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Editor & Graphic Design by Lara Kantardjian Interview by Marie-Pierre Lambelin Cover Photo by Manolo L B Mantero Published in London, 2017 by Kantardjian Editions Š 2016 The Analogue Street Collective theanaloguestreetcollective.com

___________________________________________________________________ All images and text published in this magazine by The Analogue Street Collective are copyright protected and the sole property and ownership of the photographers and editors. No part of this publication may be copied, printed, manipulated, edited, distributed or used in any form without prior written permission from the copyright owners and publisher. All rights reserved.


The ANALOGUE STREET COLLECTIVE

“A diverse and eclectic group of photographers united by their desire to capture the soul of city streets—using (mostly) the irreplaceable medium of traditional film photography.” - Alexander Strecker, Collectives Spotlight LensCulture Magazine


COLLECTIVE PROFILE DIRK VOGEL Dortmund, Germany


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DIRK VOGEL


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DIRK VOGEL


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DIRK VOGEL


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DIRK VOGEL


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE MANOLO L B MANTERO C, Portogallo


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MANOLO L B MANTERO


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MANOLO L B MANTERO


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MANOLO L B MANTERO


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MANOLO L B MANTERO


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE MAIKE VENZL Lives near Cologne


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MAIKE VENZL


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MAIKE VENZL


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MAIKE VENZL


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MAIKE VENZL


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE ANDO FUCHS Sillian, Austria


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ANDO FUCHS


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ANDO FUCHS


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ANDO FUCHS


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ANDO FUCHS


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE C Y R I L J AYA N T Based in London


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CYRIL JAYANT


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CYRIL JAYANT


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CYRIL JAYANT


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CYRIL JAYANT


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE MICHAEL GEHLING Living in Hattingen, a small town in the Ruhrgebiet Region of Germany


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MICHAEL GEHLING


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MICHAEL GEHLING


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MICHAEL GEHLING


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MICHAEL GEHLING


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE FRIEDER ZIMMERMANN Living in Cologne (Koeln) Germany


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FRIEDER ZIMMERMANN


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FRIEDER ZIMMERMANN


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FRIEDER ZIMMERMANN


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FRIEDER ZIMMERMANN


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE L A R A K A N TA R DJ I A N From Nicosia, Cyprus, based in London


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LARA KANTARDJIAN


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LARA KANTARDJIAN


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LARA KANTARDJIAN


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LARA KANTARDJIAN


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COLLECTIVE PROFILE MARIE-PIERRE LAMBELIN From Lille, living in Paris


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MARIE-PIERRE LAMBELIN


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MARIE-PIERRE LAMBELIN


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MARIE-PIERRE LAMBELIN


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MARIE-PIERRE LAMBELIN


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | I N T E R V I E W ER I C FROT

I’m a graphic designer based in Paris region.


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“what I like in a photo is all that is outside of the frame, and everything I imagine outside of the frame” ________________________________________________________________ INTERVIEW WITH ERIC FROT by Marie-Pierre Lambelin (Editor’s translation from French) 1 / How did you start being interested in photography and become passionate about it? What made you first pick up a camera? It started unexpectedly, after high school. I was not very interested in classical studies, so my father asked me if photographs interested me. It was the beginning of my interest that has grown ever since. I was not well aware of the artistic dimension of the trade at that time. 2 / You studied photography, what does it mean to you? Is it actually your job? During two years, between 1984 to 1986, I learned the photographic technique, its theory, optical, physical, chemical and the practice of this technique, both in shooting and laboratory. I learned to develop and shoot black and white and color, to shoot in the field as well as in the studio, from 35mm to large format. It was an incredible time during which I only photographed, learned, discovered the great photographers. I met incredible photographers, including students from my class. With my friends Laurent Bichaud and Jean-Eric Fabre, we were going to make our arms in the demonstrations and that was the beginning of my interest in photojournalism, the discovery of the great... There were always chemical cups ready in my room and I only had to light the enlarger. I also realized that to be a photographer, is not just about taking pictures, far from it. In addition to talent, it takes determination, a lot of determination. I think I do not have enough of either. I also did not know how to broadcast my pictures, show them to the right people. Social networks did not exist at the time. I worked in a professional lab and met with great printers and shooters. It opened my eyes in a different way. We learnt from each other, from each encounter, including one of the last Dye-Transfer printers, from whom I learned to judge images, light and chromium. Then I decided to work as a freelance graphic designer, which I have done for 20 years now. 3 / Where do you get your inspiration? How do you choose your subjects? I am very instinctive, my inspiration comes, I think, from all the things that feed my mind, especially music and reading. And of course great photographers, known or unknown. Essentially discovered through books.

ERIC FROT


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4 / Do you think it is important to be technically competent? It all depends on what you want to do. To make an analogy with music, one can play a simple melody with very few instrumental and theoretical skills. If we want to go further in the discourse, we must learn the keys to language. Some do things very well in a very intuitive way, but the danger is to always do the same thing, not to evolve, to tire. For me, it is very important to master the techniques I use so that I can achieve the result I want. 5 / Why do you shoot with film rather than digital? Haha, the famous analog vs digital question ... I stopped making pictures for a few years in the mid 2000s. When I started again, I naturally turned to digital. 6 months later, I started again to shoot with my old Leica and a year later I no longer had a digital camera. This choice is very personal and I do not advise against digital, in any way. I just find that digital images are disembodied, lack reality, brilliance, life, dynamics ... I do not like the digital workflow. As a graphic designer, I spend my days on my computer, and that's good enough. I need to do things with my head and with my hands, I need sensuality, sensation, odors, failures, accidents, irreparable errors to appreciate the successes. For practical reasons I scan the negatives and make my prints in Lightroom. 6 / B&W or colour, what makes you choose one over the other? It all depends on the subject, the light, what I plan to do with the picture, insert it in a series or not, the atmosphere I want. It also depends on the film that is in the camera that I have in my hands.

ERIC FROT


7 / What matters more to you? The story ? Details? Mood? Can you tell us more about your series ‘My nights’? The story is written by the person who looks at the photo. As many stories as spectators for a single photo. The details, if they serve a purpose, matter to me, but it is mainly the atmosphere, the emotion and the poetry that the photograph offers that matters to me. I do not like photos that only emit geometry or graphics, however perfect it is. I think what I like in a photo is all that is outside of the frame, and everything I imagine outside of the frame. My nights is a very personal series, in which I try to explore my dreams, my unconscious nightmares, my intellectual and emotional barriers. All the photos are made with a 4X5 view camera handheld with flash. I know exactly what I want to have before I look for where I can achieve it. I can not always do what I want, but that's what's interesting. I unfortunately lack time to develop it as fast as I would like. 8 / You often use flash, in what circumstances? What do you think it brings to your pictures? I use the flash very often. It is a valuable tool for me. It allows me to choose the light, to clarify what I want or to alter reality and to make an abstraction of it. 9 / Can you quote me three works that have strucked you, or really influenced you and why? This is the most difficult question of this interview. There are so many great artists who are inspiration, how to avoid drawing up a catch-all catalogue? When I first started, I was fascinated by war photographers, Gilles Caron, Don McCullin. Then, fashion photographers and portraitists, Richard Avedon, Jean-Loup Sieff, Irving Penn, David Bailey and Helmut Newton. Press photographers, the agency Vu, Magnum ... And William Klein ...

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10 / What would you say to a newcomer who asks for your advice on how to start? Explore without barriers of genre, technique, and learn by looking at the great painters, filmmakers and photographers in books, cinemas, galleries and museums if possible. It's always better than on the internet. 11 / What projects are you working on? What is your actuality? Apart from My nights, I develop a series called My Land, on which I work regularly without really working. I started this series when I left Paris to go and live in the country a year and a half ago. It has no other interest other then allow me to appropriate my new universe and to oblige me to take Images out of my comfort zone. It will therefore surely never be shown in a completed version. I was recently published in Plateform magazine and some other webzines. I had a short exhibition in January and will show some photos from My Land in September.

ERIC FROT


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ERIC FROT


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | A R T I C L E DON SPRINGER Philadelphia, USA Photography has been in my active DNA since before I was 13. I started on the streets where I grew up in North Philly. I wasn’t aware of doing Street. I had no idea others made images out there. I was a virgin shooter with little or no guidance. The camera and thus, photography seemed to protect me from the harsh everyday realities. When I got drafted and sent to Nam, I carried an M4 with a 35 & 50 Cron. I documented my experiences and the change in my life. I photographed everything and everyone I could because I felt the reality of life changing almost every second. Photographs captured and preserved the moment and I became acutely aware of the power of the silver image. After Nam, I worked at a heightened awareness on the streets of Philly. I made many trips to NYC and other places to find my next image. Nothing satisfied my hunger like walking the street with my M4. The street had taken over my vision. The street had taken over my life and it also granted me life. To this day, I am not complete without a camera in my hand. We as shooters are blessed with the gift of recording what life on the planet looked like while we were here. It is said that shooters should try to see as if seeing something for the first time. I’d rather see something as if I’m seeing it for the last time. Go in peace but go with a camera in your hand. As photographers we must do our work without fear of acceptance or rejection by others or by ourselves. We do our work because we must. We don’t define our work, it defines us. It makes us who we are and shows us the way to become who and what we strive to be.


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DON SPRINGER


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DON SPRINGER


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“We as shooters are blessed with the gift of recording what life on the planet looked like while we were here. It is said that shooters should try to see as if seeing something for the first time. I’d rather see something as if I’m seeing it for the last time. Go in peace but go with a camera in your hand.” ________________________________________________________________ REFLECTIONS ON FILM PHOTOGRAPHY by Don Springer ….as the safelights shine in that lovely soft and sweet glow, I stand in the middle of the darkroom. “There ain’t nothing like the smell of fixer in the morning”.... The water siphons gurgling in the trays….the air conditioner is running with a hum that is comforting as the room drops to 70F. I open the 16x20 paper safe and load 50 sheets of Portriga Rapid 3 on a shelf and 50 sheets of Brovira 3 on another shelf. The Leica enlarger is warmed and ready to work. I mixed my black tone developer and my warm tone developer ½ hour ago and they wait patiently to feed and bathe the paper and make the magical latent image visible. The thing about the darkroom is that the serious shooter becomes an alchemist in this process. We become Merlin the Magician and we mix our chemicals and run film or prints. So sweet. I’m sure there are those amongst us that go into the darkroom and just get extremely proficient at making beautiful prints. Yeah, but for me and many I hear about, there is a sense of oneness in the process. That’s what i lived. Look at cooking. Some go in and make a meal and yes, it’s great and wow.. Then there are the few that touch each ingredient and talk to the things maybe telepathically but still, feeling and knowing all that works together to make the one. What makes a great chef is not the ingredients but the love of the process. Hey, ya don’t love darkroom work, the corner drugstore might be for you.

DON SPRINGER


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In photography as well as life, we have times of needed refreshment, or off time. Some panic and can’t breathe as the fear of not being able to make photos looms overhead. It ain’t a pretty picture I tellya. See, that’s why they made a darkroom. So when you have off times, you don’t have off times. Ya work in the darkroom discovering new formula or cleaning trays etc. Maybe, just maybe… part of the lure to analog work is not so much the practice but the cameras. With all the complicated digital versions of cameras, maybe it’s a welcome thing to have simplicity in a camera. It is said, The beauty of art is in the simplicity of design”. There’s not much simplier than a film camera. A Leica M4 does this perfectly. No meter, nothing. Is this part of what people strive for using film? There is no purity. There is no way to cleanse yourself of digital images. There shouldn’t be a need to anyway. This may be leading to another article but it certainly heeds warning to the intent of those seeking the purity of film. There is none. The argument nullifies as soon as you scan your photo and send it to someplace. It’s now a digital image. Yeah and what’s wrong with that? Nothing. In fact if you ever spotted prints with spotone or something, you appreciate the beauty of the heal tool in Lightroom.

DON SPRINGER


So there must be something else that is appealing to people that want to try film. Is it the search for knowledge and experiences from the dark..room ages? Perhaps. I see it this way. I am a photographer and as such I insist on the rite of passage that I deem needed to produce my work. I don’t care if I change processes, cameras, lenses, anything. By any means necessary! There are many people writing about how great analog is and others how great digital is. I used both and have chosen digital because I need the control I get in the way I use it. I was an expert printer and film processor and did this work for others shooters also. Let me put it this way. When I was in the darkroom I usually listened to Classical Music. Respighi or Holst, maybe Pink Floyd. That music put me in the state that I required to do my best work. Now doing digital, I hardly listen to music anymore, anyplace. I listen to the creaking of my chair as I lean back, or maybe the sound of the typing and my fingers on the keys.

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Here it is and many will not like it but I speak truth. You are a shooter, there’s nothing else in the world better. Using film or digital or non-silver, whatever it’s your choice. Leave yourself the freedom of choice. Use a film camera or a digital, matters not. Approach your photography as if your life depends upon it, because it does. Don’t fall trap by the notion that digital is not as good as film. Don’t let yourself think that the magic is in either, it isn’t. The magic my friends is in you and it’s up to you to discover what and where it is and then to bring it forth. Go in peace but go with your camera in hand…… shooter

DON SPRINGER


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DON SPRINGER


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DON SPRINGER


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DON SPRINGER


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E ALBERT LEVY Berkeley, California, USA


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ALBERT LEVY


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ALBERT LEVY


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ALBERT LEVY


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E M AT T E O Z A N N O N I Rome, Italy I was born in 1982 in Piombino, Tuscany. After finishing my studies in cinema at the university I started taking pictures in the street. Today I work at Istituto Luce – Cinecittà one of the most important historical archives for the audiovisual and continue to photograph. I am part of the collective EyeGoBananas.


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MATTEO ZANNONI


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MATTEO ZANNONI


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MATTEO ZANNONI


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E ES ES MOTO Tokyo, Japan Eses is a research worker and a street photographer born in Japan in 1963. One of his subjects is imaging a sense of loneliness and quietness in urban environments. He tries to devote himself to a silent street, a heavy rain, a midnight drive and strong coffee. “Why analogue?� Memory has been a matter of concern for him, since he lost a part of his memories by injury decades ago. Analogue photographs for him are almost equivalent to his lost memories, which seems to be obscure, fragile and a little mysterious, but definitely engraved something deep in his mind. Probably he wants to reconstruct a pure and confused mosaic of those deep feelings for himself in a very primitive way, that is a reason why he often shoots a photograph using a film on the street.


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ESES MOTO


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ESES MOTO


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ESES MOTO


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E N I C H O L A S D O M I N I C TA LV O L A Arcata, California Trumpet player, my profession and photography is my escape and passion.


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NICHOLAS DOMINIC TALVOLA


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NICHOLAS DOMINIC TALVOLA


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NICHOLAS DOMINIC TALVOLA


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E TOSH IHI RO OSHI MA Tokyo, Japan The crystal elements of my eyes are the Looking Glass to observe the world. My mind is the Dark Room which carries the Negative film inside. Then the Photographs are the representation of the Image which is reflected through the Prism of Soul. Photographs won’t tell any truth, but only gives us the bits and elements waking up from our mind’s eye. ….but then,the question is what’s the “truth”?


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TOSHIHIRO OSHIMA


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TOSHIHIRO OSHIMA


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TOSHIHIRO OSHIMA


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E J O C H E M S C H M I DT NYC, USA I live on Long Island, New York I prefer film photography and am glad to see it making a comeback. My choice of film is Tri-X400 using a Leica M-2 with a 35mm Summilux lens. I develop the film myself and make silver gelatin prints on fiber base paper of my best photos. In this digital age craftsmanship and skill are superfluous. The only thing that counts is individuality and genuineness. Basically it takes a long time and commitment to become a good photographer; it doesn’t happen overnight. I walk the streets of New York. Central Park, Midtown, Lower East Side, Harlem, Brooklyn, Coney Island, anywhere one finds all kinds of people going about their daily life. I just like to look at people. There is nothing more fascinating than human beings and how they behave with all their various manifestations, like posture, facial expression, gesture, movement and voice. They all express something that betrays their inner little world if you know how to see. Many people these days are forgetting how to see life being expressed by their fellow men. They are constantly fiddling with their electronic devices and miss the beauty of life right in front of them. All the best work of any artist must have some mystery. Life is everywhere, but rarely does it come to complete expression.


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JOCHEM SCHMIDT


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JOCHEM SCHMIDT


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JOCHEM SCHMIDT


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E PAS CA L ROT ZET TER Fribourg, Suisse


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PASCAL ROTZETTER


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PASCAL ROTZETTER


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PASCAL ROTZETTER


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E R E N ATA G I N Z B U R G NYC


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RENATA GINZBURG


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RENATA GINZBURG


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RENATA GINZBURG


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F E AT U R E D P H O T O G R A P H E R | P R O F I L E GABOR SAMJESKE Mitaka (Tokyo prefecture), Japan Born and raised in Germany. University of Bonn, PhD in chemistry. Gabor went to Japan in 2003 with the purpose to return after one year. That never happened. He ended up living in Japan ever since. He moved from Sapporo to Tokyo area in 2010. Gabor started with photography at the age of 14 but became really interested in documentary photography after going to Japan. After a short stint with digital, returned back to film in 2007 and has been using 100% film since then. All his BW films are self-developed and occasionally some printing in the dark-room (if available).


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GABOR SAMJESKE


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GABOR SAMJESKE


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GABOR SAMJESKE


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THE COLLECTIVE

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHERS

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The Analogue Street Collective Magazine - #2  

May 2017 - Digital edition