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discipline

aias at asu architecture journal Arizona State University Herberger Institute of Design Spring 2017 | Issue 03


COVER IMAGE CREDIT: NICHOLAS SHEKERJIAN


Research and Discovery We as a profession are inherently known as ‘problem solvers’ which calls for a foundation of research for a basic understanding of past, current, and future situations in order to remedy or enhance the built environment. “Some argue that design and research are intertwined—that architects are conducting research as their design process leads them to better understand the site and other peculiarities of the project. In this guise, all design is a form of research.”1 Research and discovery are embedded in our very nature as architects, and should be elevated and further exploited to a higher degree within the field of everyday practice to conceive innovative ideas. These critical tools, key to empowering ourselves and others through design, encompass our obligation and instinctive desire to curiously and continuously explore, discover, and invent. 1 Davis, Daniel. "Three Top Firms That are Pursuing Design Research." The Journal of the American Institute of Architects. February 18, 2015.

WRITTEN BY: CATHLEEN KEBERT, BRITTANY BAILEY, NIKA PNIAK, AND BRANDON POWELL EDITED BY: PHILIP HORTON

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PREFACE | A LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Over the past three years, Discipline has provided a window into student, faculty, alumni, and student organization endeavors. Delving into projects that are not only pursued within The Design School, but also beyond, allows this journal to showcase a glimpse of all facets of its architecture program through studio submissions, competitions, AIAS events, etc. Research and discovery is common amongst all of these undertakings, and highlights individuals’ yearning for innovation. Contributor’s comprehensive research heightens diverse, innovative, and inspirational projects. I hope this publication continues to bring inspiration, insight, and connections to the individuals within The Design School to the greater community of architects and alumni. This process of discovering the creative outputs within our school was curated with the aid of three exceptionally talented students on the committee this year. Together, we have been able to compile the largest issue of Discipline to date comprising 60 submissions including new features from alumni and professionals. The establishment of the committee provides the foundation for continuing publication of future issues.

Since the release of last year’s addition, the extent of the audience this journal has reached has been an unexpected surprise. With over 200,000 views and thousands of reads across more than 75 countries, we have been able to connect our school to a world-wide audience through Discipline. We are grateful for its impact and the extent of the readership and following that the journal has brought to the Design School, and we are eager to witness the impact this year’s issue will bring. Helping initiate and being heavily involved in Discipline for the past three years, this journal is the legacy I leave behind as this is the final year I have the honor of participating as a student. It is of utmost importance that a medium is used to cohesively bring student and faculty work and ideas together, celebrating diversity and design merit, and I believe Discipline does just that. I am proud and honored to have been able to work with such invested mentors and committee members to create the foundation for this school’s new tradition. My heartfelt gratitude goes to Professor Philip Horton for his continued mentoring for the past three issues, and his striving to progress the journal forward each year and into future years.

A LETTER FROM THE COMMITTEE

EDITOR CATHLEEN KEBERT

Being members of this year’s journal committee for Discipline has been a pleasure and an honor. The opportunity to bring students, faculty, and professionals together has been inspiring to witness and we hope that the essence of this collaboration is evident in the journal and effectively translated to its readers. The atmosphere assembled through these various levels of engagement from the different years of architecture education, alumni, practicing professionals and faculty has provided valuable perspectives on the discipline of architecture, enabling a beautiful embodiment of the current and future trajectories of the field. Focusing on the theme of research and discovery, we have found a new energy manifesting within the school and the field beyond. Delving deeper into aspects of research allows for a more playful approach that ultimately strengthens design as a whole. This was an underlying premise unveiled within the content of this issue, which we hope you will find equally inspiring. We are extremely proud of this third issue of Discipline and are excited to see what the next issue brings, with hopes that this tradition continues to cultivate and further involve a diverse faction of students and contributions alike.

5TH YEAR REPRESENTATIVE BRITTANY BAILEY

3RD YEAR REPRESENTATIVE NIKA PNIAK

COMMITTEE MEMBERS: CATHLEEN KEBERT | BRITTANY BAILEY | NIKA PNIAK | BRANDON POWELL MENTOR: PHILIP HORTON DISCIPLINE

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2ND YEAR REPRESENTATIVE BRANDON POWELL


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John Meunier Tribute to Gary Herberger

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Aleksandra Tesanovic This Saint Your City

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Nicholas Shekerjian Building Ecologies

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Brittany Bailey Salt Lake City Courthouse Case Study

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Orcutt | Winslow A Story of Symbiotic Successes

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Bone, Greene, Ramirez CamelBackyard

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Hawaii Global Engagement Studio Nahele Hale: A Portal to Hawaiian Nature and Culture

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Garcia-Setien, Gresko Where Innovation Meets Nature

Elena Rocchi Pragmatic Poets and Critical Craft: “The Making of a Thing”

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Melton, Raisanen Tabula

Ben Lyons Education Ripple Effect

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Zachary Bundy You Do You

Christina Lufkin Herberger Student Center: An Artists Promenade

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David Richardson Printing a Garden

Gautam Palav Re-Habilitation of the Riverbed: Sonoran River Park

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Matthew Boylan Leaving Traces

Bhoomi Desai City as a Park-Urban Scenography

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Avalon Leavens Centre Georges Pompidou Case Study

Jinesh Jain After-Modern Home

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Bundy, Zanzucchi In Between

Joe Pritchard Golden Ruler: Architecture, Authority, and the Insecurity of Wealth

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Cervantes, Li, Tolosa The Santa Monica Wall: A Space-Time Reflection

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Nina Calic ASU Beacon

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José Bernardi An Encounter with the ASU Art Museum Collection

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Joshua Melton Desert Panel House

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Yuchen Zhao Shanghai Architecture

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Bates, Cleveland, Palav Culture Hub

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Noah Brown Silence and Contemplation

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Hawaii Studio [Waimea] Studio

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Xueke Yang Stairs and Stories

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Ali Saman Chopra “The DUCT” and “Challenging the Status Quo”

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Miles Foster Symbiosis: Sparking Urban Relationships

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Dane Lemma Hy-per Home

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Professional Knowledge Building Written by Susan Liu and Brandon Powell

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Thomas Ibrahim The Republic of Georgia: Architecture and National Identity

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Olivia Raisanen Urban Shift

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Bernhard, Calvendra, Frampton, Karenzi, Mahoro Teddy Bear Cholla Pavilion

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Gulinson, Madsen Link

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Calavendra, Medina, Synacek, Zhao 79 Collective Housing Units

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Yousef AL-Roumi Sense of Absence in Urban Scenography

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Women in Architecture Written by Olivia Raisanen

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Alexandra Patrick Juxtaposing Elements

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Studio Night Written by Brittany Bailey

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Andrew Carlson Tucson Ceramics CO-OP

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Nenwe Geeso Dazaka

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Luis Medina The Weight

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Felipe Mancero Sun Devil Stadium: “A Theater of Absence”

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AL-Roumi, Salinas, van Horne ASU Polytechnic Pavilion

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Coverdale, Huft, Pniak Case Study: Bruder Klaus Feldkapelle

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Bruna Nakhle Digital Environment Art Explorations

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Claudio Vekstein Montessori School, Luján

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Nicole Bone Airganic

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Cheng, Wright Mindfully Mad

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Jack Scheren ARA Small House

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Brandon Powell The Shift

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Veronika Volkova Social Re-Formation of the Bank Tower

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Cathleen Kebert Sequence of Phenomenal Experiences

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Josh Greene Curiosity

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Nikkel, van Horne Iceland Trekking Cabins

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Cathleen Kebert Redefining the Typology of Desert Residences

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Submission Index AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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JOHN MEUNIER |TRIBUTE

A TRIBUTE TO GARY HERBERGER There is so much to remember as Gary was my major supporter throughout my deanship. Thoughts on Gary Herberger by Professor John Meunier, Dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design from 1987-2002. There is so much to remember as Gary was our major supporter throughout my deanship. Almost as soon as I was appointed dean, Gary came to see me and asked what he could do to help.

With his support, we established a Council for Design Excellence. The goal was to put together about 50 people, many of whom came from Gary’s circle of friends and associates from the development community who were interested in Design. Each member contributed $1,000 a year to establish a fund that we could spend, at my discretion as Dean, in any way we saw fit to promote the College of Architecture and Environmental Design. That made it possible for us to do take many initiatives beyond what we could do with state funds, including regular meetings of the Council with faculty, as well as an annual Desert Cities Dinner with distinguished speakers at places like the Arizona Biltmore and the Phoenician.

Gary took me to see his father, Bob, who, at that very first meeting committed $500,000 to support the college. Gary later committed another $500,000 to support and establish the PhD program for the college, allowing us to initiate annual symposia run by the faculty who were able to invite leaders in their areas of research interest and then publish the findings through the Center for Design Excellence. The latter became the Herberger Center for Design Excellence whose goal was not to be a Research Center but a support for the development of all the faculty through summer salary grants and publications as well as assistance in gaining grants and contracts.

John Meunier exchanges a laugh with Gary and Jeanne Herberger

Gary led the way in providing funds to support my travels to Desert Cities all over the world that produced several marketed videos, book chapters, and several TV appearances. I still give lectures on Making Desert Cities to all kinds of audiences, including the Masters of Real Estate Development program here at Arizona State University. Whatever success we had during my 15 years as Dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design was most often because of Gary’s quiet support. Gary was trained as an architect at Taliesin, and worked with Milan Srnka on the design of the trio of buildings that surround the square with Fine Arts and Design. Bringing the two Colleges together to create the Herberger Institute was a grand, and appropriate, final gesture.

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NICHOLAS SHEKERJIAN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: JOSÉ BERNARDI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: BUILDING ECOLOGIES

Man and nature are characteristically non-coexistential. Nature is background. Man is foreground. This aestheticization of nature is what creates unhealthy ecological relationships. New theories suggest a new ecological aesthetic must be determined to mend these relationships. Via the ‘ambient aesthetic,’ a consideration of the physical imprint of environment, this project explores an adaptive reuse manifestation of this new ecological aesthetic, a ‘building ecology:’ where the user, the architecture, and the environment coexist, produce, influence, and create community identity with one another through a shared cyclical ritual.

Given the building’s significance as a prominent Baptist church in Downtown Phoenix marked by the burning of its roof structure, the site is an example of an ecological design. The environment, a catalyst (fire), and an architecture collaborate in converting a sanctuary space into a courtyard.

Desert’s low and infrequent precipitation, this new program and ritual is stretched and experienced over many years of time, creating a program dependent upon the desert’s natural ecology. In effect, this program forces users to experience ecology through the architecture.

The next adaptation is to put the Baptist church into another process of baptism via water, a resource with increasing significance and scarcity in our desert and worldwide. Water becomes an element which provides formal ecological and new ecological transformation creating true, working coexistence between environment, user, and architecture through ritualized construction defined by collection, fabrication, and ruination. As a result of the Sonoran

The project asks: “Is the built necessary for creating transformation in people through architecture?” and “Is ‘building environment,’ a place for ritualized construction, perhaps more transformative and ecologically conscious than a ‘built environment?’”

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ORCUTT | WINSLOW | PROFESSIONAL

YEAR COMPLETED: SUMMER 2016 PROJECT NAME: A STORY OF SYMBIOTIC SUCCESSES PARTICIPATING STUDENTS: HAN HONG AND ROSE ROSHANI

Orcutt|Winslow’s DesignLink Summer Research program is coming upon its third year. It is a way for us to focus on cutting edge research topics in the market sectors where we work and topics that we are applying to projects that might not have the budget to support in depth research on their own. Last summer, we explored Biophilic Design, specifically in how it can be applied to Healthcare and Senior Living projects. Biophilia is a buzz word right now but the application is timeless and important, especially with such vulnerable populations as the sick and elderly. The focus of the research was to distill complicated scientific and evidence-based research into simple tools that could be given to clients and used by architects on any project.

Rose Roshani and Han Hong were the two ASU students selected to participate in DesignLink. They created a body of research and together we worked to create our 5 Simple Elements of Biophilic Design. Once this tool was developed, Rose and Han worked on individual applied research projects for two existing clients. The real story happened once the 12-week research project was complete. Rose and Han took the body of research they had spent the summer compiling and were able to bring their extensive knowledge to their Fall 2016 studio (Darren’s Global Engagement Studio) and share it with everyone. In addition, their contribution to the group project was invaluable. Orcutt|Winslow has had great success applying the 5 Simple Elements to our projects and will be speaking at the 2017 ASHE PDC Conference in March and the ILFI Living Future Conference in May. We are hopeful that our future DesignLink research projects can be just as successful and mutually beneficial, bringing together ASU students and local professionals to study topics of interest. This summer’s topic is coming out of our Education Studio and is focused around Transforming Existing, Traditional Classroom Spaces into 21st Century Learning Environments.

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HAWAII GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT STUDIO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTORS: DARREN PETRUCCI, ADELHEID FISCHER YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: NAHELE HALE: A PORTAL TO HAWAIIAN NATURE AND CULTURE

Sixth year students from various Design School disciplines collaborated together for their Hawaii Global Engagement studio to create a environmental and culture center founded on their experiences in Hawaii and their knowledge in biophilic design. Nature does not operate with a master plan. It adapts to changing conditions, recycles and repurposes materials, decomposes and regenerates when faced with disturbances. Nahele Hale seeks to incorporate these Life Principles into the design of a nature and culture center. The project site is a rectangular forested area, located in Hilo on the island of Hawaii. The site is owned by Kamehameha Schools, a local school system for native Hawaiian students. The forest is not perfect or pristine, but has an identity in Hilo and positive natural characteristics. What

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Kamehameha Schools hopes to build is an environmental nature and culture center where students and out-of-town visitors can come to learn about Hawaii and Hawaiian culture. What we are proposing is an integrated solution with buildings that function like trees in a forest, creating an immersive experience. Students who participated in Darren Petrucci and Adelheid Fischer’s Global Engagement studio include: Lu Bian Yubailu Cao Han Hong Chengmin Li Pabitra Pandeya Addam Roberts Rose Roshani Cissy Tang Shivansh Thanawala Zoey Tian Zhenqi Wang Dain Williams

M. Industrial Design M. Interior Architecture M. Architecture M. Visual Comm. M. Architecture M. Industrial Design M. Architecture M. Industrial Design M. Architecture M. Visual Comm. M. Visual Comm. M. Visual Comm.


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GARCIA-SETIEN, GRESKO | ESSAY

WHERE INNOVATION MEETS NATURE BIOMIMICRY CENTER AT ASU | DESIGN AND APPLIED RESEARCH YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2015-FALL 2016 WRITTEN BY: PROFESSOR DIEGO GARCIA-SETIEN AND STUDENT MARIA GRESKO

The Biomimicry Center project was led by Architectural design professor Diego Garcia-Setien, with the assistance of BArch. student Mariah Gresko for more than 18 months. It was developed in collaboration with the Biomimicry Center’s crew, including Dayna Baumeister (Co-Director and Biomimicry 3.8 cofounder), Prasad Boradkar (Co-Director) and Adelheid Fischer (Assistant Director) with the help of local experts and ASU researchers. This pilot project demonstrates how Biomimetic principles can be applied to design a unique, comprehensive and stimulating educational space, where inhabitants can learn from nature and their own environment, the Sonoran Desert.

What would nature do? How does nature solve similar problems? These are the questions to pose when addressing design from a biomimetic standpoint. This unique approach emulates nature’s patterns and ecosystem’s processes to produce better and more sustainable design solutions. Life’s Principles1 synthesize the essential lessons that we can learn when we observe how nature works. These were taken as a design philosophy guide by the team, to create a local example of biomimetic design in action. The project is a remodel and a new stage in the life and purpose of an existing organized inert structure. If we ask nature how it solves dismantling and renewal, we would easily conclude in the need to be resource efficient and recycle all materials. The remodel was addressed as a zerowaste work. To achieve this goal, the existing furniture could be donated to educational institutions in the neighborhood, the existing modular partitions would be disassembled and stored for reuse, components such as dry walls, technical ceiling and carpet would be removed and managed by companies (USG, Armstrong, Interface) with a commitment to protect the environment, and an active recycling program. HVAC services and electrical network were preserved, considered with the shell, as the given infrastructure.

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Ecosystem The project was conceived as a multi-layered threedimensional system, where each layer is related and codependent of the others, generating strong spatial bonds between them to achieve an integrative design, just as it happens within ecosystems. This system was built selectively out of a small subset of elements each of which fits form to function. Integration and Multifuntionality can be found in elements such as the finned ceiling, diffusing light inside the room, working also as an acoustic damper due to its louvered profile, and providing support to showcase biomimicry materials on the lateral walls. The tables organize the circulation inside the room, but they also host the working spaces for humans as well as other living beings such as native plants. The table’s underside is used to drive electrical and data wiring for the workstations. The material catalogue was selectively chosen from available off-the-shelf products and materials: plywood for the DeserTable and the auxiliary furniture, resin panels for the ceiling fins, extra-transparent glass (metal-free) for the partition wall, windows and doors, and a patterned modular carpet. Their manufacturers are committed to preserve the environment and have implemented biomimicry in their


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production processes (e.g. using life-friendly chemistry or implementing zero-waste and recycling programs). Not only will the Biomimicry Center showcase available modern environmentally-friendly products and materials, but it will also tell its own story, becoming a built model for designers in search of bold applications. Flexibility Nature always shows great capacity of adapting to changing conditions. To be successfully resilient, it draws upon variation, redundancy and decentralization. One of the biggest challenges in this project was to provide a flexible space, able to host different activities in the Center during a typical day. The new Biomimicry Center works as an open landscape,2 ready to be camped by its users. The open-plan layout of the 50’s, liberated from the partitions flanking most office spaces, was followed in the 70’s by the ‘sea of cubicles’. Today, co-working spaces have replaced the cubicle and individual work, with the meeting table and team work. They proliferate worldwide as a solution that meets the needs of contemporary life and its fast changing patterns.

new Center enables its users by inviting them to appropriate the space through their active occupation, transforming it in its place for different activities. A set of recurrent working pods are sparsely arranged across the room, avoiding any hierarchy. Through their multiple variations they can host very diverse situations, such as individual working spaces, private interviews, group meetings, classes, seminars or workshops, public lectures and exhibitions, campus tours, or even some of these functions simultaneously. These pods create a decentralized, redundant and varied space, which promotes a synergistic working environment. It is a flex-space that doesn’t ‘flex’ in itself, but rather provides humans a room to self-organize in a true exercise of spatial agency.

Rather than providing movable partitions and furniture, potentially rearranged on a daily basis in endless possibilities, the apparently rigid and static layout of the

Following a modular strategy, the working pods were designed as a circular void, to be replicated several times across the DeserTable. This special table includes nested components, such as these working pods, or the different carved holes hosting planters, pencils or electronic devices. The DeserTable relates to the rolling drawers, made with leftover pieces after cutting the table pieces, and with the dustbag seats, filled with wood dust produced during the table’s CNC milling and fabrication. This creates another example of biomimicry applied to design; waste material becomes a resource and a design opportunity through the recycling process.

Office Hours (9am)

Meeting (12pm)

Campus Tour (3pm)

Evening Mixer (6pm) AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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Performance The new Biomimicry Center is locally attuned and responsive to its environment and uses readily available materials and energy. Its facilities occupy a fully serviced indoor space, located on the ground floor of Design South, a massive cast-in-place concrete building from the 60s. In order to leverage the building’s thermal inertia, we planned to install a layer of phase change material (PCM) under the first floor slab, to considerably reduce the demand of AC, especially in the morning hours. This solution was complemented with a smart HVAC management system, helping the Center– as well as the whole building--to be more efficient, and produce fewer emissions.

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With one of the highest solar insolation in the country (>6Kwh/ m2/day. Source: NREL), Arizona’s climate usually forces architects to react against the sun with ‘defensive’ solutions as the small and deeply shadowed window openings in the building. This fact makes the Center’s interior a dark cave where sunbeams are not allowed. The desirable presence of plants and other possible living organisms besides humans, recommended the presence of natural light in the room. Commercial natural lighting systems, based on fiber optic bundles which drive sunbeams indoors, provided the technical opportunity to have a natural light source over every native plant on the DeserTable, allowing them to photosynthesize. This design solution does not only use readily available sun energy; besides evident benefits for humans, it also introduces daylight cycles, and circadian rhythms in an ever-lit and ever-air-conditioned working space. A dimmerized LED lighting system, which uses the resin fins as diffusers, is planned to be installed on the ceiling to provide artificial light to the room. It will replace the existing fluorescent lighting system, reducing the Center’s electrical consumption and emissions, and allowing its users to modulate the light intensity and spectrum, and create customized atmospheres. A Piece of the Sonoran Desert The experience of the Center will be strongly influenced by the natural world. Visitors are drawn in by a soft floor resembling a sand dune. The carpet presents flowing trajectories indicating available paths through the space. Back-lit fins span over the room and create a translucent canopy, similar to a cloudy sky over the desert, providing a soft lighting effect where shadows almost disappear. A horizontal plane floats across the room. The DeserTable’s surface is not completely flat and presents a relief, resembling the characteristic basin and range topography


Section D

of the Sonoran desert. Each section of the table represents one of its different eco-Regions, featuring different topography and vegetation. Native species are hosted in ceramic planters nested into the table, providing a green, fresh and unique atmosphere. An invisible sheet of glass merely transects the DeserTable, creating two acousticallyseparated spaces within the room, which are always perceived as one space. The DeserTable is extended across the glass facade, showing that interior and exterior spaces stay continuous and connected. It also acts as a decoy to attract visitors into the Center. Natural light is caught from the exterior through three solar panels installed on the facade. They are equipped with lens array concentrating the sunbeams and driving them through fiber-optic bundles, across the facade, to directly feed every precisely located lamp over each plant on the table. These living organisms share the space with humans, serving as the model for a more inclusive working

space. Humans can settle around the circular pods and will always feel surrounded by other living beings. People might be scattered throughout the room, some working alone and some talking amongst a group. Biomimicry’s interdisciplinary nature, could make the Center a common ground for the encounter between different disciplines, a community space for learning, cooperating and innovating. The Biomimicry Center forms an externally cohesive design which is internally complex at a closer look, just like nature itself. NOTES: 1. Every topic related to Life’s Principles in the text is referred to in italics. See: https://bio-sis.net/life-principles/ 2. Office landscape (Bürolandschaft) was a movement in open-plan office space planning in the 50s. The office landscape approach was pioneered by Eberhard and Wolfgang Schnelle, based in the Hamburg. It was intended to provide a more collaborative and humane work environment. It encouraged all levels of staff to sit together in one open floor to create a non-hierarchical environment that increased communication and collaboration. AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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MELTON, RAISANEN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: ELENA ROCCHI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: TABULA GROUP MEMBERS: JOSHUA MELTON AND OLIVIA RAISANEN

“The sensitivity to atmospheres is in a way the classic task of the architect. You have to be passionate for architecture as a real thing: the presence of architecture. First of all you have to see it in a reality, be sensitive to each situation. You have to like it… as an architect I am interested in this because I create real things: I am not creating ideas and abstractions. Therefore I have to focus on my material, I have to understand why and when things look the way they do, why this is high and this is dark and this is light.” -Peter Zumthor

Transcending aesthetic, form, and progression, emotion conceives the deepest architectural experience. Effectively designing experiential architecture requires an integrated organization of structure and systems dedicated to delivering atmosphere. Atmosphere is conceived by a culmination of all the senses, which together allow the emergence of emotions within a space. Through the careful examination and defining of eleven different atmospheres, the incorporation of the five senses of humankind, and the utilization of concrete as a material, a phenomenological system of design that encompasses emotion creates a tabula of concrete. Atmospheric Block An entirely new system of architecture inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s textile block. This system of building is reintroduced using concrete and mechanisms held within devoted to the delivery atmosphere. The form is derived from the scripting of a book--allowing the potential for the narrative to be rewritten in a manner that best responds to site and context. Atmospheres Change (see: shelter, hear: soft piano, taste: rosemary, touch: rough walls, smell: rosemary) Madness (see: egg crate, hear: silence, taste: prickly pear, touch: foam on wall, smell: damp concrete) Decay (see: stones underwater, hear: running water, taste: spring water, touch: mossy grass, smell: damp grass) Comradery (see: flickering fire, hear: wood burning, taste: food, touch: warmth, smell: fire, food) Climax (see: camera obscura, hear: water moving, taste: herbs, earthy water, touch: vines, smell: vegetation) Respect: (see: light from fire, hear: steps on steel, taste: mint, touch: cold steel, smell: mint, fresh linen) Love (see: flickering light, hear: music, taste: chocolate, touch: soft linen, smell: roses) Community (see: towel detail, hear: water movement, taste: green wall, herbs, touch: towels, smell: fire, water) Independence (see: sky, water on floor, sink detail, hear: water falling, taste: mouthwash, touch: rough walls, wet floor, smell: wood, fire) Isolation (see: stake floor/ wall, hear: water spraying, taste: water, lavender, touch: wet wood, smell: lavender, wood) Heartbreak (see: darkness, hear: silence, taste: sour berries, touch: burnt form concrete, smell: rotting).

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Smell

Touch

respect & comradery

change & isolation

community

Taste

Hear

See

Atmosphere

heartbreak, isolation, & independence

decay

climax

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ZACHARY BUNDY | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: THOMAS HARTMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: YOU DO YOU

The site at the corner of Grand Avenue and Roosevelt Street poses multiple specific challenges to the architect: one must design living spaces for unknown clients, enhance the lives of locals who may fall victim to gentrification, and also satisfy the needs and desires of a burgeoning art community.

This design proposal emphasizes flexibility and economy for residents as well as investors. Unit plans are repeated and mirrored; Maslowian needs for space are organized against plumbing walls, while the rest of the unit is left fully open. This allows renters to have full autonomy in arranging their respective apartments. In addition, units can be combined and separated by the management in order to accommodate a clientele which will change over time.

This proposal also includes a much-needed urban space with a flexible program with amenities for residents as well as potential for commercial investment. Each unit has the “life functions� aligned on one wall, and a large open space which allows residents to organize their apartments in the way they see fit. Units can be combined or separated by the management. Therefore, the size of each unit is either 570 square feet or 1,140 square feet. The building is organized by levels of privacy as well as voyeuristic viewpoints. The street is watched by the stairs, the stairs are watched by the mezzanine, the mezzanine is watched over by the catwalks, and the catwalks are watched from the apartments. The exterior is a monumental series of

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vertical concrete walls, cloaked from its surroundings by a gentle facade of perforated white metal. People are sitting, talking, and daydreaming on wide flights of gradual steps. Time moves slowly here. At the top of the steps, an urban space has a medieval scale. At eye-level are galleries and shops, trees, artists, bodybuilders, people-watchers, and the trickle of fountains. There are a few people overhead, walking across catwalks and carrying groceries into their homes. An easterly breeze passes by.


DAVID RICHARDSON | PERSONAL

YEAR COMPLETED: ONGOING PROJECT NAME: PRINTING A GARDEN

It may seem that the 3D printing process is currently as slow as ‘watching paint dry’ but I consider it more like watching and tending to a garden as it grows. During my time at Arizona State University I have been steadily researching and constantly practicing 3D printing for architectural design. What I would like to introduce to you here is a project I call “Printing a Garden” and it comprises about 1/3 of my printing activity. What began as a simple pot to grow plants in, has taken many turns over time.

My passion for growing plants and studying botany and ecologies has become a proposal for a vertical park structure for a studio project, a retrospective print of a branching tower idea I have made many iterations of over the years, and a accessories such as watering pitchers and more plant holders for a studio model transformed into an indoor garden I have been building and tending to primarily made by 3D printing. So far, the plants have adapted very well. Watering them is a routine I enjoy and I have found that draining the soil is not an issue due to the aridity of my micro-climate. I had initially filled the holders with mostly cacti and succulents but have been phasing in herbs and vegetables: rosemary, peas, peppers, and tomatoes. I anticipate those to catch on, other issues may occur but we will see. Printing a Garden, as I call it, has been a slow and educational process, and it helps me conceptualize the 3D printers I have been working with as less as technological instruments and more as natural processes.

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MATTHEW BOYLAN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: LEAVING TRACES

This project began with the readings, All That Is Solid Melts into Air by Marshall Berman, and The Unfinished Project of Modernity by JĂźrgen Habermas. Berman and Habermas discuss the ideals of the modernist movement, but determine it ultimately failed due to the sense of alienation felt by people. Upon traveling to Finland and experiencing the work of Alvar Aalto, I discovered that he developed a human connection, even as a modern architect, through the act of leaving traces. Through materiality and spatial configuration, Aalto allows people and time to leave traces on his work.

This residence in Palm Springs, California explores the contradiction between durability and deterioration with the intention of leaving traces. While certain elements of the landscape and interior are meant to change with

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time, the structure of the home will remain. This creates relationships between the home, the landscape, and the people, allowing each to leave traces on one another. Through time, these physical traces create a vulnerability within the home, allowing people to more readily form connections with the architecture. These mental traces make the home more meaningful to the residents. As time passes, and as future generations continue to live in the home, even more traces are left. I began by mapping the traces that I left within my own home over the course of the day. Multiple iterations and explorations were developed through the actions of wrapping, pushing, and folding as various ways of connecting these traces. I then used these three actions to explore how they, in combination with programmatic, climatic, and topographic conditions, can begin to influence certain aspects of the home design.


AVALON LEAVENS | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: KASEY JOSEPHS YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: CENTRE GEORGES POMPIDOU CASE STUDY

The Pompidou Center, designed by Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano, is an iconic building in Paris that set the precedence for modern architecture around the world. By placing the mechanical and electrical systems outside of the building, it maximizes the use of the floor plate, and creates a dynamic façade that is highlighted with vibrant primary colors dependent on the system. The building also becomes a focal point for Paris as is sits above the traditional 5 story mansard roof buildings that surround the existing neighborhood.

One of the other iconic features of this building is its use of external circulation space, in the form of a large vertical escalator and tunnel system that fronts the open pavilion area located on site. This 1’-½”:1’-0” bass wood scale model features that trademark circulation system the Pompidou is known for. The model also showcases an element of structural engineering that made the large expansive bay systems possible. The Gerberettes are a cast steel fabricated structural element that act as counter weight to the large truss members. Ove Arup developed this 11-ton system to connect to the exterior columns and, by doing so, creates bracing along the horizontal façades. The model represents a section of the façade, and how to Gerberettes work with the façade and exterior circulation system. In addition to the model, the analytique showcases the overall form of the Pompidou Center and how it fits into Paris’s urban fabric. The analytique also highlights key elements of the buildings showing details in section and perspective. Over all, both elements of the presentation work together to represent the striking features of the Pompidou Center.

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BUNDY, ZANZUCCHI | COMPETITION

YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: IN BETWEEN GROUP MEMBERS: ZACHARY BUNDY AND ADAM ZANZUCCHI

This project was developed for an international competition between architecture students and young architects. Designers were asked to envision a landmark on a peninsula which is located next to Cape St. Vincent, the most westerly point in Europe. The organizers also requested that the landmark be maintenance-free and age with the landscape, while paying homage to the human history of an abandoned landscape. The sea enters the land; the land enters the sea; the stairs mediate the two. The Cape of St. Vincent is a natural boundary at the edge of many opposites: water and rock, cliff and horizon, continent and ocean, known and unknown.

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This project imagines people as explorers of the “inbetween;” that is to say, entities which automatically recognize these opposites and then through a combination of logic and will, traverse an infinitely thin boundary. The architectural manifestation of this concept is a straight 200 meter long staircase which cleaves the area between opposites through a method of “mediation;” the application of structure rationalizes a middle area between conceptual extremes; thick concrete beams anchor the building to the cliff and become the steps of the staircase. The steps are punctuated by covered landings which visually acknowledge the surrounding geography through a series of framed viewpoints: a view first towards an old armory, then a beach, then the town of Sagres, and finally of Cape St. Vincent and its lighthouse. Therefore, the steps which visually orient visitors to the cliff, are interrupted by curated views of the distant landscape.


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CERVANTES, LI, TOLOSA | COMPETITION

COMPETITION: LAND ART GENERATOR YEAR COMPLETED: 2016 PROJECT NAME: THE SANTA MONICA WALL: A SPACE-TIME REFLECTION GROUP MEMBERS: ROMAN CERVANTES, HAILONG LI, AND SANTIAGO TOLOSA

This proposal aims to create a wall for the city of Santa Monica; a wall that reflects its current state as a city and where it can go in the future. In a sense, this wall will help teach people like the chalk board in your school classroom. The east side of the wall is composed of mirrored surfaces that upon arrival incites playful interaction. As one travels along the wall each panel progressively warps, displaying a juxtaposition of fiction and reality of the city. The wall’s core harvests water from fog and energy from the parabolic trough dish running on top of the wall. On the west side of the wall, translucent panels allow the visitor to see the technology and behind him, growth of wild nature facilitated by the harvesting of water.

As a result to California’s dry period, we are constantly bombarded with this awareness to take care of the city, which as a result, becomes an overwhelming experience and an endless checklist of sustainable actions we need to accomplish.

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The question then becomes, can we create a wall that teaches us while also disappearing when it crosses the threshold of over-stimulation? Hence, we propose a wall that stitches city and nature; a wall that teaches us how to generate energy for the city, drinkable water for the environment, and vanishes when overwhelming the pier. As time passes with the wall, so as the high ocean tide, with the rise of water the wall will vanish within nature’s horizon.


1.Parabolic Trough The 500 meters of the wall can allocate 205 parabolic trough arrays, enough to generate 750 MWh annually. 2. Warped One-Way Mirrors The east side of the wall consists of progressively warped mirrored surfaces, a metaphor that reflects on everyday complexities. 1

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3. Revelation The west side of the wall is composed of wild nature. The wall consists of low reflective translucent panels. 4. Fog Catcher For every 6 linear meters, the net harvests water from fog. The net collects 500 gallons a day. 5. Space-Time When over-stimulation happens, the wall is flooded during high tide and disappears from sight.

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JOSÉ BERNARDI | EXHIBIT

AN ENCOUNTER WITH THE ASU ART MUSEUM COLLECTION PHOTOGRAPHS BY: JOSÉ BERNARDI AND CATHLEEN KEBERT

The Violence of Truth originated in the summer of 2016 when Julio Morales, the Curator of Latin American Art at the ASU Art Museum extended an invitation to curate an exhibit as part of the museum’s Encounter series, where “artist and scholars re-imagine and recontextualize the collection to address larger issues related to the current social and culture climate in Arizona and the world at large.”

After initial conversations with Julio, several visits to explore the collection, and interactions with their professional staff, the theme and narrative slowly began to emerge as a response to the artwork selected combined with my previous research and creative work. We decided to incorporate a few of my own pieces to dialogue with the pieces selected from the collection.

The larger topic of the exhibit reflects society’s search for certainty and order during a time in which we seem divided by conflicting and irreconcilable beliefs. The title of the exhibition references Jorge Luis Borges’s 1941 short story The Library of Babel. In the story, the Library--a metaphor for the universe--is an orderly arranged place, where all knowledge is contained. In search of ultimate meaning, the Library’s inhabitants are divided between unrestrained joys and excruciating sadness; they turn to violence and fight amongst each other, destroying whole sections of the Library. The work selected here alludes to Utopian visions, the daunting routines of everyday, the tensions between conflicting myths, the permanence of memory, and the expectations of moments to come. The exhibition advocated for the potential of critical thinking and the need for dialogue and empathy among opposites. The visit is structured in a sequence of four interrelated yet distinct rooms, reinforcing spatial characteristics already

Paseo de Carnaval (Carnival Promenade), 1995 by Esterio Segura DISCIPLINE

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existing in the configuration of the gallery. Contrary to most of the other display spaces in the museum--where the whole area can be grasped and seen upon entrance--the gallery selected provided the opportunity to orchestrate a series of connecting narratives through rooms related to each other, but not fully comprehended until the visitor moves into the space. The sequence was crafted to allow the visitor “to encounter the collection,” generating their own interpretation. Three basic design elements contribute to experience a different atmosphere in each room: the use of few crucial thresholds and walls to transition between spaces, suggesting a distinct character for each area; the use of color on two walls to reinforce the meaning of a particular artwork and its relationship with other pieces; and finally, the use of light and shadows to heighten and differentiate the atmosphere of each room. The southern wall remains empty and silent though the exhibition, except at a critical, culminating moment.


Pa’ Cuba (For Cuba). 1995-98 by Fernando Rodríguez

A small entrance transitions the visitor from the stairwell to the exhibit, presenting the basic ideas and themes explored. Because of its location and generic character, this was the most difficult room to design and to provide with a unique character. The gray on the wall contributes to differentiate it from the freight elevator and the door leading to the loading bay. The color echoes and anticipates the gray in the two larger pieces in the next room. This larger room is structured by the central wooden sculpture Pa’ Cuba (For Cuba), an elongated and winding artwork that divides the room in two. The eastern wall offers daunting reflections on violence in its different manifestations, on the opposite side, the sinking boat of Utopia by Francesc Torres, and the larger piece of the exhibit, Eduardo Sarabia’s City in the Clouds.

Ruina de Charque-Quina (Corner Jerked-Beef Ruin), 2003 by Adriana Varejão

Left to right: Figura En Rojo by Rufino Tamayo; The Library of Babel, 2007 by José Bernardi; The Violence of Truth, 2016 by José Bernardi

Foreground: Sphere, 1986 by Howard Wevner AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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Northward Course of Immigration Makes its Way, 1999 by Sandow Birk

Rufino Tamayo’s Figura en Rojo, seen from the entrance, illuminates the transitional space leading to the third room. This is the central space of the exhibition, charged with powerful contemporary themes exploring the tension between conflicting ideals and myths. Dominating the narrative of the room, the central wall is painted with a Barragån pink color, full of strong allusions while holding the painting Northward Course of Immigration Makes its Way. The last room evokes the quiet atmosphere of a chapel. It is the most intimate and withdrawn area in the exhibition, imbued with personal memories. Almost in shades, it contains a kneeling, emptied figure in silent dialogue with a vibrant Tree of Life, a symbol embraced by different cultures and religions through time. This is the only piece on the southern wall of the gallery. Full of energy, joy and hope, it transcends our differences and beliefs. Serenely, beyond our fears and misunderstandings, El Arbol de la Vida reminds us of our common human condition. DISCIPLINE

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Clockwise, from top left: Signs in the City by José Bernardi; Tree of Life, attributed to Monica Soteno; Yield-Resist, 2000 by Darrin Hallowell

Like Father, like Son, 2000 by Patti Warashina AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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YUCHEN ZHAO | SKETCH

YEAR COMPLETED: 2012 PROJECT NAME: SHANGHAI, ARCHITECTURE, 2012

“Shanghai, Architecture, 2012” is a series of practicing sketches I have done from different periods in 2012. In that year, I was admitted into a collage in Hangzhou, China to study architecture. After I left Shanghai where I have lived for more than 15 years, I started thinking about all the beauties of the city. I decided to use my sketchbook to save some architectural elements and memories of the city.

As one who grew up in Shanghai, being a part of this city means a lot for me. From historical buildings to modern architecture, from traditional residential buildings to flourishing commercial areas, all the elements gave me the initial inspirations of architecture. So I traveled around the city and sketched multiple places and buildings which are unique parts of the city while including unforgettable moments related to my life. The sketches I selected consist of the places and buildings with different types and different meanings. They accompanied three to four generations of Shanghainese and gave us so many memories and influences.

1. A view of Shikumen(sketch). Shikumen (Stone Warehouse Gate) is a traditional Shanghainese architectural style

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2. New world city plaza. One of the earliest and most famous shopping malls with steel and concrete structure which was built in 1914. 3. Shanghai Museum(sketch). Shanghai Museum is a landmark building located in the city center of Shanghai built in 1950. 4. A view of Xintiandi, a new shopping and entertainment district. It is composed of an area of reconstituted traditional Shikumen houses on narrow alleys. 5. Jin Mao Tower, a landmark of modern architecture of Shanghai. It is also a milestone showing Shanghai’s start as a developing city. It was designed by Skidmore, Owings Merrill. 6. Two sketches of the Campus of Tongji University, a comprehensive university in Shanghai which was established in 1905. It has one of the most famous architecture school in China.

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combining Western and Chinese elements that first appeared in the 1860s. It is also one type of traditional Shanghainese community called “Longtang”

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NOAH BROWN | ESSAY

YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: SILENCE AND CONTEMPLATION

SHHH!!!! Listen! Did you hear it? The nothingness, the absence of sound. What is the sound of silence? Does it have a name? Was it the birds I just heard outside, merrily chirping on a sunny day? Or was it the fan spinning overhead? Or just maybe it was the slow and steady melody that sounds like ocean waves against the shore coming from the computer as I’m typing this. Sit. Listen. R e l a x . Think. Contemplate. Because too often, we don’t. Too often, we forget to remember what it was we said we would do. Too often, our lives are consumed by an ever present force reacting to our emotions that know how to take us and steal us away from the world. We are consumed by it. It is our lives. But when we decide to sit and listen and relax and just think without thinking, our minds forget what we were doing in the first place and all of the sudden the noise comes back. The static. The jittery jagged juxtaposition of thoughts that cannot and will not sit quietly in our heads. They refuse and say LOOK I’M HERE! DON’T FORGET ABOUT ME AND HOW IMPORTANT I AM! The trees: nature. How often do they speak? When they do, what do they have to say to us? That we should be more silent and listen to them? I just listened. In fact we should listen because Nature was first. Nature knew before we did and now we look back and ask, “How?” Silence and contemplation are reflections. When silence is present contemplation soon follows. If you don’t believe me then don’t believe me. But when silence is present who will do the talking but yourself?

SHHH!!!!

Listen!

Did you hear it? The nothingness, the absence of sound.

S I L E N C E Did you hear it?

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XUEKE YANG | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: STAIRS AND STORIES

Intimacy derives from intimus with the meaning of inmost or superlative inside. With the demand of a closeness beyond closeness, intimacy of people’s relationship is so attractive to people that we can only share our stories with the specific ones. Storytelling is the necessary process to achieve intimacy in either human’s life or architecture’s performance.

The Global Engagement studio to Helsinki focused on Alvar Aalto’s design, including the stories of the stairs reflecting the architect’s desire and the process that introduces visitors to architecture’s intimacy. According to Lacan’s theory, extimacy represents the exterior that is present in the interior. Meanwhile, the most interior has a quality of exteriority.

Stories of people and architecture are introduced by stairs in Aalto’s design. Stairs are an open book, welcoming us with delicate handrails and releasing us from work by a simple wood step. Through the interaction with stairs, one’s own memory is resonated to fulfill the intimacy with architecture.

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In my project in Palm Springs, juxtaposition and deconstruction of Aalto’s stairs define a house of intimacy, privacy, vacillation and extimacy. After a few steps to the lobby, a long and narrow stair lead to a study which is private for the master while the intimate family space is directly adjacent to the steps. This is followed by vacillating steps up and down to your bedroom. Finally, an outdoor stair creates a route around the flooding area and reaches the roof of stepping bedrooms representing the extimacy of the entire house.


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MILES FOSTER | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: WENDELL BURNETTE YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: SYMBIOSIS: SPARKING URBAN RELATIONSHIPS

The existing University Center Building located in the heart of Downtown Phoenix acts as the central hub for ASU’s downtown campus with an interdisciplinary focus for ASU. There are 3 primary issues with the building: A lack of connection to the context, no presence of ASU, and poor building performance and neglect of users.

The primary concept is to bring the life of ASU to the front elevation. The idea is to engage the public and surrounding context as well as provide the face for ASU. The circulation becomes the sign. This idea of circulation lead to the decision of the facade and how both the intermediate space (the stair) and the conditioned spaces are to be represented independent of one another.

The majority of the facade is a modular ceramic brick that provides optimal shading from the western summer sun, while still letting in the winter sun as well as providing views outward. The facade along the stair has

two main purposes: to mediate the temperature in this intermediate zone and to talk to the city and promote ASU and its life to the otherwise stagnant downtown. With addressing the issues at hand, improving the existing building’s place in the city and its performance. The idea is that this adaptive re-use project now fosters the symbiotic relationship that is thoroughly needed in a city center like Phoenix. Facade System 1: Ceramic block provides optimal shading on the harsh West face of the building while also controlling the views outward, allowing for a complete balance between the harsh exterior environment and the cooled interior space. Facade System 2: Ceramic louvers are located along the stair. The louvers act as a layer between the harsh west sun and summer temperatures and are the mode of transport. The operable louvers follow the path of the sun to mitigate the summer and accept the winter. The ceramic louvers take on water to help cool the exterior stair as much as 15 °. This improves the performance of the building and helps control the heat gain along the west facade.

PHOENIX CIVIC SPACE PARK

ASU SRC + THE YMCA

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1st AVE. (southbound) -lightrail + Public transit + car-

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Park grass + shade

Janet Eckelman Sculpture

ASU Classroom Building

ASU DOwn town campus

Central Ave. (northbound) -lightrail + Public transit + car-

ASU Downtown Library

ASU Parking Structure

1st st.

ASU Law School


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PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE BUILDING | AIAS

ARTICLE WRITTEN BY: SUSAN LIU AND BRANDON POWELL PHOTOS BY: SUSAN LIU

On September 28, 2016, the American Institute of Architecture Students were thrilled to host two accomplished architects from the bright and competitive Phoenix valley. Each with over 25 years of experience, Catherine Hayes from Hayes Inc. and Diane Jacobs from Holly Street Studio were gracious enough to speak some wisdom to the members of AIAS of what awaits us architects in the professional world, and what skills are valuable. As technology begins to revolutionize the architectural industry, the importance of sketching and drawing has become a widely debated topic. As the principal of Hayes Inc., Catherine has found tremendous importance in the ability to design with her mind and her hand. The ability to show clients a hand drafted drawing or sketch rather than a computer generated one has allowed Catherine to develop her ideas from conception to finish. In her own words, “A client is more willing to work with what you have when you show them a sketch… There is a value to what you have drawn.”

Our second guest of the meeting, Diane, came to promote the AIA State Conference and encourage the members of AIAS to jump in and experience the annual event. Gaining a grasp on current events and information about the professional industry can provide a student with the mindset and the confidence that is necessary to excel in the industry of design and architecture. In addition to being a member of AIA, Diane was the 2014 AIA Arizona President. With her kind attitude and encouraging words, it is no wonder she and the professionals around the state of Arizona have graciously assisted the architecture and design students of Arizona State University and the American Institute of Architecture Students.

Catherine also emphasized that sketching and drawing isn’t always pretty: “I remember sitting on a fountain at Versailles and trying to sketch one corner of the building correctly. My professor walked over and laughed… yet I have continued to draw and have found it useful.” While both computer drafting and hand drawing require time and patience to learn, Catherine and many other notable architects before her, such as Louis Kahn, Frank Lloyd Wright, Frank Gehry, and Rem Koolhaas, have and continue to emphasize the power of sketching.

“I believe I have never had a difficulty with work because I always have a pencil in my hand, ready to sketch” --Catherine Hayes DISCIPLINE

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OLIVIA RAISANEN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2016 PROJECT NAME: URBAN SHIFT

This project primarily responds to the need for affordability, an urban connection, desirable living spaces, and strategic placement of the Herberger School of Design and the Arts.

In response to the need for affordable living, especially as this housing should accommodate student living, there is a high density of modular units, including micro-units, which are to be clad with the affordable material of fibre cement panels. The open plaza, cafe, and restaurant allow a connection to the surrounding urban environment. All units have north or south orientation for optimal lighting and minimal glare from direct east or west sunlight. Each unit also has a balcony and access to community gardens and a pool.

Though the Herberger School of Design and the Arts is not designed fully, the space allotted for the school has been thought out strategically. Placement of the gallery space on the plaza provides maximum exposure of the work to the surrounding community, allowing others to be reminded of the value of design and designers and to provide feedback and suggestions to improve the work being done. This interaction could allow better communication, and therefore support, between the Design School and the community.

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GULINSON, MADSEN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: ELENA ROCCHI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: LINK GROUP MEMBERS: JACOB GULINSON AND LIZ MADSEN

The Link is a third space which provides a community space to actively engage with one another. At the junction between the university and inter-city transportation is a shelter for community movement and interaction. By designing the public space, the Link enhances the metropolitan condition of the city. Each place has a unique set of stories and a unique combination of words, bringing together people and place into a unified whole. The stories of the place’s inhabitants define the place itself, for the building is nothing without the user. People find their own story within a common space.

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These stories give the individual a sense of place, a sense of shelter. To find shelter then within a place, each story must be represented. Through use of projectors, the Link provides the opportunity to share stories with the community. Stories are shared between individuals and projected to the community. Sharing by means of projection, story swaps, and message boards gives individuals the chance to relate to one another, unifying the community. The Link provides these conduits within its structure. By creating this space with stories brought into physical form, the project creates new opportunities for dwelling. The walls, beams and shades of the Link provides opportunities at moments for collaboration and engagement for the community. Stories unify the community and provide the individual a place in the city, and therefore a sense of shelter.


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YOUSEF AL-ROUMI | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: ELENA ROCCHI YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: SENSE OF ABSENCE IN URBAN SCENOGRAPHY

The functionality of a canal is to transport a much needed resource, water, to an area devoid or lacking in its abundance. Yet, the absence of any activity surrounding the canal is contrary to what has historically transpired. In ancient civilizations, cities’ growth centered around and stemmed from water, which is evident throughout history.

Currently, the canal is clearly perceived as an abandoned place, potentially accumulating junk, as it channels water from other sources to the city. Yet this vital infrastructure, which is pertinent to our city’s survival and growth, is virtually ignored and overlooked. Some instances reveal the canal cutting through barren desert or following the perimeter of streets and building developments. In other cases, certain activities around the canal are restricted or banned when the canal intersects private property. In order for the public to become more conscious of and embrace the canal’s presence, the canal should become the central playground and gathering place of our arid, desert city. Here, species and humans can jointly create a variety of events and new ecosystems.

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ALEXANDRA PATRICK | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: JUXTAPOSING ELEMENTS

Currently, all programs within the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts inhabit a significant portion of Forest Mall. However, due to the lack of artwork displayed, this is not apparent to many university visitors. Therefore, it was important to demonstrate more artistic characteristics in the proposal for the Herberger Student Center. The design for this center originated from folding bands of paper and translating these bands into large sculptural pieces that could provide not only an artistic piece to the area, but also some much needed shade. A bold, gold ribbon made of perforated metal first catches the eye of the students walking by and then draws them into the building.

The goal was for people to enjoy the design of the building as opposed to only inhabiting it. The building acts as an exhibition space, cafÊ, and lounge for students to enjoy each other’s company or projects on display. The folded bands intersect the ground plane to contribute to the exhibition space. To contrast the prominent folding bands of metal used for the roof, reinforced concrete adds stability to the appearance of the structure. The concrete acts as a understated platform material to give the roof more

Design Parti

prominence. To carry out the gold ribbon effect, the site is also a sea of interlacing ribbons. These ribbons consist of different colors of concrete for walking spaces, pea gravel for housing vegetation, and turf for added greenery and potential lounging space. This design allows the area to have a fresh new look, while accenting the existing buildings, allowing for a diverse and complementary reaction between three forms of architecture.

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ANDREW CARLSON | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: MAX UNDERWOOD YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2015 PROJECT NAME: TUCSON CERAMICS CO-OP

The Tucson Clay CO-OP project was very close to my heart because it is in my hometown of Tucson, Arizona. The site
was in Barrio Libre, an old neighborhood near the University of Arizona. The project was to design a community maker-space that could give people creative outlet, opportunities to start a business, and preserve the culture of the area. We were to build it off of an existing building there called “the block.” It was a Sonoran-styled row house most likely built in the late 1890s. Keeping as much of the original building intact as I could, I created the Tucson Clay CO-OP.

The concept for the design was earth
and sky. Since it was a ceramics studio,
I thought it was fitting to use earthen materials for the building. The original building was mud adobe brick and my add-on courtyard in the back is rammed earth. The roof is a common element that connects the whole project together and it is littered with skylights that allow the sun to peek through, leading the visitor towards the large courtyard workspace. In the back of the courtyard, the kiln room hides like a side chapel of a church. It is a quiet space with natural ventilation to house the kilns.

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LUIS MEDINA | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2016 PROJECT NAME: THE WEIGHT

The Pioneer Military Memorial Park is a historical cemetery located at 13th Avenue and West Jefferson, near the Arizona State Capitol complex in Phoenix, Arizona. It extends through 11 acres of mainly dirt and what is left from its graves. According to the Pioneers Cemetery Association, there are about 3700 burials from which only 600 still have headstones. The cemetery honors the lives of those families that pioneered city of Phoenix on its emerging stages.

characteristics combine both steel framing and loadbearing rammed earth walls. The upper level exterior walls are wrapped with perforated corten steel panels. The strategy behind this project was to explicitly convey the influence of Phoenix’s pioneers by imprinting the weight of their souls on the landscape. The building is a two-level mass that floats on top of the site and pays respect to the remains.

The project program consists of a History Center, located in the northeast corner of the site, that will allow visitors to learn more about the families and how the city came to be. Besides an Exhibition Hall on the ground level, the lower level of the building will also accommodate amenities such as: a reception, private offices, meeting rooms, an archive, and restrooms. A ramp connects the street level directly to the graveyard and also allows families that visit the graves to have a private and more intimate way of entering the cemetery, in which they can reflect and reconnect with their loved ones as they descend. The building’s structural

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AL-ROUMI, SALINAS, VAN HORNE | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: THOMAS HARTMAN YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2016 PROJECT NAME: ASU POLYTECHNIC PAVILION GROUP MEMBERS: YOUSEF AL-ROUMI, CRISTIAN SALINAS, RICHARD VAN HORNE

Through deep research and analysis, we identified a series of primary, secondary and tertiary axes that exist within the polytechnic campus. With our design, it was our goal to activate these existing axes by identifying and engaging the 12 distinct programs of the campus. These distinct programs were then condensed into three main programs: 1. Occupying infrastructure activates the space in-between and around the buildings. 2. Various experiences provide multiple ways of interacting with the architecture, infrastructure, and landscape of the campus. 3. A climatically-responsive building which responds to the context and climate.

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By implementing these programs, we were able to create a pavilion that activates the existing infrastructure and grid while creating a campus-wide woven shift which is now activated with activity and life.


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BRUNA NAKHLE | PERSONAL

INSTRUCTOR: WALID FEGHALI YEAR COMPLETED: 2017 PROJECT NAME: DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT ART EXPLORATIONS

The Digital Environment Art Explorations are a personal pursuit of mine that has been pursued for the past six months. Digital Art is a passion of mine that I am looking to pursue more actively once I graduate with my degree in Architecture. The five drawings displayed are a few of the works that I have been experimenting with. I use references to inspire color choice and some of the composition-building early in the process. I also like to study other artists I admire by trying out some of their techniques.

Digital Art and, more specifically, Concept Art are widely used in the Film and Game industries. As an avid gamer and artist, my interests lay in studying the techniques and mastering the digital arts. The images presented are mainly of wide landscapes that hold potential for multitudes of stories to be weaved through them. They allow one’s eye to wander unto unfamiliar landscapes and allow the mind to contemplate what may have happened there or who may have inhabited or traveled on the strange lands. Some important elements that help bring a digital painting to life, much like reallife painting, are shadows and light, spatial perspectives, attention to certain details (but not too much depending on what type of painting you are going for), and atmospheric depth, which is especially important for Environment Art.

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The hardest thing to do is start to paint from imagination, similar to any design project where a certain narrative of process work needs to occur before hypothesizing what the solutions to a problem can be. The difference is that there is more wiggle room for imagination to take over in digital art. Allowing the mind to extend and create elements that may or may not be real can be a very good thing at times. When in doubt, references always help and keep the mind fresh with new techniques to experiment with and help weed out the bad ideas that shouldn’t necessarily be given the light of day.


NICOLE BONE | SEMINAR

INSTRUCTORS: DARREN PETRUCCI, ADELHEID FISCHER SEMINAR: BIOMIMETIC DESIGN AND THE SONORAN DESERT YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: AIRGANIC

Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, nestled in the heart of the city, acts as an artery coursing with a constant influx of 44 million people per day, year round. The airport typology cultivates a city of its own where temporary inhabitants are premier gourmands, and thus, producers of food waste.

Through biomimetic thinking, collected food waste is repurposed to mitigate current airport functions, and by-products generating an atelier for cultural and educational tools. Modifications to existing airport conditions result in food waste being locally attuned and responsive in the hopes of leveraging cyclic processes, using readily available materials and feedback loops, and leveraging in cooperative relationships. The waste (food scraps, paper/napkins, coffee grounds, compostable service ware, organics) is composted through anaerobic in-vessel composting methods, generating the foundation for growing vegetative mycelium mushrooms. As a result, mycological biomaterial processed on-site replaces the

yearly introduction, transportation, and replacement of 11,520 polyethylene security bins with compostable security bins – an in-house product. In this model of anaerobic in-vessel composting, food waste is composted within the airplane module, an existing airport condition. Working as a pressurized system, the oxygenstarved environment found in the airplane produces compost, biogas, and liquid fertilizer in aiding Phoenix Sky Harbor. Once harvested from the airplane, the compost is transported to shipping containers for processing. Here, the organic matter is sanitized and prepared for the introduction of vegetated mycelium. The compost is then placed into the bin molds for what the mycological biomaterial will grow into. Once the compost is fit to the bin molds, the molds are placed into repurposed meal carts. Scattered across Phoenix Sky Harbor concourses, the passengers get a final glance as to how their experience began – with the security bin. Glazing on the meal cart allows for viewer interaction and education, while still maintaining optimal conditions for mycelium growth.

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JACK SCHEREN | COMPETITION

COMPETITION: ARIZONA RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTS HOUSE DESIGN COMPETITION YEAR COMPLETED: SUMMER 2016 PROJECT NAME: ARA SMALL HOUSE

system, solar water heater and power system, and radiant heating. With streamlined EMP, the house can be prefabricated as well.

The small house is created by a series of similar and repetitive half-gable forms. These forms come together to provide the most basic understanding of shelter and privacy, while providing plenty of opportunity for natural light and ventilation. In the house, walls do not define space. Rather, space is defined by function, and walls are incorporated only in order to facilitate certain functions. This allows the space to be circumstantially multi-functional.

However, the most unique feature of the house is the irrigation system. The system is found running through the point in the roof at which all the half-gables meet, and breaches the surface of the roof at the midpoint of each half-gable form. When turned on, water flows out of the spouts and is channeled down to the hedges providing shade and privacy for the house. The system cools the roof before it is used to water the surrounding vegetation and then a portion is required by the catchment system.

The house also responds to issues of sustainability and consumer awareness by using a water catchment

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VERONIKA VOLKOVA | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: KASEY JOSEPHS YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: SOCIAL RE-FORMATION OF THE BANK TOWER

The task was to propose a new envelope for the Wells Fargo tower in Phoenix that would answer the contemporary environmental requirements and social conditions. Nowadays, the only reason for a bank to occupy a tower in the city center is forming a strong community inside a company. Therefore, the social performance of a bank tower is its capital asset. The proposal creates a vertical sequence of public spaces within a building and also reflects on the evolution of corporative structure in America, enforcing its demanded shift from elitism to egalitarianism in financial institutions.

The tower has several functional sections that are diffused through the public spaces. Organizational structure is applied to floor plans of each section. The circulation zones for each section were arranged vertically into a public core with community hubs. Public activity is expanding the skin outwards and the “bubbled“ spaces are used for visual and physical vertical spatial connections. The geometry of the facade is based on the grid which changes according to the function and climactic conditions on each facade.

disassemble envelope and structure

public domain.

traditional hierarchy

1.

The existing envelope is taken off

auditorium

administration

2.

Two floor slabs are disassembled

sky gardens (approximated from viewshed analysis)

traders offices

social diffusion 1.

Hierarchy reversed

2.

Zones diffused

community hubs administration traders offices community

sky gardens

skin penetration

Outdoor public areas evolve from community hubs in diffusion areas.

Vertical public spaces are created where public activities penetrate the skin.

connection Community zones get connected with stairs between the prodruding skin and floor slabs.

envelope mapping Different zones are mapped onto the skin, imprinting spatial, visual, thermal and other qualities.

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JOSH GREENE | TRAVEL

FUNDED BY: SEAN MURPHY TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP YEAR COMPLETED: SUMMER 2016 PROJECT NAME: CURIOSITY

Chilean architecture is in the midst of an extremely prolific period in time, most recently marked by the international acclamation of Pritzker Prize Laureate Alejandro Aravena. A stable economy, democratic leadership, and a strong academic structure have resulted in a rise of exceptional contemporary architecture with a definitive character.

Although Aravena may be the most renowned architect of his country, his projects hardly scratch the surface of the architectural work being done in Chile today. Since the fall of the Pinochet dictatorship in 1980, a new wave of architects has emerged responding to the culture of the people, and the specificity of place, all while tackling countrywide social issues like housing shortages. Aravena is a product of the high-caliber architecture that exists in Chile which warrants global attention.

groceries in the same stores, playing soccer with them in the local park, and I have began to recognize faces in the neighborhood allowing an exchange of friendly nods.” “With no electricity I found myself reading Jane Jacobs to pass the time one Friday afternoon. As I was reading her eloquent description of the daily ballet on Hudson Street, I was distracted by the pleasant noise of parents returning to work and children out on the street playing with one another. I decided to put down the book and have a stroll to view the street from her eyes. Within minutes I was engaged in a conversation with my host and one of our neighbors. Thankful I paid attention in my high school Spanish classes, I began to tell him about my travels and the reasons that brought me to Iquique. Within minutes, he mentioned that he knew someone in one of the [Aravena] houses, and that it would be easy to put her in contact with me.”

I traveled to Chile in order to study contemporary Chilean architecture as a means of understanding the incremental housing design strategy that Alejandro Aravena implements with his studio Elemental. The successes of his projects lie in his awareness of Chilean culture and his response to such extraordinary conditions with innovative methods. “A strong gust of wind came through a few days ago and knocked out our electricity, along with the roofs of some of our neighbors. Although many travelers might find themselves aggravated with such ‘inconveniences,’ I was loving the realness of every moment. My Airbnb is located across the street from the Aravena housing projects, and in a short amount of time I have found myself integrated in the community, and sharing their spaces. I was buying Student installation at Pontifica Universidad Cátolica

Playing soccer with a kid in Quinta Monroy DISCIPLINE

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Praxedes Campos in her home in Quinta Monroy

Painters House in the Open City of Ritoque

Mother carries child in Villa Verde

Casa Poli, Pezo von Ellrichshausen

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CATHLEEN KEBERT | THESIS

INSTRUCTORS: DARREN PETRUCCI AND PHILIP HORTON YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: REDEFINING THE TYPOLOGY OF DESERT RESIDENCES

Amongst the sprawling desert landscapes across our planet, civilizations have emerged and initiated a constant battle of survival against the relentless sun and its environment’s limited resources. At the outset, some groups retreated to the shade of the mountains for dwellings, utilizing brush and/or earth to screen, protect, and hinder the transfer of heat. Water’s scarcity influenced communities to reside in areas close to small bodies of water or to rely on wells. These harsh, desert environments heavily shaped the way people lived.

However, with advances in technology, especially in regards to dwellings, individuals and communities are neither connected with the intricacies of the desert climate

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impacting their survival nor allow those characteristics and opportunities to influence their dwelling decisions. Technology allows individuals to fine tune their interior environments and lifestyles through cooling and heating systems, personal cars, and digital media that transports them outside of the surrounding context. The paradox is that technology has severed us from our external environment, yet coupled with design, can also be the path that saves us. By synthesizing the core methodologies of indigenous responsive desert residences with current market-driven developer homes to redefine the typology of desert residences, uniting individuals with their environment is achievable while integrating technologies. Reconnecting with our external environment gains three main rewards. At the outset, biophilic benefits target our health and well-being, including reducing stress,


elevating moods, and improving energy. In turn, this fosters sustainable behaviors and mindsets within individuals. As a result, this should reduce our dependence on and consumption of resources. Within Arizona, there are 1.5 million single family homes. This number has skyrocketed since the establishment of Maryvale, the first post-war suburb in 1954 which was Arizona’s equivalent of Levittown. These quick-to-construct homes allowed families to move in at a rate of 100 per week. Maryvale developer homes were the epitome of the main attraction for families purchasing houses for their swift construction, key amenities offered such as interior privacy and private yards. This offered buyers the ideal homeowner image. Yet, these developers ignored amenities afforded by the lots, resulting in an environmental disconnect. Certain current developers’ primary business focus to maximize gross profit has led to offering meager amenities while creating denser neighborhood pockets. These homes still rely on limited cookie cutter models to gain a wider customer base; however, this increased density raises privacy concerns, grants very little environmental benefits as homes are built up to the property lines, resulting in the close proximity of windows to neighbors while limiting the amount of yard space offered. Additionally, their consideration to the environment is lacking, as evident through their heavy reliance on technology to cool interiors, a general disregard to orientation and context, and their prescriptive living arrangements.

indicate climates across the US are becoming warmer, whereupon Arizona could be one of the leading if not the leading consumer of energy in the US. Our resources are not infinite. As temperatures continue to rise and Arizona is burdened with a climate similar to that of Kuwait, it is unwise to continue developing in this manner. Looking back at indigenous architectural responses to climate, it is clear they evolved purely out of necessity, keenly addressing climatic and topographic conditions of their area. Their solutions ranged from awnings and self-shading facades to cooling and ventilation towers, as well as subterranean compounds. However, the one characteristic common amongst this typology is the inclusion of an interior-exterior room which accommodated various functions across the day and seasons. In order to reconcile the gap between developer homes and responsive desert residences, this research has led to the concept of an environmental “Green Room” that could be applied across several existing scales of homes with their own unique context. The current focus is to target the great room (living room, kitchen, and dining), reconceptualizing it as the environmental core of the residence, as it is the social heart of the home. Taking prototypes found within the Maryvale and KB Homes neighborhoods (shown below) is the starting point of my current thesis design work.

Sensitivity to the environment is key in order to better manage water, energy, and other resources. Already, Arizona residences use four times as much energy for cooling as the average US household. Studies clearly

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ALEKSANDRA TESANOVIC | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: JOE PRITCHARD YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: THIS SAINT YOUR CITY

The constant question throughout the project was: How can a tangible object vanish and become a feeling? This Saint Your City stands in testimony to human character, evolution, curiosity, and the natural environment. Like humans, This Saint Your City constantly evolved and continues to evolve, starting off as a series of nothing more than collages from random magazine scraps and sketches, growing into models made out of T-pins and eventually taking to its current form and developing an essence through a vignette journal.

This Saint Your City is not about a building, but instead it focuses on connections between ourselves and others. The structure only serves as a gathering ground or a vessel that connects the visitor to the nature and even to the powerful history surrounding the South Mountain. Standing at fifty feet tall, the structure is an extension of the mountain nestled around it, with five main levels and eight concrete nooks that provide a framed view to nature, the visitors can choose to be in isolation or in connection with others--the visitors ultimately create the form of the structure through their own feelings, interactions, and experience.

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At South Mountain, the sun buzzes like a rattlesnake and no matter where you go, you’re still in the same place. The cacti stand like naked bodies that were never told how to grow. For one day, they turn purple in the heat and bloom, becoming the only thing that looks like life in this dust. Have you ever looked at something and wondered how it’s taken you so long to notice its beauty? Have you ever listened to silence for this long?


BRITTANY BAILEY | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: KASEY JOSEPHS YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: SALT LAKE CITY COURTHOUSE CASE STUDY

As a means of discovery, a case study on the Federal Courthouse building in Salt Lake City, Utah was fulfilled. Focusing on representation and understanding through an analytique drawing and wall section model, knowledge was gleaned in all aspects of the project.

The building, designed by Thomas Phifer and Partners, was completed in 2014. With a goal of emanating equity and transparency, the building stands in the center of the city desiring to represent the moral and ethics of the justice system. Through the utilization of curtain walls and custom anodized aluminum louvers, the cube building maintains nearly similar facades on every elevation while inviting the public in by enabling the program of the courthouse to be read from the outside. Careful orchestration was given to the circulation of the court’s varying users which manifests on the envelope through slight sifts and changes of the louvers.

These thoughtful considerations and beautiful solutions were what made this building a meaningful case study for the Fall 2016 envelope studio and ultimately manifested itself in my studio project through deliberate and catalytic integration of program and façade.

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BONE, GREENE, RAMIREZ | DESIGN BUILD

MENTOR: PHILIP HORTON YEAR COMPLETED: ONGOING PROJECT NAME: CAMELBACKYARD GROUP MEMBERS: NICOLE BONE, JOSH GREENE, BRANDON RAMIREZ

Harvest Harvest

CamelBackyard reclaims a vacant lot in the heart of Downtown Phoenix, transforming the space into an urban farm, where food doubles as the scaffolding in the architecture of taste. In allocating shared spaces, we generate the art of community by supporting the vision of harvesting, prepping, storing, and selling fresh produce. Serving as a neighborhood backyard, this project enhances community participation and educational outgrowth by growing in tandem with food.

Prep Prep

Awarded the Woodside Grant through Arizona State University, $1,500 was allocated for the design and build of a table and mural. As the first gesture for the creation of CamelBackyard, the table is the manifestation for the communion of taste.

Store Store sell sell

aquaponics system As a symbiotic, closed-loop system, aquaponic systems provide essential grow space within the urban interface. In this specific model, the gravity-fed system allows for low costs of operation and maintenance. ibc tank

fish tank tilapia

settlement tank ammonia, fish waste, broken into nitrates

sump tank clean water pumped back into rearing tank

hydroponic gardening plants remove nitrates from system

gravity-fed system biofiltrated water fed into Deep Water Culture Beds

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For more information, visit: http://camelbackyard.weebly.com/ Sponsored by:

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ELENA ROCCHI | ESSAY

PRAGMATIC POETS AND CRITICAL CRAFT: “THE MAKING OF A THING” FEATURING THE DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS CLASSES OF FALL 2016 AND SPRING 2017 PHOTOS BY: ELENA ROCCHI

In the book The Craftsman, Richard Sennett describes the “making of a Thing” as constituted by both the Thing itself and its reasoned conception. I have read The Craftsman many times, thinking of how that description of “making” resonates to a similar one given by my first architecture studio professor in the late 80s. At that time, a professor would introduce freshmen students to the “Thing of architecture” by teaching process as a way to reason a concept, and to make clear that, in its beginning, a real building creates its own reality outside the state of built or unbuilt.

A project is different than reality: it is an autonomous reality made of models and drawings, comparable to the one of an art piece which can be looked at in an “architectural way.” We were trained into crafting documents as buildings, as if the slow time of constructing a line would have taught us how to construct a beam. All kind of curriculum’s Architectural Courses would request us to make drawings, including History of Architecture. We integrated drawing by remaining longer in what I call the “overproduction of drawing.” As my professor would say, the “making of a Thing” is made by both the Thing itself and its reasoned conception. I still see him stepping once a week in our classroom, as crowded as the Design Fundamentals class led by Professor Kristian Kelley, the teaching assistants, and me. Once in class, standing by the physical blackboard 400 students could hardly see, my professor would start with the chalk the transference process of the same undiscussed knowledge codified 24 centuries ago by the Greek mathematician Euclid: Descriptive Geometry. We would receive from him an analog knowledge exposed to almost no change over time until the 90s, a moment in which a change in the “Nature of Change” forever altered the way we would reason concepts and construct our conception of reality: the analog way of reasoning an architectural concept by crafting turned into the digital one of clicking. With the proliferation of modes of analysis, geometry is not taught anymore but “made” by students using software professors might not even know. I myself still use AutoCAD 14 (1997). Software “constructs” geometry instead of hands, with the consequence that the act of craft does not need to be necessarily introduced anymore. But.… Design is still a craft in digital age, and a critical one: to achieve their best possible education, students of architecture still need to be trained in the critical craft of

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drawings, models, photographs, and zines “to craft” their individuality according to a universal concept of quality of architecture. More than ever, architecture must continue to be taught as the integration of all its parts, both in the broad sense of being an interdisciplinary culture and in the detail of the different phases and parts of a project. In avoiding the risk of reducing architecture to only one part of it, we need to relate its disciplinary culture with the larger culture someone possesses. So.… How do we introduce architecture to freshmen students in the epochal change of current critical reality? The complexity of software systems of representation is beyond the capacity of any of us, professors and students, disconnected from the slow time of construction. In the impossibility of teaching such things in the foundational years, we prefer to introduce design in general as critical craft, as a “general attitude” to gain insight into “problems” intended as rebus we face and their potential solutions. In the first year course, Professor Kelley and I treat all disciplines of Architecture, Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture as one Design Field on which students can cross through, moving between “problems” of Anti-Context as ideas and of Context as reality, aiming solutions by using the three-way approach of Tectonics, Program, and Space. Just as Marcel Duchamp did with his work, I generally build my studios by copiously providing students with instruction “manuals” to clarify in advance the process that underlies the development of the potential solutions of the rebus. The freshmen course is again a sequence of logical considerations and steps, a correlating exploration regarding principles and tools on the design process in general such as texts, colors, collages, photographs, drawings, isometrics, models, analytical sketches, and free-hand drawing. To provide a disciplinary culture within the larger culture someone possesses I was referring


above, the Design Fundamentals Course is structured to give a system of reasoned conception, capable to facilitate students in developing their capacity to deal with the still unknown realm of their future design. But mainly, with an eye on their entry into the professional degree program, the Foundation studio builds a framework we are sure will be developed in the future discipline each student will choose, and a system that teaches students an “attitude” to acquire “conceptual and constructive” abilities as critical craft, gaining during the process awareness of ethical responsibility of their work.

avoid judging ideas before they are materialized. Students deliver an assignment per week, working with models or drawings as powerful analog instruments both to “make” and “to express” projects. On the Thursday Bridge PinUp Session, Professor Kelley, the TAs, and I facilitate the dialogue to have students inspect students’ developments and questions, not as concepts but as choices, and at any level of the design progress. This is because nothing is made randomly since everything needs to have a reason to be. It is important to raise awareness of students’ trajectories while they move through different Species of Spaces (George Perec), from a page to a landscape, in a continuous operation of adapting and reusing material from the previous project. I like to think of professors and TAs as “agents of an experience” more than teachers since they help students to use crafting time to develop an awareness of the Order of Phases in having ideas, and that “to design” requires operations in time. A kind of self-deductive method will move Pragmatic Poets from the analysis of a Thing generated by chance to a constructive self-criticism of general problems. Little by little. Design does not happen in a minute, or in a week. It might happen at any time, but always after a reasoned conception. So… Work Work Work Work Work Work….

In both semesters, a high number of students repeatedly fill the crowded space of the Bridge and the classroom COOR 170. Despite the physical places where the assistants and professors teach, I like to think of our freshmen environment as a Room, as the place of an experimental collectiveauthored sketch and a genuinely co-operative adventure. In poetry, a “stanza,” a Room, is a grouped set of lines within a poem, simple or more complex, but a “number” of related thoughts grouped into a unit. I feel the Room wants to have a distinctive sense of place that welcomes our new students at The Design School, to engage with them, to develop a sense of belonging to the school, and to create a sustainable culture since applying to pass the degree milestone requirement is extremely competitive. It is each individual student’s responsibility to do the right Thing, but in the Room, I believe students help each other by sharing process and also teaching themselves to be designers as Pragmatic Poets on the idea of making things by reasoning on parts. Paraphrasing John Hejduk, we as architects “make things well, and we like to fabricate parts and we like parts.” I like to think that our Design Fundamentals Course is a Room where students become Pragmatic Poets in adoration of craft. It is in the Room where, before transitioning into other disciplines, students discover the basic elements of design and their interrelationships, while discovering the construction of concepts and processes as a way to design a problem and not a project. I believe Design is a question and not an answer; an answer that suggests a more serious study and, more importantly, an analog (not virtual) research in the sense of being physical. Students act in the Room as “scientists of design,” to develop over a year the capacity to put hypotheses on Architecture, Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture. All the tasks a designer needs to face are broken down into specific operations. The work of the TAs in studio is to produce a post-rationalization of processes in order to Photograph by Ke Zhang AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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Axonometric drawing by Cody Zimmerman

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Axonometric drawing by Reed Doolan


Featured hats (left to right): Top row: Brooke Carney, Adrian Keller, Kayley Hulverson, and Gabby Klein. Second row: Ashleigh Smith, Salma M. Osuna Lopez, Lydia Kennedy, and Bailey Mora. Third row: Rongting Jin, Haley Holden, Zachary Bursi, and Allison Fernandez. Bottom row: Lisbeth Fajardo, Garrett Langefels, Boyana Babanovski, and Nasraa Albusaidi

Teaching Assistants for Professor Rocchi and Professor Kelley’s Design Fundamentals classes of Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 include: Kristin Antkoviak, Erica Aragon, Brittany Bailey, Matthew Boylan, Noah Brown, Bhoomi Desai, Miles Foster, Drake Hoffman, Jinesh Jain, Cathleen Kebert, Nicholas Shekerjian, Christopher Woosley, Richard van Horne, and Veronika Volkova AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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BEN LYONS | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: EDUCATION RIPPLE EFFECT

This semester began with an assignment to design a small section of the pedestrian walkway and create a student pavilion on Herberger Mall. The project mission was to effectively create a relationship between the space and the Herberger’s values in the arts. My idea began with the organic circulation of the students which then inspired the form of this student pavilion and site design. This space was designed to serve as a relaxed node for art and design students to display, market, and collaborate on their work.

The program of the building ripples from the center, initially using light for principal focus. From there, the interior walls nurture inspiration for creativity as well as hosting displays of all art forms, representing the Herberger Institute from the inside out. The Herberger Institute does not currently provide an infrastructure for students to advocate their abilities in a professional and economically viable environment, in all spaces that extend from the classroom or studio. This student pavilion proposes a space that will allow for artists to expand their creative potential while cultivating professional networks.

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CHRISTINA LUFKIN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: HERBERGER STUDENT CENTER: AN ARTISTS PROMENADE

Reimagining the social landscape of Forest Mall, this project integrates both building and site through the implementation of one continuous path. Driven by the experience of the architectural promenade, the path informs the architecture, choreographing the visitor’s experience as they move through the space. The playful, undulating form and manipulation of material transparency captures the attention of passersby, and, guided by their curiosity, they find themselves embarking on the artists promenade.

traditional circulation

integration + program

integration

choreography

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GAUTAM PALAV | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: DIEGO GARCIA-SETIEN YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2016 PROJECT NAME: RE-HABILITATION OF THE RIVERBED: SONORAN RIVER PARK

The water course of the Salt River, through its channelization, has completely lost touch with the natural ecosystem that once existed there. This thesis urges that a new type of public space emerge driven by public engagement through bringing together the benefits of bottom-up and top-down approaches to urban design, and taking a formal departure from the existing rules and limitations which govern a city.

The project seeks to revitalize the existing ecological conditions for recreation, ecology development, and energy production by amplifying the potential they possess as peculiar and fascinating urban conditions. The benefits of modular redundancy are used to create a variety of spatial opportunities along the various sites on the Salt Riverbed. These easily deployable kit of parts coupled with existing infrastructure allows for palpable design intervention catering to various unique opportunities on the Salt Riverbed as desirable urban experiences.

*Salt River 2020-Linear Park

collage of various activities driven by public engagement

*Salt River Transformation

Organization system=Crossover Bridges (vertical) + Flood Lines (horizontal) **Compare Parc de la Villette-OMA

*Salt River Now (Phoenix Metropolitan Area)

dilapidated state due to material erosion by sand mining companies

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Erosion due to material extraction at Fisher Sand & Gravel mining site (430 N 47th Ave)


The Tempe Town Lake is a Catalyst to induce development. Unfortunately, the water in the lake is stagnant and henceforth not healthy to use for recreation. The Intervention seeks to oxygenate the water while creating a favorable Micro-Climate attracting people to use the lake more often.

Arizona is blessed with amazing landscapes. The sunrise and sunset events are spectacular and view worthy of experiencing. With clear skies, right next to the Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, this site has a great potential to offer the immense views of various celestial activities which occur all year round. Also, the Landing and Taking-off activity can be experienced closely.

Arizona has a great variety of habitats encompassing everything from lower elevation Colorado River up to sub-alpine forests at the tops of our “Sky Island� mountain chains. Because of this variety, birds can enjoy near-perfect weather throughout the year. AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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BHOOMI DESAI | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: EDWARD COOK YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: CITY AS A PARK-URBAN SCENOGRAPHY

A space is an entity that cannot be measured, gauged or quantified. It is the sense of that space which makes it different from the rest of the world. It becomes different when it is occupied. Once it is occupied, it is consumed by the events and actions that happen in that space. It could be as small as a dot or as big as a district. That space comes to life and is transformed into a being, leaving behind the marks of the past--a proof of that space being occupied.

Luis Barragan, a Latin American architect, used colors to add life to his designs. These colors were not randomly picked. They were taken from nature and were chosen as per the sense of space that he intended the users to have in that space.

Courthouse plaza being used for the Lantern Festival

What if Downtown Phoenix turns into a park? What if the events are just like pop-up shops? What if the places are defined by the event(s) and actions? The aim of this project is to rejuvenate the districts of Downtown Phoenix using intruders that do not belong (are not in context) to the city, but become a part of the districts by the drama performed through the users. Roads, buildings, and other infrastructures form the new boundary of the park

Food trucks take over the plaza and convert it into a cultural play

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Nodal pulls, temporary props, and platforms draw users to the event-filled park


JINESH JAIN | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: AFTER-MODERN HOME

Lux central is a modern cafe that blurs the line between a workplace and a recreational space through its open plan, closely placed eclectic furniture, and the vibe of the place which creates a vibe in its orchestration that allows for “social breaching.” User movements were mapped and abstracted to determine the informalformal spatial construct of the café.

This house replicates the spatial construct of Lux Central in Phoenix, AZ to ensure “active engagement through dialogue” as Jeff Fischer, the owner of Lux Central, describes. Engagement is crucial to counter isolation and the disconnection of our modern times.

The living room of the house is a social condenser that is open to the public. People can bring in their own furniture, occupy the space, work, live, play, and enjoy serendipitous encounters within a domed space.

The existing wash is addressed in several ways. First, it is flanked by an outdoor deck and a swimming pool. Secondly, the wash flows under the house while establishing an area for an xeriscape landscape. Through the arrangement of the house, pool, existing wash, and outdoor deck, a porous void is created which allows for visual connections to the mountainous landscapes to the north. Thus, there is an active and continuous dialogue between these various elements between each other and the surrounding landscape.

A music performance activates the City Council Chambers’ plaza and a parking lot at Jefferson and 3rd Ave. AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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JOE PRITCHARD | ESSAY

GOLDEN RULER ARCHITECTURE, AUTHORITY, AND THE INSECURITY OF WEALTH

This essay is an investigation into the conflicting views of historical architecture and modern times through Donald Trump’s actions and buildings. By looking at his views of the World Trade Center, as well as his apartment in New York, the essay examines the possibilities of viewing reality in a clear way when his world is so conflicted. “...if there is no Minotaur, then the whole thing’s incredible. You have a monstrous building built around a monster, and that in a sense is logical. But if there is no monster, then the whole thing is senseless, and that would be the case for the universe for all we know.” - Jorge Luis Borges

As a New York real estate developer and reality television personality, Donald Trump was always a go-to soundbite to satiate cable news when stories about Manhattan development were in the headlines. Such was the case in May of 2005. “I’m somebody who believes strongly in great architecture, and this was a design that is just not a good design.”1 The “not... good design” was the competition-winning scheme by the architect Daniel Libeskind for the rebuilding of The World Trade center in New York City. Trump labeled Libeskind as “an egghead architect” who lacked “experience designing something like this.”2 Of course very few people could claim experience designing for a site as revered as Ground Zero. The Libeskind scheme, however, meant something unacceptable: “If we build this job the way it is, the terrorists win.” Mr. Trump, who, to be clear, pointed out that he did not “want to have the terrorists win,” proposed an alternative scheme. “If we rebuild the World Trade Center, but a story taller and stronger, then we win.”3 In full view of the media was his proposal: to re-build the Minoru Yamasaki towers one story taller. The original World Trade Center could be resurrected from the rubble, and history wiped clean as if nothing happened. Except for an extra story.

harmless, but given the power of the executive branch of the United States government, causes a great deal of concern. Although elected by the democratic process of the United States, he shares a line of thinking that is championed, past and present, by unelected officials and figurehead rulers. The need to replicate the past and hide the influence of change is nothing new for politicians, government leaders, and patriotic figureheads. Charles, His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, whose authority is derived in part because his family owns a collection of shiny rocks, bemoaned the “broad discretionary element in our planning legislation, as well as absence of aesthetic control” which has allowed “architects and developers [to] have the wrong kind of freedom — the freedom to impose their caprice, which is a kind of tyranny.”5 How evil must architects be to wield their tremendous power over the masses, forcing “voguish innovations and fashionable novelties” into places where doric columns and vaulted arches should properly exist.6 His Royal Highness knew exactly how architecture should respond to context and history: “Why can’t we have those curves and arches that express feeling in design? What is wrong with them? Why has everything got to be vertical, straight, unbending, only at right angles - and functional?”7 The tyranny of aesthetics does not loom over Trafalgar Square, as was Charles’ worry. It does, however, present the issue of historicism and symbols in new architecture. Trump dismisses Libeskind’s design as a rejection of deconstructivism while championing the modernism of Yamasaki. It is easy to suspect, however, that the real value of the Yamasaki design, at least for Trump, is in its symbolism as a terrorist target and not based on its aesthetic grounds. In his book The History of Postmodern Architecture, Heinrich Klotz discusses the use of historicism in an unambiguous way (as in the case of Prince Charles) or in a naive way (as in the case of Trump). He states: when the historical element is used naively and unambiguously, in pure imitation rather than as a counterpoise to modern architecture, its value as a new insight is lost and all that remains is nostalgia.8 Trump’s nostalgic attachment to the original World Trade Center is apparent and the driving force behind his scheme. Klotz could say that “what is sought is not juxtaposition to history but identity with it, even at the price of adding an artificial patina.”9 This leads to an even deeper insight into Trump’s psyche: nostalgia for a New York, and an America, that may or may not have ever existed, except in his own mind. The clearest example of Trump’s mental struggle with architecture exists in the form of his New York penthouse apartment.

Television personality Donald Trump speaks next to a model of his vision for a terrorist-defeating World Trade Center scheme.4

The disjointed remarks by Mr. Trump in a 2005 interview on MSNBC’s Hardball highlight a way of thinking about architecture which, for a private citizen, is relatively DISCIPLINE

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Occupying the top three floors of the incredibly-named Trump Tower in mid-town Manhattan, it is the golden and gilded top of a modernist, curtain-walled building. Creating an apartment that would make Louis XVI blush inside a steel and glass skyscraper is a fete in itself, but a telling one. Again, Klotz talks about the contrast between historicism and modernism thusly:


Donald Trump in his home, golden rooms in the sky above Manhattan.10

The nostalgic historicism found in the residential suburbs of the Western countries uses the imitation of styles as the sole means of argumentation. The absence of any tension between building type and the anachronistic use of a style simplifies historicism by making it the means of naive acknowledgment and self-representation. When the imitation of style is added, the effect of irreality is compounded by totally historicized pretensions and longings.11

NOTES: 1. Trump, Donald J. Interview by Chris Matthews. Hardball. MSNBC, May 12, 2005. 2. Ibid. 3. Ibid. 4. Christiansen, Jeff. “Donald Trump unveils a proposal to rebuild the Twin Towers in 2005.” Digital image. The Atlantic. October 19th, 2015. February 21st, 2017. https:// www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/10/did-george w-bush-do-all-he-could-to-prevent-911/411175/ 5. Jencks, Charles, and Karl Kropf. Theories and Manifestoes of Contemporary Architecture. (Chichester: Wiley, 2008), p. 189-190 6. Ibid. p. 190 7. Jencks p. 185 8. Klotz, Heinrich, and Radka Donnell. The History of Postmodern Architecture. (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1988), p. 51 9. Ibid. p. 51 10. Kander, Nadev. “President-elect Trump in the living room of his three-story penthouse on the 66th floor of Trump Tower in New York City on Nov. 28.” Digital image. Time Magazine. October 19th, 2015. February 21st, 2017. http://time.com/time-person-of-the-year 2016-donald-trump/ 11. Ibid., p. 51 12. Thrush, Glenn, and Maggie Haberman. Trump and Staff Rethink Tactics After Stumbles. The New York Times. February 5, 2017 13. Klotz, p. 51 14. Charles, Don Hogan. “Donald Trump in 1980, with a model of Trump Tower.” Digital image. The New Yorker. October 6, 2016. Accessed March 13, 2017. http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment seeing-trump-in-trump-tower.

What this represents, on the part of Trump, is a view of the world disconnected from reality. Versailles in the sky is an interesting conceptual problem for an architect or an academic. For the leader of the United States government, however, it represents the conflicted mythology that he had built around himself. Trump now sits at the center of an oval room in Washington, D.C. At his disposal are hundreds of staffers to assist with day-to-day operations and commands the attention of countless policy, military, and political experts. Yet, as The New York Times pointed out, “for a man who sometimes has trouble concentrating on policy memos, Mr. Trump was delighted to page through a book that offered him 17 window covering options.”12 His image, and the symbols of that image which are manifest in the architecture he surrounds himself with, are a psychological obsession for the 45th president of the United States. The ostentation of his home, while part of a calculated brand, demonstrates the need he feels to portray his wealth to the rest of society through nostalgia for historicized symbols. “The object of nostalgic pleasure is marked above all by irreality, as is all kitsch.”13 He lacks the confidence to promote the new, as is evident in his criticism of Libeskind, yet he has nothing original to say. His use of a golden architecture is an insecurity on his part to create anything of his own; he must constantly reference himself against others, and in doing so, he leaves reality for a world of kitsch.

Real estate developer Donald Trump and a model of his reality.14 AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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NINA CALIC | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: WENDELL BURNETTE YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: ASU BEACON

Focusing on in-depth facade development for an adaptive reuse a building on the ASU Downtown Campus, the idea of the building being a beacon for the campus as well as the area becomes the central concept.

The ASU University Center’s potential is in the site context, with its location on Central Ave, the main corridor of Downtown Phoenix. It is also in the middle of the transportation hub, and overlooks the Civic Park Space, the only major park in Downtown Phoenix. The existing building has some disadvantages, including no connection to the street, confusing circulation, and an exterior façade completely facing the west with no shading devices.

This proposal incorporates three main design concepts that work together to make a new University Center. The first concept is to open the ground floor with an arcade, creating a connection to the ground, as well as a more pleasant experience for the pedestrian. The second concept is transforming the original space of circulation into a glass core that ends in a light box reaching the sky. At night, this light box acts as a beacon of light. The third concept is a new façade that addresses sustainability, views towards the south, an ASU identity, movement, and transparency. Perforated metal vertical and horizontal louvers are hung on a curtain wall façade to control the west exposure sun. The louvers are nested into one another to create more shading and are angled at thirty-four degrees to create movement. Horizontal louvers are tapered to direct views to the south towards downtown and to the Civic Park directly in front. The identity of ASU is expressed through color explorations of gold and maroon on the louvers, which can create dynamic and abstract patterns. Together with the arcade, glass core vertical circulation and light box, and louver façade, a new and revitalized ASU University Center can become the face of Downtown ASU.

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JOSHUA MELTON | COMPETITION

INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT ROEDER COMPETITION: ARIZONA RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTS HOUSE DESIGN COMPETITION YEAR COMPLETED: SUMMER 2016 PROJECT NAME: DESERT PANEL HOUSE

Rooted in the belief that quantity of space does not translate to quality of life, this new micro prototype for housing encompasses all the programmatic elements that define a home in just under 550 square feet. Where this proposal lacks traditional square footage, it flourishes in its painstaking attention to detail, ease of use, efficiency of space, and choice of materials. Structural insulated panel (SIP) construction allows the home to be rapidly manufactured and constructed at virtually any location with ease. The SIPs not only provide excellent insulation from the desert’s harsh

climate, but also allow for warm OSB exposed interiors with a minimalist Dryvit stucco exterior. A large glass wall system allows the covered patio, living room, and kitchen to become one–blurring the boundaries between indoor and outdoor living while creating the appearance of a large living space, with a flood of natural light. Under stair storage, custom millwork, and built-ins on every wall permit the user to maintain the possessions one typically associates with home while living a more sustainable micro-dwell lifestyle. With mobility in mind, this proposal inherently lacks a connection to site; however, inhabitants are able to establish that visceral emotional connection typically associated with home through the elegance of this simple form and a truly cohesive space.

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Section B-B

Section C-C

Section D-D

Section A-A

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BATES, CLEVELAND, PALAV | COMPETITION

COMPETITION: THIS IS PHOENIX YEAR COMPLETED: 2016 PROJECT NAME: CULTURE HUB GROUP MEMBERS: SPENCER BATES, AARON CLEVELAND, AND GAUTAM PALAV

Phoenix is a young, emerging city uniquely set in the Sonoran Desert. It is home to a variety of different cultures and people, all of which come to experience the same pioneer spirit which helped form the city centuries ago. Spawning from two simple architectural elements, the tower and the canopy, this intervention provides the template for a highly flexible space within each of Phoenix’s districts to create a cultural hub of evolving activity for the community. Designed to fit within a typical Phoenix parcel, this network of spaces highlights the unique aspects of each district, as well as the quintessential qualities of light and plantlife of the valley. These hubs promote inclusion rather than exclusion, act as a gateway to each district, and encourage the varied constituencies of Phoenix to celebrate their diverse culture within each district of the city.

The canopy provides shade for a space capable of hosting a variety of programs. For example, there might be an outdoor Latin American art gallery at the Roosevelt Row Culture Hub, while simultaneously an Irish Step-Dancing festival at the Warehouse District Culture Hub. The canopy celebrates the cultures of Phoenix and creates a space capable of rapid transition and possibility, while also creating energy through solar photovoltaic panels. The tower acts as a solar chimney passively cooling the space while promoting the reflection of the surrounding landscape and city. The procession up the tower features strategically placed apertures framing specific views (Camelback Mountain, city skyline, sunsets, etc.). The tower takes the traditional gallery experience and inverts it, making these framed views the artwork of the city. The tower’s tranquil quality contrasts the dynamic activity under the canopy providing a place for thoughtful contemplation of the surrounding context--the beauty of the city and desert.

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HAWAII STUDIO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: PHIL HORTON, HARVEY BRIAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: [WAIMEA] STUDIO

The goal of the [Waimea] Studio was to provide integrative and sustainable architectural solutions for the Waimea Nui Community Complex. This community development project by the Waimea Hawaiian Homesteaders’ Association seeks to preserve native Hawaiian culture. The studio kicked off with a week long trip to the big island of Hawaii where we developed an understanding of native and modern Hawaiian culture. Visits to our site in Waimea, natural landmarks, and architecturally significant structures gave us insight into how the people of Hawaii live, closely connected to their land and with a caring generous spirit.

A multitude of distinct program elements came together in the form of a master plan which integrates community service facilities with economic development projects, promoting the resilience and self-sufficiency of the Waimea Nui community, and will facilitate timely and comprehensive community-based growth. The master plan makes use of a green belt to preserve culturally significant pastoral lands and to connect the 163-acre site to other areas of the town. Trails along this green belt link agriculture facilities, an equestrian center, a cultural center, a health center, visitor villas, and a chapel. New vegetation provides protection from the harsh winds from the northeast and includes some native plant species. Additionally, wind turbines and solar panels are carefully placed throughout the site to provide energy for all of the program elements, thereby giving the complex energy self-sufficiency.

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The studio was made possible by a grant though the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and The Design School at Arizona State University. Special thanks to the Waimea Hawaiian Homesteaders’ Association for their support. Students who participated in Phil Horton and Harvey Brian’s Waimea Studio: Kelsey Ayotte Bri Crittendon Hector Diaz Adam Dunaway Rene Duplantier Xueying Fan Josh Greene Thomas Ibrahim Yazhen Luo Yanet Martinez Hang Mu Bruna Nakhle Casey Rowden Jack Scheren Qiwei Zhang AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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ALI SAMAN CHOPRA | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: MILAGROS ZINGONI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: THE DUCT AND CHALLENGING THE STATUS QUO

These collages are two projects which focus on ‘what if’s?’ and challenging the stigma of tradition in water and education. “The DUCT” is emphasized on what a dream about water would be like in the great state of Arizona, celebrating water in this dry climate. Water illustrates two sides of the psychological mind, the unconscious and conscious. By looking at their own reflection, the mind can reveal their alter ego.

“Challenging The Status Quo” puts emphasize on challenging the status quo of the building and the program, the idea of thinking outside of the box. Through examination of the building and library, the concept of breaking open the box leads to creation of a new program, the creation of the library of the 21st century. Focusing on technology, a book bot was designed that stores books and creates a new way of interacting with a library. This collage acts as propaganda to challenge the status quo of the library, making it more fashionable and providing a more provocative experience.

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DANE LEMMA | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: JOHN TAKAMURA YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: HY-PER HOME

Hy-per home is high performance residence designed for a family who has a child, or children, with Autism. Using natural materials, neutral pantones and a golden ratio, the home is designed with a combination of soothing phenomena rooted in psychology.

Located in the heart of New York City, this Richmond County home is ideally located for a family with special needs. Homes in this region are typically cramped bungalows made by developers who pay small mind to detail. Recent investments in this specific area are leading to large apartment complexes with high densities–a break from the past of Island living. This project seeks to develop a 100’ x 100’ plot of land to fit 3 residences–a spacious alternative.

This aluminum-clad bungalow with open glass skylights rests above a perforated masonry wall. The glass provides the home with maximum solar gain during cold months of the year. Carefully spaced CMU blocks with variated glass windows add a gentle gradient effect, leading visitors toward the entry and diffusing soft light from within. An open floor plan with high points of visibility allows the family

to pay close attention the location of their children in the main living spaces. With Autism in mind, this home is sensitive to touch and experience. Honed soft stone and wood finishes throughout bring gentleness to the home. Bedroom skylights bring the nighttime sky inside, to inspire this family and their children to look within and reflect on the world around…

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THOMAS IBRAHIM | TRAVEL

FUNDED BY: CLASS OF ‘77 SCHOLARSHIP YEAR COMPLETED: SUMMER 2016 PROJECT NAME: THE REPUBLIC OF GEORGIA: ARCHITECTURE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY

In May of 2017, the Republic of Georgia will celebrate its twenty-sixth year as an independent nation. After the fall of the Soviet Union, the fledgling republic was faced with the challenges of civil war, a decimated economy, and government corruption. The end of this turbulent period was marked with the Rose Revolution and the consequent beginning of the Saakashvili regime which would bring economic growth and political stability. However, growth has arguably come at the cost of more than five millennia of ethnic identity and national spirit.

before the iconostasis, thus, drawing the eye and body forward from the entrance. Above the cylinder, a cone of the same scale is perceived from the exterior, but on the interior, it becomes a dome bearing a fresco of Christ and the four incorporeal creatures, which had been whitewashed during the Soviet era but still remains. Though the cathedral is massive, standing 175 ft. tall, the proportions of the space inside do not evoke austerity or force reverence.

The Establishment of Georgian Architectural Tradition Some of the earliest remains of the Georgian architectural tradition can be found at the ruins of Uplistsikhe, a historic cave city from the 3rd Millennia BC, approximately 70 kilometers from the capital city of Tbilisi. The elaborately carved caves served the functions of dwelling and worship. It is in places of worship that the first layer of the Georgian architectural tradition is found in the symbolic motifs based on traditional folklore. Though these motifs are associated with the Iberian pagan tradition, they would continue to be used in local Christian architecture, which was introduced to the Iberian Kingdom in the 4th Century AD by St. Nino. These motifs were used to adorn the Jvari Monastery and Cathedral of Mtskheta – Svetitskhoveli, built as they are contemporarily known, in the 7th and 11th centuries, respectively. In the following millennia, the building traditions established in Mtskheta would persist in the construction and adornment of churches across Georgia.

Svetitskhoveli Cathedral

The third layer of tradition can be experienced in the historic district in Tbilisi, off the sinuous main Kote Afkazi Street. Walking off the main street and into the capillaries with which it intersects, the traditional two-story courtyard houses are found in poor shape, yet are national treasures nonetheless. The houses are built for multiple families, with balconies facing the courtyard. The courtyard is the central gathering place for the families, making the heart of the home communal. The city’s fabric was once characterized by a series of these houses, welcoming guests from the larger local community. These three distinct Georgian traditions would manifest themselves in the architecture of the Soviet years, both in the Stalinist period and again in the Late-Soviet period. Holding on to Traditions During the Soviet Period

Carved cave at Uplistsikhe

The second layer of Georgian architectural tradition began with the construction of the cathedrals and churches, especially the aforementioned Svetitskhoveli Cathedral, located in the city of Mtskheta, 20 kilometers from Tbilisi. The design of these ancient structures is evidently regional, bearing no semblance to the cathedrals of Europe, Russia, or any other Christian nation. The discerning characteristics of the Georgian cathedral are the composition of simple geometric forms, the purity of the translation of the interior spaces from the exterior form, and the comfortable volumetric proportions of the interior regardless of scale. The footprint of the building is rectangular, and emerging from it are a series of smaller gabled prisms stepping back towards the center and forming a cross. Above the gabled prisms that form the cross is a cylinder with a series of narrow apertures bringing down soft light into the space DISCIPLINE

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After the Soviets had taken control of Russia, they began reclamation of the territories that declared independence amidst the chaos of the Bolshevik Revolution. The democratic government established by Noe Zhordania, the first prime minister of the Republic of Georgia, was exiled to France. Georgia fell under the control of the Soviets on May 7, 1920, less than two years after they had declared independence. Despite being under Soviet rule, the Georgians clung to their ethnic and national identity through art, literature, film, and architecture. When Joseph Stalin (an ethnic Georgian, formerly Ioseb Jughashvili) ascended to the highest position of leadership in the Soviet Union, he transformed the nation from agrarian to industrial. The revolutionary and experimental architecture of the Constructivists, which was embraced during the Lenin regime, was discarded and replaced with imposing, Soviet neoclassical, ‘Stalinist’ architecture. The national growth of the Stalinist period was accompanied with the construction of several housing blocks and administrative buildings. Among the notable Stalinist buildings in Tbilisi is the Georgian Parliament building on Rustaveli Avenue, still used as an administrative building


today. Though the building is distinctly Soviet neoclassical, it retains some aspects of national architecture mentioned. The building was initially built with an open courtyard, but the later addition facing the street closed it, and the initial intentions were lost. In addition to the courtyard, the sides of the building are adorned with the traditional Georgian motifs though the building is not sacred. These small details, though unsuccessful, purely representational and out of context, are an attempt at Georgian ethnic nationalism at a time when it was unattainable. The Late-Soviet period in Georgia is distinctly different from the Stalinist and Khrushchev periods, and is defined as the years between 1970 until the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. Politically, the period was marked with overwhelming nationalism. In the 1970s, there were several anti-Soviet protests, the most significant being the 1978 demonstrations over the attempted change of the national language of Georgia to include Russian. One of the most distinguished architects and intellectuals of this period, Victor ‘Butza’ Djorbenadze, was arguably subliminally working towards an independent Georgia through his buildings. Though radical, this is twice evident: once in the construction of The Palace of Ceremonies, and again in the function of his house as a museum of Georgian culture of the 19th Century. According to David Bostanashvili, an architectural historian at Georgian Technical University (GTU), the Palace of Ceremonies, completed in 1985, is an ironic building. Within the building’s design are several references to Georgian folklore and history, but without the Soviets and a national movement away from religion and local ethnic tradition, its construction would not have been necessitated. The building is a silent protest against the Soviet government manifested in stone, and representing the Georgian distaste for the politics of Late-Soviet period, the desire for independence, and the restoration of tradition. It offers both subliminal and blatant displays of ethnic nationalism in the organization of the rooms, in the pure translation of the exterior spaces to the interior, and to the more obvious use of the historical darbazi structure at the building’s entrance. Only a few years after the building was completed, the Soviet government had collapsed, but what would become of the national spirit that was untamable leading up to the collapse?

Former Georgian Parliament

Palace Of Ceremonies

Abandoning Tradition to Create the Image of a Contemporary European State Disputes over territory plagued the entire Caucuses region after the collapse of the Soviet government. Armenia and Azerbaijan have a frozen dispute over the Nagorno-Karabakh territory still today, and likewise Georgia is still facing the challenge of unification with the territories of Abkhazia and South Ossetia to the north, and until the middle of the 1990s, Adjara to the west. These disputes are a result of a deeply entrenched ethnic conflict that went unresolved from the time of the first Georgian republic in 1918, and was further aggravated because the Soviet government granted these regions unique autonomy within their respective republics. In addition to the civil war fought in the 1990s, the country faced government corruption, deportation of non-ethnic Georgians, and the illegal acquisition and construction on property which would weaken the economy, destroy the urban fabric, and lead to a decline in national morale. The buildings that would emerge during this period were mostly illegal, and the architecture that would come after the Rose Revolution would not pay homage to the rich Georgian tradition. When President Mikheil Saakashvili was inaugurated, he made his intentions of creating a globalized, contemporary, European nation incredibly apparent, however, this would come at the cost of perpetuating national tradition and cultural preservation. As a result, the historic district in Tbilisi would fall victim to the object architecture of European architects which were intended to induce the so-called ‘Bilbao effect.’ These projects have since been heavily criticized by local architects, planners, and cultural heritage protectors who were uninformed about the projects until construction began. Though the image of the city has forever been changed by the turmoil of the 1990s and Haussmann-like Saakashvili, the dissatisfaction expressed by the emerging generation of architects is hope for a more authentic Tbilisi.

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TEDDY BEAR PAVILION |COMPETITION

YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: TEDDY BEAR CHOLLA PAVILION GROUP MEMBERS: DASH BERNHARD, MAURICE CALVENDRA, THOMAS FRAMPTON, EMERY KARENZI, AND CHANTAL MAHORO

This project was designed by an interdisciplinary team made of members from three different majors. At the beginning of the project, our group’s big idea was to connect the main public spaces on ASU Tempe campus through green areas, pathways, and sophisticated green indoors. Later, our research narrowed down to only one building, the Memorial Union. After analyzing the building, we came to realize that there were two issues to address: heavy traffic of people and underutilized areas in the building. The project then evolved into providing the design to satisfy the requirements of a biophilic environment and meeting the needs of the redesigned area.

After an analysis of the plants found in Sonoran Desert was conducted, we became very fascinated by the overall structure of the ironwood tree, which inspired the creation of a shade structure, and the pattern found in a Cholla cactus skeleton, which inspired the shape and layout of the openings on the shade structure.

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From there, we started looking for the unique beauty of the space and an identity that would make the design more useful. The first design was a sculpture-like concrete structure that would allow many manipulations and make the design look like a living tree-like hybrid of both the cholla cactus and ironwood tree. However, the feasibility and effectiveness of concrete grew questionable. We revisited the choice of materials and their performance. This led to two materials: steel and canvas. Steel provided the forms that we were looking for, with reliable strength and lightness. As for the canvas, it is a flexible material which provides the comfort needed and semi-permeability necessary to control the ventilation and natural light penetration. The shade structure can be installed in three different series and moved around while leaving its core structure in place to maintain its biophilic environment. It is light enough that it can be installed in less than 24 hours. However, the main goal of the whole installation is to provide the kind of space in which the ASU community can thrive. This would decrease the heavy traffic in the building by creating another area of attraction to a wider audience, making the patio more utilized.


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CALAVENDRA, MEDINA, SYNACEK, ZHAO |STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: THOMAS HARTMAN YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: 79 COLLECTIVE HOUSING UNITS GROUP MEMBERS: MAURICE CALAVENDRA, LUIS MEDINA, ANDREW SYNACEK, AND YUCHEN ZHAO

Located in District Terres Neuves, Bègles, France, 79 Collective Housing Units by LAN Architecture is a housing type intended to reinvent collective housing by incorporating advantages and qualities of a single family home. The principle underlying the approach of the project is of stacking containers and the organization of the stacking. Each unit has four facades while three are exposed. Each also has a sense of privacy, an outdoor space, is autonomous, and has a strong sensory contact with the outdoors. Using a hybrid climatic model that corresponds to the climate of France, the building has a façade system that can change with the seasons. Each unit has the ability to slide the façades to allow air movement and fresh air during the spring and summer as well as the ability to slide them closed for the winters to block harsh weather. This feature can be adjusted individually by the users of the units allowing them to create their desired environments. There are three main types of units although there are many variations due to the ability of the user to transform their outdoor spaces into rooms without having to obtain a permit.

The project is also a demonstration of how the economics of architecture can be irrational. At the cost of $1,000 per square meter or $100 a square foot the project was built below the cost of the region with twice the surface area.

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Typological

Hybrid


INSTRUCTOR: _______ YEAR COMPLETED: _______ PROJECT NAME: _______

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WOMEN IN ARCHITECTURE | AIA + AIAS

EVENT: WOMEN IN ARCHITECTURE HAPPY HOUR: TOUR AND TALK TOUR: JONES STUDIO with MARIA SALENGER, AIA TALK: TRUDI HUMMEL, AIA, KRISTA SHEPHERD, AIA TOPIC: LEADERSHIP AND DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE WRITTEN BY: OLIVIA RAISANEN

The field of architecture is about problem-solving and responding to research and the needs of society. Evidence shows that the ratio of women to men in the discipline are nearly equally represented in architecture school; this proportion drastically changes post architecture school, as fewer women work within the profession, even less have a position of leadership, and the smallest proportion (in relation to their male colleagues) become principals or partners. The Missing 32% Project, a committee formed by AIA San Francisco in 2011, conducted a survey in which “2,289 respondents from around the world—66 percent female and 34 percent male—answered questions in three main categories: Hiring and Retention; Growth and Development; and Meaning and Influence” (Source: Dickinson, Elizabeth Evitts. “The Missing 32% Project Survey Results Reveal Gender Inequity in Architecture. Now What?” The Journal of the American Institute of Architects. October 18, 2014). The main finding of this survey was that “42 percent of architecture graduates are female, but the number of licensed female practitioners and senior leaders in the profession hovers between only 15 and 18 percent” (Source: Dickinson). This research presents information that demands investigation; as a profession that works to design for people, it is only logical to maintain the highest diversity of designers to represent the groups being designed for.

concerns brought forth by young professionals was surprising. It appears that there exists a fear of addressing equality issues due to professional backlash. However, the fact that the event was held in the first place shows promise of a future in architecture that is better represented by both women and men at all levels, inclusive of leadership and principal or partner positions.

As the conversation progresses, awareness of the research that has been done is one of the most important steps towards equality within the field of architecture. The invitation of students into the conversation speaks volumes, as we are the future of the profession. Knowledge of “As a profession that is working this evidence, which defines the problem, is to design for people, it is only logical to maintain the highest the foundation. This issue demands a critical diversity of designers to awareness of existing, bias-affected tendencies represent the groups being by each person within the professional world of designed for.” architecture. As events such as these continue, it is vital that men are invited and encouraged to be a part of the conversation. It is essential to balance representation in a transparent process towards true progression. A response to this issue is being made by the Women’s Leadership Group of the American Institute of Architects at a national scale and by AIA Arizona at a local scale. ASU’s AIAS Chapter was invited to be a part of a locally hosted Women in Architecture Happy Hour with Maria Salenger at Jones Studio. During the event, the information from The Missing 32% Project, previously mentioned, was brought to attention briefly, followed by a talk by Trudi Hummel, AIA, and Krista Shepherd, AIA, both of Gould Evans, on leadership and design in architecture. Afterwards, they led an open discussion, followed by questions related to the information brought to light from The Missing 32% Project. From the experiences mentioned, it is clear that there is contribution, both positive and negative, to the progression of the issue of inequality within the profession and the field locally. As a student fortunate enough to be surrounded by mentors who enforce the importance of recognizing unequal treatment and bias within any working or professional environment, parts of the conversation were disconcerting. Among the majority present, the absence of direct address of tangible workplace DISCIPLINE

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On behalf of the ASU Chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students, thank you to AIA Arizona, Trudi Hummel, Krista Shepherd, Maria Salenger, and Jones Studio for inciting discussion on this topic.


STUDIO NIGHT | PROFESSIONAL

STUDIO NIGHT AT THE ASU DESIGN SCHOOL, SPRING 2017 WRITTEN BY: BRITTANY BAILEY PHOTOS BY: PHILIP HORTON

One of the requirements for graduation from the Master of Architecture Program is that of an academic internship completed during the summer. During which 200 or more hours of professional experience is acquired counting toward the NCARB Architectural Experience Program (AXP), one of the three ‘E’s’ on the way to an architect’s professional licensure.

The ASU Design School supports this task by hosting a Studio Night every year where the professional community from every design field, including architecture, is invited to come and interact with the fifth year students. It is an opportunity for both students and firms to network and make valuable connections with the intention of these meetings leading to interviews for summer intern positions. With each passing year this event becomes more and more successful. This year’s Studio Night hosted more than 50 firms with a total of 86 professionals present. The enthusiasm from all involved was inspiring and resulted in a wildly successful evening.

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NENWE GEESO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: ELIZABETH MCLEAN YEAR COMPLETED: 2016 PROJECT NAME: DAZAKA

The requirement for this project was to create a student cultural center that would be located on the Forest Mall of the Arizona State University campus. The goal was to create a space that could serve as the central destination primarily for the students of the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts, but that would also be open to students of any and all majors offered at ASU.

Aramaic, a Semitic language that originated in the Fertile Crescent over 3,000 years ago, is spoken to this day by me and hundreds of thousands descendants spread across the world. ‘Dazaka,’ Aramaic for ‘layer,’ describes the three-tier design of this structure.

The space, which is made up of an exhibition area and a small cafe, is intended to be a space where students from all over campus could come to spend their free time. Whether they are hanging out with friends, getting a bite to eat, doing homework between classes, admiring the art in the exhibition space, or simply passing through, students are led throughout the site via interwoven pathways that are intended to encourage movement and exploration within the space. The design of the center itself utilizes a sharp angle which projects out towards the mall to draw people inside while not interfering too harshly with the designed movement of the pathways. The building also features a green roof that can be accessed by a large set of stairs located on the north side of the building. When on the green roof, students can stop to sit in the grass and relax or simply enjoy the views of the surrounding campus. With a multitude of potential uses, the space is intended to encourage creativity and stimulate interaction among students.

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FELIPE MANCERO | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: ELENA ROCCHI YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: SUN DEVIL STADIUM: “A THEATER OF ABSENCE”

The French Theater Company Royal de Luxe’s performance in Santiago Chile titled “The Missing Elephant” inspired the exploration of the absence in theaters, arenas or, in this case, Sun Devil Stadium. The theater company was so successful in bringing arts and performance out onto the street that it also brought the community into the public realm. The infrastructure of the adjacent theaters or venues served as a backdrop rather than a performance space. This performance enabled people to occupy or appropriate public space in a way never seen before.

The Sun Devil Stadium is a theatrical set as it hosts grand athletic performances that unite and activate the ASU and Tempe community. A study of stadium configurations expose how this massive venue is a dormant giant for nearly 90% of the year. By introducing an “activator,” a giant billboard that broadcasts the absence of the Sun Devil Stadium, this comments on and describes the contemporary life of this monumental infrastructure when not hosting a football game.

+ GREEK

Through the introduction of this activator structure, the stadium could become: a backdrop for future performances, iconic signage for the university--the possibilities are endless. The reveal of the absence of the stadium attempts to provoke viewers to speculate on what the possible uses for the stadium could be in its everyday life.

= ROMAN

SUN DEVIL STADIUM

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COVERDALE, HUFT, PNIAK | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: KASEY JOSEPHS YEAR COMPLETED: SPRING 2017 PROJECT NAME: CASE STUDY: BRUDER KLAUS FELDKAPELLE GROUP MEMBERS: NICK COVERDALE, BRIAN HUFT, NIKA PNIAK

In a remote field in the outskirts of Cologne, Germany Peter Zumthor designed The Bruder Klaus Feldkapelle. The remarkable work of architecture and incredible feat of engineering was constructed with local tree logs, in a series of 24 pours over the span of 23 days, and burned in a maintained fire for 3 weeks. The project is especially remarkable because of the method in which it was constructed, taking away material in the end, rather than adding to it.

Following the method of construction of the real chapel, we constructed the model in a series of pours of concrete over a similar wooden framework, let it dry, and then burned out in a fire. However, we did not pour the model in 23 even layers, allow it to cure properly, and then burn out the framework slowly. Since we rushed the process, not perfectly evening out the pours and burning it 24 hours later, the model cracked and broke in the places that air was trapped. Still, it was inspiring to experience the building process at a smaller scale, and the model’s close representation of the actual chapel was surprising.

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Model Photo of Occulus

True Photo of Occulus

Model Photo of Entryway

True Photo of Entryway

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CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN | DESIGN BUILD

Elementary School

PROJECT NAME: MONTESSORI SCHOOL, LUJÁN LOCATION: CITY OF LUJÁN, BUENOS AIRES PROVINCE, ARGENTINA YEAR COMPLETED: 2013-ONGOING DESIGN: ASU PROF. CLAUDIO VEKSTEIN [ECV_OPERA PUBLICA] IN COLLABORATION WITH MARCELO BARREIRO, ARCHS

The challenge proposed was to design the first Montessori School anew in Argentina, following the philosophy of education and method Maria Montessori introduced at the beginning of the 20th century. The method builds on the child as one who is naturally eager for knowledge and capable of initiating learning in a supportive, thoughtfully prepared learning environment. The first Montessori architectural experiences such as the Primary Schools in Nagele by Aldo van Eyck and the Montessori Primary School in Delft by Herman Hertzberger profusely articulate the school and the classroom, creating a multi-focused and poly-functional space. Classroom floor plan

Site

North unfolded facade

South unfolded facade

Section c-c

Context Plan

Section a-a

High School

Elementary School

Kindergarten

Site Plan DISCIPLINE

Elementary School Floor Plan SPRING 2017


High School

Kindergarten

North unfolded facade

North unfolded facade

South unfolded facade

Montessori banner unfolded facade

Section a-a

Stair Plan

Section c-c

Stair Elevation Section

High School Floor Plan

Section c-c

Section a-a

Kindergarten Floor Plan AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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Elementary School

The School is located in a rural area close to the town of Luján, 68 km northwest of Buenos Aires. The program is organized in three continuous but separate buildings, a Kindergarten, Elementary, and High School, to phase the construction along three subsequent years. The structures follow a general east-west alignment, slightly rotating to seek the best north orientation for classrooms and views to common areas and the lake. Access and parking are organized to the southwest, buffering the constructions by mounds and tree-lines from the cold winds. The internal programs configure the structures in two ways: as flexible public spaces with high sections to the south and more intimate spaces as articulated modular classrooms with lower sections to the north. Both sections’ profiles follow two folding roofs extruded, transitioning in a shared structural line that jumps the levels. The Kindergarten (south building, unbuilt yet), comprises three classroom modules along public corridor areas for play and multipurpose events and houses administrative offices for the School. The entry courtyard creates a zone of community interaction, where a large “Montessori Luján” inscription unfolds around it welcoming students and visitors.

air amphitheater for school events. Kindergarten and Elementary School classroom modules unfold a diversity of internal zones profusely articulated and multi-focused which encourages independence, freedom within limits, and a sense of order. The High School (north building, second built), develops a further fine grain spatial articulation for the classroom modules, for specialized group activities with adaptive partitioning. The structures are constructed with cast-in-place concrete composed by split point columns and slanted beams forming linear plane porticos with perimeter bracing of thin concrete beams. To the shaded and humid south façade, aluminum framing glass and panels are responsible for the institutional, open, contemporary character facing the community, following the colors of the School and the corresponding developmental stages identified by Montessori; on the warmer, northern sun exposed classrooms’ façade, traditional masonry walls patterning colored and glazed ceramic bricks provide a handcrafted, earthy, and tactile scale.

The Elementary School (middle building, first built), develops flexible public areas and modular classrooms assembled in two groups which are split by a small courtyard. Extending outside to the south public space expands in an open-

The Montessori School Luján activates diverse microterritorial affiliations between the School community and its physical environment as a focused, intensive endeavor to reach design specificity, fine-grained proximity to people and issues, towards a more refined, exhaustive depiction of public-intimacy life.

Elementary School

Elementary School

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Kindergarten

Kindergarten

High School

High School

High School

Elementary School

Elementary School AIAS AT ASU ARCHITECTURE JOURNAL

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CHENG, WRIGHT | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: ELENA ROCCHI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: MINDFULLY MAD GROUP MEMBERS: JUNYUAN CHENG AND ELISA WRIGHT

The shelter is an integrated frame structure because of the madness the mind produces. Possessing a sense of shelter requires an emotional connection with people, which comes from the frontal lobe of the brain. The architect builds, dwells, thinks, and bridges images; it produces places in the space with the mind. He dwells with a certain something, atmosphere, and map to process a meaningful time passing by.

This shelter discovers that existing connection that remains the same no matter which space he occupies. Having a sense of shelter does not mean being isolated, a shelter does not have closed walls to the outside world, if you choose. The shelter is a project that does not make one escape, but leave. This is produced with the madness and complexities of love we experience everyday. Madness is complex. Madness is love. A complex, maddening love has formed a system of frames, deeply rooted in the land, independent individuals, and intertwined in the air a system of different components organized to change in architecture as a result of experience in different environments, supported with and connected to each other, an integration of madness. It moves and is what matters the most, an element of care. For the time being and in this case a physical movement for all users. This is an integration that has an unlimited extension and growth for all users. This shelter is our integration--to have others discover their emotional journey, their own sense of shelter through personal madness. Here you will always find a place of your own because you will always have your mind and madness.

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BRANDON POWELL | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT MURFF YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: THE SHIFT

On the campus of the sixth largest public university in the United States, there is a missing necessity: a home. A gathering space where innovative minds can come together to relax, invent, create, and stimulate away from the pressure of classwork or busy schedules. The Shift is a home away from home for students and the community. The Shift aims to “Pull” the eyes of drifting students, and physically shift them into the structure.

When inside, students will find a peaceful retreat where a cafe space overlaps with the artistic minds and work of both physical and philosophical ideas.

Grey Potable Water System

Cast in Place Concrete

IEP Wood Application

Linear Seating Extension

Exterior Exhibition Continuation

3 Tier Retractable Panel Door

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CATHLEEN KEBERT | STUDIO

INSTRUCTOR: JOSÉ BERNARDI YEAR COMPLETED: FALL 2016 PROJECT NAME: SEQUENCE OF PHENOMENAL EXPERIENCES

“Sequence” adaptively reuses the Phoenix Seed and Feed Building, striving to enrich the context with a dedicated place that encourages a quiet, reflective environment suitable for studying, group meetings, conversing, learning, and nurturing the spirit through art and nature.

Derived from my observations in Venice of what phenomenal elements influenced individuals to rest, loops of spaces are punctuated by: light and views, the unexpected, promptings of movement, and environmental conditioning (such as water, vegetation, and shade). These elements link the three main programs of the site--a gallery, café, and community garden--together to encourage further exploration of the site through these varying sequences. The “unexpected” moments manifest as pods which facilitate the community’s fluctuating programmatic needs: meetings, study sessions, yoga classes, workshops, presentations, etc. With several smaller businesses and

ARTISTS’ WORKSHOP 5

GALLERY

A

A 4 1 2

COMMUNITY GARDEN CAFE

3

schools nearby, these pods become destinations that can be rented out. Not only does the change in atmosphere from their daily environments heighten the experience, but they also benefit from the biophilic benefits offered through the layering of the four phenomenal elements.

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NIKKEL, VAN HORNE | COMPETITION

YEAR COMPLETED: SUMMER 2016 PROJECT NAME: ICELAND TREKKING CABINS GROUP MEMBERS: AUSTIN NIKKEL AND RICHARD VAN HORNE

This project was a competition entry for an Iceland trekking cabin that couple appear all throughout Iceland. Our proposal was to create a space that rooted within the deep history of Iceland, all whole embracing modern and sustainable building techniques that fit well within the landscape. The building provides a place of refuge and relaxation during the harsh Icelandic Treks. Due to its construction and assembly, the cabins could be successfully installed in any location and withstand varying conditions. The cabin’s language was created from the historic Icelandic vernacular and its form was derived from the historical Icelandic huts’ singular, long, linear form. The color is influenced from the cities in Iceland which are a series of brightly colored homes that help to differentiate themselves from the landscape.

The building is used to help establish a greater Trekking system as the versatility of the cabins’ facades allow them to take on a larger role within the current trekking systems within Iceland. The cabins may take on any color which can help mark or distinguish current and future trails within Iceland. By blending in or standing out amongst the landscape, they can become visible to those seeking its location from miles away. Ultimately, the design forges itself into an icon within the landscape while becoming not only the face of Trekking for Iceland, but also the place for hikers to seek refuge along their routes.

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SUBMISSION INDEX DISCIPLINE

Student 40, 44 58 74 58 55, 87 72 82 8 47, 56 20 31 18, 22 58 70 82, 84 8 42 58 24 96 78 72 90 74 66 74 58 74 74 58 74 58 34 82 88 50, 56, 74 12 38 58 7, 8 90 58 74, 80 67 58 82 52, 99 58 58 58 58 21 79 8 24 36 63 74 62 38 82 89 74 43, 84 16, 71 58 74 46, 74 100 58 64, 72 8 41 90 36, 98 16, 37, 86 56 19 8 7, 8 74 44 48, 74 6 58 84

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AL-Roumi, Yousef Albusaidi, Nasraa Ayotte, Kelsey Babanovski, Boyana Bailey, Brittany Bates, Spencer Bernard, Dash Bian, Lu Bone, Nicole Boylan, Matthew Brown, Noah Bundy, Zachary Bursi, Zachary Calic, Nina Calvendra, Maurice Cao, Yubailu Carlson, Andrew Carney, Brooke Cervantes, Roman Cheng, Junyuan Chopra, Ali Cleveland, Aaron Coverdale, Nick Crittendon, Bri Desai, Bhoomi Diaz, Hector Doolan, Reed Dunaway, Adam Duplantier, Rene Fajardo, Lisbeth Fan, Xueying Fernandez, Allison Foster, Miles Frampton, Thomas Geeso, Nenwe Greene, Josh Gresko, Mariah Gulinson, Jacob Holden, Haley Hong, Han Huft, Brian Hulverson, Kayley Ibrahim, Thomas Jain, Jinesh Jin, Rongting Karenzi, Emery Kebert, Cathleen Keller, Adrian Kennedy, Lydia Klein, Gabby Langefels, Garrett Leavens, Avalon Lemma, Dane Li, Chengmin Li, Hailong Liu, Susan Lufkin, Christina Luo, Yazhen Lyons, Ben Madsen, Liz Mahoro, Chantal Mancero, Felipe Martinez, Yanet Medina, Luis Melton, Joshua Mora, Bailey Mu, Hang Nakhle, Bruna Nikkel, Austin Osuna, Salma Palav, Gautam Pandeya, Pabitra Patrick, Alexandra Pniak, Nika Powell, Brandon Raisanen, Olivia Ramirez, Brandon Richardson, David Roberts, Addam Roshani, Rose Rowden, Casey Salinas, Cristian Scheren, Jack Shekerjian, Nicholas Smith, Ashleigh Synacek, Andrew

Student 8 54 8 8 24 44, 100 49 8 8 96 32 22 58 74 30, 84 58

Tang, Cissy Tesanovic, Aleksandra Thanawala, Shivansh Tian, Zoey Tolosa, Santiago van Horne, Richard Volkova, Veronika Wang, Zhenqi Williams, Dain Wright, Elisa Yang, Xueke Zanzucchi, Adam Zhang, Ke Zhang, Qiwei Zhao, Yuchen Zimmerman, Cody

AIAS 36 86

Professional Knowledge Building Women in Architecture

Competition 71 48 72 100 22 82 24

Desert Panel House ARA Small House Culture Hub Iceland Trekking Cabins In Between Teddy Bear Cholla Pavilion The Santa Monica Wall: A Space-Time Reflection

Tribute 5

Tribute to Gary Herberger

Design Build 56 92

CamelBackyard Montessori School, Luján

Essay 58 68 31 12

Pragmatic Poets and Critical Craft: “the Making of a Thing” Golden Ruler: Architecture, Authority, and the Insecurity of Wealth Silence and Contemplation Where Innovation Meets Nature

Exhibition 26

An Encounter with the ASU Art Museum Collection

Faculty Contributions 26 12 5 68 58 92

Bernardi, José Garcia-Setien, Diego Meunier, John Pritchard, Joe Rocchi, Elena Vekstein, Claudio

Personal 46 19 47

Digital Environment Art Explorations Printing a Garden Airganic

Professional 7 87

DesignLink: A Story of Symbiotic Success Studio Night

Sketch 30

Shanghai Architecture


Studio 84 67 70 44 6 90 21 66 88 62 63 79 41 20 38 96 8 64 55 40 99 49 34 32 89 16 78 98 43 54 42 37 74 18

79 Collective Housing Units After-Modern Dwelling ASU Beacon ASU Polytechnic Pavilion Building Ecologies Case Study: Bruder Klaus Feldkapelle Centre Georges Pompidou Case Study City as a Park-Urban Scenography Dazaka Education Ripple Effect Herberger Student Center: An Artist’s Promenade Hy-per Home Juxtaposing Elements Leaving Traces Link Mindfully Mad Nahele Hale: A Portal to Hawaiian Nature and Culture Re-Habilitation of the Riverbed: Sonoran River Park Salt Lake City Courthouse Case Study Sense of Absence in Urban Scenography Sequence of Phenomenal Elements Social Re-Formation of the Bank Tower Sparking Urban Relationships Stairs and Stories Sun Devil Stadium: “A Theater of Absence” Tabula “The DUCT” and “Challenging the Status Quo” The Shift The Weight This Saint Your City Tucson Ceramics CO-OP Urban Shift [Waimea] Studio You Do You

Contact Us asuarchjournal@ gmail.com

Short Essays

Studio Projects

Competitions Thesis 52

Redefining the Typology of Desert Residences

50 80

Curiosity The Republic of Georgia: Architecture and National Identity

Travel

Studio Lead 6, 99 74 34, 70 66 46 8, 47 64 18, 22, 44, 84 52, 56, 74 19, 21, 49, 55, 90 88 37, 41, 43, 98 8, 47, 52 54 16, 38, 40, 89, 96 71 84 79 42 84 20, 32, 62, 63, 67 78

Sketches

Bernardi, José Bryan, Harvey Burnette, Wendell Cook, Edward Feghali, Walid Fischer, Adelheid Garcia-Setien, Diego Hartman, Thomas Horton, Phil Josephs, Kasey McLean, Elizabeth Murff, Scott Petrucci, Darren Pritchard, Joe Rocchi, Elena Roeder, Scott Ryan, Mark Takamura, John Underwood, Max Upadhye, Amit Vekstein, Claudio Zingoni, Milagros

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asuarchjournal.wordpress.com DISCIPLINE

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Discipline: ASU Architecture Journal 03  

This is the AY 16/17 volume of Discipline, the Architecture Journal for Arizona State University (ASU), produced entirely by students from t...

Discipline: ASU Architecture Journal 03  

This is the AY 16/17 volume of Discipline, the Architecture Journal for Arizona State University (ASU), produced entirely by students from t...