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ABHA PO Box 2607 Bowling Green, KY 42101 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

SUMMER 2020


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Features

SUMMER 2020 Volume 5, Issue 3

EPD’s 101: Where have we been, and where are we going Page 12-13

Black Herefords Find a New Market in Brazil Page 15

Also in this Issue: The Resume...14 Know All of Your Data, But Avoid Single Trait Selection...16 Dealing with Heat Stress in Beef Cattle Operations...20

In Every Issue 6 8 10 17 18

4

President’s Thoughts Board Briefs Association Update Juniors Corner

22 24 25 29

New Members

The American Black Hereford is published quarterly by the American Black Hereford Assoc. PO Box 2607 Bowling Green, KY 42101-2607 Marketing, Events & Billing Beverly Chafton, 833-501-4750 opt. 1 Reg, Membership, DNA & Supplies Jennifer or Cheryl 833-501-4750 opt. 2 www.blackhereford.org Graphic Design & Advertising: Leanna McGuire & Carey Brown

Sale Report The Way I See It Upcoming Events

Breeder Spotlight

The American Black Hereford

On the Cover Photo taken by Ken Padilla at The Flying Diamond K Ranch. Have a cover photo? Send to cbrownabha@gmail.com

Members of the Livestock Publications Council Summer 2020

Scan the QR code above to visit the ABHA website


RANCH’S

FALL BLACK HEREFORD SALE

SATURDAY

OCTOBER 10, 2020 12:30 PM AT THE RANCH

SELLING 80 LOTS JN BALDEE 1516

JN BALDER F559

Black Hereford Bulls Registered Black Hereford Bred Cows Select Angus Cows bred to Black Hereford Bulls This sale will be broadcast live on the internet.

JN BALDEE 1555

JN BALDER F637

Real time bidding & proxy bidding avaialble.

Birthplace of Black Hereford Cattle

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Watch a video of sale cattle on our website. www.blackhereford.com

Dirck Hoagland (816) 225-1246 • Ranch Office (913) 727-6446 25332 Wolcott Road • Leavenworth, KS 66048 • www.blackhereford.com Summer 2020

The American Black Hereford

5


Presidents Thoughts

Wow, what a year!!!

S Carol Dewrell ABHA President

O MANY GOOD THINGS are happening in our breed! At the conclusion of the first 8 months of this fiscal year, registrations are UP by 34%. transfers are UP by 19%. genotyping is UP by 45%. salary expense is down by 32%, and our customer service is outstanding thanks to Jennifer Roach and Cheryl Minyard in Platte city, and Beverly Chafton in Bowling Green. Our Association is robust, and interest in American Black Herefords is strong, not only in the USA, but in Canada, New Zealand, and Brazil. We are promoting the breed on Social Media as never before, and our national ad in Progressive Cattle is putting us in the living rooms of 52,000 cattlemen and women 10 months of the year. Come join the fun in Kansas City, Missouri! Our National Sale, Meeting, and Show are fast approaching. We anticipate a GREAT sale with an ELITE group of cattle. If you have wanted to add something special to your herd there will be many donor prospects selling in the “A Royal Affair”. Be there October 14th through the 17th for the entire “ABHA at the Royal” experience, from the cutting-edge calving clinic on the afternoon of the 14th, to the show on the 17th, come early and stay to the end to SUPPORT your breed. It will be a GREAT time for a family vacation, with the famed Power and Light District nearby. The Holiday Inn has given us a special rate, so book your room by September 14th to take advantage of it. You are also invited to the ABHA Kansas City -Style Barbeque on the 15th, where we will sample the best they have to offer. Tickets may be purchased on the ABHA website, www.blackhereford.org. Be thinking of what you will contribute to the Annual Silent Auction. We already have some unique western items, and hope to have lots more to offer. If you have a craft that you enjoy, please consider donating an item to this ABHA fundraiser. Finally, I will tell you that we had an AJBHA meeting via Zoom, and I was fortunate to be able to speak with Junior members face to face. Parents, you have done a great job! We have an enthusiastic, articulate group that takes responsibility very seriously. The 2020-21 Officers and Court are: Laken Troup: President Kenadi Rumble : Vice-President Carter Gilham : Secretary Kolten Jenkins : Treasurer Mckay Grohmann : Historian Laken Troup : ABHA National Queen Chaney Parsons : ABHA Princess Tenley Shannon : ABHA Princess Congratulations to all of you! Adult members, if you want to get EXCITED about the American Black Hereford, just talk to one of these Junior members. They are on FIRE for American Black Hereford cattle, and so am I! JOIN IN THE EXCITEMENT! ABHA

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Schedule of Events OCTOBER 14TH - 17TH, 2020 Kansas City, MO

OCTOBER 14TH 7 AM: Cattle on the grounds 4 PM: ABHA kick-off event; Kansas State University virtual calving clinic featuring Dr. Tarpoff and the KSU Cow/Calf simulator. OCTOBER 15TH 11AM: ABHA “A Royal Affair” Sale cattle viewing 1 PM: ABHA “A Royal Affair” Elite Sale, Wagstaff facility 4 PM: ABHA Member/Director Meet and Greet, Wagstaff Facility 5:30 PM: ABHA’s Famous Kansas City Barbeque, Wagstaff Facility 7 PM: ABHA Annual Meeting, Wagstaff Facility October 17TH 8 AM: ABHA National Show in conjunction with the American Royal, North side Hale Arena

Follow the ABHA on Facebook or visit BLACKHEREFORD.ORG for more details. Summer 2020

The American Black Hereford

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Board Briefs

I Logan Hill ABHA Secretary ABHA Officers President:Carol Dewrell 850.259.5207 Vice President: Matt Marsh 912.425.0365 Treasurer: Jason Shroeder 573.680.1439 Secretary: Logan Hill 970.629.8807 Board Members: Mark Baxter 605.472.3253 Tammy Bargen 402-209-0958 Jason Schroeder 573.229.8997 Darrell Selby 270.566.2624 Robert Walters 270.832.1180 ABHA Staff Beverly Chafton 8

The American Black Hereford

am excited to write to you about the first ever, comprehensive and genomic enhanced EPD run performed by the ABHA. This EPD run was completed by the office of John Genho at Neogen. In the EPD run that was completed and published in June, all animals in the ABHA database were used, including Herefords, Angus, and F1’s. You will notice that the Herefords and Angus will have different EPD values listed on Digital Beef than they do on their parent organization websites. This is because running them with our ABHA cattle gives us a picture of what those animals do in our breed. I believe this gives us an accurate appraisal of their genetic value to the ABHA. The standards set by the Beef Improvement Federation were used and are important to the success of this EPD run. BIF sets the standards for all breeds on how performance data is collected and used. If you are unfamiliar with those standards, please read through them, they are readily available on the Beef Improvement Federation website. No EPDs can be successful without accurate, truthful, and timely data being submitted by the membership. All of the raw data that you, the members, have sent in has an impact on your EPDs and they really can’t be created without that. If you want your EPDs to be an accurate reflection of your herd then you must submit all of your weights, calving scores, ultrasounds and other measurements to the Association. Our EPDs can only be as good as the information you submit. The genomic enhancements that were added to our EPDs were created using the single-step process. Single-step is the same process that the Angus Association uses to create their genomic enhancements. This evaluation method provides a high degree of relatedness to the process, thus allowing closely related animals to track relatively closely to each other and provide an accurate display of their genetic value. These enhancements are powered by your Approved Herd Sire testing submissions, as well as any 50k addons you may have submitted. Going forward after recent changes with the Neogen test availability, we will be offering a 100k testing option that will further increase the accuracy of our evaluations. Please remember when you are looking over your Expected Progeny Differences that they are designed to create a comparison for an entire breed across all environment types. Individual actual weights are adjusted to a date value and a factor that includes the age of the dam. These adjusted weights are then put into a format that shows a deviation from the mean or ratio for the contemporary group that those animals are in. These comparative ratios are then used Summer 2020

to determine how different genetic makeups succeed when compared directly. The ratios are extrapolated across the breed and compared to see how those genetics performed in other contemporary groups. In this manner, a ranking is reached and values associated with genetic merit and real world values is reached. This final value is what is displayed as an EPD. Because of this method, you can compare the genetic merits of animals in South Dakota, Florida, Arizona, and Montana. Without these equalization procedures, a good comparison of animals from different environments would not be possible. It is also important to remember that the structuring of your contemporary groups is essential to good data reporting. Ideally the contemporary groups will be composed of animals of similar age and sex but different in their genetic makeup. It is also important that a contemporary group only be made up of animals that were exposed to the same environmental effects, i.e. pasture animals versus show animals versus range cows. Submitting data on all of your animals provides for the best possible comparison in your herd and across the breed. If you only send in birthweights showing light calves, there will still be a disparity with a top and a bottom and the ratios will reflect this. If you only submit weaning weights for the top half of your calf crop, they receive the same treatment and your top calves get no credit for being better than your bottom calves, for the simple reason that the computers don’t know that they exist. If you assist or pull a calf and don’t enter that information in the system (even if you cull the calf or it dies), we have no way of finding good data for our calving ease scores. Don’t forget that the entry of weight and measurement data into our Digital Beef system is free and adding in nonregistered NX calves costs nothing. This was done to encourage more weight reporting and create more accurate contemporary groups and datasets. We are working towards having more data fields in our EPD display. For this, we need commitment from the membership to submit these data points, even though there isn’t anything to show for it right at this moment. We are working towards carcass traits, including Rib Eye Area, Marbling, and Fat Thickness, and Udder and Teat scores. Please keep sending this information in and eventually we will get to the point of being able to publish them. In the end, I am excited about this comprehensive genetic evaluation and believe it to be the most accurate and logical evaluation that I have yet seen from the ABHA. I am proud to have been part of the team that got it done and published. ABHA


2020 ABHA JUNIOR NATIONALS

North American Livestock Expo LOUISVILLE • KY Junior Show

WEDNESDAY – NOVEMBER 18TH 4 PM

Open Show

THURSDAY – NOVEMBER 19TH

VISIT BLACKHEREFORD.ORG FOR RULES AND SHOW INFORMATION

See you at the NAILE! Summer 2020

The American Black Hereford

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Association Update ABHA Hires New OfďŹ ce Manager

B

everly Chafton is the new Office Manager for the American Black Hereford Association. She is a native to Bowling Green, KY. Beverly has worked in the Accounting field for over ten years. She has a Masters Degree in Business and a Bachelors Degree in Information Technology/Software Engineering. She is here to help with information regarding accounts payable,billing, invoicing and advertising. Before coming aboard, she worked for the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Outside of work she enjoys spending time with family, gardening, and outdoor activities.

Beverly Chafton OfďŹ ce Manager at American Black Hereford Association.

Revolutionizing the way cattlemen manage grazing on fescue pasture. University Tested, University Proven Shown to increase conception rates, increase weaning weights, and improve overall herd health Contact us today to find out how we can help improve your herd health! 10324 W U.S. 36 Modoc, IN 47358 Phone: 765-853-1246 www.gro-tec.com

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The American Black Hereford

Summer 2020


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Jo Bulls Genetics The ABHA’s first online semen and embryo source. Brock Johansen • (435) 749-1543 www.jobullsgenetics.com • www.jobulls.com bjohansen@emerytelcom.com Summer 2020 The American Black Hereford

11


EPD’s 101 - Where we have been, and where we are going Jamie T. Courter, Ph.D. – Beef Product Manager, Neogen Genomics

T

he idea that there are predictable patterns in the inheritance of DNA that help inform what a phenotype will be, go as far back as 1863, with Gregor Mendel and his well-known pea experiments. He learned, through years of experimenting, that there was a predictable relationship between the pea shape of two “parent” plants, and that of their “offspring”. These “Basic Laws of Inheritance” are the same philosophy applied to simply inherited traits such as coat color and polled status in cattle. However, as technology and research progressed, Mendel’s Laws of Inheritance transformed into the study of animal breeding, along with many others. One of the simplest equations an Animal Breeder learns in is P = G + E. In simpler terms, an animal’s phenotype, or what we visibly see, is a combination of their genotype, or genetic potential, and the environment in which they are raised. That equation is the basis for a majority of the work that geneticists do today. Understanding that the environment and management practices of an animal may vary based on geography, nutrition and many other circumstances, animal breeders focus on using their training to estimate the genetic potential, or breeding value, of an animal to help cattlemen better predict their phenotypic performance. To do that, they calculate EPDs, or estimated progeny differences.

Just like Mendel’s idea of inheritance of simple traits, the same overall concept is applied with more complicated traits such as birth weight and calving ease. For quite some time, genetic evaluations

12

The American Black Hereford

Summer 2020

have been used to characterize the genetic potential of registered cattle to ensure the correct animals are being selected and propagated for key economically relevant traits. To do this, seedstock producers invest heavily into reporting the key pieces of information that go into calculating an EPD – including individual animal pedigrees, recording phenotypes for key traits on that animal themselves, and then any phenotypes reported on the progeny of that animal. The overall outcome being, if you know the EPD or genetic potential of a sire and dam, you can then use that as a proxy for how their offspring will perform, on average. When an EPD is reported back to the seedstock producer, the true estimate of genetic merit in an animal is summarized in three different ways: 1. Estimated Progeny Difference (EPD): This is the estimate of genetic merit that an animal will pass on to their offspring and is normally the first number listed following the trait abbreviation. The EPD is also published as a deviation from the breed average for that trait. For example, if the breed average for birth weight is 72 lbs, then a bull with an EPD of 0 for birth weight would be expected to have calves with a birth weight of 72 lbs, on average. Similarly, if another bull has an EPD of -1.0 for birth weight, he would be expected to have calves with an average birth weight of 71 lbs.


2. Accuracy: This value ranges from 0 to 1 and is as an estimate of the confidence that the EPD provided is in fact the actual EPD of the animal. After all, an EPD is a geneticist’s best estimate of genetic potential in an animal, given the information provided to them at the time. However, as more progeny records are reported, that estimate is likely to move up and/ or down. The higher the accuracy, the less likely an animal’s EPD is to change as more information comes into the genetic evaluation. 3. Percentile Rank: Normally the last, or bottom value, a percentile rank reports where the specific EPD for that animal ranks across the entire breed. Ranging from 1 to 100, if an animal is in the top 1%, they are one of the best animals in the database for that trait of interest. While sometimes useful to gain bearings as to what a “good” or “bad” EPD looks like, it is recommended that seedstock producers use the EPD when making selection and bull buying decisions. So how did we transition from EPDs to GE-EPDs? Due to basic biology, officially termed Mendelian sampling, there are over one quintillion possible combinations of DNA that full sibling calves can inherit, no matter the sire. Traditionally it has taken several years of recording phenotypes of progeny to characterize which calves inherited the “good” genes from their parents. Genomic testing is a tool to characterize what specific genetic merit an animal inherited at a younger age than has been feasible from pedigree information and progeny records alone. The use of genomics, or DNA, in genetic evaluations has been happening for about a decade, providing “Genomic Enhancement” to the EPDs producers were already accustomed to. Experience has shown the addition of genomic

information to an existing pedigree based evaluation has several impacts: 1. It increases the accuracy of the EPD. This provides more confidence in a bull’s performance, and a decrease in the likelihood that the EPD will drastically shift over time. 2. It decreases the generation interval. Genomically testing an animal provides as much information to a genetic evaluation as if they had already sired from 8 to 33 calves, depending on the trait. This provides the ability to make decisions faster, decreasing the generation interval. 3. It allows for more accurate evaluation of traits that are hard to measure, or are measured later in life like carcass traits, stayability, and heifer pregnancy. Selling bulls with genomically enhanced EPDs is a standard practice to ensure that when a young bull is sold to a commercial rancher, he will perform as expected. In other words, purchasing a heifer bull will not lead to a calving season filled with pulling calves. Genomic testing increases the confidence a seedstock producer has in the bulls they are selling, as well as the confidence the commercial customer has in their purchase. For the future, the path to having dramatically improved offerings of bulls requires the addition of genomic testing, today. The increased accuracy from genomic testing leads to improved selection of animals that meet an operation’s breeding objectives. This ultimately leads to an improved overall quality of your bull offering and alignment with the needs of your customer base. ABHA

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The American Black Hereford

13


The Resume By Aaron Schroeder, Missouri Meadows

T

housands of people raise registered cattle. That being said, it may be considered important to ask ... why? What does it mean to raise registered cattle? Why should I register my cattle? What purpose does a registration paper serve? Ask these questions to any number of people, both in the registered and the commercial world, and you are bound to get many different answers because people view registration papers in many different ways. Some people believe registration papers are simply a fancy paper or “ticket” granted by an association to be able to show animals at the county fair or sell them in a registered sale. Some view registration papers as a lineage document stating that their cattle are the progeny of such and such bull or cow. Some value the registration paper as proof that their cattle are free of genetic defects or that they possess the preferred EPDs for their operation. The truth is, registration papers are all of these things and so much more. Many people are familiar with the idea that expected progeny differences (EPD’s) are a tool to enhance cattle selection. The truth is, every part of a registration paper can be used as a tool to enhance cattle selection. Cattle that are actively registered in an association’s database possess EPD’s, performance records, a genetic defect status, the animal’s lineage, etc. and it is because the animal possesses these things that they are also allowed to participate in association sanctioned functions such as shows and sales. On my Facebook feed this morning, I was reminded of a seminar I attended where I was moved enough to post on my own feed a quote from that seminar: “… cows don’t care if they make you money or not, make them work”. I went on in my Facebook post to say not to give preferential treatment to the pretty cows, the expensive cows, or the cows with the right bloodlines. Everyone has made an excuse for a cow before, just remember when you are making that excuse, she isn’t making excuses for you and doesn’t care about your welfare. You don’t owe her any favors. Some may see this as an argument not to raise registered cattle because they perceive the focus on registered cattle is the pretty ones, the expensive ones or the right bloodline ones. The reality is, this is an argument for raising registered cattle. Registered cattle are the cattle that have extensive records going back many generations. Registration papers include birthweights, weaning weights, and yearling weights. With a registration number, I can go into a database and look up calving intervals for individuals, an animal’s genetic defect status, and I can compare their data with

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The American Black Hereford

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other cattle within the breed using percentile rankings. Think of a registration paper as a resume and if you are going to make your cows work, I can not think of a more detailed resume than a registration paper. The future of any business whose employer hires employees without a background check or a resume would be questionable. If your business is raising cattle, and the cows are your employees, why would you hire cattle that do not have a background check or a resume? What does that say about the future of your business? Many people may claim they value their registration papers and will then sell a bull or cow to an individual without a registration paper. A customer who does not want a registration paper obviously does not value the papers themselves or they would ask for them, but every seller of registered cattle should insist on transferring the registration papers to the new owner. If a seller does not transfer the registration papers, they are silently saying to their customer that the registration paper does not hold a value and are undercutting the value of their cattle, their operation and their breed. When a seedstock producer transfers their registration papers they are doing many things. 1. They are making the statement that they stand behind their product. 2. They are demonstrating to the buyer that the paper has value. 3. They are showing appreciation to the buyer by adding value to the bull or cow and transferring that value to the buyer. 4. They are creating a sense of intrigue; often a person who acquires a registered animal will go online and investigate more about their purchase if the registration papers are in their possession. 5. They introduce the idea of owning registered livestock to a potential future breeder (how many times have you heard about a breeder starting their endeavor by trying a new bull). 6. Your monies spent in transferring the paperwork will help your association who in turn helps you and other breeders as well, remember the saying “a high tide raises all ships.” 7. Do I really need to come up with seven reasons? A new business quarter will be here before we know it, and with it, fall calving will start. Before it does, make sure all of your book work is up to date. Register your spring calves, record your weights, evaluate your data collection systems and help ensure your business’ success by hiring the best cattle you can and firing those who spend too much time in the break room. In short, update your resumes! ABHA


Black Herefords Find a New Market in Brazil

B

razil has a population of 200 million people. They are the world’s largest beef producer and exporter of beef products. Due to the tropical heat, the most popular cattle are the Bos indicus Nelore breed. (pictured below) They cross this breed with Angus to produce meat for export. In 2019, Brazil exported $19 billion in agricultural products to the European Union. Although Angus improves the meat quality, the F1 cross is not very feed efficient. Researchers in Brazil are looking for ways to improve their feed to gain ratios by measuring feed intakes. That is where the Black Hereford comes into consideration. Black Herefords improve beef quality nearly as well as Angus (Howells Study, 2011). However, Black Herefords are 25% more feed efficient than Angus. Semen from JN Balder F540, (pictured below) owned by Mark

Bengtson of Huggins, Missouri, will be shipped to four locations in Brazil for testing in the 2020 breeding season. Former ABHA President, Joe Hoagland, together with his son and past ABHA board member, Dirck Hoagland, recently traveled to Brazil to meet with local ranchers about using Black Herefords. “If we can be as successful with Black Herefords in Brazil as we have been in New Zealand using Black Hereford bulls on dairy cows, this will become a huge market for us” said Hoagland. Many of the ranches, we visited were diversified farms raising soy beans and corn as well as cattle. “They all seem quite prosperous” said Dirck Hoagland. ABHA

Bos indicus Nelore is a typical breed used in Brazil.

JN Balder F540 semen will be shipped to Brazil for the 2020 breeding season.

Joe Hoagland (upper right hand corner) with a group of Brazilian ranchers on a recent trip to Brazil.

Dirck Hoagland speaks to Brazilian ranchers. Summer 2020

The American Black Hereford

15


Know All of your Data, But Avoid Single Trait Selection Jennifer Hill

By Jennifer Hill

E

very few years one breed or another develops a new Expected Progeny Differences field and in a flurry of excitement cattlemen everywhere chase it hard and fast. Foot structure, calving ease, $B in the Angus world, birth and weaning weights; all of these trait markers matter, but focusing solely on one will bring an unbalance to the herd which may take generations to correct. Just as each of our operations have unique strengths and challenges, so should our prioritized traits be unique. For instance, my family’s ranch is a western range outfit. Our commercial and registered cows must be hardy and are expected to calve out unassisted if they hope to fit our ranch needs. It would be easy for us to place sole emphasis on calving ease, as covering thousands of acres of rangeland to pull calves is untenable, but at what cost? Selecting bulls based only on calving ease may lead to less framey cattle with lower weaning weights, and a problem for us in the market. Inversely, we and our customers all want large calves come auction time, so surely we should start with them big and focus on adding high birth weight cattle to our herd, right? I occasionally see Facebook posts celebrating the birth of a 140lb calf with the shoulders of an NFL lineman. Boy, won’t it look great in the showring, order your semen today! But again I ask, at what cost? The dam surely required a Cesarean Section to deliver, as any downstream progeny likely will. Not a marker of sustainability either. EPD fields give us many data points to consider, allowing us the opportunity to make sure we are covering numerous bases. They can also provide additional marketing points. Scrotal circumference is one data point that is occasionally taken for granted, as the difference in numbers are typically relatively small and many producers only consider the overall breeding soundness results. However, as a seedstock producer, it may yet play a role in the marketing of bulls and add to a well-rounded herd. Because scrotal size is directly correlated with fertility in both the bull and their daughters, it is prudent for seedstock producers to focus on improving this data point. A larger circumference indicates a younger maturity age in progeny including daughters, leading to a faster rate of return on heifers. This could be an interesting and overlooked marketing tactic for a seedstock provider. Of course, balancing your EPD’s alone won’t get you a well-rounded herd either. EPD’s are necessary and our

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industry has seen dramatic improvement in the quality of animals since their wide acceptance, but they cannot give us the entire picture. No EPD can tell you if the animal travels well or walks stiffly from an off-placed hip. An EPD won’t help you picture the animal’s frame shape. For that we rely on our own eye and good sense, which is hopefully grounded in the unique needs of our operation. My own family’s operation is in a high desert, rough terrain area, making traveling soundness and hardiness a must. Our cattle must know how to work for their feed. Many years ago my husband and I purchased a handful of registered cows from a dispersal sale based in Ohio. We proudly brought our fancy girls home only to watch them die one after the other, often in ways that seemed unusual for our cattle. One cow, for no understandable reason as there was plenty of fresh water running in the creek, walked out onto a frozen lake and promptly fell through. They all seemed to find new, creative ways to die. We realized that it was simply because cattle from the fields of Ohio were just not built to thrive in the mountains of Western Colorado. We hadn’t selected for enough traits and we paid for it. Our goal as cattlemen is to create a well-balanced product that will flourish from field to plate. This means finding a balance of traits that will suit our needs first and those of the consumer later, while being willing to adjust as our herds as markets change over time. The more data we collect on our own animals, the better our chances of making the best in herd selections are. While the ABHA has not yet achieved enough carcass data to provide carcass trait EPDs, it should still be an important factor in your selection process. Getting ultrasound data back on your cattle will not only help you make a well-rounded breeding selection but also provide you with valuable information to help market to your buyers. Several years ago we lost a bull buyer when we were unable to provide carcass information. The would-be-buyer stated that not having carcass data would be, “taking a shot in the dark.” He knew that having a great looking animal on the outside wouldn’t mean much if it couldn’t perform in the feedlot and at processing, because at the end of the day we are all producing beef, not just cattle. As with most areas of life we watch fads come and go and cattle selection is certainly not immune to this. But if we want to stay sustainable for the long term we are best served by focusing on a holistic approach to our individual operation needs rather than chasing a single trait while arming ourselves with all the data possible. ABHA


Junior Corner By Jeffrey Calvert, Outgoing Junior President

I

hope everyone is having a great summer. I hated that we did not get to see all of you at Junior Nationals this year but cannot wait to see you at the Royal or NAILE. It has been amazing being the President of the Junior Black Hereford association. I have seen so much growth in this junior association than ever before. The growth might not have been huge in numbers but every new junior counts. That is why this association will grow so much down the line. Having a sale at the American Royal and the new sale at Kentucky Beef Expo got some new kids involved. I am going to miss working with these juniors as their president, but I feel like I have left them in great hands. The events that have been added since I have been in this association has made me see how important the juniors are to this association. I want to congratulate Laken Troup on being elected as the new president of the Juniors. I can see a great deal of ideas coming to the juniors with her as their president. It has been great to serve as your 2019-2020 AJBHA President and I know this association is in great hands with the new Junior Board. ABHA

By Laken Troup, Junior President

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t is my honor to introduce myself to you as your 20202021 AJBHA President and the 2020-2021 ABHA Queen. I would like to start off by thanking each and every member and supporter for their continued hard work through these unusual circumstances, each of you are representing the cattle industry and all that it stands for. When I first became involved in raising Black Herefords I found myself in a family, even as the new member I was automatically greeted and welcomed by the other members. This welcoming environment was something I will never forget, and I hope that each of our members continue to experience this as they begin their own Black Hereford journey. Aside from being welcomed into this new family, I saw farms and ranches working hard and working together. Often times we get caught up in our own little world of business and work that we lose sight of lending a helping hand to those who surround us. When I saw the kindness that fills this association, I realized that this was the true definition of cattleman and I wanted nothing more than to be a part of it. Moving forward I have big plans for the American Junior Black Hereford Association, I plan on implementing new ideas to not only grow our involvement but to also represent our

breed and association in the best possible way. I see potential for growth in our juniors, I hope to lead in a way that surpasses all of the expectations that have been set before me, but most importantly, I hope to find new ways to advocate for our breed. Thank you all for trusting me and allowing me to serve at this capacity. I am always open to new ideas or suggestions and I can be reached at lakentroup@gmail.com . ABHA

Summer 2020

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The Flying Diamond K Ranch “Gems of the Rockies”

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he Flying Diamond K Ranch L.L.C. (TFDKR) was established in the late 1900s in Ft. Collins, Colorado by Ken Padilla owner and operator of the ranch. Ken is a 1st generation rancher. The ranch was started with a hodge podge group of 45 mama cows and two Registered Black Angus bulls. Being a novice at ranching, Ken struggled for the first couple of years. However, it didn’t take Ken too long to figure out that The Flying Diamond K Ranch needed to go a different direction. TFDKR started to sell off the commercial cattle and replace them with Registered Black Angus cattle. By 2003, TFDKR was a fully registered Black Angus operation and decided to become a seed stock operation. Stepping into this mode changed things, this meant paying more attention to detail in order to raise breeding bulls and replacement heifers. TFDKR

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continued in this mode until 2017. In the 2017 spring breeding season, TFDKR decided to make a change to their program by using a Black Hereford Bull to A.I. their registered Angus herd. Black Angus bulls were used to cover the cows that hadn’t settled with the A.I. procedure. In 2018 after all the calves had been born, Ken separated all the calves into an alley way to be worked. Besides the obvious markings of the calves, Ken noticed a difference in the A.I. calves, they were bigger and wider across the top and had more bone structure in the legs than the pasture bred calves sired by registered Angus bulls. It was that day, that convinced Ken to take The Flying Diamond K Ranch, yet another direction. This all meant Ken had to put things in motion immediately, if he was


going to make the turning point in 2018. He scrambled around, talking to breeders in the Black Hereford breed. He soon found that there were not many females available for sale. Ken did manage to find a breeder in Iowa who had 3 females and some embryos for sale. Ken bought the 3 females and 12 embryos and used his Angus cows as recipients. His next quest for The Flying Diamond K Ranch was to find a good Black Hereford Bull. In late March 2018, Ken found what he wanted for TFDKR, he was a handsome 2-year-old Black Hereford bull. He had and met the criteria that The Flying Diamond K Ranch was looking for; calving ease, homozygous black, homozygous polled and high percentage to put their program together. This bull came from Selby Farm in Kentucky and is now known throughout the breed as FDK BLACK DIAMOND SELB. Next on the list for The Flying Diamond K Ranch was to find a good Red Hereford Cow to use as a donor to create some 95.5% embryos. This Cow was found at the Coyote Ridge Ranch, she was sired by CMR GVP Mr. Maternal 156T. The Flying Diamond K Ranch continued to build their herd by purchasing more females through the 2018 ABHA National Sale and the ABHA 2019 Southwest Sale. However, in early January of 2019, The Flying Diamond K Ranch and Kroening Black Herefords started negotiating on a 98% Black Hereford Bull that they had in Minnesota. When the bull finally made his way to The Flying Diamond K Ranch in late April, he became known as FDK

SPINEL MAX 879 JRK. This lucky “MAX” went straight to the creek bottom with “MS MATERNAL”, they spent their entire summer together and no mountain hikes. In November of 2019 after the rest of the herd had been brought down from the mountain ranch, they were preg checked by the veterinarian and discovered that “MS MATERNAL” was indeed very pregnant with the natural service of “MAX”. Just knowing she was carrying a 99% calf was a wonderful feeling. Then, the wait. Winter got to be very long, windy and cold. It got to be mid February and temperatures were falling way below freezing. Ken was spending more time in his truck now more than ever, waiting, waiting for “MS MATERNAL”. He was glad that he had been there on at least a couple of occasions to help some of the other cows keep their calves warm in the middle of those freezing nights, waiting and waiting. Until late afternoon on March 3, 2020. Ken noticed that “MS MATERNAL” had wondered off from the rest of the herd. He continued to watch her and decided he should bring her into some sheltered calving pens. It was approximately an hour and a half after Ken had made her comfortable, and he had finished chores, that he went to check on “MS MATERNAL”, no calf yet but she was laying down and laboring. Ken returned to his truck to warm up. Within the next five to ten minutes, “MS MATERNAL” let out a loud beller and the 99er had arrived! Elated by the arrivial and it being of a dark color, Ken praised the Lord that it wasn’t an HX! The calf was up and nursing in just a few minutes. Ken gave “MS MATERNAL” about a half hour or so before he approached to determine what gender the calf was and when he did approach to determine the gender, he found it to be a BULL CALF! The calf was named FDK SPINEL MAX FACTOR 1. He was registered on April 15, 2020 and is an Approved Herd Sire, Registration #HB017261. “Little MAX” is already being halter broke by Kens adopted grandson, Trayton. Ken is looking forward to the day that “Little Max” can be collected and is hopeful to have semen available on him by mid March of 2021. His dam is CRR 156T ECLIPSE 458 SIRED BY CMR GVP MR MATERNAL 156T. Since becoming a member of the ABHA in April of 2018, The Flying Diamond K Ranch has been a very active supporter and proud sponsor of the juniors and of our national events and consignor to all of our sales. Further, Ken also serves on the ABHA Membership Committee. On behalf of The FLYING DIAMOND K Ranch, Ken wishes to congratulate the Grofts on their 99ers as well. ABHA Summer 2020

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Dealing With Heat Stress in Beef Cattle Operations C.R. Dahlen, Beef Cattle Specialist and C.L. Stoltenow, Veterinarian North Dakota State University

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eing proactive is the best approach for dealing with heat stress in cattle. Once cattle are in a severe state of heat stress, you may be too late to help them. Interventions that cause animals to cool extremely rapid or animal distress could have disastrous consequences. Having a solid management plan in place to address heat stress could pay big dividends in the form of maintained animal performance during periods of heat and in avoiding death losses in severe cases.

Introduction to Thermoregulation

Mammals have involuntary methods of regulating internal body temperature. They include shivering and sweating to maintain “homeostasis,” or a constant, stable environment. Homeostasis is good, and, as cattle managers, we regularly use it to our benefit. Using a thermometer to determine if a calf has a fever is only possible because of homeostasis. The thermoneutral zone is the range of temperatures in which an animal (including humans) does not use energy to stay warm or stay cool. When temperatures rise above the thermoneutral zone, animals must expend energy to cool their bodies. Signs this is occurring include an increasing respiration rate, increased heart rate and increased panting. At the same time the animals use extra energy, their feed intake declines. Heat stress occurs when the animal’s attempt to dissipate heat is unsuccessful or overwhelmed, and the animal’s performance or health suffers as a result.

Managing Heat Stress

Step one: Identify animals that are most susceptible to heat stress. Feedlot animals that are closest to the market endpoint are the most at risk. They are physiologically overweight and have the least amount of lung capacity relative to body weight. Animals that are very young and very old also are at increased risk. They do not have the physiologic reserves to withstand prolonged periods of heat. Animals with dark hides are at a higher risk of suffering heat stress and dying. Deaths of black-hided cattle on pasture without shade and limited supplies of water have been recorded. Body core temperature research has shown that in a cohort of cattle that were genetically closely related but phenotypically had different hide colors, cattle with dark hides had a 2°F higher core body temperature than their cohorts with lighter-colored hide. Know where the animals most susceptible to heat stress are before the danger of heat stress is present. Be prepared to have these animals as a priority in your prevention/intervention plan. Step two: Develop an action plan for heat stress. The action plan is the essential actions you will take to protect the animals most susceptible to heat stress. The action plan should include the following: Animals in heat stress need to drink water. Water trough capacity often is overlooked in Northern environments. Large amounts of water space typically result in winter freeze-ups, so producers tend to utilize smaller water troughs than recommended, especially for periods of heat. Most of the year, this type of water trough may provide animals with a sufficient 20

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water supply, but during periods of heat stress, water intake increases dramatically. Each animal should have access to at least 2 inches of linear trough space per head in a pen. This will allow cattle access to water and prevent socially dominant animals from stopping subordinate animals from drinking. This means that in a pen with 200 animals, you need to have 400 inches of linear water space. If your cattle have access to only small water troughs, you should add space for water access during the summer months. Evaluate water supply lines and ensure you have sufficient water pressure and flow capacity available to keep troughs full during times of peak water consumption. Imagine every calf that could possibly fit at a water trough drinking at the same time. Move the animals’ feeding time to late afternoon or evening. This will allow rumen fermentation to take place during the cooler night temperatures, and it will increase lung capacity for the cattle during the hotter daytime temperatures. Normal digestive processes create heat in cattle. This body heat reaches a maximum several hours after the meal is consumed. When feeding cattle in the morning of high-heat-stress days, producers may be matching peak environmental temperature with peak body temperature from digestion. Altering feed deliveries accordingly can avoid some potential additional heat from digestion. If feeding once daily, consider moving feed delivery until the afternoon. If feeding multiple times daily, consider feeding a small meal in the morning and a larger portion of the diet later in the afternoon. Decrease the amount of feed offerings during and for several days after heat stress. Effects of heat stress may linger, and aggressively increasing feed deliveries will increase metabolic heat production and possibly cause problems even though the environmental heat index has dropped below the typical heat stress threshold. Air movement is an additional factor that promotes animal cooling. A breeze or wind moving over the hide of cattle promotes evaporative cooling. Blocking or hampering the movement of air impedes evaporative cooling. The same windbreaks, trees or other protections that are so vital during the winter to prevent frostbite and hypothermia can prohibit wind from circulating in pens during the summer. Remove unessential wind barriers (portable wind panels, equipment, weeds and other objects) to promote better air movement. Having mounds in pens gives cattle more elevation and possibly access to a microclimate with more wind. Cool the ground and the cattle gradually. Sprinklers function to cool the ground cattle are lying on as much as they do to cool the cattle. Set up sprinklers well in advance of anticipated heat stress because cattle take time to adapt to all changes. Use the sprinklers during mildly hot days so cattle become accustomed to the sights, sounds and the cooling effects of the sprinklers. Be aware of the droplet size of water coming from the sprinklers. The goal is to have large droplets of water. A fine mist likely will make the pens even more humid and contribute to greater heat stress. An alternative to sprinklers is running a hose into pens to wet the ground where cattle will be lying. Run the sprinklers or wet the ground the cattle will be on before the peak temperatures of the day. Provide shade if possible. Solar radiation from sunny, clear skies contributes to body temperature in cattle. Black-hided cattle in the same pens with white-hided cattle will have internal body temperatures several degrees hotter than the white-hided cattle. Providing shade stops solar radiation from increasing body temperature. Although this may not be


practical for all cattle in a feed yard, identify susceptible pens and be ready to intervene proactively with all measures possible. Consider turning cattle out temporarily under trees for shade. The decrease in feed efficiency or loss of weight is minimal, considering the potential cost of losing cattle due to heat stress. Adding bedding to the ground can reduce the temperature of the ground on which cattle are lying. Work done in Midwestern feedlots indicates that simply spreading straw on the ground can decrease the ground surface temperature by 15°F, compared with black dirt. Apply bedding to the tops of mounds and other areas likely to have wind. Wetting the bedding before or shortly after putting it out can reduce the temperature even further. Control flies as much as possible because hot cattle tend to bunch together and flies only will add to the stress of hot days. And maybe the most important, do not work cattle during temperature extremes. If working cattle is absolutely necessary, keep working time as short as possible, use calm animal-handling techniques to minimize stress related to handling, and consider running smaller groups through the facility or into holding pens. Provide sufficient water in holding pens. Get started as early in the morning as daylight will allow. Do not work in the evening after a heat-stress day; cattle need this time to recover. Reconsider the necessity of working cattle during these periods; some working events need to be postponed or canceled.

Pay attention to long- and short-term weather forecasts and have a copy of the temperature humidity index chart readily available. Determine the potential risk threshold and be prepared, even if the risk is several index units away. Additional solar heat, lack of air movement and heavy fat cover all can lead to disastrous effects of heat stress. Step three: Know when to intervene.Heat stress is driven by a combination of factors. Temperature and humidity are two of the most frequently cited issues. A Livestock Weather Hazard Guide is included. Understanding that heat stress in cattle is cumulative is important. If the evening temperatures do not cool low enough, cattle cannot fully recover physiologically before the next onset of heat. Cattle are at danger of death from heat exposure when the following occur: The heat index is 75 or greater for a 72 hour period The heat index during a 48 hour period is no lower than 79 during the day and no lower than 75 during the night The daytime heat index reaches 84 or higher for two consecutive days Heat in summertime is not avoidable. However, you can take preventive measures when designing facilities and before temperatures reach dangerous levels to minimize impacts of heat stress on cattle. ABHA

MIDWEST BREEDERS Black Hereford Sale NOON, NOVEMBER 7, 2020, CARTHAGE, ILLINOIS SALE HELD AT THE LOWDERMANN CATTLE COMPANY FACILITY

SELLING 70 LOTS OF BULLS, PAIRS, BREDS, OPEN FEMALES, & FROZEN GENETICS For more information or a sale book, contact:

TYLER HAMILTON (618) 567-4339, MIKE HAMILTON (618) 410-4293, or KYLE HAMILTON (618) 670-4027

Summer 2020

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New Members New Annual Members Alabama EMSLEY LOVELACE 1535 60 RD 112 FLORENCE, AL 35633 EDLOVELACE07@GMAIL.COM 256-702-3738 COLT THOMAS 1950 HWY 43 PHIL CAMPBELL, AL 35581 COLT.2004THOMAS@GMAIL.COM 256-668-1321 Arkansas TAYTON BARNETT 163 COCA COLA AVE GLENWOOD, AR 71943 LARRY BISHOP 760 COOTER NECK RD HEBER SPRINGS, AR 72543 DOUBLE D LAZY T TOMMY PARK 3109 HWY 60 WEST PERRYVILLE, AR 72126 DEBPARK1952@YAHOO.COM 501-250-5833 JLJD FARMS JULIAN J& DONNA JONES 170 NORTON RD RISON, AR 71665-8859 DONNAKAYBEARD@YAHOO.COM 870-718-7263 PREWITT FARMS DANNY PREWITT 3719 GENOA RD TEXARKANA, AR 71854 PREWITTMID@AOL.COM 972-974-8953 Canada MATT & DYANNA MARQUARDT BOX 215 ENILDA, AB T0GOWO MARQUARDTRANCHES@GMAIL.COM 780-523-2427 Georgia FANCY FARMS INC NANCI CONNER 3971 MILLCREEK RD STATESBORO, GA 30461 FANCYFARMSINC19@GMAIL.COM 770-380-2685

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THE NARROW GATE RANCH DARRYLL & PATRICIA SIMPKINS 5237 HENDERSON RD HEPHZIBAH, GA 30815 NARROWGATE@YAHOO.COM 706-691-6014

WERK HEREFORDS SHANE WERK 7715 HWY 13 MANHATTAN, KS 66502 WERK_SH@HOTMAIL.COM 785-565-1881

Illinois MCKAY GROHMANN 517 KNOX HWY 5 AVINGDON, IL 61410 SHOWSTOCKMOM@YAHOO.COM 309-221-5390

Kentucky DIAMOND P FARMS JAMES W PARSONS 3982 GILLESPIE PIKE POINT LICK, KY 40461 WTPARSONS27@GMAIL.COM 859-661-0120

MCPEEK FARMS ROBERT MCPEEK 11434 E WILLOW RD STOCKTON, IL 61085 STOCKTONSTAINLESS@GMAIL.COM 815-275-2004 Indiana COLE YOUNG DARLAGE 1657 N CR 1300W NORMAN, IN 47264 MARTY44YOUNG@AOL.COM 812-583-4986 COY GILHAM 926 S CR 600 E SULLIVAN, IN 47882 LLBLACKHEREFODS@GMAIL.COM 812-564-2486 CLAIRE YOUNG 1657 N CR 1300 W NORMAN, IN 47264 MARTY44YOUNG@AOL.COM 812-583-4986 Kansas CADE JONES 35863 CRESCENT HILL RD OSAWATOMIE, KS 66064 CRESCENTHILLBLACKHEREFORDS@GMAIL.COM 913-731-3428 ELIZABETH JONES 35863 CRESCENT HILL RD OSAWATOMIE, KS 66064 CRESCENTHILLBLACKHEREFORDS@GMAIL.COM 913-731-3428 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY-PUREBRED UNIT 2200 DENISON MANHATTAN, KS 66506 SDW6633@KSU.EDU 785-565-1881

Summer 2020

WHITNEY PARSONS 3982 GILLESPIE PIKE PAINT LICK, KY 40461 859-925-4435 Louisiana LIVE OAKS FARM THOMAS M. TATUM 1417 COTTONWOOD RD, LOT 1 LEESVILLE, LA 71446 830-431-0888 PAYNE’S BLACK HEREFORDS SCOTT & MELISSA PAYNE 2070 HWY 134 RAYVILLE, LA 71269 SCOTTP@COPELANDELECTRIC.COM 318-372-6578 Missouri A FARM, LLC CHRIS & DEB ANDERSON 2 OLD JOE BRANCH RD BRUMLEY, MO 65017 CHRIS@ANDERSON-MARKETING.COM 573-216-2170 CLEAR CREEK CATTLE STEVE & CRYSTAL VAUGHN 7617 WEST DAVID ROSS LANE SPRINGFIELD, MO 65802 STEVEVAUGHN@WILLARDSCHOOLS.NET 417-300-1990 J4 FARMS NATHAN JUDY 24668 HWY 139 HALE, MO 64643 NATHANJUDY2002@YAHOO.COM 660-247-2238’ ELY SCOTT JUDY 24668 HWY 139 HALE, MO 64643 ESJUDY10@ICLOUD.COM 660-565-2308


New Members JUSTA J FARMS JANELLE OSBORNE 4820 INDIAN GROVE ROAD HARTVILLE, MO 65667 JANELLE@JOESHORSESHOEING.COM 417-926-1522

North Carolina CHANEY PARSONS 7066 WHITE PLAINS RD ROARING RIVER, NC 28669 CHPARSONS@WILKES.NET 336-957-3395

FLYING DINGO FARM BRIAN & JULIE LADD 2636 MT VERNON RD CHAPEL HILL, TN 37034 BLADD@MARSHALLFARMERSCOOP.COM 931-993-3312

VALLEY OAKS FARMS TONY WARD 35000 E MCQUERRY RD OAK GROVE, MO 64075 TONY@VALLEYOAKSANGUS.COM 8163655930

Ohio BENNETT FARMS LINDSAY BENNETT 2649 UPPER 5 MILE RD WILLIAMSBURG, OH 45176 LINDS_WC@YAHOO.COM 937-423-2141

LATITUDE FARM JEFFREY SOWARDS 22 MOLLY LANE TAFT, TN 38488 JWSOWARDS@GMAIL.COM 931-814-0076

Michigan ALBUS BLACK HEREFORDS JOHN ALBUS 214 N 192ND AVE HESPERIA, MI 49421-9376 JOYANDHOPESEEKER@GMAIL.COM 231-854-9812

PINE MOUNTAIN FARMS MATTHEW,AMY & ADELINE ALRED 9312 HWY 22 S MICHIE, TN 38357 PINEMOUNTAINFARMS@HOTMAIL.COM 662-415-6567

KAYLA MARKER 4115 ST RT 47 ANSONIA, OH 45303 LINDS_WC@YAHOO.COM 937-423-2141

GABBY REESE SHANNON 437 S ORE RD WESTPOINT, TN 38486 DRCHADSHANNON@GMAIL.COM 931-231-9004

Montana MK BLACK HEREFORDS MATT & KATHY SMITH 213 AYERS OPPORTUNITY, MT 59711 MATTSMITH1955@HOTMAIL.COM 406-539-6211

Oklahoma GOOCH RANCH NATHAN & TRACY GOOCH 4901 NE 1182 AVE RED OAK, OK 74563 GOOCHRANCH@GMAIL.COM 918-465-7105

Nebraska JAKE KRAUSE 70544 RD 381 MCCOOK, NE 69001 J_KRAUSE_4@HOTMAIL.COM 308-340-3081

CURTIS LUGARD 58684 W 2050 RD VICI, OK 73859 CRAZYYAMAHARIDER@YAHOO.COM 970-765-5122

KUHLMANN RANCH ORVIL E KUHLMANN & SONS 3533 SCOUTS REST RANCH RD NORTH PLATTE, NE 69101 ANTHONY@KUHLMANNRANCH.COM 308-530-4574

South Carolina SANDHILLS RANCH JOHN HICKS PO BOX 178 PATRICK, SC 29584 JWH.SANDHILLSRANCH@GMAIL.COM 843-339-8512

ROUTE 66 LAND AND CATTLE, LLC SHAD & MORGAN HILTON, PAUL MEUNIER P.O. BOX 378 RICHLAND, MO 65556 SHADHILTON@GMAIL.COM 573-842-5528 New York JEREMY WALLACE 11472 SOUTHARD RD CATO, NY 13033 JPWALLACE2003@GMAIL.COM 315-626-3169

Tennessee CONLEY FARMS SADIE CONLEY 360 BRAY RD SURGOINSVILLE, TN 37873 MTNPRIDERESTORATION@GMAIL.COM 828-778-5231 FETZER CATTLE COMPANY ASHLEY FETZER 1304 E JEFFERSON PIKE MURFREESBORO, TN 37130 ASHLEYFETZER313@GMAIL.COM 615-631-6787

Summer 2020

TENLEY CATE SHANNON 437 S ORE RD WESTPOINT, TN 38486 TENLEYCATE10@GMAIL.COM 931-231-9004 Texas BENTLEY LONDON PO BOX 28 COLLINSVILLE, TX 76233 AMY_LONDON@ME.COM 972-800-0676 Utah CROOK AND POST RANCH MARIO LA GIGLIA 937 E 350 N BLANDING, UT 84511 MDLAGIGLIA@GMAIL.COM 915-540-2736 West Virginia GREEN MTN FARM NATHAN & EASTON KISAMORE 1013 ELK GARDEN HWY ELK GARDEN, WV 26717 NKISAMO1@YAHOO.COM 301-697-9748

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Sale Report Southern Classic Sale April 18, 2020 Henderson, Texas 49 Animals Sold Averages:

Bulls ……………………………$3,036 Bred Heifers………………… …$2,350 Open Heifers…………………....$1,796

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The Way I see It by Bradley Wilson

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020. Holy cow! Most of the year has been unlike anything ever experienced before. When I first began writing these articles for the American Black Hereford, the purpose was an attempt to teach, help inform, or give advice from the experiences I have been fortunate enough to live through in the beef industry for the past 35-plus years. I have since come to believe that nothing could have prepared us for 2020. However, I am a firm believer that opportunities to learn can be found in any situation. With that said and while keeping this article based solely on the beef business, I would like to pass along a few of the things that our current situation has taught me. Quality means more than ever. There seems to be a greater price discrepancy between the good ones and the bad ones among most breeds this year. The good ones still command a strong price, but the working class and more common individuals have been harder to move. A quality product and doing a quality job are things I have always emphasized, and I will continue to shout the message to do so from the mountain top! In my younger days, I learned a quote that I try to live by. “The job you do is your signature; autograph your work with excellence.” Time has robbed me of the name of the person who deserves the credit for the quote, but the message remains as true as it ever did. Take time to study your personal circumstances, and make the best decisions possible, because they will affect your program and the breed more than you may ever realize. The genetics you select will affect your program 2 or 3 years from now. Feeding and sound management decisions may impact your program even longer. The relationships and bonds forged while in this breed may last a lifetime. These are just some of the reasons that I stress so frequently in these articles to do a quality job, raise a quality product, and be a quality person. Culling is always important In the past, I would not cull as hard as I should’ve, and I like to think I cull more stringently than most. I used to give more free passes to animals, but the older I’ve gotten, the tougher I am on them. When feeder calves were bringing $1,200, it was easy to justify keeping one around that did a sub-par job. However, if her calf barely pays for, or falls short of paying for the maintenance of the cow, then she doesn’t need to be here. It costs as much (or more) to feed a bad one as it does a good one. Cattle must earn their keep at my place. I don’t pamper them because this is my business and the cattle should be working for me, not me working for the cattle. A sharp knife and good culling program will help, and you’ll come out of it with a much higher quality herd. Our breed will come out of 2020 in a better place. All my life I’ve heard that every cloud has a silver lining, and many of those silver linings will be found at some upcoming sales in the form of

animals, genetics, and opportunities. I would encourage each of you to keep supporting upcoming shows, sales, and your fellow members whenever possible. Take the time to find the ones that will elevate your herd to new heights. We will continue to grow our programs and the breed, but we must be tireless in our efforts. If we stay the course, and we autograph our work with excellence, everyone involved will reap the benefits. This quarterly installment is an informational and editorial article submitted each issue by Bradley Wilson, ABHA Magazine Committee Chairman and owner of BW Cattle & Photography. ABHA

Summer 2020

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BREEDER DIRECTORY

ALABAMA

COLORADO

Black Dragon CATTLE COMPANY

Wild Rose

Registered Black Herefords, Elevated

Logan & Jennifer Hill · 970-629-8807 Rangely, CO Black www.blackdragoncattle.com Dragon dragoncattle@gmail.com Cattle

Flying Diamond K Ranch

ARKANSAS

Ft. Collins, CO

“Gems of the Rockies”

Basin Creek Farm REGISTERED BLACK HEREFORDS

John & Phyllis Jackson

FDK BLACK DIAMOND SELB The ABHA Bull that has it all.

Conventional & Sexed Semen International Certification 96.5% Embryos Available

KEN PADILLA 970-204-1000 ken-padilla@comcast.net

2694 Gourdneck Valley Road Malvern, AR 72104

REG# HB009240

501-844-7167 501-844-7168 jackson2503@yahoo.com

basincreekfarm.com

IDAHO

Mountain Fork Hereford Farm

REG. R E BLACK HEREFORD & REG. POLLED HEREFORD

RICHARD & EARLENE BOONE

3341 West Rodeo Crossing | Natural Dam, AR 72948

479-650-8906 479 650 89906 06 Ÿ 479 479-414-7718 414 7718 71 earleneboone@aol.com Ÿ rboone8900@aol.com www.mountainforkherefordfarm.com

Mark and Becky Ipsen Dingle, ID 83233 (208) 681-4794

Annual Internet Production Sale -1st Tuesday in March. Visit IPSENCATTLE.COM for more information.

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KENTUCKY

BREEDER DIRECTORY

ILLINOIS

HAMILTON’S

MADISON COUNTY AG AUCTION Hay and Straw IL Auction Lic. #041000806

MIKE HAMILTON - 618-410-4293 www.hamiltonhayauction.com

Mike Hamilton: 618-410-4293

LOUISIANA

Tyler Hamilton: 618-567-4339 Kyle Hamilton: 618-670-4027 ¶ Registered bulls - heifers - cow/calf pairs ¶ hamiltonfamilylivestock@gmail.com 7773 Vonnahmen h Road Bethalto, th lt IL 620100 V R d◆B

INDIANA

Heifers and Bulls For Sale Private Treaty u

Brian, Sharon Gilham & Family Sullivan, Indiana 812-564-2486

Legendary Livestock Black Hereford

IOWA

NICK & KELLI HERRINGTON 318-282-0453 h5blackherefords.com Bonita, B t herringtonfarms@gmail.com

LLouisiana

MISSOURI

MARK NUELLE HUSCHER FARMS REGISTERED BLACK HEREFORDS

MARK NUELLE HIGGINSVILLE, MO 64037

Cell: 660-238-3207 • nuelle@ctcis.net

Call or email today to get your business card in the next issue for as low as $50 per issue! Call Leanna McGuire at 937-248-4119 or Carey Brown at 859-948-1256 or email lmcguireabha@gmail.com

Summer 2020

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BREEDER DIRECTORY

TEXAS

OKLAHOMA

JL

Jeff & Lanee’ Anderson 4809 W. Wood Road Waukomis, OK 73773

Legacy

Black Herefords

580-747-1067

jllegacyblackherefords@gmail.com

BRYAN VALDEZ 830-480-9513

PETER VALDEZ 210-834-2835

DOUBLE V BLACK HEREFORDS 1725 Vaness RD. Poteet, TX 78065 MAIL@DOUBLEVBLACKHEREFORDS.COM WWW.DOUBLEVBLACKHEREFORDS.COM

SOUTH DAKOTA

Lori Makarski Cavitt, MS, DVM, cVMA Justin Cavitt, MS, DVM Henderson, TX 903-657-9212 • www.hendersonanimalcaretx.com

Call or email today to get your business card in the next issue for as low as $50 per issue! Call Leanna McGuire at 937-248-4119 or Carey Brown at 859-948-1256 or email lmcguireabha@gmail.com

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The American Black Hereford

Summer 2020


Upcoming Events October 2020

October 10 J & N Ranch Fall Production Sale, Leavenworth, KS, See ad on pg. 5 October 14-17 “A Royal Affair” ABHA National Black Hereford Sale, Kansas City, MO, See ad on pg. 7

November 2020

November 7 Midwest Breeders Black Hereford Sale, Carthage, IL, See ad on pg. 21

November 17-19 North American International Livestock Expo, Louisville, KY, See ad on pg. 9

February 2021

February 3-5 NCBA Convention, Nashville, TN

Have a date you would like added to the Calendar? Contact cbrownabha@gmail.com to get it added.

Join the American Black Hereford Association

Membership Fees: Life Membership fee is $1,000 Annual Membership Fee $100 per year (Jan. 1 - Dec. 31)

New annual memberships are prorated based on quarter joined

Junior Membership Fee $25 per year (Jan. 1 - Dec. 31)

Junior memberships are available to persons under 21 years of age and junior membership privileges expire at age 21.

Upon becoming a member and, in consideration of acceptance, I/we agree to conform to and abide by the By-Laws, Rules and Regulations of the Association as Amended or Modified from time to time. Application is hereby made for membership (Life, Annual or Junior) in the American Black Hereford Association.

__________________________________________________________ (Individual, Farm, Ranch, Partnership, etc.) __________________________________________________________ When you have completed the application, send it with the proper fee to Owner’s Name the Association at: PO Box 857, Platte City, MO 64079 __________________________________________________________ Mailing Address Membership Privileges: __________________________ ________ ________ - ________ 1. Only Life and Annual Members of the Association are eligible to City State Zip register cattle in the American Black Hereford Registry. __________________________ _____________________________ 2. Each Life and Annual Member shall have one (1) vote per animal Home Phone # Cell Phone # registered with the Association. Life and Annual Members may __________________________ _____________________________ not vote by absentee ballot. Business Phone # Fax # 3. Each Life, Annual and Junior Member will be informed by Association __________________________ _____________________________ mailings on a routine basis of important matters for both the Email Website (if you want it linked to ABHA) members and the ABHA. ________________________________________________ Birth Date - For Junior Members Only Upon becoming a member and, in consideration of acceptance, I/we ___________________________________ ___________________ agree to conform to and abide by the By-Laws, Rules and Regulations Signature Date Summer 2020

The American Black Hereford

29


Advertiser Index ABHA National Show & Sale Acorn Ridge Bacica Farms Basin Creek Farm Black Dragon Cattle Co. Burton Cattle Company Call Me Back Farms Double V Black Herefords Flying Diamond K Gro-Tec Inc. Ground Zero Farms H5 Ranch Hamilton Hay & Straw Hamilton Family Livestock Henderson Animal Care Hospital

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The American Black Hereford

7 2 28 26 26 27 26 28 3, 26 10,31 32 27 27 27 28

Summer 2020

Ipsen Cattle Company JL Legacy Black Hereford J & N Ranch Jo Bulls Legendary Livestock Longview Farms Mark Nuelle Farms MidContinent Livestock Supplements Midwest Breeders Missouri Black Herefords Mountain Fork Hereford Farm Peaceful Valley Ranch South Ark Cattle Co.

26 28 5 11 2 27 27, 31 13 21 25 26, 31 26 26


YEARLING BULLS & TWO-YEAR-OLD BULLS FOR SALE PRIVATE TREATY

Mountain Fork

HEREFORD FARM

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

479-650-8906 Ÿ 479-414-7718

earleneboone@aol.com Ÿ rboone8900@aol.com

www.mountainforkherefordfarm.com

RICHARD & EARLENE BOONE

3341 West Rodeo Crossing | Natural Dam, AR 72948

One of our leading herd sires: JN Balder A426 ET

BW ff.91

WW 47.36

YW 81.04

Reg #HB004416

MILK 23.43

M&G 47

MARK NUELLE HUSCHER FARMS DOO6

Purebred - Homo Black - Homo Polled 10324 West US 36 Ÿ Modoc, IN 47358

PH: 765-853-1246 FAX: 765-853-5886 EMAIL: gro-tec@hotmail.com www.gro-tec.com

BW 2.34

WW 37.39

YW 60.60

M&G 41.95

Bulls for Sale by Private Treaty

MILK 23.25

MARK NUELLE• Higginsville, MO 64037

A World-Wide Leader in Nutritionally Balanced Feed Ingredients for Livestock, Poultry and Pets Featuring Livestock Premixes and Cattle Mineral

Cell: 660-238-3207 • nuelle@ctcis.net

Summer 2020

The American Black Hereford

31


Where Champions

are Born

BULLS & HEIFERS FOR SALE AT THE RANCH GROUND ZERO FARMS

Rod Garman, Owner (479) 957-2068 62101 South 4680 Rd., Watts, OK 74964 WWW.GROUNDZEROFARMS.COM 32

The American Black Hereford

Summer 2020

Profile for The American Black Hereford

The American Black Hereford - Summer 2020  

The American Black Hereford - Summer 2020  

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