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The ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE

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ALSO BY THE ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE novem II novem

Magazine No. 1 - 4


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INTRODUCTION

I.

The primary focus of TASC Magazine publications is to feature the work by invited photographers. To accomplish that, in our 4th edition we have an extensive 378 pages of what we hope will be an inspiring read through 12 like-minded, yet diverse photographers, working within their individual style and vision. Along the work of 8 Collective members, which includes ‘Midnight Thoughts’ by Eses Motto – an intriguing series photographed in 3 cities, Tokyo, Rome and Paris capturing the mood of the streets between 9pm until 7am over a period of 2 years.

Nanã Sousa Dias, a Portuguese professional saxophone player and Fine Art film photographer, is featured with two sets of series: Ruralidades (Ruralities), taken in the countryside, mostly with large and medium format film and some of his street photographs. Chet Bak is published with his dream-like atmospheric photos of his daily walks around the neighbourhoods of his city and Safia Delta, presents us with her vivid colour work. ‘City of Ghosts’ is a visually expressive series by Roberto De Mitri.

In this magazine we interview two photographers, Rui Correia from Portugal and Joel Durand from France, which is accompanied by a text written by Leslie Buleux.

‘The Element of time in Photography’ is an article written by Feleco, from Spain, who also takes us for a walk through the City streets.

Bernard Jolivalt tells us about his encounter with Jorge Luis Borges in his article ‘Le portrait de Jorge Luis Borges’ illustrated by documentary portraits of the Argentine writer, essayist, poet and translator.

And from US Peter Schafer’s shows us Brooklyn in his series ‘Brooklyn by Night’ along with his thought-provoking writing which starts with a surprising sentiment: “I love street photography. But I might hate it even more”.

Anton Novoselov’s photographs are like true stills from Andrei Tarkovsky’s films, and transport us “the foreigners” - to use his own words – to Russia.

The Austrian photographer Florian Schiesterl takes us on a journey through the far East and writes how his camera is a compass that guides his way.

In this issue we begin to publish Rogério Akiti Dezem’s Part 1. of a 4 year long project ‘Naniwa A City Without A Face...’ , taken between 2016-2020 in Osaka.


II.

Featured Photographers

NANÃ SOUSA DIAS PETER SCHAFER ROGÉRIO AKITI DEZEM CHET BAK RUI CORREIA ROBERTO DE MITRI ANTON NOVOSELOV JOEL DURAND FELECO SAFIA DELTA BERNARD JOLIVALT FLORIAN SCHIESTERL

III.

The Collective

DIRK VOGEL MANOLO L B MANTERO . LARA KANTARDJIAN MARIE-PIERRE LAMBELIN PAULO ABRANTES FRIEDER ZIMMERMANN ESES MOTO AURORA


COLLECTIVE

DIRK VOGEL

Dortmund, Germany


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COLLECTIVE

MANOLO L B MANTERO

C, Portogallo


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COLLECTIVE

LARA KANTARDJIAN

From Nicosia, Cyprus, lives in London, UK


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COLLECTIVE

MARIE-PIERRE LAMBELIN

From Lille, living in Paris, France


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COLLECTIVE

PAULO ABRANTES

Portuguese, lives near Aveiro City, Portugal


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COLLECTIVE

FRIEDER ZIMMERMANN

Living in Cologne (Koeln) Germany


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COLLECTIVE | SERIES

ESES MOTO

Tokyo, Japan

Eses is a research worker and a street photographer born in Japan in 1963. One of his subjects is imaging a sense of loneliness and quietness in urban environments. He tries to devote himself to a silent street, a heavy rain, a midnight drive and strong coffee. “Why analogue?�

Memory has been a matter of concern for him, since he lost a part of his memories by injury decades ago. Analogue photographs for him are almost equivalent to his lost memories, which seems to be obscure, fragile and a little mysterious, but definitely engraved something deep in his mind. Probably he wants to reconstruct a pure and confused mosaic of those deep feelings for himself in a very primitive way, that is a reason why he often shoots a photograph using a film on the street.


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Series by Eses Moto

There is a certain moment from midnight to dawn, when few people appear in the street even in the middle of a huge metropolis. Some of them in the street wander alone illuminated by dull artificial lights. Some of them stand still in the dark deep in thought. In a noiseless atmosphere, our psychological distance often gets close enough to make us out of anonymous and personalized.. Is it impossible to capture their (or my) personal thoughts?

Photographs taken in Tokyo, Rome and Paris between 9pm until 7am, 2018-2020.

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COLLECTIVE

AURORA

I’m an amateur photographer, living by the sea in the South of Portugal. I like particularly analogue photography, not so much by the purity of the concept, because I also do digital photography, but because it gives me a more direct relation with the subject and with the photographic act. I never seek technical perfection but rather the mood, story and content inside the frame. This is why I use mostly experimental and very low ISO BW film in my shooting, sometimes added to Medium format cameras slowing down even more the process of shooting. Aurora is a pseudonym.


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EXCLUSIVE

NANÃ SOUSA DIAS

Born 1957 in Torres Vedras, a small town a few miles from Lisbon, Portugal.

As well as being one of the most famous professional saxophone players in Portugal, his work as a fine art photographer, using mostly medium and large format film, has been shown in more than 50 exhibitions in Portugal and Brazil, as well as many articles and interviews published in books and magazines in Portugal, USA, UK, Russia and Brazil. In 2005 his work was published in one of the best fine art magazines in the world, the B&W Magazine.

He develops and enlarges all his films and photographs in his personal darkroom and sells photographs in 25 limited editions and also some open editions. All of his photos are enlarged in fiberbase barited glossy paper, sellenium toned, dated, signed and numbered. He teaches Landscape, Studio Portrait, Nude, Aerial photography and Darkroom Workshops, in Portugal and Brazil.

Interview with Paulo Abrantes ‘Nanã Sousa Dias: the man, the music, the photography’at 1x: 1x.com/blog/permalink/8055


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by Nanã Sousa Dias

“You can make a good photograph in almost any place, you just have to learn to look and “see” the right subject, choose the right angle, make the right composition, with the right light, using your photographic equipment the best way possible”.

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Series by Nanã Sousa Dias

“I want to shoot everything that touches my “senses”. It can be the shape of a rock, a look on someone's face, the shape of a body, a cloud formation, a wave in the sea, a shine on wet sand, an old building, etc, etc”.

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F E AT U R E D | S E R I E S

PETER SCHAFER

I grew up and went to college in northern California in the US, but spent most of my life in Baltimore and New York. I currently live in Brooklyn.


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“...it’s rewarding to recognize a good composition with just your eyes, without using the frame a camera offers.”

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On creative freedom by Peter Schafer

I learned photography in the pre-digital days and when I came back to photography after a 20-year absence, I started again with the Diana toy camera, which still informs my approach today. In fact, the only digital I shoot is on my phone with an app that replicates, quite well, the look of Diana toy cameras and Velvia (see the ‘Phoney Diana…’ Portfolios on my website).

Even with that, I love the limitations the one setting on the phone app imposes, like the limitations inherent in a choice of film and camera. For me, the key to creative freedom is the limitations set by the choices you make, which is why I find film so liberating.

Another liberating limitation is working with a set focal length. Although these photos were taken with two different cameras, all of them were taken with a 28mm lens. Getting to know a focal length – the field of view and perspective and depth of field it offers – is very helpful in that you can see the scene as you stumble upon it when you walk around, and then in no time you can raise the camera to your eye and snap the picture. I like taking a more deliberative approach sometimes, as well. But in all cases, it’s rewarding to recognize a good composition with just your eyes, without using the frame a camera offers.

I love to walk, especially in cities. That’s one of the joys I get from walking. Looking and finding interesting compositions, arrays of people and objects and light, even if I don’t take a picture of them. My brother, who’s a birdwatcher, is always full of interesting comments about the sky – the clouds, the light, the smog and stars. He says it’s because he’s always looking up, searching for birds. I guess I’m more of a people watcher, and from looking around as I walk, I observe and learn a lot of interesting things about cities and society. I try to imagine the lives of the people I see as they pass through the city on their journeys, and every time I go out I become more hopeful. I don’t know why exactly, but I think that’s why I do it.

PETER SCHAFER


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Series by Peter Schafer

I love street photography. But I might hate it even more. I’m not sure what motivates other photographers, but for me there’s usually a good bit of wanting to do something established — something that I’ve been drawn to and respect or even love — in a different way, in a better way if I dare aspire.

I think we often start off emulating, but from a strategic or ethical realization that you can’t just try to copy (suffused with doubt that you ever truly could if you wanted) you decide to try something a little different.

So much of any kind of photography suffers from over-emulation, people who imitate what they admire, perhaps unaware of what they are doing. But we see what they are doing and it’s depressing. With street, maybe because I’ve been shooting street off and on for a long time, this seems especially tiresome.

I know prevailing thought says to specialize and become known for a particular thing — something to do with branding yourself — but what effect does that have on your growth as a photographer, as a person? I like doing different kinds of photography, different formats, genres, color and black & white. The idea of confining myself to street feels like I would be buttoning up a tight collar, then treading a suffocating path toward a likely dead-end.

There is some interesting street work out there. I recently came across the Vivo collective and I like some of the work posted there quite a lot. But for the most part the street work I find on the internet, popping up in various feeds, is… pretty tedious.

Each photographer has themselves to draw upon, their ideas and personality, their experiences and fears, their gifts and handicaps (which could be one in the same). These are the things that need to be confronted out on the street. They are our own, and they result in gestures that point away from imitation.

PETER SCHAFER


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I’ve long been interested in conveying the sensation of seeing rather than the details of what I see — which I often can’t make out anyway, being very nearsighted. This leads me to shifting shapes, glancing impressions, transitory light, darkness.

I don’t believe that understanding is necessarily enhanced by ever more details or sharpness of resolution. It’s like that point in learning a new language when you stop trying to comprehend by deciphering and translating individual words and instead the meaning of the sentence as a whole emerges at once, revealing itself in tone and rhythm.

“I love street photography. But I might hate it even more.” That’s the subtext, the underlying tension to whenever I shoot street. The thrill, the fear, the exhilaration, the nausea, the joy, the self-loathing, the laying traps for beauty amidst a doubtful struggle against banality.

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F E AT U R E D | P R O J E C T

ROGÉRIO AKITI DEZEM

Born in Osasco city in Sao Paulo State, Brazil in 1974.

Since I was three years old I see the world myopia through my glasses, observing from my “darkroom” the movement of things around me, without trying to understand them, just wandering around… Therefore, my (late) choice in photographing “strangers” in the streets for me was something natural. For me Photography is the exercise of seeing for what is not.


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“cities are like dreams, made of desires and fears...”

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Naniwa, a city without a face ... (2016-2020) by Rogério Akiti Dezem

This black and white analog photographic project began in late 2015. The Japanese name "Naniwa" (な に わ ) refers to the old name of the city of Osaka, Japan where the urban photography project is being carried out. In the words of the Italian writer Italo Calvino, cities are like dreams, made of desires and fears, a synthesis that moves the urban element that by constructing / destroying space, mythologizes, producing a post-urban imaginary prodigal in signs and richer still in meanings.

The physical space of the city that should denote a certain “neutrality” ends up “shrinking” the individual who upon trying to project himself in the collective has, before himself, the real denial of “being neutral,” undergoing the action of the very environment in which he lives. The Japanese society has as one of the leitmovs, does not always respect the differences standardizing behaviors and actions. Often, the influence of a group of individuals on the environment (consciously and unconsciously) occurs through the strength of their desires, the belief in their hopes, the overcoming of their fears and the investment in their dreams and fantasies. My goal here is to try to capture this process of loneliness, disenchantment and "shrinking of the individual" in the urban space of a transforming metropolis like Osaka. Naniwa project: www.flickr.com/photos/159607533@N02

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F E AT U R E D | P R O F I L E

CHET BAK

Leica M6

Chetbak, le poète et photographe, amoureux du jazz, partage ses états d’âme du quotidien et nous laisse découvrir pleins de détails de sa ville ou il se promène avec son appareil photo argentique. Les volets battants, les pavés et les grilles en fonte brillants de pluie, quelques petites tables rondes devant un café avec des tasses à café vides, les posters déchirés, les façades écaillées, les rues éclairées par les phares des voitures et les silhouettes des piétons. Ces prises de vue typiques avec une faible profondeur de champ ne dévoilent pas tout d'un coup. Structurées de manière originale les photos prises par Chetbak laissent de l'espace à la fantaisie et des rêveries.

“Chetbak, the poet and photographer, jazz lover, shares his daily moods and lets us discover lots of details of his city where he walks with his film camera. The shutters, the cobblestones and the cast iron grilles shining with rain, some small tablesround in front of a cafe with empty coffee cups, torn posters, chipped facades, streets lit by car headlights and pedestrian silhouettes. These shots typical with low depth of field does not suddenly reveal. Structured in an original way, the photos taken by Chetbak leave room for fantasy and daydreams” - Review by Tomas Vimmr


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F E AT U R E D | I N T E R V I E W

RUI CORREIA

Portugal


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“analogue causes a great transformation in your way of photographing, it forces you to carefully visualize and anticipate the moment...”

____________________________________________________________ Interview with Rui Correia by Paulo Abrantes Introduction

Rui Correia is a Portuguese amateur photographer who lives in a small village in the centre of Portugal. Born in the beginning of the 70’s, he shoots in both digital and analogue, though these last years a major part of his work is with film. Shooting almost exclusively in B&W, now and then he also “goes for a ride” in the colour world, always with film. He shoots for mood in the streets, composing for atmosphere rather than the reality of the situation, achieving many times a completely abstract composition from the reality starting point. The taste for deeply B&W images takes him into the street in search of this game of light and shadow. How and when did this taste for photography begin?

Since I remember that I like photography. In my youth I still have the memory of my father's old AGFA, certainly the first camera with which I had contact.

But it was only in my twenties that I bought my first film camera, an APS and later I also remember buying a Pentax zoom which I used for some years.

However, the first more serious steps were taken later and in digital photography, when in 2010 I bought my first digital reflex camera. At the time, a kit camera, with which I truly started taking more seriously this photography experience. It was around that time that I also started to take some training in photography initiation, having later also attended training in composition and editing. Besides that, I have always been a self-taught photographer. And when did the analogue come up?

It was in 2017, in digital era, that due to the challenge of a friend, I decided to buy an analogue camera, a Halina 35. At the time, and more for the curiosity to start shooting again in analogue, I RUI CORREIA


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began shooting some rolls again. I think analogue was love at first sight, however it was not an easy relationship at first...

But why?

For those who spent years photographing in digital, with the photos very focused, with everything very clear‌. starting to receive the first negatives revealed full of grain, in which the subject was unfocused or out of frame, in which the speed or aperture were not the best, in which the development was not very good and having to deal with light leaks or vignettes, was not easy to accept.

But it was around that time that a click took place in my head and I realized the path I wanted to take in photography‌ that was my style, it was what I most identified myself with.

Gradually I evolved in analogue and today I photograph almost (not to say only) exclusively in analogue.

Right now I have no doubt that digital photography is much easier. The analogue easily discourages anyone who begins to take the first steps, but it is in this discouragement that mistakes can become learnings. And what transformation has the analogue caused?

As I said before, I had already photographed analogue in my youth. However, it was only recently RUI CORREIA


that I started to take analogue more seriously and to discover the other possibilities that it offers.

I had to stop being so anxious…. with analogue there is no anxiety, or better, you start to deal with it differently. Any exposure you make, you only see the final result after some time, so there’s no meaning in searching the result on the back of the camera…. it has nothing to show you!!

I know it seems like a nonsense... but if we think about it, we realize that what we do instinctively when shooting in digital, is to anxiously look for the result of the photo in the viewfinder. And if we are not satisfied, we will take half a dozen more, just in case.

The analogue causes a great transformation in your way of photographing, it forces you to carefully visualize and anticipate the moment, to think about the photo in another way, to choose the best frame and wait for “that” magical moment. It forces you to measure the light more carefully and does not give you the opportunity to fail. In digital, if you fail the click you can redo everything in the next frame. It was a big paradigm shift and a different experience.

I think that it is the whole ritual that precedes the click that makes the analogue unique. The process of choosing the film, choosing the camera, waiting to see the results of the developed film, creates an aura of mystery and, at the same time, a self-challenge...

In my digital days, I usually arrived home at the end of the day with a few hundred photos on the camera's card, nowadays I come home with a roll of 36 photos exposed and the great satisfaction for knowing that those 36 moments were intensively lived. THE ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE | No. 4

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I started to shoot less, I spend a lot less time editing, which leaves me time for other things.

As with everything in your life, goal setting is extremely important. In photography, it was very important for me at some point to have set goals that I wanted to achieve. Why the analogue mood?

I mainly do street photography and, in my point of view, that photo must first of all convey a certain mood. More than having an appealing composition, photography must have a story behind it, it must tell a visual story and awaken the emotional side of those who see it.

When I photograph I try to capture the nostalgic and melancholic mood of the streets and try to convey the emotion of the story that was behind that click. I think this sentimental mood is easier to transmit through black and white.

We must think more about how our photos make us feel, photography will only make sense if first of all you enjoy yourself doing it and if you like it first.

I think that in this task the analogue allows me without any doubt to reach the mood I want for my photos and helps me to transmit that message.

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The shades and transitions that photographic film allows us to achieve are difficult to obtain in digital, and then it is possible with different types of film to achieve different results. This is also the challenge of the analogue.

What are your influences?

In Portugal, we have great photographers like Eduardo Gageiro, Alfredo Cunha, Paulo Nozolino, who are always a great reference. Abroad, there are many others that I like a lot, from those I highlight, for example, the great poet photographer Mario Giancomelli. There is also a generation of Japanese photographers that emerged in the 60s and 70s and that dominated in Japan, with a more radical and innovative style of photography, completely “out of the box�, which favoured a more confusing and chaotic dimension, renouncing capturing the reality as we see it. At this moment, I am fascinated by this sensitivity of Japanese photography, which is one of my greatest inspirations in terms of influence.

Sooner or later each photographer ends up defining his personal style, the one with which he most identifies and feels familiar with. This learning process and personal growth is often influenced by the photos we see and the books we read. What is your style, how do you define yourself?

I don't know if I can say that I already have my own style. I can certainly say that street photography is the one where I feel at ease and which better defines me. RUI CORREIA


I try to shoot for the mood in the streets, composing for the atmosphere and not for the reality of the situation, trying to achieve a completely abstract result from the starting point of reality. In my pictures blacks normally dominate, they are the way to hide the details that are not important and add nothing to the final result.

The taste for deeply black and white images makes me wander the streets in search of this game of light and shadow. And the medium format?

It is a more recent discovery. I have taken the first steps and tried some pictures, but most are only experiences. It will be a project for the future and always connected to street photography for sure. And other projects for the future?

I think that photography is like a wedding, after a while you start thinking about having a child‌ In photography, I think the same thing happens, after a while you’re a little tired of always seeing your photos on the computer, you start to think about printing some to see the final result in your hands.

I truly enjoy to feel the photos on paper. It is the culmination of a journey that started with a click. Turning the photographs into paper, more specifically in book format, will be a future challenge. Another project that I have already started, involves shooting with colour film. THE ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE | No. 4

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F E AT U R E D | S E R I E S

ROBERTO DE MITRI

Photography never assumes the function of providing a merely descriptive or aesthetically artificial reproduction of the real, but becomes metaphorical expression and manifestation of a feeling. Allegorical illustration of the transience and emptiness of life. Of an existential condition profoundly marked by the sense of impermanence and chaos.

Born in Italy, graduated in Economics at the University of Bologna, Roberto De Mitri have overcome the "Black and White Spider Awards" 2014 category "Fine art - Amateur" with the photo "De silent of sand". In 2015, he gets the second place in Fine Art, abstract category, for the series "Nigredo" at International Photography Awards. In 2016, he won the 11th edition of the Black and White Spider Awards, abstract category, with "De Fall", winning the title of "Honor of Distinction" in Photographer of the Year. In 2018, he wins the first prize to the IPA Awards in the category "Fine Art - Abstract" with the series "Solaris".


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____________________________________________________________

Series by Roberto De Mitri

The city is an abstract indefinable, densely populated by endless adrift voids. It is the brainchild and the automatic reflex of a condition of the human soul. On the stage of this theater, touching lives, they consume and lose themselves. Existences destined to repel and never understand one another. The city is what soul and mind perceive and recognize. As such, it is ephemeral dimension, a place of lies and illusions. But also of silences, alienations and dissipated dreams. It is the altar on which they sacrifice loneliness and regret.

These photos show up and tell a few small fragments of these conditions. Detachment, latent loneliness and the vulnerabilities of our everyday lives.

"City of Ghosts" were born just as a consequence of this abrupt and painful mutation of perspective. At the base of the series there is a bare and sharp observation. That is, the world around us is an illusory world. What we thought we knew about of reality around us is just a mirror that reflects an illusion. Our certainties of the past rested on foundation of deception. The ideal place to stage this change of perspective (and the relative change in the way we relate to others) was the city.

Of the awareness that reality is an illusion, the city becomes a perfect metaphor. That is the place where illusions take shape and consistency. An abstract indefinable, densely populated by endless adrift voids. It is a dimension of alienation that wears the mask of social space. Although it appears familiar and distinguishable to us in its structural characteristics, yet it assumes an unreal and disturbing appearance, thus crossed by sulphurous rivers of ghostly shadow or amorphous creatures which have very little of human.

These photos show up and tell a few small fragments of these conditions. Detachment, latent loneliness, dreams to which we have inexorably given up, silences, inability to communicate, fears. All these things fill our everyday lives of vulnerabilities.

Favoring this view, cities are like empty shells in which resounds the alienating echo of loneliness. Are cradles in which rise and shake the anxieties of the people, a place of concentration of solitudes.

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F E AT U R E D | P H O T O S T O R Y

ANTON NOVOSELOV

My name is Anton Novoselov. I was born in 1980 and live in Russia, in the city of Yekaterinburg. I am engineer, and photography is my main passion, to which I devote almost all my free time.


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“Shooting film is a ritual.� ____________________________________________________________

From Russia with Love by Anton Novoselov

I've always had my Minox GT-E with me lately, and I carry it in my bag or jacket pocket every day. You never know when you'll be inspired and want to take a picture, so a small camera is always a good idea.

On the weekends, I take my Rolleiflex 3.5 E2 to shoot my family, children, or country stories. This camera is brilliant! I find it incredibly compact, lightweight, comfortable and absolutely versatile, suitable for all subjects.

My film is a color negative kodak, either a slide from a fujifilm I take abroad, or a black and white film when I need high sensitivity.

I've been shooting film all my life, and there's nothing like this classic technology for me. Beautiful and correct color that pleases the eye, which is better than in life, is already laid by professional colorists in the emulsion. I don't need to do any color correction by spending hours in front of a computer. I immediately get an image with the best color that can be. I haven't been thinking about how to store my digital archive for years, because I know that I can restore my images from the originals again at any time, and it has its own charm and pleasure - to bring back to life long forgotten images from years ago. The film is incredibly disciplined, because it ends quickly, it is always not enough, it has one single sensitivity and color temperature, it imposes its own useful limitations and makes you think carefully about each frame.

Shooting film is a ritual. Firstly, it is the choice of film. It appears on the market more and more, you can constantly try something new and experiment. Secondly, the process of shooting with a beautiful classic film camera. Then, waiting and anticipation of the result - this is the most pleasant of the stages. Film development is a pleasure for those who like chemistry, to dilute solutions, to load a tank, to sit with a thermometer and a timer and to do everything with their own hands. Scan or print photos in a dark room - getting a finished image. Film cutting and archive organization for fans to structure and arrange everything in shelves.

ANTON NOVOSELOV


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If you shoot a slide - work with a magnifying glass on the viewing table, slicing the best shots and packaging in frames, and then the most pleasant thing: the display of your pictures on a slide projector to relatives, friends, colleagues, accompanied by a long story with tea, cookies, or even better with a glass of wine.

Some of my pictures were at collective exhibitions in Moscow and Seattle, but I never did a solo exhibition. My site is a Flickr where I show my works to people from all over the world, some of them were distributed on social networks, I was surprised to learn about it not so long ago. I also saw two online drawings based on my photos. For me it was the best compliment.

My photo project is aimed first of all at the foreign audience. Our country is very interesting and beautiful, but very little photographed and poorly represented in the world network. There is an endless field of opportunity here, especially for genre photos. I want the foreign viewer to know my country through my photos, to come to us and travel in search of their own stories, which can be found here in great numbers.

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F E AT U R E D | I N T E R V I E W

JOEL DURAND

I was born in 1969, I started photographing when I was 9 years old.I like to stroll while gleaning poetic moments, Here are some chimeras. I only work in silver. 1998-2008 allocation of an artists workshop DRAC Metz PUBLICATION: de la Maison Close Prima Editions 2002

Monkey number 2 and 4 2005 ILka Schonbein: from mask to puppet Themma 2012 University Edition

inspired eye magazine: 2018 issue 55

Street photography August 2019

streetphotographymagazine.com /article/wandering-full-of-reverie


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Mots par Leslie Buleux

Voyage de l'autre côté du miroir, là où la foule esseulée n'a pas mal aux pieds. Reflet hypnotique d'un chemin intérieur aux mille dérives. Glaneur des instants perdus. Solitude des foules. J'ai semé des points de suspension un peu partout dans mon espace temps. Un rêve autour du feu, de la fumée, des cendres. Prisonniers de la dernière séance, à quel moment nous arrêterons nous ? A la plage ce matin, les vagues semblaient muettes ; alors je n'ai rien dit. J'ai seulement vaguelé avec elles et c'était bien. J'ai couru au-dessus de la mêlée des gens, des sacs, des chiens enlaissés et me suis ramassé seulement à l'arrivée. Je perle ma chaleur. Les choses se détachent du monde comme le crépis d'un vieux mur. Tu continueras demain si ton désir t'y porte. A la récréation des absents, les cris sont ténus. Môme néant au chapeau de géant dit la vérité en marchant. Et j'articule tel un pantin dans le tiroir. J'explore la cave de ma tendresse et n'y décèle aucun écho. Le film de la vie sur la pellicule de mes nuits. JOEL DURAND


Words by Leslie Buleux

Journey to the other side of the mirror, where the lonely crowd doesn't get sore feet. A hypnotic reflection of an inner path with a thousand drifts. Gleaner of lost moments. Loneliness of crowds. I have sown suspension points all over my space-time. A dream around fire, smoke and ashes. Prisoners of the last session, when will we stop? At the beach this morning, the waves seemed mute, so I said nothing. I only wandered with them and it was fine. I ran over the melee of people, bags, hugging dogs... and only picked me up at the finish line. I'm beading my warmth. Things come off the world like the plaster of an old wall. You will continue tomorrow if you wish to. At the playtime of the absent, the cries are faint. Nothingness kid in a giant hat tells the truth as she walks. And I articulate like a puppet in the drawer. I explore the cellar of my tenderness and find no echo. The record of life on the tape of my nights... THE ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE | No. 4

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“Analogy is for me a daily poetic breath, it reveals the mirror of my soul, protects the memory which becomes oblivion without the image, without the silvery perfume....” ____________________________________________________________ Interview with Joel Durand by Lara Kantardjian

1. Pourquoi la photographie analogique ? Qu'est-ce qui vous incite à utiliser la pellicule ? Par exemple, depuis combien de temps travaillez-vous avec le film / votre relation avec le film ?

La photographie argentique est un médium que je connais depuis l'enfance, cela fait environ quarante ans que j'utilise du film, mais je ne suis pas technicien : le film pour moi représente une matière magique source d'une future poésie où le visible palpite dans l'invisible avant révélation…

Pourquoi la photographie argentique? Parce que l'instant est fragile, comme les sentiments, les mots... Une fraction de seconde est subtilement volatile, le négatif de la réalité est de l'autre côté du miroir dans l'inexprimable oubli du temps et de soi. L'analogique est pour moi une respiration poétique quotidienne, elle dévoile le miroir de mon âme, protège la mémoire qui devient l'oubli sans l'image, sans parfum argentique... 1. Why analog photography? What motivates you to use film? For example, how long have you been working with film / your relationship with film?

Film photography is a medium I've known since childhood, I've been using film for about forty years, but I'm not a technician: film for me represents a magical material that is the source of a future poetry where the visible palpitates in the invisible before revelation? Why silver photography? Because the moment is fragile, like feelings, words... A fraction of a second is subtly volatile, the negative of reality is on the other side of the mirror in the inexpressible oblivion of time and self. Analogy is for me a daily poetic breath, it reveals the mirror of my soul, protects the memory which becomes oblivion without the image, without the silvery perfume... 2. Quel est votre mode de pensée lorsque vous prenez des photos ? À quoi pensez-vous, vous concentrez-vous sur votre promenade dans les rues?

C'est une flânerie, avant tout. Puis une mise en abîme d'une réalité possible. Tout, en géneral, se met en place, comme une rencontre avec un monde invisible, une piece de théâtre sans scénario, tout est là devant nous...

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Dans la rue je ne pense à rien en particulier, j'observe l'espace qui m'entoure et je vois la photographie que je vais prendre en amont.

2. What is your way of thinking when you take pictures? What do you think about, do you concentrate on your walk in the streets?

It's a stroll, above all. Then a mise en abyme of a possible reality. Everything, in general, is set up, like an encounter with an invisible world, a play without a script, everything is there in front of us... In the street I think of nothing in particular, I observe the space around me and I see the photograph I'm going to take beforehand. 3. Prenez-vous des photos seul ou en collaboration également ?

Habituellement je suis solitaire mais je prends aussi des photos avec ma fille et ma compagne qui font également de la photo argentique.

3. Do you take pictures alone or in collaboration as well?

Usually I'm alone but I also take pictures with my daughter and my girlfriend who also do silver photography.

4. Que signifie la photographie pour vous ? Est-ce un moyen d'expression, une forme d'art ?

Vivre, libre de créer, est certainement la forme d'art la plus absolue. La photographie me permet d'exprimer ce désir d'être libre et sans attache dans une société aliénée aux apparences et au pouvoir. 4. What does photography mean to you? Is it a means of expression, an art form?

Living, free to create, is certainly the most absolute art form. Photography allows me to express this desire to be free and unattached in a society alienated from appearances and power.

5. Développez-vous, imprimez-vous votre film ? Si oui, pouvez-vous nous parler de votre processus ? Par exemple, travaillez-vous dans une chambre noire, développez-vous vos bobines par lots ? En silence ? En musique ?

Je travaille en silence, de préférence. Je fais mes tirages dans une chambre noire aménagée dans ma cave. Elle fait environ 14 métres carré mais c'est largement suffisant et très confortable. J'utilise trois agrandisseurs pour travailler dont deux récupérés dans une déchetterie. Remis en état ils se trouvent être d'excellentes machines. Je me sers uniquement de papier baryté, mat de préference; toutefois j'accueille avec joie les dons de vieux papiers et films périmés, j'en obtiens parfois de superbes résultats. Je travaille avec des films de toutes marques et je développe film par film. Je réalise des planches contacts mais j'attends toujours un peu avant de sélectionner les photos afin de prendre du recul par rapport aux prises de vues. Ensuite je réalise des tirages de lecture, qui sont déjà en soi de beaux tirages. J'effectue ensuite un virage au sélénium pour améliorer la profondeur du tirage : cela s'opère à 28 degrés. Un tirage final me prend environ une journée : du tirage à la repique des petits défauts. Toutes les chimies en fin de vie sont traitées dans un centre de recyclage agrée.

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5. Do you develop, do you print your film? If so, can you tell us about your process? For example, do you work in a darkroom, do you develop your reels in batches? Silently? To music?

I work in silence, preferably. I do my prints in a darkroom in my basement. It's about 14 square metres but it's more than enough and very comfortable. I use three enlargers to work with, two of which are recovered from a waste dump. Reconditioned they are excellent machines. I only use baryta paper, preferably matt; however, I welcome donations of old paper and film, I sometimes get great results. I work with films of all brands and I develop film by film. I make contact sheets but I always wait a little bit before selecting the photos to take some distance from the shots. Then I make reading prints, which are already in themselves beautiful prints. Then I make a selenium turn to improve the depth of the print: this is done at 28 degrees. A final print takes me about a day: from the print to the re-picking of small defects. All end-of-life chemicals are treated in an approved recycling centre. 6. Pourquoi prenez-vous des photos dans la rue ? Qu'est-ce qui vous motive dans la rue, dans la ville, dans l'environnement urbain ? Est-ce l'atmosphère dans son ensemble ? Les gens ? Et qu'est-ce que vous cherchez, une histoire ? L'humeur ? La composition, etc.

J'ai toujours pris des photos dans la rue, mais avant de le faire de façon permanente, j'ai beaucoup travaillé l'art du photogramme et des sténopés. Une manière plus abrupte d'appréhender la matière et de jouer avec la lumière. J'ai également photographié le théâtre et la danse à une époque où l'art semblait tout oser dans la rue, ce qui malheureusement tend à disparaître aujourd'hui. Désormais la rue est surveillée sous des pretextes sécuritaires dépassant bien trop souvent les droits fondamentaux des individus et sans le savoir nous sommes liés par une corde invisible dont le noeud nous empêche d'être, d'agir, de rêver. C'est pourquoi je photographie ces lieux, ces espaces où l'on peut encore vivre et explorer sa liberté. Car la rue sait se dérober et elle reste cette zone exposée où tout peut arriver. Sa vitalité spontanée disparaîtra peut-être un jour mais pour le présent je me concentre sur sa composition et la met en scène dans un espace qui m'appartient, celui de mon imaginaire.

6. Why are you taking pictures in the street? What motivates you in the street, in the city, in the urban environment? Is it the atmosphere as a whole? The people? And what are you looking for, a story? The mood? Composition, etc.

I've always taken pictures in the street, but before I did it permanently, I worked a lot on the art of the photogram and pinhole cameras. A more abrupt way of apprehending matter and playing with light. I also photographed theatre and dance at a time when art seemed to dare everything in the street, which unfortunately tends to disappear today. The street is now watched over under security pretexts that too often exceed the fundamental rights of individuals and without knowing it we are linked by an invisible rope whose knot prevents us from being, acting, dreaming. This is why I photograph these places, these spaces where one can still live and explore one's freedom. Because the street knows how to escape and it remains this exposed zone where anything can happen. Its spontaneous vitality will perhaps disappear one day but for the present I concentrate on its composition and stage it in a space that belongs to me, that of my imagination.

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7. Pourquoi êtes-vous passionné par le noir et blanc ?

Parce que le noir et blanc agit sur ma rétine de façon hypnotique. Du noir au blanc et inversement, on traverse tout une palette de gris qui redessine au plus près du grain d'argent la réalité que j'aurais saisi en prenant ma photo. Et cependant c'est un leurre car la photographie ne represente pas réellement la réalité. Elle évoque humblement la vision propre à chacun. Je perçois physiquement et de manière symbolique que le noir et blanc est graphiquement beaucoup plus fort que la couleur. Il me rapelle l'art de la gravure, et je pense que l'on peut façilement les rapprocher, la photographie est elle aussi une gravure par la lumière. 7. Why are you passionate about black and white?

Because black and white acts on my retina in a hypnotic way. From black to white and vice versa, we go through a whole palette of greys that redraw as close as possible to the silver grain the reality I would have captured when I took my photo. And yet it's a decoy because photography doesn't really represent reality. It humbly evokes one's own vision. I physically and symbolically perceive that black and white is graphically much stronger than colour. It reminds me of the art of engraving, and I think we can easily bring them together, photography is also an engraving by light. JOEL DURAND


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8. Qu'est-ce qui vous fait prendre votre appareil photo ? En avez-vous toujours un avec vous ou planifiez-vous à l'avance ?

J'ai toujours 2 appareils au minimum avec moi je les emmene en tous lieux. Je ne planifie absolument rien. Il faut juste se laisser envahir par ce qui se présente.

8. What makes you take your camera? Do you always have one with you or do you plan ahead?

I always have at least 2 cameras with me and I take them everywhere. I don't plan anything at all. You just have to let yourself be overwhelmed by what comes up.

9. Est-ce que les appareils photo à pellicule ou les objectifs que vous utilisez ont de l'importance ? Ou s'agit-il simplement d'outils ?

On peut faire d'excellentes photographies avec un appareil jetable, et dans ce cas je le considérerai plutôt comme un outil. Mais j'aime beaucoup les appareils photos, je ne peux m'empêcher de leur donner des petits noms et surtout de les féliciter quand ils ont fait du bon travail! Je suis toujours impressionné par la finesse de leur mécanique et passe de nombreuses heures à les étudier lorsque je dois pratiquer une petite révision ou réparation sur l'un d'entre eux. J'avoue j'ai presque failli pleurer lorsque par accident ma cellule photographique des années 20 s'est cassée! Je plaisante un peu mais ces appareils ne sont pas des fétiches. Pour moi ils sont porteurs d'un passé et d'une histoire qui réveillent ma curiosité. Prendre une photo avec de tels objets me procure

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la sensation d'appartenir à cette histoire, c'est je crois le seul objet ayant traversé le temps avec lequel on puisse encore s'amuser. Personellement, j'aime les appareils avec télémètre de format 24 X 36, ou moyen format. 9. Does it matter what film cameras or lenses you use? Or are they just tools?

You can make excellent photographs with a disposable camera, in which case I will consider it more like a tool. But I really like cameras, I can't help but give them little names and especially congratulate them when they've done a good job! I am always impressed by the finesse of their mechanics and spend many hours studying them when I need to do a small overhaul or repair on one of them. I must admit I almost cried when by accident my 1920's photo cell broke! I'm joking a little bit but these cameras are not fetishes. For me they carry a past and a history that awakens my curiosity. Taking a picture with such objects gives me the feeling of belonging to this history, I think it is the only object that has survived the passage of time that we can still have fun with. Personally, I like cameras with rangefinders in 24 X 36 format, or medium format.

10. Y a-t-il un endroit, un lieu, un moment particulier de la journée où vous prenez régulièrement des photos ? Votre environnement quotidien par exemple, ou prenez-vous des photos au hasard à tout moment?

Je n'ai pas de moments particuliers. Et pour moi le hasard n'existe pas, qu'il s'agisse de photos ou dans la vie. Alors je suis seulement attentif à l'ambiance, à la lumière, à l'animation de l'instant. THE ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE | No. 4

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Les évènements se présentant ou pas, je déclenche ou pas! Je trouve néanmoins très intéressante la démarche de certains artistes qui vont avec rigueur dans le temps expérimenter la régularité dans la prise de vue, d'un corps qui viellit, d'un lieu animé pris à heure fixe tous les jours, c'est une façon de voir et de raconter qui m'inspire. 10. Is there a particular place, time of day when you regularly take pictures? Your daily environment for example, or do you take random pictures at any time?

I don't have any particular times. And for me, there is no such thing as randomness, whether in photos or in life. So I am only attentive to the atmosphere, the light, the animation of the moment. Events happening or not, I trigger or not! Nevertheless, I find very interesting the approach of certain artists who go with rigor in time to experiment with regularity in the shooting, of a body that ages, of an animated place taken at a fixed time every day, it is a way of seeing and telling that inspires me.

11. Pourriez-vous décrire ce qui vous pousse à vous arrêter pour faire une photographie. Quels sont les facteurs qui vous relient au sujet ou à la scène ? Et est-ce quelque chose d'instinctif ? Un sentiment que vous ressentez ? Quelque chose que vous savez tout simplement ?

La plupart du temps je pressens les choses. La lumière me parle, l'espace est en mouvement et j'aperçois un homme ou une femme sur sa lancée, qui s'approche de moi avec sa vie, son enfance, ses histoires. Á ce moment là mon instinct peut me guider à vérifier le réglage de mon appareil, tout en gardant

JOEL DURAND


une vue d'ensemble sur la scène qui est en train de se dérouler. La photographie qui va s'inscrire sur ma pellicule va également se graver dans mon cerveau. Il se produit une sorte d'ancrage dans le présent. Une présence intime de ce qui va disparaître se dévoile une première et dernière fois à mes yeux et j'ai le pouvoir magique d'arrêter le temps...illusoirement bien sûr. Chacun a, je pense, ce pouvoir d'être sa propre mémoire, d'avoir sa propre vision de la vie qu'il emportera avec lui quand tout sera fini.

11. Could you describe what makes you stop to take a photograph. What are the factors that connect you to the subject or the scene? And is it something instinctive? A feeling you have? Something you simply know?

Most of the time I feel things. The light speaks to me, the space is in motion and I see a man or a woman on the move, approaching me with his life, his childhood, his stories. At that moment my instinct can guide me to check the setting of my camera, while keeping an overview of the scene that is unfolding. The photograph that is going to be on my film will also be etched in my brain. A kind of anchoring in the present occurs. An intimate presence of what is about to disappear is revealed to me for the first and last time and I have the magical power to stop time...illusively of course. Everyone has, I think, the power to be his own memory, to have his own vision of the life he will take with him when it is all over. THE ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE | No. 4

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JOEL DURAND


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F E AT U R E D | A R T I C L E

FELECO

Sevilla, Spain

Before I got into photography, I loved the cinema, especially American Film Noir and I loved aquariums and their inhabitants. Specifically, fish from Lake Tankanyika. They are cichlids who display exemplary behaviour and they are very curious. But in 2007, my son came into the world and as a result, I had to sell my fish and my aquaria to make room. I had to leave the house to take walks with my son and I began to have the same sensation as when I watched my fish, observing the interactions of the people in the streets.

Expositions: I have had several expositions, both collectively and individually, with the photography associations El Farolillo Rojo and FO-CAL, in the provinces of Seville and Cadiz. I develop all of my photos myself.


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“The scene doesn't stop the moment that you take it. It continues in the process when the image becomes patent...” ____________________________________________________________ The element of time in photography by Feleco

The Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa wrote in his famous work The Book of Disquiet (212): “To have opinions is to sell out to yourself. To not have opinions is to exist. To have every opinion is to be a poet”. What is a photo? For me photography generates an emotion. An emotion that is maintained in time.

Time that is not manifested as Chronos, but as Aion.

It often occurs that when I go out with the intention of getting a few shots, I don't do so with the idea of creating some kind of photographic project: photographs of bars, photographs of people with dogs, photographs of women in hats, etc. Quite to the contrary, I just allow myself to flow...

At the begninning of my picture taking day, I think a lot about the shot, but little by little, depending on my sensibility that day, I enter a kind of trance, which manifests itself in the plentitude of observing what's going on around me. These are truly beautiful moments because you have everything: gestures, glances, the play of the light... Everything slows down and reveals itself in the development events around me. The least important thing at that time is having a camera in my hands and capturing the moment. What is essential to me is the pleasure of that instant that is so great it only requires what is happening in front of me, while I am completely enveloped in the surroundings.

With the snap of the camera shutter, throuugh the photograph we materialize the special relationship that is established between the world and our emotions. It's a communion between Chronos: time in the sense of before and after, and Aion: the time of pleasure where the clock disappears... and at moment the shot is taken, it's as though a wrinkle occurs between the two notions of time. This is what the Greeks referred to as Kairos.

The scene doesn't stop the moment that you take it. It continues in the process when the image becomes patent, which in my case occurs in the work that I do in the dark room.

FELECO


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When I started to develop film in a serious way, I used the Split-filter method, but I found it very difficult to achieve a balance with only two filters. So, I began to look at the negative area by area and to use different filters according to the need of each negative.

I have two very basic principles when I develop film: 1) The search for balance in the negative in order to be able to interpret it later. For example, if the negative has a lot of contrast, I will use a very soft filter as a base and vice versa. 2) The construction. We should start with the most important scene in the negative, and progressivley burn or cover the rest of the photo accordingly.

When I look at a negative, the first thing I observe is its tonal range. If it has a good range of tones, more interpretations can be derived in the print, which may or may not coincide with the one at the moment the photograph was taken. In this sense, if the photographer is printing the image, him of herself, it's easy to observe if the tone achieved captures the scene as it was initially observed, or on the contrary, perhaps he or she may wish to give it another interpretation. Before I make this decsion, I print a series of contact sheets using different times of exposure. This is what guides me when I decide on which is the most appropiate tone to make the moment materialize and to bring the latent image to the forefront.

It results in an image that does its best to trap an irrepeatable instant of time that inevitably slips away from us...Kairos.

FELECO


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F E AT U R E D | P H O T O S T O R Y

SAFIA DELTA

France

I’m a visual author and writer based in the south of France. I started taking pictures in 2015 to keep track of time. The camera has been a recording tool ever since and shifting to film deeply affected my practise. I place off-beat moments and moody contemplative scenes at the core of my work. To me the medium has both an introspective and an explorative function. Through pictures I try to understand my relationship to time and space with the desire to document the territory that connects me to people and the society I live in.

Since 2018 my interest in arts led me to create Intérieur-s, a blog published on a French website dedicated to photography, Le Révélateur Phocéen. This collaboration allows me to share thoughts around known artists and photographers’ creative process through a series of articles confronting paintings and photographs. Member of Fragment Photo Collective


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About This Picture

WHERE? This picture was taken in my hometown, in the south of France. In a public garden where I used to go as a child. There used to be turtles and water lilies in the pool you see in the background.

WHEN? It’s summertime, during a poetry festival.

WHY? The heat was overwhelming that day. A friend and I went for a walk in the city and decided to go through the garden. Usually the place is empty except for a few old men and old ladies sitting on benches enjoying some fresh air. The festival attracted a new population, younger and enthusiastic. During such events what the municipality does is offering a new experience of an otherwise unchanging space and this is what drew my attention.

All these people relaxing in a silent communion. The shades of green (I’m a colourist.) and the blunt afternoon light. I pulled the camera out of my bag and took one picture of the scene.

A few months later when I had the film developed and scanned, I discovered the shadows of the hammocks in the foreground drew two distinct crosses on the ground. That and the shadows of distinct body parts added a sinister, contrasting touch to that sunny scene. A reminder of the power photography has to surprise the eye of the photographer and reveal other realities.

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F E AT U R E D | A R T I C L E

BERNARD JOLIVALT

France

Translator specialized in digital photography, 2D and 3D computer graphics and micro-computing in general.

Ex reporter-photographer illustrator (but still and still photographer).


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“...the salesman at Sepia put my photos on the editorial desk of Le Nouvel Observateur who was more than seduced by the effects of shake. The atmosphere of my images evoked the strange and fantastic universe of the writer.� ____________________________________________________________

Le portrait de Jorge Luis Borges / The portrait of Jorge Luis Borges by Bernard Jolivalt

The article was first published in French as a blog hosted by Le Monde on 02 January 2013. The article is not devoted to a street photo in the purest sense of the word, since it was taken in the living room of a hotel, but it is nevertheless during a wandering in the streets of Paris it was realized. And at the same time, I involuntarily doubled the agency Magnum on this report. Photographic wandering

It was October 21, 1977, almost 35 years ago. I was walking around the Louvre, a place where there are always photos to take, and not just because of the large number of tourists. The latter obviously offer many opportunities to be photographed - certainly not Martin Parr who would contradict - but in the fall, they were quite rare. On the Orangerie des Tuileries side, works by sculptor Henry Moore werewaiting to be transported to the exhibition hall. With its wooden wedges that made it like legs, one of them looked like a disturbing monster looking like a bird threatening a passer-by on a bench. A little further in the Tuileries garden, many trees had been cut. A pensive statue stared at the burning trunks. From a purely photographic point of view, the harvest was already good today. I crossed the Seine to reach the small streets that converge on the Place de l'Odeon. The Buci junction is a well-known place for street photographers. For mysterious reasons, there are always photos to do. But before skimming this neighborhood, I had drifted to the rue des Beaux-Arts. She is best known for the establishment called The Hotel (no name more particular) at number 13, where the Irish writer Oscar Wilde died in utter destitution November 30, 1900, only 46 years old. This establishment is remarkable because of its spectacular cylindrical stairwell, fantastic in every sense of the word, visible on its website.

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13, rue des Beaux-Arts

The normally quiet street was a little rough on my arrival. Photojournalists were coming and going and I had immediately imagined that something had happened, maybe in one of the buildings because, except for the comings and goings, nothing special happened on the roadway or on the roads. sidewalks. I asked one of the reporters what was happening. He noticed the Leica I was holding in my hand and, suspicious, answered me with another question: was I in summons, that is to say sent by an agency or a competing newspaper, or just passing through? I told him that I was just passing by quite by chance. This reassured him, especially since I did not have a flash, a detail that was going to be important. He then told me the cause of all this agitation: the writer Jorge Luis Borges was at the Hotel where he held a press conference. The information was not insignificant because it passed very rarely in

Paris. Subsequently, he took his habits rue des Beaux-Arts, but for the moment, his presence was exceptional. It was a unique opportunity for me to approach a writer whose work and fantastic world, including the fabulous Library of Babel , I greatly appreciated . At the moment when I learned of his presence in The Hotel, it was no longer the photographer who reacted, but the reader who wanted to meet an author. Fortunately there was no order service. It was easy for me to enter the hotel and join the very dark living room where the blind writer lent himself with good grace to the flashes of the photographers. Near him stood his secretary Maria Kodama , herself a writer and translator, with whom he married in 1986, a few months before his death. The dark room

Faced with the writer, the photographer won out on the admirer. I had the intention to make a portrait of Jorge Luis Borges but technically, the conditions did not lend themselves to it. My only hardware was the Leica CL with a 40mm lens opening at f / 2 and loaded with Tri-X at 400 ASA (now ISOs). I may have changed film and consider pushing the Tri-X to 1600 or even 3200 ASAs by developing it in warm developer, but at the price of a grain as big as peas. I opted for a risky solution: "borrow" the flash of others, or rather exploit the flash of the flash of another photographer, without his knowledge but of my own free will. The technique was simple: I adjusted the speed in pose B - like Bulb, the pneumatic bulb of the trigger of a century ago - and I closed the diaphragm at f / 11. Given the darkness of the place, I could afford to expose for a few seconds while waiting for a flash from the flash of one of the many other photographers. I had of course tried to immobilize the camera, arms propped against the body, breathing blocked. The lightning was not very numerous, in any case much less than the bursts that fuse as soon as a rock star shows the tip of his nose. He left one every ten or fifteen seconds. At that moment, I released the trigger to end the pose, I advanced the film with leverage whose sweetness is the charm of the Leica, I took the opportunity to take a breath and, the finger again immobilized on the trigger pressed down and the shutter open, I waited for the next flash. A press photographer soon noticed my ride. Furious at sharing his light, he glared at me and changed his location. This did not matter because other photographers would provide something to enlighten the scene. At the end of the movie, I decided to leave The Hotel. I thought I had a good fifteen views and hopefully one or the other should be exploitable.

BERNARD JOLIVALT


Under the enlarger

The same evening, I was developing the film with the others taken that day. As I mentioned, there was no question of applying a special development to the photos taken in The Hotel. In principle, given the power of the flashes of the press photographers - it was the great time of the Rollei torches, all the photoreporters had one - the writer had to be abundantly illuminated. Examination of the negative revealed that his face was very overexposed. There was nevertheless some detail in the maximum densities, but the draw was going to be difficult. Needless to say, with a digital camera, nothing would have been recoverable. In such extreme conditions, the dynamic range of the black and white negative remains irreplaceable. Around the face of Borges, the dark suit and the decor were better exposed. But because of the long pose before the flash, the decor was very blurry because of the inevitable shake, even stalling the Leica as best as I could. This move was not prohibitive, far from it: the mixture of chaotic decor and perfectly clean face could be graphically interesting. The film engaged in the film, I adjusted the focus on the grain of the film through a magnifying glass Scoponet. While a few seconds of exposure were sufficient for the decor to impress the photographic paper, it took a minute and a half to two minutes just for the face, protecting the rest of the image with the hands. I let only the beam of light corresponding to my face pass through my

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hands. With software like Photoshop, this operation is done with the Density + tool. Observe her icon: she shows a hand allowing only a little light. To make the image go up even more in the too bright parts, I took the soaked paper of developer sandwiched between my two hands. Their heat accelerated a little bit the development at this place. All that remained was to fix the prints, wash them and dry them. The story could have stopped there, with the pleasure of having beautiful portraits of one of my favorite authors, but the chance, which had already done things well, recovered from the game. Le Nouvel Observateur

I went the next day to the photo agency with which I worked. It was the great era, now gone, of the big agencies like Gamma, Sygma and Sipa. New agencies were trying their luck, including Sépia, created a few months ago. Photographers who made careers in other agencies or in television passed by. When the managers of the agency Sépia saw the photos, they immediately measured the interest. By tortuous channels, perhaps a "mole" at Magnum, they had learned that Le Nouvel Observateur was preparing to publish a report on the visit of Jorge Luis Borges in Paris, as well as his interview by Jean-Claude Guillebaud. In the next hour, the salesman at Sépia put my photos on the editorial desk of Le Nouvel Observateur who was more than seduced by the effects of shake. The atmosphere of my images

BERNARD JOLIVALT


evoked the strange and fantastic universe of the writer. And so some time later, in mid-November, the photo was published in full page to open the long article dedicated to Jorge Luis Borges. The young photographer that I was could only be flattered by such a prestigious publication, both by the subject than by the support. On the other hand, this publication provoked the fury of the Magnum photographer to whom Le Nouvel Observateur had entrusted the order. Only a quarter-page image in the middle of the text, showing Jorge Luis Borges interviewed by Jean-Claude Guillebaud, was published. I fully understand his anger; anyone would have hated doubling up, even if in the chain of decisions I was the furthest, though the most decisive, link. This photographer was none other than Guy Le Querrec , who was already a great photographer, famous and widely published. He immediately called the photo agency for explanations. Alas for the agency Sépia, who would have liked to also enjoy the prestige of this publication, Le Nouvel Observateur was wrong in the photo credit. The publication was signed Bernard Jolivalt / Sipa. So it is probably Gökşin Sipahioğlu , the founder of the Sipa agency , who paid the price for the anger of Guy Le Querrec, whom he claimed was not to blame because the offending photographer was not part of his team.

A few weeks later, I went to the general assembly of a professional association - the ancestor of the UPP (Union of Professional Photographers) - when my wife motioned me to look to the left. There was an empty chair, an empty chair, and a chair occupied by Guy Le Querrec. THE ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE | No. 4

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F E AT U R E D | P H O T O E S S AY

FLORIAN SCHIESTERL

Born in 1989 in Lower Austria. Based in Vienna.

FLORIAN SCHIESTERL


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____________________________________________________________

A Photo Essay by Florian Schiesterl

My camera is a compass and it guides me the way.

When it is dragging you down. When all your power is gone. When gravity finally gets you. And you question yourself: Why? Why do we live and be in this prison made out of flesh and bone? And the longer you think about it, the more your thoughts move into a dark Nirvana. The soul is just numb, the body so heavy.

I want to escape. I gave away everything and the little which is left is now in a backpack around my shoulders. And suddenly I’m not a prisoner of these thoughts anymore. Because I’m far away. Thousands of kilometers east of my home. Sometimes my thoughts come and find me there, but it is the east that protects me and keeps me safe in a magic kind of way. And even if my mind sometimes gets lost within the fog of meaninglessness, it is the east that keeps me going and discovering. All I need to do is follow my emotions. My camera is a compass and it guides me the way. And without even realizing it, my camera takes me to the places where my numbness suddenly gets released. Where I can feel again. It shows me moments rich of dedication, hope, melancholy and joy.

What stays is the pictures I took during my journey east. Somewhere between Istanbul & Tokyo. They document my feelings. They are a reflexion of my soul traveling out of a black and numb void into a world filled with hundreds and thousands and even millions of tiny moments of life and meaning. I can see it now. I can see a big hope shining on the horizon.

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THE COLLECTIVE


FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHERS

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Editor and Graphic Design by Lara Kantardjian Cover Photo by NanĂŁ Sousa Dias Interviews, Lara Kantardjian and Paulo Abrantes

Published in London, 2020 by Kantardjian Editions Š 2020 The Analogue Street Collective theanaloguestreetcollective.com All images and text published in this magazine by The Analogue Street Collective are copyright protected and the sole property and ownership of the photographers and editors. No part of this publication may be copied, printed, manipulated, edited, distributed or used in any form without prior written permission from the copyright owners and publisher. All rights reserved.


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Profile for The Analogue Street Collective

The Analogue Street Collective Magazine #4  

16 May 2020. Softcover Print Edition. 378 pages. Preview PP 1-378 theanaloguestreetcollective.com/magazine-4

The Analogue Street Collective Magazine #4  

16 May 2020. Softcover Print Edition. 378 pages. Preview PP 1-378 theanaloguestreetcollective.com/magazine-4

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