  the  Linazay  Branch   of  the  Poitou-­‐Charentes  RBL  met  on  Saturday  16th  March  in  the  Café   des   Belles   Fleurs   in   Fenioux   to   inaugurate   and   rename   their   new   group.       Several  people  were  unable  to  attend  and  were  sadly  missed,   but   hopefully  they  will   be   with  us  on   18th  May  2013  for  our  second   formal  meeting. The  name  chosen  for  the  new  group  is  the  Combined  Services  Support   Group,  or   CSSG  to  make  is  easier  on  the  tongue.    The  aim  of  the  Group   is  to  hold  social  events  and  to  raise  monies  for  Service  Charities  and  to   help  ex-­‐service  people   and/or  their   families,  however   we  can.     The   group   is  chaired  by  Mr.  Will  Rowe  ably  assisted  by  a  committee  which   will  be  elected  annually  from  within  members  of  the  group.   The  first  event  on  our   agenda  is  at  Le  Ferriere-­‐en-­‐Parthenay  on  12th   May,  where  we  will  be  selling  tea,  coffee  and  cakes.    We  shall  also  have   a  tombola  stall.     Paperback  Jan  is  holding  an  ‘Open  Day’  again  which  is   always  a  fun  and  entertaining  day,  so  please  do  come  along  and  have  a   “Cuppa”  and  a  slice  of  cake.  There  are  usually  lots  of  interesting  stalls,   and  hopefully  this  year,  some  entertainment  as  well. As  I  have  mentioned   above,  we  aim  to  help   not  only  personnel   but   other   charities,  and  Mr   Will   Rowe  and  his  wife  have  recently  aided   Help   For   Heroes   by  accommodating  lady   walkers  and  their   support   team  doing  a  100km  walk  from  Bressuire  to  Lezay  via  Parthenay.    The   route  takes  in   the  obsolete  rail  track  to  Parthenay,  and   then  by  green   ways,  fields  and  lanes  the  rest  of  the  way.    Although  not  giving  directly   to  the  charity,  this  has  helped  to  keep  their  costs  to  a  minimum.     If  anyone  wishes  to  join  our   group,  attend   our   meetings,  or   help  at   events,  please  contact  me  by  email  at  laverick_83@hotmail.com Page 15


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Take a Break... DSM  Easy  Crossword Across: Down: 8.   Run  away  to  marry.  (5) 1.   Posted.  (4) 9.   Slanting   or   inclined   in   direction   or   2.   A   party   of   people   assembled   in   the     course.  (7)   evening.  (6) 10.   Small   pastry   of   various   filling   used   3.   Fit  and  well.  (7)   as  a  canape.  (7) 4.   Medical  practitioner.  (6) 11.   Republic  in  West  Africa.  (5) 5.   Beats  with  a  whip.  (5) 12.   Extreme  excess.  (8) 6.   Racket  sport.  (6) 13.   Commercial  outlet.  (4) 7.   Summarised  briefly.  (8) 15.  Finished.  (4) 12.   Likely  but  not  certain.  (8) 17.   Let  go.  (8) 14.   Capturing.  (7) 21.   Common  snake.  (5) 16.   Make  attractive  or  lovable.  (6) 22.   European  short-­‐winged  hawk.  (7) 18.   Flowing  back.  6) 24.   A   usually   secretive   or   illicit   19.   Go  without  food.  (6)   relationship.  (7) 20.   Offensively  bold.  (5) 25.   Not  once!  (5) 23.   A   challenge   to   do   something     dangerous.  (4)

Down: Toughie  Crossword 1.   Unusual   band   of   one   sort   of   tuna   is     plentiful.  (8) 2.   Badly  done  by,  and  more  so  than     expected!  (6) 3. Ken   is   not   the   same   now   we   have     some  of  the  material.  (5) 4.   FC   substitution  makes  one  shrink  back     from  the  border.  (6) 5.   Current   power  given   by   French  father     in  the  mornings.  (7) 6.   Girl   inspired   by   overture   in   South     Africa.  (6) 7.   Treatment  done  on  scar  produces  nice     curves.  (4) 14.   Newly   met   Green   adapting   to   the   up     and  coming.  (8) 15.   Describing  a  bit  of  what  you  fancy?  (7) 17.  Tiny  alien  fused  into  the  whole  thing?  (6) 18.   Seek  protection  from  anger   about  sun     transmutation.  (6) 20.   Bardish   heroine   going   into   Napoli   via     Verona.  (6) 21.   Stocky   sailor   taking   over   upturned     tanker  initially.  (5) 22.   No   parking   in   front   of   the   fruit   tree;     that  means  everyone!  (4)

Sudoku Corner... Easy

www.printfreesudokupuzzles.com

Hard

With  thanks  to  M.Morris

Please  see  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr  for  answers

Across: 8.   Following  a  short  holiday  the  queen     gives  a  wave.  (7) 9.   Given   time,   even   an   untidy   room     can  be  a  driving  force.  (5) 10.   Diana  omitted  to  include  a  lady  from     the  bible.  (5) 11.   Coastal   landmark  irritates  and,  with     pins,  is  numbing.  (7) 12.   Sounds   like   publicity   puts  two   and     two  together.  (4) 13.   Produce  a  form  of  green  tea.  (8) 16.   Chat   Mme   is   wasted   when     referring  to  subject  maOer.  (8) 18.   Certainly  no  less  found  in  unusual     European  city.  (4) 22.   Energy   applied   to   conditions   in     housing  developments.  (7) 23.   A   distributed   night   leads   one   to     object.  (5) 24.   Italian   cooked   in   second   half   of     earthenware.  (5) 25.   Get  together  with  old  acquaintances     in  the  Indian  Ocean?  (7)

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

A-Z of the Communes in the Deux-Sèvres A-Z of the Communes of the by  Sue  Burgess Deux-Sèvres. CHEF-BOUTONNE This  small  country  town  gets  its  name  from  the  river  Boutonne  whose   source  is  in  the  centre  of  the  town  under  the  wash-­‐house  in   rue  de  la   Fontaine.    The  name  «chef»  comes   from  the  fact  that  the  town   is  at   the  «head»  of  the  Boutonne  river.      Chef-­‐Boutonne  is  the  main  town  of   the  canton  and  is  known  because  of  two  historic   figures:   Lamoignon   de   Malesherbes,   a   defender   of   Louis   XVI   and   Jean-­‐François   Cail,   engineer   and   mechanic,   who   was   a   rich   industrialist   of   the   XIXth   century.     Chef-­‐Boutonne  has  for   several  years   been   the  home   to   a   renowned  international  table  tennis  tournament.    Many  of  the  top  100   world  players  take  part. When   you  arrive  in  the  town  from  Javarzay,  you  go  along  the  old     rue   du   Château   which   has   become   avenue   des   fils   Fouquaud.     The   Fouquauds  were  shot  by  the  Germans  in  1944.    The  place  des  Martyrs   de  la  Résistance  leads  to  another  avenue  which  is  dedicated  to  another   member  of  the  resistance,  Louis  Proust,  shot  at  the  age  of  16. The  name  of  the  little  square  of  la  Croix  perrine  already  existed  in  1654   and  probably  comes  from  the  chaplaincy  that  used  to  be  there.     It  was   a  charitable  establishment  that  took  in  beggars  and  pilgrims.    There   was   a   chapel   for   prayer,   a   cemetery  and   of   course   a   cross.     The   Charitable  establishment   with   its  Chapel   fell  into   disuse  under   Louis   XIV  in  1696. The  Grand'Maison  attracts  the  attention  because  of  its  architecture.    In   the  triangular   pediment   above   the   door   there   is   a  latin   inscription   confirming   that   "la   crainte   du   seigneur   est   le   début   de   la   sagesse"  («the  fear   of   the  Lord   is   the  beginning   of   wisdom»).   The   house  dates   from  1567   and   since   the   protestants   liked   to   engrave   biblical   quotations   at  the   entrance  to  their   homes,  we   can   suppose   that  the  Grand'Maison  was  built  by  a  protestant. A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • The  château  de  Javarzay  and  its  traditional  head-­‐dress  museum • The  Grand'Maison  (private) CHENAY Situated   at   33km   south   east   of   Niort,   the   village   of   Chenay   is   surrounded  by  the  communes  of  Chey,  Avon  and  Exoudun.  The  499   inhabitants  are  the  Chenaisiens  and  the    Chenaisiennes. Chenay  is  situated   at   an  altitude  of  130  metres  above  sea   level.  The   Sèvre  Niortaise  river  crosses  the  commune. Throughout  the  centuries  the  houses  and  the  pieces  of  land  bordering   the  main  road  through  the  village  of  Chenay  have  regularly  undergone   modifications   –   lining  up   of   buildings,   road   widenings.  But   in   1846   major   work  was   undertaken   to   make   a   straight   line   for   the   road.   Numerous   buildings   were   demolished   and   pieces   of   land   were   purchased  in  order  to  make  a  straight  road  over  546  metres  long. A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE • The   PlaineEnvol   ParaMoteur   school   for   paragliding   and   ULM   lessons. • The  wash-­‐house  of  Brieuil • The  bridge  of  Brieuil   was  built  in  1905.  A  public  enquiry  held  in  the   autumn  of   1904  showed  that   this  bridge  would  be   useful   for   the   inhabitants  of  the  village.  The  bridge  avoided  crossing  the  river   at   the  ford  and  replaced  the  pedestrian  footbridge.  

CHERIGNÉ Cherigné  with   its   149   inhabitants   is   both   a  village  and  a  commune   situated   in   the   canton   of   Brioux-­‐Sur-­‐Boutonne.   The  river   Boutonne   runs   past   the   village  which   is   4km   from   Brioux-­‐Sur-­‐Boutonne.   The   village  supports  several  agricultural  businesses,  a  gîte  and  a  B&B. CHERVEUX Cherveux   is  a  small   village  situated   12km  from   Niort.  Archaeological   finds  (flint  tools)  testify  that  the  place  was  inhabited  during  prehistoric   times. The  name  of  Cherveux  is  of  Celtic  origin,  which  would  indicate  that  the   area   originated   at   a   very  ancient   date.  This  village  was  first   known   under  the  name  of  Carvium  in  1100,  then,  a  century  later  as  Cherveox   and  Cheveras  until  the  fifteenth   century.  It  then   became   Cherveaux,   and  by  1603,  Chevreoux  and  later,  Cherveus.    It  was  known  as  St  Pierre   of   Cherveux   in   the   eighteenth   century   before   simply   being   called   Cherveux.     Its   name   comes   from   the   word   for   hemp   (in   "local   patois"   (dialect)   «chorbe   or   chorve»).   Since   this   plant   was   very   abundant  in  this  region,  many  people  made  their  living  as  weavers  and   rope  manufacturers). Cherveux  probably  owes  its  existence  to  a  monastery  that  was  close  to   the  feudal  castle  that  was  later  to  become  the  powerful  fortress  of  the   Lusignan  family.    The  monks  that  lived  here  were  driven  out  during  the   wars  that  ravaged   the  Poitou.  The   monastery  was   destroyed   and   on   the  site  where  it  was  now  stands  the  parish  church  of  St  Pierre. Around  Cherveux    we  can  find  the  small  hamlets  of  Maurie  and  the   Raberie   (previously   written   Araberie)   and   they   remind   us   of   the   passage  of  the  Maures  and  the  Arabians  through  this  area. A  VOIR  /  MUST  SEE The  castle  with  its  moat.  It  has   been   listed   as   a   historical   monument  since  1929. The   castle  is   privately   owned   but   is  open  for  visits  from  April   to   October   on   Saturdays   and   Sundays   from   10h  –  12h   and   from  15h  –  19h.  (Please   check   these  times  for  yourself  before   setting  out).  There  is  an  entrance  fee. The  present  castle  is  situated  on  the  site  of  the  original   fortress  which   was  built  by  the  Lusignan  family.   But  Hugues  XI  de  Lusignan   fell  out  with  St.  Louis  who   seized  the  castle   in   1242   and   gave   it   to   his   brother,   the   Count   of   Poitou.  After   the   Count's  death  the  castle  was  given  back  to  Hugues'  ancestors  and  then   it  passed  into  the  hands  of  three  different  families  before  being  taken   by  the  English  in  1363. Duguesclin   recaptured   the   castle   and   brought   it   back   into   French   hands.  It  was  eventually  bought  by  the  Chenin  family. Their   daughter   Louise   Chenin   married   Robert   Conningham  in   May   1440.  Of  Scottish  origin,  captain  of  the  bodyguard  of  king,  Cunningham   (or   Conygham)   had   the  money  to   rebuild  the  whole  of  the   present   castle  in  one  single  effort  about  1470.    Through  the  ages  the  castle  has   been  sold  many  times  and  has  belonged  to  many  families.

More  ‘A-­‐Z  of  the  Communes  of  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres.’ next  month...

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Health, Beauty & Fitness... 2013 Spring Beauty Recommendations Samantha says...

Also  another  top  tip  would  be  to   use  a  primer.  This  can   minimize  pores  and  create  luminosity. Always  select   the  correct   colour  for  your   skin  tone.  Check  the  shade     on  your  jaw  line.  I  always  select  3  colours  and  just  leave  them  for  a  few   seconds  to  see  how  the  colours  change  on  your   skin.  You  could  do  this   on  yourself  in   a   make   up  store  or   ask  a  beauty  adviser  to   help  you   select  the  perfect  match.

Emma says...

Advert Size A or B, only 38€ per month or from 33,33€ per month for 12 months.

Perfect  base  Perfect  Look!  Foundation  back  to  basics:   Firstly  if  your  skin  is  unhappy  under  your  foundation,  it  will   not  sit   perfectly  and  can  look  patchy.     Make  sure  you  are   using  the  correct  moisturiser  for  your  skin  type.

Hi   Ladies,   this   month’s   article   is   about   having   beautiful  Shiny  locks  that  glisten  in  the  light.  No   matter   what   your   hair   texture   is,  you  can  have   healthy-­‐looking   hair   by   following   our   Simple   guide. If   Your  Hair  Is  Damaged  Improving  its   condition   is   the  only  way  to   make  it  look  shinier.    When  hair  is  damp,  apply  leave-­‐in  conditioner  to   damaged  areas.     Invest  in  a  quality  deep-­‐conditioning  treatment  and   use  once  a  week. Although  blow-­‐dryers  and  straightening  irons  may  add  to  the  damage,   they're  the  only  things  that  will  make  your  hair  look  sleeker.     Your  hair   needs  heat  to  smooth  the  cuticle  and  these  are  the  tools  that  can  do   it.  Put  the  blow-­‐dryer  on  a  high   setting  and   use  an  iron  on  hair  ends.   Apply  drops  of  frizz-­‐taming  serum  to  dry  hair. TIP:  Add  a  spritz  of  hairspray  to  your  brush  before  running  it  through   your  hair  to  control  static  and  hold  the  style. TIP:  Glossing  sprays  are  great  for  boosting  shine  midday.   DON'T  apply  finishing  products  too  close  to  your  scalp  —  your  hair  will   look  greasy.   DON'T  apply   a   ton  of   product   before   using  a  straightening   iron.   A   sticky  gel  not  designed  to  protect  the  hair  can  actually  "cook"  it. Emma’s  recommended  product  is  :    Schwarzkopf  Gliss  Shine  Tonic   Charente  Hair  &  Make  Up Tel:  05  45  31  56  93  /  06  50  04  37  30 www.charentehairandbridal.com

Hey! I'm back! ..

..and  working  again  from  our  new  address, La  Gare,  85120  La  Breuil  Barret. Please  see  my  advert  above  for  details,  or   call  02  51  51  50  06  for  an  appointment. New and former customers always welcome.

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Our Furry Friends... Canicloture are Here to Help You. Canicloture   offer   an   animal   containment   system   to   keep   your   dog/s   safe   in   your   garden.     We   use   a   unique   FM   radio   signal   patented   by  Dog   Watch   which   guarantees   against   any   interference   to  your  system. The   radio   signal   is   transmitted   through  a  buried  or    hidden  boundary   wire  up  to   200   acres  away.    Your  dog   wears   a   receiver   collar   that   detects   the  signal  and   as   he   approaches   the   wire,  he  will   soon  learn  to  react  to  the   audible   signal   (a   beep).     If   he   then   continues,   he   will   receive   a   mild   correction  (a  static   shock)  transmitted   from  the  collar.   We   offer   a   lifetime   guarantee   on   the   system   and   a   containment   guarantee   on  all   systems  installed  by  Canicloture   as   we  also  will   train   your   dog  after   the  installation.   As   spring   is   just   around   the   corner  Canicloture   are  pleased   to   offer   a   15%   discount   on   all   installations   in   April,   so   you   can   rest   assured   your  dog   can   enjoy  the  garden  safely  contained   within   your  boundary.   For  more  info  please  check  out  our  web  site:  www.canicloture.fr

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

HOPE BOOK SALE 24/25/26 May 10am - 4pm Salle des fetes, Clussais-La-Pommeraie, 79190 (D45 Sauze Vaussais to Lezay Road) Thousands of English and French books, fiction and non-fiction for adults and children, each for just 1 euro. Many trade stands and interesting things to see and do including:

MAYDAY MES AMIS Mayday Mes Amis  has  been  formed  to  help  animals  in  need  in   l'Absie  and  the  surrounding  area.   For  more  information  please  email:  jill.zub@sky.com.

Phoenix  Association

Registered charity to help abused and abandoned animals in France. www.phoenixasso.com   www.facebook.com/PhoenixAssociationFrance    

* Massive sale of plants * English fish and chips (by Mr T’s Fisherie) * Tea and cakes * Bacon butties (by La Boite Delicieuse) * Excellent quality 2nd hand clothes * Exciting bric-a-brac * Dog agility and obedience display (25th May) * Face-painting (26th May) * Classic car display (26th May) Please see www.hopeassoc.org for further details. Books to donate? Email:givebooks4hope@gmail.com Hope  Association   has   lots  of  dogs  and   cats   looking   for   adoption/ foster  homes  please  take  a  look  at   our  website  www.hopeassoc.org   if  you  can  help.

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

Equine Rescue France

We are always looking for new members and we are in need of donations so we may continue to help equines in France. Please support the ERF.

Please contact Equine Rescue France via their website www.equinerescuefrance.org HOOF (Horse Orientated Open Forum)

HOOF  is  open  to  anyone  with  an  equine  interest.     You  do  not  need  to  own  a  horse!    We  meet  about  once  a  month   for  talks,  visits  etc.    Interested? Contact Jo Rowe on: 05 49 64 30 59

Nos Amis Les Animaux 85480 (NALA 85480). Tel: 07  70  31  54  59  ~  

Email: nala85480@hotmail.com www.nosamislesanimaux.com

Say  hello  to  LEWIS  a  very  friendly   4   1/2   year   old   dog   who   needs   a   home  for  life. Lewis   was   adopted   almost   a   year   LEW IS ago   by  a   family   who   looked   after   him   well   and   grew   very   fond   of   him.  Sadly  they  are  now  moving  back  to  Ireland  and  cannot  take   Lewis  with  them. This   means  that   he  will  have   to   go   into   a   pension   until   a  new   home  can  be   found  and  for  a  dog  that  has  grown  used   to  being   part  of  the  family  this  is  going  to  be  a  very  unhappy  experience. Lewis  is  micro-­‐chipped  (250269801844099),   castrated   and  fully   vaccinated.     He   is   house-­‐trained   and   gets   on   well   with   other   dogs,  cats  and  horses.     Like  most  dogs  he  adores  playing  and  can   be   left   indoors   without   any  problems.     However   what   Lewis   really  needs  is  a   pal  to  play  with.    Good  with  women  Lewis  is   a   bit  shy  of  men  to  start  with,  but  kindness  always  wins  through.

L’Association   Galia   is   a   recognized   public   utility   aiding   the   adoption   of   dogs   in   the   shelter   of   Fontenay   Le   Comte.     We   help   dogs   out   of   impound,  found  stray  or   abandoned  to   find   new   families. Refuge  de  l'association  Galia Chemin  des  perchées  (ancienne  déchetterie),  85200  Fontenay  Le  Comte Tel  :  02  51  52  06  19  or  06  28  18  13  72,  association.galia@orange.fr http://association-­‐galia.forumactif.com

As   an  ex-­‐Chasse  dog,  Lewis   must  have  a  secure  enclosed  garden   and   an  owner   who   can   continue  to  train  him.   Perhaps  his  luck   will   change   if   someone   with   a   big   heart   reads   this   advertisement.   There   is   no   adoption   fee   for   Lewis,   but   a   donation  would  be  appreciated. Please   contact   Association   Orfee:   asso.orfee@laposte.net   or   fosteringinfrance@gmail.com  for  further  details. Ever  thought  of  Fostering   a  dog?  there   are  literally  thousands  of   dogs   being   destroyed   in   France  each  year   because  they  cannot   be  found   good   homes  in  time.     Fostering  an  animal  saves   lives   and   allows  abandoned   or   unwanted   dogs  to   be   assessed   and   home-­‐trained.     It   takes  a  certain   type  of  person  to  do  this  work   and   you   must   be   dedicated   and   have   previous   experience   of   owning  a  dog.      Could  you  do  it?   For  more  details  contact  fosteringinfrance@gmail.com

Julie  and  Jim  need  a  new  French  home.   I  have  had  to  go  back  to  England  to  work  and  I  can't  take  them  with   me.    They  are  5  years  old,  have  been  neutered,  chipped  and  had  a   rabies  jab.  Very  clean,  quiet  and  affectionate.     They  are  used  to  a  rural  location.     If  you  can  help  please  call  on  0044  1223  301179  or  0044  7788  678973.   Email  -­‐  jewelleryjohn_1@hotmail.com.

Here  is  SLIM,  a  male  Briard  born  December   2006.    He  is  an  adorable  dog  needing  a  new   family  (without  cats). Refuge  SPA  de  SAINTES route  des  GAUTHIERS,   17100  SAINTES Tel:  05  46  93  47  65  ~  www.spa.de.saintes.free.fr/

Our   refuge   is   open   every   day,   even   on   Sundays.  14h00  to  18h00.    Please  call  if  you   can  give  him  a  home. Tel:  05  46  93  47  65    or  06  98  38  97  98

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THE DEUX-SÉVRES MONTHLY

The Great Outdoors...

Hfuujnh!Uo!Lnox!Hobut

by  Angela  Wood

It   may  surprise   you   to   know   that   the   Deux-­‐Sèvres   is   one   of   the   most   densely   populated   departments   in   France.     No,   not   with   humans,  with  goats! The   vast   majority   are   reared   intensively   for   their   milk,   most   of   which  goes  into  cheese  production,  and  the  birth  of  the  young  kids   is   timed   to   coincide   with   Easter,   when   the   meat   is   traditionally   eaten.     As  with   most  intensively-­‐reared  animals,  these  goats   never   go   outside,   but   live   in   large   sheds,   eating   concentrates   and   hay.     Their  reproductive  cycle  is  managed  artificially  and   they  are  viewed   as   a   commercial   enterprise,   with   milk   production   the   primary   consideration. On   the   other  hand,  goats   can  be  a  great  asset   for   a  smallholding   like   ours,  and   with  some  careful  land  management,  can  be  almost   self-­‐sufficient:   we  buy   in  only   a   few  sacks  of   concentrate  for   our   milkers. There   is   a   popular   misconception   that   goats   will   eat   anything.     True,  they  will  eat  anything  that   you   don’t   want   them  to  eat,  like   your   precious  fruit   trees,   and   they   will   demolish   a   hedge   faster   than   you   can   say   “Billy   Goat   Gruff”.     Goats   are   browsers,   not   grazers,  and   will   favour  a  hedgerow  and  trees    before  grass.    They   need   to   be   securely   fenced   with   sheep   netting  and   at   least   two   electric  wires;  they  can  stand  on  their  hind  legs  and  reach  branches   well   over   seven  feet  high.     Goats   can  be  notoriously  fussy  eaters   and   the   hay   that   we   have   toiled   all   summer   to   make   and   to   us   smells  divine,  can  be  pushed  aside   in   disgust   either   because  it   is   too  damp,  too  dry  or  not  the  right  type  of  grass….. Goats  adore  branches  of  hazel,  willow,  oak,  ash   and  apple  and  pear   tree  prunings,  and   we  also  grow  large  quantities  of  oats,  which  we   cut  and  feed  green  all  through  the  Spring  and   Summer.    This  also   acts  as  a  green  manure  for   the  soil.    We  also  grow  mangold  wurzels   which  we  store  over  the  winter   and  the  goats  love  these  chopped   up  as  a  treat.

Latest   research   has   shown   that   goat’s   milk  has   a   high   zinc   and   selenium   content   which   may   combat   illnesses  such   as  Alzheimers   and  Parkinson’s  disease. Everything   that   can   be   made  from  cow’s  milk  can   be  made  from  goat’s   milk   too,   and   our   goats   allow   us  to  be  self-­‐sufficient  not   only   in   milk,   but   I   also   make   yogurt,   cheese,   butter   and   ice-­‐cream.     French  goat’s  cheese  can   be   very   strong-­‐tasting,   and   this   is   because   the   milk  is   allowed   to   ripen   naturally   before   the   rennet   is  added.     I   prefer   to  pasturise  the  milk  and   then  add  a  starter,  which   is  a   culture  of   lactic-­‐acid  producing  bacteria.    This  produces  a  mild,  clean-­‐tasting   cheese.    I  make  a  coulommier-­‐style  fresh  cheese,  as  well  as  pressed   cheeses   using   traditional   British   recipes,   such   as   Wensleydale,   Derby,  Cheddar,  Scottish  Dunlop,  etc.    These  are  stored   in  the  cellar   to   mature   for   up   to   six   months,   depending   on   the   recipe.     A   summer-­‐time  favourite  is   curd   cheese,  which   is  great   for   making   cheesecakes  with  fresh  berries,  or  for  savoury  dips,  etc. With  good  husbandry,  goats  are  generally  healthy  animals,  are  very   intelligent  and  can   easily  be  trained  to  stand  for   milking,  or   to   be   led  to  the  field.    They  are  the  ideal   animal  for   the  smallholding  and   we  often  laughingly  refer   to  them  as  our   anaerobic  digestors  (very   on  trend),  as  they  can  consume  vast  quantities  of  vegetation,  give   copious  amounts  of  milk  in  return,  and  yes,  another   valuable  end-­‐ product  –  manure,  for  the  compost-­‐heap.    But  that’s  another  story.

Goats  come  into  season   naturally  in   the   Autumn,  and  so   we  plan   the  birth  of  the  kids  for   late  April   or  early  May,  when  there  is  plenty   of  fresh   grass   available.     Goats  are  far   more  civilised   than  sheep,   and   will  always  give  birth  during  the  day,  usually  waiting  for   us  to   have  our  10  o’clock  cup  of  tea  first!     The  kids  stay  with  their  mums   throughout,  and  they  wean  themselves  naturally  after  a  couple  of   months.    The  nanny  goat   always  produces  far   more  milk  than  the   kids  will   need,  and  so  I  can  then  begin  milking  her,  taking  whatever   is  left  over  after  the  kids  have  had  their  fill.     Goats  are  milked   twice   a   day,   morning   and   evening,   every   day.     Yes,   that’s   right,   no   holidays  together,  as  there  always  has  to  be  one  of  us  here. Goat’s   milk  tastes   no   different   to   cow’s   milk,   but   often   has   the   reputation  for  having  a  “goaty”  taste.    Unfortunately,  this  is  often   a   result   of   poor   dairy   hygiene:   friends   and   guests   who   have   our   goat’s  milk  in  their  tea  or  on  their  breakfast  cereal  rarely  notice  any   difference.     The  higher   natural   acidity  in   goat’s   milk  means   that   unless  it   is  pasturised,  it  can  go  sour  more  rapidly.    The  fat  particles   are  smaller  than   those  in  cow’s  milk  and   are  suspended  throughout   the  milk,  instead  of  forming  a  layer   at  the  top,  and  many  people   who   are   allergic   to   cow’s   milk  find   goat’s   milk   easier   to   digest.     Unlike  cows,  goats  do  not  transfer   carotene   from  the  grass  to   the   milk,  so  that  butter  made  from  goat’s  milk  is  white,  like  lard,  rather   than  yellow.

Photographs: Angela Wood.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Abeilles (Bees)

As   we  have  just  received   our   first  telephone  call  of  the  year  about   a  swarm,  we  thought   this  might  be  of  interest  to  readers.     There   weren’t  any  bees  present   at  the  house,  but   a  1   metre  square  hive   had  been  constructed  in  the  roof   space  of  the  house   between  the   plasterboard   and   roof.     The   damp   patch   reported  by   the   owner   was   in   fact   honey   soaking   through   the   ceiling!     Here   is   a   photograph...

We  thought  we   would   put  a  few  lines  together   about  how  we  can   all   help   the   dwindling   bee   population.   One   of   the   biggest   predators  is  the   Frelon  (Hornet)  which  will  kill  a  bee  mid-­‐flight  or   destroy  a  hive.    A  simple  method  to  kill  Frelons  (hornet)  is  to  make   a  trap:   -­‐   cut   the  top   off   of   a   plastic   bottle,  invert   the   top   add   a   cheap   bottle  of  beer  and  cassis  (not   alcohol)  or   grenadine  juice.  If   possible  hang  the  bottle  about  2  metres  off  of  the  ground  in  a  tree.   See  below.

To  help   bees  collect  pollen  and   nectar  we   can  all   help  in  the   garden   with   our   choice   of   flowers   that   we   plant,   such   as   wild   flowers   or   open   petal   flowers   such   as  single   Zinnia’s.     May  and   June  is  the  likely  time   for  new  queens   to  cause  the  bees  to  swarm   from  the  hive  and  they  will  probably  hang  from  a  tree  or   (a  classic   practice  in  France)  between  a  shutter  and  a  window.   If   you   find  or   think  you   have  a  swarm  please  do  not   panic,  leave   them  alone.    Contact  us  or  you  can  find  other  bee  keepers  on  this   website  www.planetepassion.eu.                                                                           Our  details  are:  -­‐  Dominey  family,  dominey.michael@orange.fr  or   05  49  07  79  78  or  06  69  67  67  06.

Page 22


THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

THE AMATEUR GARDENER

by Vanda Lawrence

At   last   the   weather   is  on   our   side   and   we   can   get   out   into   the   garden  to  get  on  with  our  veggies,  fruit  and  beautiful  flowers. So   start  sowing  your   vegetable   seeds  and   annual   flowers   -­‐   check   the   seed  packet  for   the  best  planting  time  for  the  particular  plant   you   have   chosen.     Seeds  previously   sown   indoors  will   be   about   ready  to  be  planted  out  into  the  garden,  just  be  alert  for  a  late  frost   warning   so   you   can   cover   with   newspaper   or   fleece   to   protect   them. If   the  herb   garden  needs  refreshing   now  is  a  good   time  as  young   herb  plants   are  readily  available   in   the  garden   centres.     You   can   also   plant   your   favourite,  most   used   herbs  in   decorative  pots  to   keep  by  the  back  door   so  they  are  easily  accessible  when  you  are   cooking  -­‐  also  a  bonus  if  it's  pouring  with  rain,  you  won't  get  wet! Lawns  will   already  have  had   their   first   cut   of  the  year   but   if  you   have   found   some  mossy  patches  then   you   can  apply  a  combined   fertiliser/moss   killer   to   deal   with   the   situation.     Rake   out   larger   areas  of  dead  moss  and  re-­‐seed. Still  on  the  subject  of  lawns,  leatherjackets  (larvae  of  crane   flies/ daddy  long  legs)  eat   the  roots  of  grass  in  Spring.   Get  rid  of  them  by   watering  the  lawn  in  the  evening  then  covering  the  area  with  black   plastic   sheeting.     When  you  remove  it  in  the  morning  you  will  find   that   the  leatherjackets  will  have  come  to  the  surface  -­‐  ready  for  the   birds  to  come  along  for  a  scrummy  breakfast. Other  insects  are  good  for   the  garden  so  why  not   make  a   bug  box   to  encourage  helpful   insects  such  as  ladybirds,  lacewings  and  bees.     This  will  provide  somewhere  for  them  to  shelter  or  hibernate.     You   need   untreated   timber   and   hollow   bamboo   canes.     Make   a   small,  square  box   with  a   back  but  leave  the  front  end   open.    Cut   the  hollow  bamboo  into  lengths  the  depth  of  your   empty  box  and   slide  in   place  with  the  hollow  ends  facing  outwards.     If   you  have   a   log  you  can  utilise  that  too  by  drilling  different  diameter   holes  into   the  cut   end   of  the  log  -­‐  different  sizes  suit  different  insects.     Drill   a   hole  in   the   back  of   the   box   for   fixing  to  a  fence  or   archway  in   a   sheltered  spot,  but  don't  hide  it  too  well  otherwise  you  won't  have   a  view  of  the  comings  and  goings. Your   established   shrub   and   perennial   borders   will   need   weeding   and   fertilising,  as  will   the  fruit  beds.    As  you  tackle  this  job   try  to   mulch   as  you  go.     This  will  help   to  reduce  weed  growth  but  also   retains  moisture  around  the  plant  roots. Don't   forget   the   houseplants!     Before   we   get   too   engrossed   outside   spare   a   thought   for   the   plants   which   have   given   us   so   much   pleasure  during  the  grey  days.    Repot  those  showing  signs  of   becoming  potbound   or   topdress   very  large  containers  with   fresh   compost.     Clean   shiny-­‐leaved   plants  with   a  damp   cloth   and  spiky   plants  with  a  soft  brush.    Amaryllis  (Hippeastrum)  can  be  left  to  die   down  naturally;  just  deadhead  and  leave  the  stalk  to  die  back  in  its   own  time.    If  you  keep  feeding  and  watering  you  might  get  more   flowers  in  August.    Alternatively,  feed   for   only  a  few  weeks  to  build   up   the   bulb   then   reduce   watering   and   let   the   plant   dry   out   completely.    Store  in   a  cupboard  or  under   the  greenhouse  bench   until   early   autumn   when   they   can   be   brought   out   again   for   flowering  the  following  winter. Now   something   for   the   children   -­‐   find   some   round,   slightly   flattish   stones   and   make   ladybirds   to   decorate   the  garden   or   give  as  gifts   to   Nan   or   Grandad.     All   you   need  are  the  stones  and  some  red   and   black   paints.    Voila!

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY We  have   also  had   a  very  successful   hatching   of   chicks   combined   with   a  few  ducklings.  During  the  first  week  after   hatching,  we  had   them  safely  tucked   up   in  a  barn  with  a  heat  lamp  on  them  but  they   still   seemed  so  cold,  all  huddled  together.     So,  when  I  came  home   one   afternoon   to   find   they  had   moved   in   to   what   will   be   our   master   bedroom,   it   was   no   great   surprise.     Probably  a  little  too   much  in  the  way  of  home  comforts  but  at  least  they  are  warm.

Life on the Farm...

by  Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.

What  a  strange  month  March  has  been.  One  minute  it’s   warm  and   dry  with  the  promise  of  spring    and  the  next  it’s  snowing  and  cold! On  the  better   days  we  managed  to   get   up  the  frame  for  the  poly-­‐ tunnel,  the  cover  will  go  on  when  we  get  a  calm  day,    and   plant  out   some  grape  vine  cuttings.     I  have   started   to   prepare  the  ground   ready  to  plant  this  year’s   potatoes  and  veggies.    It  must   have  been   a  strange  sight  with  the  ducks  quacking  along   behind  me  picking   up   all   the   bugs   and   grubs   closely  followed   by   the   chickens   and   guinea  fowl  also  looking  for  a  tasty  worm. We  are  pleased  to  announce  two  new  arrivals  to  our   farm.  Firstly   Nom  Nom  (another  of  our  rare  breed   pigs)  has  had  a  litter  of  eight   spotty   piglets.     She  did   very  well   being   a   first   time  mum   but   as   usual  was  attended  by  Jenny  throughout  the  birthing  process. When  pigs  give  birth  they  are  not  the  attentive  mothers  that  sheep   normally  are.  They  drop  the  piglet  and  sometimes  it  needs  a  good   rub   with   a  towel   and  a  check  that   their   airways   are  clear   to  get   them  going.  Nom  Nom  is  proving  to  be  a  good  mum  with  plenty  of   milk.

I’m   sure   I  said   last   year   “Never   again”   and   I’m   not   sure   how   it   happened   again   but   we  bought   in   some   orphan   lambs.     Bottle   feeding  day  and  night,  can’t  go  anywhere  without   being  back  by  a   certain  time  is  certainly  a  tie.     It’s  hard  to  drag  yourself  out  of   bed   at   some  unearthly  hour   to  make  up  the  milk  formula  and   trundle   off  to  the   shed  in   wellies,  a  woolly  hat   and  dressing  gown  only  to   get  mugged  by  three  hungry  lambs. Hardly  classed   as   fun   but   the   little   mites   depend   on   you,  look  to   you  as  the  supplier  of  food  and  therefore  a  surrogate  mum.   Since  we  bought  those  lambs   we  had  a  problem  with  a  ewe  with   mastitis,   which  is  an  infection  in  the  udder.  It  means  that  the  ewe   cannot   feed   because  it   is   too   painful  and   the  milk  is  no  good,  so   the   number   of   lambs   being  bottle   fed   increased   by   two.  It   was   touch  and   go  with  the  ewe  but  she   appears   to  be   responding  to   treatment  although  her  lambing  days  are  over  as  the  udder  will  be   useless. Thats  all   for  now  folks.    If   anyone  is  thinking   of  raising  a  couple  of   weaners   for   delicious   pork   give   us   a   call.     We   still   have   a  few   available.     Stay   warm   and   dry  and   if   you   see  any   nice   weather   please  point  it  this  direction. See  you  next  month  for  more  Life  on  the  Farm.

The   second   long   awaited  arrival   is   the  tractor,  it’s  only  taken   two   and   a  half   years.   At  last   we   won’t   have   to   use  the   car   for  towing   around   the   farm  and   things  like  ground  preparation  will   be  a  lot   quicker  and  much  easier. I’m  sure  you  will  be  well  aware  of  how  dangerous  and  strong  a  ram   can  be  and  Beavis  our  ram  is  no  exception.    He  weighs  in  at  about   100  kilos  (just   about   16  stone  in   old  money)  of  muscle  -­‐  even  the   bit   between   the   ears!     We   never   go   in   his   pen   unless   he   is   restrained  and  the  number  one  rule  of  keeping  a  ram  is  never  turn   your  back  on  him,  ever! So  one  day  when  Jen  was  feeding,  Beavis  decided  he  would  come   and  greet  her.    We  had  moved  him  into  a  temporary  pen  during  the   really  wet   spell   and  he  had   obviously  had   enough.  He   backed   up   and   charged   straight   through   the   wooden   front   of   the   pen!     So   now  he's   in  the  lane  outside  the  stables,  Jen  has   nothing  to   hand  -­‐   no   rope   and   no   me.     Beavis   is   just   standing   looking   at   her   -­‐   probably   with   a   sore   head   (and   definitely  a   cut   lip).     So...   her   dilemma  was,  does  she  turn  her  back  on  him  and  run  (and  running   is  not  her  strong  point!)  to  the  shed  where  I  am  (hiding)  well  out  of   earshot,   and   if   she   runs   will   Beavis   charge   and   chase   her?     The   other  alternative   was  to  tackle  him  on  her  own?     Guess  what,  she   rugby  tackled  him  and  managed  to  get  him  in  the  chicken  pen!   The   local  women’s   rugby  team  have  been  in  touch  and  offered  her   the  captaincy  with  a  view  to  using  Beavis  for  ongoing  training.   With  lambing  successfully   finished   and   every  single   lamb   named   (by  Jen   as   they  all  look  the  same   to  me)  and   Nom  Nom  with   her   first  farrowing,  our  spring  numbers  are  on  the  up.

Peter  &  Jenny  Sebborn.  Breeders  of  pigs,  lambs  and  poultry.   La  Gauteliere,  79220,  Pamplie.    Tel:  05  49  28  38  57.

For  a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    for  an   advertising  pack  or  download   from  our  website:   www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Life, Food & Drink... French Village Diaries I  was  sure  I  smelt  a  whiff  of  spring   in   the   air   these   last   few   weeks;   morning   coffee   and   lunch   were   taken   in   the   garden,   the   farmers   were   busy   in   the   fields   (so   that   could   have   been   what   I   smelt),   and  the  sun  on  my  face  felt  great.

by  Jacqueline  Brown.

Then  the  cold  returned.  At   least   I   could  cheer   myself   up  with  a  bit   of   seed   sowing   as   now   is   the   perfect   time   to   start   preparing   my   summer   favourites   like  tomatoes,   courgettes,  squash,  aubergines,  peppers   and  some  fiery  hot  chillies. We   don't  have  a  real  greenhouse,  but  have  found   sowing   indoors   using  recycled  plastic   vegetable   punnets  as  mini  propagators,  then   moving   them   to   our   mini   plastic   greenhouse   once   they   have   germinated  works   very  well.  By  mid   May  we   should  have   lots   of   strong  healthy  plants  to  put  out  in   the  potager  and   I  positively  look   forward   to   the   summer   glut   of   vegetables   that   I   will   turn   into   soups   for  next  winter.     This  year  disaster   struck  and  we  ran  out   of   soup   by  mid   January  so   my  plan   is  to   sow  more   courgettes  and   squashes  this  year  than  we  had  last  year.  Courgettes  are  perfect  for   the  summer,  and   do  make  a  delicious  and  creamy  soup,  but  I  think   for   autumn   and   early  winter   the   firmer   fleshed   squashes   really   come  into  their  own. As  well   as  introducing  Mince  Pies  to  the  locals,  the  English  in  our   village   have   also  introduced   Le  Booter   Nout   and   the   French   love   them.  For   many  years  we   held   a   plant   swap   every  Spring  where   seedlings   or   cuttings   could   be   swapped   over   a   cup   of   coffee   outside  the  salle  des   fetes.  One  year   I  had  some  spare   butternut   squash   seedlings  that  a  brave   couple  agreed  to  take  and   try.  Our   elderly  French   neighbours,   who  kindly  share  part   of  their   potager   with   some   other   English   friends,   have  also   tried   them   and   they   couldn’t   believe   the   texture   difference   in   comparison   to   a   pumpkin,   or   any   of   the   other   winter   squashes   you   find   in   the   French   supermarkets   and   were   almost   begging   for   a   packet   of   seeds   for   Le   Booter   Nout.     This   year   I   predict   there   will   be   butternut  squash  appearing  in  nearly  every  potager  in  the  village! Another   new  crop  for  me  this  year  is  a  real  monster   and  surprised   some   of   my  friends   when   it   took   over   their   potagers   last   year.   Described   by   the   ‘seed   giver’   as   a   butternut   squash   it   bore   no   resemblance   to   the   dumpy  shape  we   were  used   to,  instead,   at   nearly  two  foot   long   it   looked   like   a   weapon!  However  the  firm,   meaty  flesh  was  very  like  the  butternut  and  each  fruit  could  make   at  least  a  weeks  worth  of  soup  so  I  can’t  wait  for  my  monsters  this   year.    If  you  are  interested  I  think  they  are  called  ‘Longue  de  Nice’. I’m  delighted  to  say  our  village  plant  swap  will  be  back  this  year,  so   if   you   are  anywhere  near   Loubille   79110   (south   Deux-­‐Sèvres)  on   Saturday  27th  April  at  10.00,  do  pop  along  with  your  excesses!

You  can  read  more  from  Jacqui  and  find  her  favourite  recipes   at  www.frenchvillagediaries.com.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

To Make Vertigo-Water.

by  John  Sherwin.

Take   the   leaves   of   red   sage,   cinquefoil,   and   wood   betony,   boil   them…when   it   is   cold   put   in   a   pennyworth   of  roch-­‐allum   and  bottle   it   up.     When   you  use  it   put   a  little  in  a  spoon  and   snuff   it   up;  go   not  into  the  air  presently. I  must  say   this  seems  very  sound   advice  from  ‘ The   Compleat   Housewife’,  a  book  without  which  no   household   could   function  in  the  late  18th  century.    The  drift  is  clear  -­‐  there  must  be   a   gap   between   the   main   event,  the   meal,   and   the   fluttering   of   delicate  leave-­‐taking.     This   is   the  time  for   round  bellies,  cigarred   reflection,  fond   memories,   indelicate   jokes,  a  loosening  of   belts,   smokey   coughs   and   spittle   in   handkerchiefs.     And   with   that   fugitive,   fusty  pause  comes,  as  night   follows   day  and   as  Hepburn   succeeds  Audrey,  the  digestif. Let’s   mix   metaphors  and   talk  turkey.    A  ‘digestif’  sounds   vaguely   medical,   like   a   hernia   or   laryngitis.   Something   technical   and   therefore   rather   good.   Something   your   grandma   would   smile   approvingly  over   in  wunnerful   technicolour   while   knitting  a  never-­‐ ending  scarf.     It  is  of  course  nothing  of  the  kind:  it’s  just  an   excuse   to  get  that  little  bit  more  sozzled. That’s  all   well   and   good   –   and   at   that   time  of   night   after   a   jolly   good  evening,   who  would  argue?  –  but  it’s  the  how   and   the  what   we  must  focus  on  unless,  well,  unless  good  men  unwittingly  allow   bad   things  to  happen.    You   will   know  from  last   month’s  interlude   on  aperitifs   that  I  like  to  keep  things  simple  –  it’s  Nature’s  way  of   leaving  you  enough  grey  matter   to   figure  out   the  winning  trio   at   Chepstow.    So,  if  you’re  with  me  so  far,  a  digestif   should  not  be  too   alcoholic.     Out  with  the  brandy  and  the  single  malt   whiskeys  and   their  tiresome  adherents.    Enter  stage  right… Vins  doux  naturels!     The  principle  is  similar   to   port,  but   I  am  not   getting  into  the  complexities  of  that  beverage  here.    A  VDN  is  made   by  the  process  of  mutage.     The  normal  way  of   making  wine  is   that   grape   juice   sugar   is   turned   to   alcohol   under   the   prompting   of   yeast.   Stopping   this   process   (mutage)   before   it   has   reached   its   natural  conclusion   by  the   addition  of  a  strong  alcohol   or   distilled   spirit  means  that   some  sugar   is  left,  therefore  the  liquid   is  sweet,   but  with  the  added  liquor,  quite  strong.    Port  is  around   20%,  a  VDN   hovers  at  16%  .   That  four-­‐or-­‐so  percentage  difference  means  a  VDN  can  be  trusted   in  the   way  that  a   port   can’t.  Don’t   get   me  wrong:  port  is   a  lovely   thing  but   it’s   somehow  too   more-­‐ish   and   can   therefore   scupper   half   of   the   next   day.     A   VDN   is   more   delicate,   more   satisfying   without  cloying.     There  are   numerous  examples  which   you  might   well   have  passed   at  the   wine  section  of  the  supermarket   without   daring   to   give   them   a   whirl.     Well,   heck,   give   any   one   of   the   following  a  fair  wind  and  kick  Johnny  Porto  into  touch!    Rivesaltes;   Muscat  de  Frontignan;   Rasteau;  Banyuls.  Personal   favourite?     No-­‐ brainer:  Beaumes  de  Venise.    And  don’t  go   into  the   air   presently,   just  curl  up  and  smile  yourself  asleep.

John Sherwin, French Wine Tours. Tel: 02 51 66 14 85 Email: johnsherwin@orange.fr ~ www.french-wine-tours.com

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

French Adventures... The Face of the Deux-Sèvres If  you  are    leafing  your   way  through  a  thriller  or  sci-­‐fi   novel,  chances  are  it  came  from  Paperback  Jan.     Jan   is  probably  the  best  known  face  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres   and   with   eleven   venues,   her   book   exchange   is   a   legend  in  its  own  time. She  came  to  France  in    the  “canicule”   of  2003,  having   decided   to   try  pastures  new  when  her  courier  business  ‘Jan  The  Van’   fell   on   difficult   times.     Along  with   the   end   of   a   relationship   and   feeling  physically  and  mentally  exhausted,  she  threw  her   lot  in  with   Lady  Luck  and  bought  a  place  in  La  Ferriere-­‐en-­‐Parthenay.    A  friend   who  lived  locally  sourced  the  property,  and  although  she  hadn't  seen   it,  she  bought  it.    The  rest  as  they  say,  was  history. Jan's   purchase   was   a   bit   of   a   random   lot:   Two   outbuildings,   two   garages  and  a  field  –  there  was  no  house  to   speak  of,  so  one  of  her   early  tasks  was   to   source   a  caravan   to   live  in  for   the   early  months   following  her   arrival.  She  endured  unbearable  heat  and  no  water  or   electricity  making  life  very  uncomfortable. She  joined  Get  Together   where   she  gleaned  the  vital   bits  of  info  she   needed   to   survive   and   start   up   here.     Her   building   project   was     ambitious:  To   create  a  home   were   there   was   none,   on   a  modest   budget.     A   chance  meeting  on  a  plane   led  her   to  the  builders  who   were  to  achieve  this  and  get  her  the  home  she  wanted. As  Autumn  approached,  she  returned  to  the  UK,  not  relishing  life  in  a   caravan  in  the  harshest  months  of  the  year.    She  returned  to  find  her   pied  a  terre  had  become  a  reality  –  just  60  square  metres,  it  was  the   home  she  wanted  and  she  moved  in  immediately. Jan's   book  empire   came   from   very  humble   beginnings.  Her   sister   gave  her  a  few  crates  of  books  following  a  clear  out,  and  it  was  with   them  she  went  along  to  the  British  shop  in  L'Absie  to  see  if  she  could   make  some  money. Like  most  new  ventures,  it   was  hard  in  the  early  days,  but  she  quickly   realised  that  in  order  to  make  a  go  of  things,  she  needed  to  put  some   added   value  into  her  book  venues.    The  shop  already  had  a  coffee   bar,  and  was  running  French  lessons,  so  there  was  existing  incentive   to  get  people  through  the   door.     Soon  Jan   was  organising  art  and   jewellery  classes,  to  draw  even   more  people   through  the  door,  and   slowly  her   book   exchanges   became   a  regular   weekly  spot   at   the   shop. Her   idea  started   to   mushroom,  and   after   the  closure  of  the  British   shop,  Jan  spread  her  net   further  to  attract  other  venues  throughout   the   region.     She  started   to  offer   her   customers  much   more  than   a  

good   read:   Slowly   charity   quizzes   appeared,   English   language   magazines  (like   The   DSM!)   Remembrance  Day  poppies,   and  much,   much  more.    She  always  welcomes  a  new  face,  understanding  herself   how  hard   it  can  be  to  be  a  stranger  in   a   new  place,  and  for  that  we   are  all  so  very  grateful! She  now  travels  from  Thouars  in  the  North  to  Saint  Maxient  l’Ecole  in   the   South,  taking  in  a  bit   of  the   Vendée   en  route.    She  tries  to   be   organised   and   works   “a   fortnight   on   and   a   fortnight   off”   as   she   additionally  helps  with  the  care  of  her   mum  Lyn,  who  in  recent   years   has  started  the  onset  of  Alzheimer's  Disease.     Through   her   warmth,   Jan  has  introduced  her  mother  to  many  of  us  on  her  visits. Looking  to  push   her  game  on,  Jan  launched  the  very  first  “Big  Book   Fayre”   in   September   2009.     As   she   offered   a   “three   for   one”   exchange  system  for  her   books,  she  was  amassing  a  seriously  large   quantity  of  books,  only  a  fraction   of  which   made  it  out  on  the  road   with  her.    She  invited  other  stall  holders,  to  coincide  with  La  Ferriere's   annual  Vide  Grenier  where  300  stall  holders  gather.     Jan  feels  one  of   her  highlights  was  counting  up  her  proceeds  after  this  first   big  event.   She   was  delighted  at  the  result   and   felt   her  efforts  had  finally  paid   off. This   year   Jan   has   changed   the   event,   and   is   calling   it   “Clear   Your   Clutter   For   Charity”   inviting   charities  along,  and   the  general   public   who  can  sell  bric-­‐a-­‐brac  and  donate  to  the  charity  of  their  choice. It   is  quite   staggering  the  effect   she  has  on  us  all   with   her   tireless   efforts  to  help  others  by  spreading  knowledge  and  increasing  contact   for  those  who  feel  isolated.   So,  does  she  have  any  wisdom  for  newcomers? She  does,  and  in  no  particular  order  she  advises:-­‐ Be  prepared  to  work  hard  for  little  reward. Look  for  opportunities  and  grasp  them. Try  and  know  at   least  ONE   person  when  you  arrive  -­‐  even  if   it's  your  estate  agent! Come  with  enough  funds  to  last  at  least  a  year Wise  words  indeed  from  Paperback  Jan. Contact  Jan  on  06  08  30  73  29 or  pop  along  to  one  of  her  book  venues  listed  on  Page  5. Below: Paperback Jan pictured at Pause! café, L’Absie with some of her many books in English. Written  by  Helen  Aurelius-­‐Haddock.    http://haddockinthekitchen.wordpress.com   or  contact  Helen  by  email  at:  helenah@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Motoring... From Microcar to F1 and back... by  Helen  Tait-­‐Wright

We’ve  all  been  there.   You  are  driving  down  a   quiet  French  road  when  suddenly  there  is   a   queue  of  traffic  ahead  travelling  at  about  40kph,  and  you   just   know   that  at  the  head  of  it  is  a  “Sans  Permis”,  “Spid”  or  “Voiturette”;  call  it   what  you  will. I  don’t  know  about   you,  but  I  think  they  are  the  scariest   and   most   dangerous  things  on  the  road.    Generally  the  driver,  who  tends  to   be   ancient   and  lacking  in  any  rudimentary  grip  on  road  rules,  (assuming   he  can  even  see  the  road  through  the  assorted  collection  of  soft  toys   piled  on  the  dash)  does   not  have  to  have  a  licence  or  have  passed   a   test  to  take  one  on  the  road,  which  is  horrifying  enough  in   itself,  but   after  having  seen   the  remains  of  one  after  an  accident  they  seem  to   offer  about  as  much  accident  protection  as  a  shopping  bag. Drivers  born  after   1st  January  1988  must  have  a  Moped   licence  in   order   to  drive  one,   but   you   can  also  drive  them  if   you   have   been   banned  from  driving!

Surely  not  the  same  company?    Oh  yes  it  is!   Ligier   started  out  making  mid  engined  sportscars  in  1969.  The  1973   fuel   crisis   saw  such   a  downturn   in   demand   for   Ligier’s  road   legal   sportscar,  the   JS2,  that   the  company  turned   its  focus   to   Microcars.     They   subsequently   acquired   the   Beneteau’s   Microcar   division   in   2008,  and  are  now  Europe's  second  largest  microcar  manufacturer,   and  the  largest  manufacturer  of  licence-­‐exempt  vehicles. In  contrast,  having   already  competed   at   Le  Mans  since  1970,  Ligier   brought  their  Formula  One  team  to  the  grid  in  1976.  Jacques  Laffite   won  the  Swedish  Grand  Prix   with  the  team  in  1977,  in   a  victory  that   will   go  down  in  history  as  the  first  all  French  victory  in   a  Formula  1   championship. Sadly   “Equippe   Ligier”,   proved   to   be   less   lucrative   than   cars   for   Frenchmen  unable  to   obtain  a  driving  licence,  and   after   a  string  of   disappointing  seasons  in  F1  in  the  early  nineties,  the  team  was  sold   to  Alain  Prost  in  1996,  leaving  just   the  Ligier   brand  on   the  back  of   that  annoying  little  car  you  are  still  following  .......  

The   cars   are   mainly  made   by   3   manufactures,   Aixam,   Ligier   and   Microcar.  They   are   all   two   seaters,  can   only   weigh   300lbs,   have   a   maximum  speed  of  28mph  (45kms)  and   an   engine  of   5.6  hp.    They   are   kitted   out   as   “proper”   cars   and   can   be   fitted   with   alloys,   cd   players,  electric  windows  and  of  course  go  faster  stripes!!    They  have   model  names  such  as  GTO,  Sport  and  RS,  which  must  be  ironic? New  cars  range  in  price  from  €9990  to  €14990,  which  is  unbelievable   considering  a  Renault   Twingo  can  be  yours  for  €6990,  and  insurance   is  understandably  expensive  given  the  risk  they  represent!     The  cost   of   a  new   model  probably   explains  why  there  are  so   many  old   ones   on  the  road  often  held  together  with  duct  tape  and  string!    I  suppose   owning  one   allows  you   to  at   least   stay  out  of  the  weather   on  your   (very  slow)   journey  and  you  can  park  in   impossibly   small  gaps  and   p u t   y o u r   shopping   in   the   back,   thus   giving   the   driver   some   independence.

Contact  Helen  at:  helen@stodel.org.

Now,  the  more   observant   of   you  will   have   noticed   that   one   of   the   manufacturers   is   Ligier,   and   that  may  ring  a  bell  with   motorsport   fans   as   a   manufacturer   that   previously   had   cars   on  the  F1  grid!  

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Advert Size A or B, only 38€ per month or from 33,33€ per month for 12 months.

THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Communications... Selecting and Buying a New PC Part  1  -­‐  Prices

by  Ross  Hendry

It   is   true   to   say  that   buying   a   new   PC   has   never   been   cheaper,   considering  power  and   features  against   cost.     However,  the  choices   at  present  are  quite  mind  boggling,   • Should  you  go  for  a  desktop  or  laptop,  or  even  a  tablet?   • Microsoft   have   recently   released   a   new   operating   system,   namely  Windows   8,  should   you   have  this   operating  system  or   stay   with   the   good   old   familiar   Windows   XP,   what   about   Windows  7  ?   • What   is  the   Android   operating   system?  Which   flavour/version   should  I  choose? • Once   you   have  decided   on   the   type   of   PC,   then   you   have  to   decide  do  you  want  a  French  or  English  one?

Type  of  PC?

Desktop  or  Tower  type  PCs. Generally  speaking  a  desktop  PC  will  cost   less  than  a  laptop  or  net   book  for  comparable  features,  the  desktop  PC  is  also  more  likely  to   be  upgradeable  and  thus  will  probably  be  useable  for  longer.   If  you   are  upgrading,  do  you  need  to  upgrade  the  screen,  keyboard   and   mouse   or   just   the   processor?     Clearly  if   you   only  need   to   replace   the   processor   and   not   the   screen   you   can   save   money.     Desktop  PCs  are  very  competitive  at  present  and  you  may  purchase   a   new   entry   level   mini   tower   PC   from   as   little   as   £160.00,   this   would  be  without  Microsoft  Windows  or  any  other  programs. If  you  are  happy  to  purchase   a  PC  with  an  operating  system,  then   prices   start   at   around   £250,   or   thereabouts,     for   a   PC   with   Microsoft   Windows  8.  Both  of  these  PCs   will   provide  the   average   home  user  with  every  feature  they  are  likely  to  require. Laptop  or  Net  book? Laptops  and  net  books  generally  come  with  an  operating   system,   Windows  8  being  the  one  most   are  sold  with  at  present,  it   is  still   possible  to   find  a  few  with  Windows   7   and  the   odd   one   with  no   operating  system. Laptops Laptop  prices  start  from  about   £280,  a  little   less  for  no  operating  system.  These  will  have   all   of   the   features   most   home   users   will   require,   including   a   built   in     camera,     microphone   and   speakers,  for  using  Skype  or   other   video   chatting.   They   generally   have   screens   larger   than   14"   and   also   have   optical   disk   drives   (CD/DVDs).   Most   common  screen  sizes  are  around    15.6".

Net  books These  have   screens   from  7"  up  to  14"  and  can  do   most   things  a  desktop   or   laptop  can   do,  they  do   not  generally  have  full   sized   keyboards   or   optical   drives,  and   unless   you   buy   a   top   of   the   range   one,  known   as  an  ultra  book,  they  will  be  much   slower   than   a  laptop.  They   are   designed   with   portability  as  the  main  criteria,  entry  level   for   these  is  around  £200.00. Both  Net  books  and  laptops  have  Wi-­‐Fi  networking  built  in  and  also   the  traditional  range  of   connectors  you   would  expect  to   see  on   any   desktop   PC,  including  USB   ports,   video   connectors,    Network  and   security  sockets  along  with  headphone  and  microphone  sockets. Tablets The  iPad  has   led  the  way  for  the  Tablet  PC,   or   is  it  a  PC?  It   is  very   difficult   to  say  if  they  are  a  PC  or   a  very  smart  mobile  telephone   with   a   big   screen!     For   the   most   part   the   technology   is   very   different   from  Microsoft   Windows,  they  are  quite  intuitive  to  use   but  do  not  have  all  of  the  features  of  Windows. Tablets  are  great   for   entertainment,  social   networking   (Facebook   etc)     and  communication  on   the   move,   the  more  expensive  ones   are  also  very  fast,  have   a  long  battery  life  and  some  will   connect   you   to  the  internet,  where  ever   there  is  a   mobile  telephone  signal   (you  need  to   subscribe  for  this   service),  normally  they  connect  to   the  internet  via  your  LiveBox  or  router  using  Wi-­‐Fi. Practical  Screen   sizes  start   at  7"  and  I  have  seen   11"  ones,  although   between   7"   and   10"   seem   to   be   the   most   common   sizes.     Minimum  price  for  these  start  at  around  £70.00,  the  better,  more   practical  ones  are  around  £150  to  £200.  The  Microsoft  Surface  and   the  iPad  4  prices  start  at  £350,  the  iPad  5  at  around  £450.00. Next  month,  I  will  look  at   the   tablet  technology  in  more  detail  and   also   consider   how   you   use   your   PC   and   how   this   affects   your   buying  decision.     R o s s   H e n d r y   i s   t h e   proprietor   of   Interface   C o n s u l t i n g   a n d   Engineering,  who  has  over   42   years   experience   in   C o m m u n i c a t i o n s ,   Computer   Technology   and   Direct  Marketing.   (See   advert   below   for   more  information).

Page 30


Advert Size A or B, only 38€ per month or from 33,33€ per month for 12 months.

THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Contact  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’ La  Bartière,  79130,  Secondigny. Telephone:  05  49  70  26  21   or  email:  info@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr or see our website: www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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0044 208 082 4729

Annual  Subscription  Costs:  28€  within  France,  18€  UK  addresses. (Unfortunately  the  cheaper  ‘printed  papers’  rate  cannot  be  applied   to  addresses  within  France,  only  when  sending  abroad)   Please tick:

‘The Deux-Sèvres Monthly’

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Full  Name: Postal  Address:

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Tel: Email: Please  make  cheques  payable  to  SARAH  BERRY.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Building & Renovation... Spring  Cleaning!

Spring  is  just  around   the  corner   with  the  prospect  of  warm  weather,   sunny  days  and  the  thought  of   a  long  hot  summer.     The  log  burner   or  open  fire  that  has  been  tended   to  all  winter  is  now  ready  to   be   cleaned  out  and  put  into  summer  hibernation. Now  is  also  the  right   time   to   have  the  flue   or   chimney  cleaned  as   well.  The  carbon  deposits  or  soot  can   be  removed   easily  when   still   dry  rather   than  being  left  for  a  few  months.     Once  the  job  has  been   done,  there  will   be   no  worries  when   it’s  time  to   light   up  again  next   winter.    Trying  to  find  a  chimney  sweep   in   October/November  can   be   very  frustrating,   so   the   answer   is  to   have  the   job   done   early   during   the   non-­‐burning   season.     The   certificate   that   should   be   issued   by   the   chimney   sweep/ramoneur   will   last   12   months.   By   having   the   work  done   between   the   burning   seasons   you   will   be   making  sure  you  start   the  next   winter  with  a  fully  compliant  heating   system. On  a  technical  note,  France  has  now  come  into  line  with  the  rest  of   Europe  and  have  changed   their  building  regulations  regarding  new   installation  of  log  burning  stoves.     The  regulations  state  that  NO  90˚   or  right  angle  bends  are  to  be  used   in  the  construction  of   the  flue,   particularly  at  the  back  of  the  appliance.    Soot  can  fall  down  the  flue   and  build  up  in  the  bend  and  this  will  reduce  the  size  of  the  pipe  and   restrict  the  flow  of  carbon  monoxide  gas,  which   if  not  detected,  can   be  lethal  as  it  will  find  its  way  out  into  the  room. If   your   existing  installation   has   this  configuration  of  bends,  I  would   strongly  recommend  it  be  altered  to  remove  these  potential  hazards.

Should   any   of   the   above   be   of   interest,   please   contact   David   Watkins  Chimney  Sweep  on  the  contact  details  below.

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

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THE DEUX-SÈVRES MONTHLY

Short  editorials  can  be  offered  to  advertisers,   free  of  charge. Please  call  Sarah  to  find  out  more. Tel:  05  49  70  26  21

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Small Colour advert only 34€ ARTISANS  &  TRADESMEN... Do  you  have  any  top  tips  you  can  share  with  our  readers?       We  would  love  to  include  them  in  this  section! For  more  details,  please  see  the  ‘Written  Contributions’  page   on  our  website:  www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

THINKING  ABOUT  PLACING  AN  AD? For  a  full  list  of  our  advertising  rates,   please  phone  05  49  70  26  21    or  download   our  Advertising  Pack  from  our  website:   www.thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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Business, Finance & Property... UK Inheritance Tax Bills to Rise... Will This Affect You?

by  Bradley  Warden,  Partner,  Blevins  Franks

UK inheritance tax bills look set to rise after the government announced that the nil rate band will remain frozen until at least 2019, as part of its plans to fund care for the elderly. This is effectively a tax rise in real terms because of inflation. is is calculated to bring an extra 5,000 estates into the inheritance tax net, earning the Treasury an extra £1 billion in tax revenues each year. Families could lose another £95,000 from their inherited estates in 2019. e current UK nil rate band is £325,000 per individual, potentially £650,000 for partners. e tax rate is then a fixed 40%.

On your death, any UK assets will be assessed in the UK to see if you have a liability to tax there. Any UK tax paid can be credited against the French succession tax due on your total assets.

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Does this affect French residents? UK inheritance tax is usually based on domicile rather than residence, so British expatriates very often remain liable. However, under the UK/France Double Tax Treaty, long-term French residents are deemed to be domiciled in France for UK inheritance tax purposes. eir worldwide estate is subject to French succession tax, although UK inheritance tax will always apply to UK assets.

French succession tax is payable on your worldwide assets if you are resident here when you die. It can be complicated enough, but gets more complex if you have UK assets. You need to understand both sets of rules, and how they interact, and then review the way you hold your assets to take steps to lower death taxes for your heirs. Blevins Franks has decades of experience advising British expatriates on effective tax mitigation and wealth management strategies, and can guide you through the rules in both France and the UK. Summarised tax information is based upon our understanding of current laws and practices which may change. Individuals should take personalised advice. To keep in touch with the latest developments in the offshore

world, check out the latest news on our website www.blevinsfranks.com

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Ask Amanda.

Question:   We   are   a   self-­‐employed   couple   living  in   France.     I  am  an  auto-­‐entrepreneur   and  my  husband   has   a   SARL.     What   pension   can   we   expect   from   the  French   system   and   what  happens  to   the  pensions  we  left  behind   in  the  UK?

With   the   freedom   of   movement   we   enjoy   under  the  EU,  pension  questions  are  becoming   more  and  more  common   and  I  am  increasingly  helping  expatriates   who  work  in  France  plan  for  their  retirement. France   has   two   systems   or   “tiers”   of   pension.   The   Basic   Pension   (Retraite   de   Base)   and   The   Complementary   Pension   (Retraite   Complementaire).     These  pensions  are  calculated  on   the  number  of   quarters   (trimestres)   completed   and   not   the   number   of   years   worked,  as   in   the  UK  system.     There  is  also  an  optional   product  to   increase  your  pension  approved  under  the  Loi  Madelin. Qualifying   for   the   basic   pension   in   France   requires   a   minimum   revenue  for  each   trimestre  &   the  number   of   completed  trimestres   will   decide   your   pension   amount.   The   Complementary   Pension   depends   on   the   regime   that   applies   to   the   insured   person.     (Whether  RSI  or  CIPAV?). To   quantifying   and   maximise   UK   pensions,   we   need   to   look   at   several  areas.    The   state  pension  you  are  entitled  to,  public  service,   or   whether   you   have   private   pensions   or   were   part   of   private   employee  schemes? In   2006  the  UK  introduced   a  law  making  it  possible  for   UK   private   pension   benefits   to   be   transferred   to   a   Qualifying   Recognised   Overseas  Pension  Schemes  (QROPS)  provided  that  the  schemes  met   HMRC  approved  qualifying  conditions.     This  is   a  highly  specialised   area  and   qualified  advice   is   essential   before  deciding  whether   this   may  be  an  option  right  for  you. Last  month   I  wrote  about   ‘The  Tours  de  Finance’,  on   Tuesday  9th   April   2013  at   Hotel   Mercure,  Niort.     Pensions  are  an   area  that  we   shall   be   discussing,   with  experts  on  hand   to   speak   to   you   r e g a r d i n g   y o u r   specific  situation.     If  you  email  or  phone   me,  I  will  reserve  you   a   space,   or   if   you   would   like   a   free   financial  health  check   to   discuss   pensions   and   other   financial   matters   please   call   me   on   the   numbers   below   or   send   an   e m a i l   t o   “ A s k   Amanda”.

Amanda  Johnson,  The  Spectrum  IFA  Group.  Tel:  05  49  98  97  46 Email:  amanda.johnson@spectrum-­‐ifa.com or “Ask Amanda” at finance@thedeuxsevresmonthly.fr

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Capital  Gains  Tax  on  French  Property When  selling  a  property  in   France  for  more  than   the  purchase   price   you  are  potentially  going  to  be  liable  for  tax  on  the  capital  gain. The   gain   is  calculated  by  deducting  the  purchase  price  (plus  eligible   expenses)   from   the   sale   price   (plus   eligible   expenses).   Purchase   expenses   can   either   be   claimed   specifically   with   supporting   documentary   evidence   or   a   fixed   7.5%   of   the   purchase   price   is   allowed,  without  such  evidence. Subsequent   costs   associated   with   construction,   enlargement   or   improvement  of  the  property  can  also  be  deducted  from  the  gain.  To   claim   these  costs  specifically  you   will   need   to  be  able  to   produce   invoices  to   support   the  expenditure,  and  normally  these  will  need  to   be  from  French   registered  builders.  Otherwise,  if   you   have   owned   the  property  for  over  5  years  you  are  allowed  to  deduct  a  fixed  15%   from  the  purchase  price  without  providing  such  evidence. Eligible  expenses  for  the  sale  include  estate  agents  fees. There  are   however   a  number   of   capital   gains   tax  exemptions,   the   most  important  of  which  are  the  ‘principal  residence’  exemption  and   the  ‘thirty  year  rule’. If  you  have  been  permanently  resident  in  France   when  selling  your   principal   home  then   any  capital   gain   is   fully   exempt   from   capital   gains  tax. In  order  to  qualify  the  property  must  have  been  occupied  by  you  on   an  habitual  basis,  although  you  need  not  actually  be  occupying  it   at   the  time  of  sale.     However,  if  you  leave  the  property  before  it  is  sold   you  are  not  permitted  to  let  out  the  property  during  the  intervening   period,  or  to  leave  other  family  members  in  occupation.     The  French   tax   authority   will   also   expect   you   to   have   made   an   income   tax   declaration  from  the  property  address  and  paid  “taxe  d’habitation”.

End

If   the   property   is   not   your   principal   residence   you   can   take   advantage  of  the   ‘thirty  year   rule’.    Under  this  rule  you  can   benefit   from   an  allowance  according  to  the  length  of  time   the  property  has   been  held.    An  allowance  of  2%  is  taken  off  the  gain,  for  every  year  of   ownership  after  the  fifth  year,  4%  pa  after  the  seventeenth   year  and   8%   pa   after   the   twenty-­‐fourth   year,   meaning  that   all   the   gain   is   capital  gains  tax  free  after  thirty  years  ownership.   With   effect   from   1st   January   2013   an   additional   surtax   has   been   introduced   payable  on   gains   over   €50,000,  after  the   application   of   the  ‘taper  relief’  allowances  previously  discussed.

For  French  residents  it  is  the  notaire  handling  the  property  sale  who   will  calculate  the  gain,  approve  expenses  and  expenditure  claims  and   apply  any  relevant  exemptions  and  allowances.  The  notaire  will  then   calculate   the   tax   payable   and   deduct   this   from  the  sale  proceeds   before  you  receive  them.    

David  Hardy  is  Regional  Manager  of  Siddalls  France,   Independent  Financial  Adviser,  specialised  in  tax,  inheritance,   pension  and  investment  planning  for  the  British  community  in   the  Poitou-­‐Charentes  since  1996.    Tel:  05  56  34  75  51 www.siddalls.fr

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There  are  five  rates  of  taxation,  starting  at   2%   and  rising  by  1%  per   €50,000  gain,  with  a  maximum  rate  of  6%  on  gains  of  greater  than   €250,000.     However,  there   is  a  “softening”  mechanism  for  reducing   the  level  of  tax  for  the  first  €10,000  of  gain  in  each  band. The   final   calculated  capital   gain  is  then   subject   to   tax  at   19%  plus   15.5%  social  taxes  “contributions  sociales”.

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Three Agencies at Your Service in the Deux-Sèvres We   are   delighted   to   announce   that   as   of   1st   February  we   have   become   the   proud   owners   of   a   third   Agency,   based   in   CHAMPDENIERS  ST  DENIS  (79220). The   Agency   was   previously   owned   (since   2007)   by   Lucie   GRELIER   who   has   remained   with   us   as   a   sales   agent,   which   is   great   for   us   and   for   her  existing   clients  as  this  makes  the   transition  so  much  easier.    Our  other   two   Agencies   are   situated   in   the   market   town   of   COULONGES-­‐SUR-­‐ L’AUTIZE  and   in  COULON,  in  the  heart   of  the  ‘Marais  Poitevin’.   We   are   a   long   established   Agency,   providing   a   comprehensive   and   professional   service   to   our   clients:   valuations  (this  is  generally  a  free  service  to  our   clients   unless  you   require  a  written   estimation  to  produce  to  a  Notaire,  Tribunal   etc   when   you  may  be  charged   a   small   fee)   sales   (whether   you  are   a   Vendor   or   Purchaser   our   aim   is   to  make  sure   that   your   property   transaction  is  achieved  as  painlessly  as  possible,  and  we  are  here  to   accompany  you   every  step  of  the  way)   ,  rental   management   (we   offer   a  full  “gestion”  package  to   our   clients,  by   firstly   letting  your   property  then  provide  a  monthly  management   service),  assistance   with  obtaining  mortgages,  insurance  and  currency  transfers  (we  are  

on  hand   to   provide  you  with  reliable  contacts  in   these   areas  and  introduce  you  as  our  clients). Through  our   user-­‐friendly  website  and  our  professional   and  helpful  staff,  we  specialise   in  French  property  for   sale   and   rent   and   our   vast   selection   of   properties   should   suit  all  requirements  and  budgets!  In   addition  to   an   intense  web   site  optimization  programme,  we  also   advertise  in   France  on  major   websites,  ‘Le  Bon  Coin’,   ‘AVendreALouer’,  ‘Annonces   Jaunes’,  ‘LogicImmo’,  and   on   the   French/English  site  ‘GreenAcres/ImmoFrance’. For   all   initial   enquiries   please   contact   me,   Marion   Spent,  at   the   Coulonges  Agency.

Marion  Spent:  L’Immobiliere  de  l’Autize Tel:  05  49  06  22  17  ~  www.autizeimmo.fr

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Top-End Buyers in the Deux-Sèvres by  Trevor  Leggett,  Chief  Executive

Our  last  article  in  ‘The  Deux-­‐Sèvres  Monthly’  looked  at  "top-­‐end"   buyers  coming  to  France  and  in   this  issue  we’d  like  to  explore  this   further. The   Wealth   Report   is   issued  annually  by  the   respected   research   team  at  Knight  Frank  and  came  out  last   week.     It  is  always  a  good   read   and   it   was   most   interesting   to   read   that   high   net   worth   individuals   now   value   "lifestyle"   over   "investment   returns"   and   "favourable  tax  regimes"  for  their  second  home  investments.       This   is   excellent   news   for   the   French   property   market   as   we   consistently  lead   polls   of   countries   offering  the  best   lifestyle  and   highest   quality  of  life.       It  may  also  go  some  way  in  negating  the   effects   of   M   Hollande's   new   taxes   on   the   wealthy.     Indeed   the   report   says   that   France   currently   has   4,074   individuals   who   are   classed  as  super  rich  but  that  this   figure  is  forecast   to  rise  by  28%   to  5,212  over  the  next  ten  years. On  a  recent  trip   to  China  our  Chief  Executive,  Trevor   Leggett,  saw   for   himself   the   insatiable   appetite   for   French   property   amongst   Asian  investors  and  it  was   no   surprise  to  see  a  report  on  the  BBC   this  week  saying  that  China  is  now   the  leading  export   market   for   Bodeaux  wine  and  that   over   the  last   four  years  30  French  chateaux   have   been   bought   by  Chinese   investors   with   another   20   in   the   pipeline. It's  the  same  story  in   the  Alps   where  we  saw  sales  triple  last   year   with  increases   both   in  the   mid-­‐market   price  range  and  at  the  top   end  to  international  investors.         We   forecast   that   this   international   demand   is   likely  to   continue   increasing.      Our  main  website  (www.frenchestateagents.com)  has   seen  a  rise  in  page   views  from  around   15.5m  pa  to  over   18m   pa   with  interest  from  China  up  by  66%   and  from  Russia  up   by   34%.   Similarly  our   listings  at   the  top-­‐end   of   the  market  (www.leggett-­‐ prestige.com)  have  seen  a  huge  increase  in  visitors.

End

We  have  hundreds  of  houses   for  sale  in  the  Deux-­‐Sèvres  including   some  glorious  high  end  estates.    One  such   is  a  15  –  18th   century,   listed  chateau,  close  to  Thouars,  which  sits  on   an  estate  of  over   5   hectares  and  is  on  the  market  for  €742,000.   It's   easy   to   get   caught   up   in   the   headlines   about   tax   refugees   fleeing   the   country   but   when   you   read   that   actually  the   super   wealthy  value  lifestyle   over   all   other   investment   criteria  it's  clear   that   France  will  continue  to  attract  international  buyers  for   a  long   time  to  come.

Leggett  Immobilier  is  one  of  the  leading  estate  agents  in  France.   You  can  access  all  their  local  property  listings  and  articles  at www.frenchestateagents.com/poitou-­‐charentes-­‐property.

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The Deux-Sèvres Monthly magazine, April 2013  

English language magazine for the French department of Deux-Sevres and surrounding areas.

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