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volume 131, number 93

MONDAY, october 15, 2012

Campus hosts record number of international students Nearly 700 new international undergraduates enrolled By STEPHANIE B. NGUYEN Aggie News Writer

This quarter, there is an estimated 1,120 international undergraduate students at UC Davis, about 680 of whom are new. This number is approximately 70 to 80 percent higher than the number of international students in previous years; last year, for example, there were 344 international students. With increased undergraduate admis-

sions throughout the UC system, the number of admitted international and exchange students is rising as well. “UC Davis is committed to increasing California, out-of-state and international student numbers,” said Moira Delgado, the outreach coordinator for Services for International Students and Scholars (SISS). “In general, most campuses are moving toward internationalizing in the broad sense of the term: sending more students abroad, increasing international students and in-

ternationalizing the curriculum.” Still, many students are apprehensive about the growing number of out-ofstate and international students out of fear that they are taking their place within the system. According to the Student Fees Fact Sheet by Budget and Institutional Analysis, national and international students pay $12,711.82 per quarter, while California residents pay $5,085.82. “I’ve seen a steady increase in the num-

Plans to rebuild are in the works

Mark Allinder / Aggie

By ANDREW POH Aggie News Writer

If anyone has passed by 336 C St. — across from the Farmers Market — recently, they would notice that a vast, empty lot has replaced the Phi Delta Theta house. The project began on Sept. 17 when the asbestos was removed from the house’s exterior. The actual demolition of the house took place Sept. 24. Though the building went down relatively easily, the cleaning up of the space took another 10 days. Jeff Marschner, the historian and construction chair of Phi Delta Theta, detailed the building’s storied history via an email interview.

“The north side of the former structure was once the Davis Presbyterian Church, located at 4th and F Streets. It was built in 1870,” Marschner said. “In about 1912, the church outgrew the building, so they sold this structure, which was then moved to Fourth and C, where it was remodeled into a student boarding house. Within a year, it became the home of the local Calpha Fraternity (California Agricultural Fraternity).” The residence would then go on to house an Army Signal Corps group during WWII, and would be reclaimed by Calpha after the war in 1955. The Calpha Fraternity would subse-

quently become the Epsilon Chapter of Phi Delta Theta. In 2002, the Phi Delta Theta chapter in Davis disbanded, and the house was left in the custody of the Phi Delta Alumni group. It had originally been slated to be remodeled, but initial inspections showed that the entire building would need to be revamped from the ground up. “The final decision: just too cost prohibitive,” Marschner said. “An alumni survey found no support for the rehab project.” In 2010, the Phi Delta Theta chapter was recolonized, and it seems that the legacy of the building may continue to live on. Tim Zeff, the Alumni

Board treasurer, said that remodeling the house would have cost roughly the same as tearing it down, since the entire foundation needed to be reworked regardless. If they were to renovate the old house, they would have to lift it off the foundation and place it back on top once the foundation work was completed. “The structure was antiquated and in need of modernization to fit in with the needs of today’s students,” Zeff said. “Though the new house will be smaller in terms of square footage, it will still hold the same number of people.” There are plans in the works for a new building, slated to be opened by September 2013. This building will house 19 beds in single and double configuration, with a dining and living room that will be estimated to accommodate 75 people. Max Tipp, vice president of the Phi Delta Theta Epsilon chapter and a senior international relations major, shared his thoughts on the upcoming housing project. “We’re really looking forward to the new and improved real estate on the block and are very grateful to our alumni for making all of this happen,” Tipp said. “They truly are wonderful men and I, for one, feel extremely obliged to be a part of this organization.” ANDREW POH can be reached at city@ theaggie.org.

News iN Brief

Hero dog arrives at UC Davis from the Philippines Nearly one year ago, Kabang, or “Spotty,” a dog from the Philippines, jumped in front of a motorcycle to save her owner’s daughter and niece. She lost her snout and upper jaw in the process. On Thursday, Kabang arrived at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine for examinations to discern what could be done to help her. She is estimated to stay for at least six weeks. According to a UC Davis news service press release, Kabang underwent an hourlong preliminary exam that involved blood and urine tests. Veterinary surgeons Boaz Arzi and Frank Verstraete are working to determine the best route through

Today’s weather Partly cloudy High 86 Low 59

which to approach the problem. They anticipate that Kabang will require a minimum of two surgeries, one that would deal primarily on dental work and another that would attempt to close the facial wound. There are no plans of developing a prosthetic snout. “We are confident we can improve her condition going forward,” Verstraete said in the release. Kabang will not be made available to the media to reduce any added stress and risk of infection. More information and updates on Kabang’s treatment can be found at vetmed.ucdavis.edu/vmth/ small_animal/kabang. — Muna Sadek

‘Educate’ phone app garners responses to vice presidential debate Voter opinions to the vice presidential debate between United States Vice President Joe Biden and Rep. Paul Ryan were collected through a new real-time smartphone application co-developed by UC Davis political science assistant professor Amber Boydstun. The Educate application was released by React Labs Oct. 3 at the UC Davis School of Law at King Hall on the night of the first presidential debate. 1,472 people reacted via the application to the vice presidential debate.

Forecast I guess fall decided to tease us last week because it’s back to summer weather this week. Maybe it’ll be winter next week? Written by Amanda Nguyen Weather report courtesy of www.weather.com

See STUDENTS, page 2

Square Tomatoes Craft Fair continues and expands

Phi Delta Theta house demolished

The Phi Delta Theta house was demolished due to the need for extensive repairs. Reconstruction of the house is expected to be finished by Sept. 2013.

ber of international students occupying seats in lecture halls, in the library, at the MU — everywhere,” said fourth-year chemical engineering major Kent Ly. “I suspect that the university is accepting more students from abroad to bridge the gap in funding since non-Californian students pay more than twice the typical resident in tuition and fees. I fear that instead of directly addressing the real issue

According to a summary of the reaction results, Biden was preferred as the debate winner, with 57 percent in his favor. 10 percent of respondents said that the two candidates tied. 53 percent identified as Democrats, 31 percent as Republicans and 16 percent as independent/ other. Reactions were also categorized by specific topics and debate style. Further information on the application can be found at reactlabs.com. — Muna Sadek

Tuesday

Wednesday

Sunny

Sunny

High 87 Low 56

High 90 Low 53

New “artisanal Farmers Market” on Sunday

courtesy

By PAAYAL ZAVERI Aggie News Writer

Davis’ Square Tomatoes Craft Fair is back this month with even more vendors, activities and booths. The fair was started in August and the community has taken such a liking to it that it is slated to continue each month. This month it will be on Sunday, Oct. 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. between 6th and G Street, right next to the Davis Food Co-op. Sally Parker, the founder of the event, started the fair after she saw the success of weekly craft fairs in Eugene and Portland, Ore. “I wanted Square Tomatoes to be a direct market, like an old-fashioned Farmers Market, where artisans bring their work directly to visitors without a large payment to a middleman,” Parker said in an email interview. “Visitors avoid paying the 50 percent markup normal to retail sales of crafts. Both vendors and visitors get a huge bargain.” However, the event itself seems to have very little to do with square tomatoes. Meant as a spoof, Parker named it after Davis’ unique but controversial agricultural invention: the square tomato. The fair has live music, food booths, comfort zones and hands-on craft tutorials. People can learn crafts from an experienced teacher. Many of the vendors at the craft fair are current or former instructors at the UC Davis Craft Center, including Parker, who teaches “Models, Molds and Microsculpture,” a shortcut in the silver and bronze casting process. Dede deGraffenried teaches bronze casting, Monica Riche taught sewing and Carol Wheaton taught knitting. Other vendors include local artists and shop owners from the Etsy website. “I like to describe our craft fair as a Farmers Market for artists. We had our first craft fair in August and that was all done by Sally,” Riche said in an email interview. “In this month’s fair, I will be teaching people to make [Día de los Muertos] pendants, also called sugar skulls. I will have polymer clay out and everything available to have people come and make their

own pendants.” This month’s fair will have a storytelling contest. Parker will tell the story “High Noon at Twilight.” She says she is putting a new spin on the story of an antisocial corpse who refuses to decompose or stop talking until he is outwitted by a mediocre violinist. Dr. D, a former professor at UC Davis, and Denise Hoffner are the two other storytellers. “Dr. D. will tell ‘Huge,’ a story of Davis genetic engineering gone awry. Denise Hoffner will tell ‘Magic at the Crossroads,’ about an event in the life of a Davis crossing guard,” Parker said. “So far we have three storytellers, but grandstanders with good lungs are welcome to join if they go to the website and submit their story ahead of time.” Ron Goldberg, Wendy Silk and a bass player will be doing a few riffs in the background to stories. They will also be playing before and after the contest. In addition to the craft booths and storytelling activities, the fair will also have food booths by Kathmandu Kitchen and Davis Creamery. “I hadn’t heard about the craft fair until recently, but it seems like a typical Davis event, kind of like the Farmers Market, but with crafts, and that’s always fun,” said Pauleen Truong, a third-year communication major. “The fact that they have food booths by Kathmandu and Davis Creamery just makes the event even better.” For people who want to take a break from the activity and just relax, there is a spot to do that. A booth called the comfort zone has wicker chairs, free iced tea and shade for those who want to just relax. “I think it’s a great way to spend a Sunday, especially this month’s because we are doing a storytelling contest for anyone who has a great imagination, and tarot readings,” Riche said. “Students might find the craft fair inspirational for their own projects, learn about the Davis community and understand the reasons for having local markets.” PAAYAL ZAVERI can be reached at city@ theaggie.org.

Did you know that you are born with 300 bones but as you become an adult, you’ll only have 206? Mindblown. Amanda Nguyen


page two

2 monday, october 15, 2012

daily calendar dailycal@theaggie.org

TODAY Linux Users’ Group of Davis meeting 7 to 9 p.m. Blanchard Community Meeting Room, Yolo County Public Library, 315 East 14th St. Listen to speaker Steve Inness in this lecture titled “Home CNC Machining with Linux.” This meeting will demonstrate actual machining, describe the electronics, and show how to install and use free open-source software under Linux. Attendees will get a chance to take home their own engraved/machined object. For more information, visit www.lugod.org/ meeting/upcoming.

Yolo NHP JPA Meeting 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Atrium Training Room, County Administration Building, 625 Court Street, Woodland Join the Yolo Natural Heritage Program in their Joint Powers Agency board meeting.

TUESDAY University of California Education Abroad Program Info Sessions Noon to 1 p.m. Education Abroad Center on 3rd & A Street The world is your oyster, but if you have some hesitations about going the road less traveled, learn about programs where there are more locals than tourists.

Global Business Brigades 7 to 8 p.m. 184 Young The Davis chapter of Global Business Brigades is now recruiting members. If you are interested in global development, business and volunteering abroad, go to the info night to learn more.

Prytanean Women’s Honor Society Info Night 7:15 to 8 p.m. 126 Voorhies Go to this info night to learn more about Prytanean Women’s Honor Society, the oldest collegiate women’s honorary society in the U.S., and what we do for the Davis community.

West Coast Civil Liberties Tour 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 1002 Geidt Attend this event sponsored by The Young

Americans for Liberty titled “The War on Terror, Civil Liberties and the Constitution.” Email mdpinter@ucdavis.edu for more information.

WEDNESDAY The Enchanted Cellar All Day 17 Wright Visit the Enchanted Cellar for Halloween Costume Rentals at UC Davis. There is a 50 percent discount for UCD students, faculty, staff and affiliates. The Enchanted Cellar will be open until Oct. 31. Appointments are preferred. Call (530) 752-0740 or email rcfemling@ ucdavis.edu for an appointment. For more information go to theatredance. ucdavis.edu.

Science Café: How Plants and Animals Use Chemicals for Survival and Defense   5:15 to 6 p.m. Wyatt Deck (rain location: 146 Environmental Horticulture) Prof. Chris Jeffrey, Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Reno, will speak on chemical communications between plants and other organisms, or “chemical ecology.” Co-sponsored by Prof. Jared Shaw and the Chemistry Department, this program is funded by the National Science Foundation. For more information, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

Global Business Brigades 7 to 8 p.m. 119 Wellman The Davis chapter of Global Business Brigades is now recruiting members. If you are interested in global development, business and volunteering abroad, go to the info night to learn more.

Vet Aide Club Meeting 7 to 9 p.m. 1003 Giedt Learn about the club, internship and gaining hands on experience with animals and veterinary medicine.

To receive placement in the AGGIE DAILY CALENDAR, email dailycal@theaggie. org or stop by 25 Lower Freeborn by noon the day prior to your event. Due to space constraints, all event descriptions are subject to editing and priority will be given to events that are free of charge and geared toward the campus community.

Senate Briefs ASUCD Senate meetings are scheduled to begin Thursdays at 6:10 p.m. Times listed are according to the clock at the Oct. 11 meeting location, the Memorial Union’s Mee Room. The ASUCD president is not required to attend Senate meetings.

Meeting called to order at 6:18 p.m. Rebecca Sterling, ASUCD president, absent Yena Bae, ASUCD vice president, present Justin Goss, ASUCD senator, pro tempore, present Kabir Kapur, ASUCD senator, present Jared Crisologo-Smith, ASUCD senator, present Bradley Bottoms, ASUCD senator, present Anni Kimball, ASUCD senator, present Paul Min, ASUCD senator, present Don Gilbert, ASUCD senator, present Joyce Han, ASUCD senator, present Erica Padgett, ASUCD senator, present Beatriz Anguiano, ASUCD senator, present Patrick Sheehan, ASUCD senator, present Yara Zokaie, ASUCD senator, absent

Presentations The nonprofit blood donor organization BloodSource spoke about the FDA regulation that states that men who have had sex with men since 1977 are deferred as blood donors. Senior Medical Director Chris Gresens stated that the regulation was based on statistics, specifically regarding a trend upward in HIV-positive donors. Crisologo-Smith expressed concerns about ASUCD supporting an organization that does not consider the FDA regulation discriminatory.

Appointments and confirmations Julia Sweitzer, Jenna Wooster, Alison Kang and Shannon Smith were confirmed as External Affairs Commissioners.

Senate Bill 7, authored by Rivilis, coauthored by Goss, allocates $245 for a “Meals with ASUCD” program, by which students in the CoHo can receive vouchers to eat lunch with ASUCD officials. Padgett believed that the program would work better if the vouchers were distributed by Student Services, rather than by the pro tempore. The bill passed unanimously. Senate Bill 9, authored by Han, coauthored by Bottoms, outlines the record-keeping guidelines for the ASUCD Scholarship Committee. The bill passed unanimously. Senate Bill 10, authored and introduced by Goss, adds Meatless Mondays to the CoHo by making meatless options less expensive on Mondays. The bill passed unanimously. Senate Bill 11, authored by Han, coauthored by Bottoms, outlines the recordkeeping guidelines for the Champagne Committee. The bill passed unanimously. Senate Bill 12, authored by Fong, coauthored by Cano and Dias, purchases 2,500 ASUCD brochures. The bill passed unanimously.

Consideration of urgent legislation An urgent Senate resolution to support Proposition 30, which will help avoid significant budget cuts in exchange for a small tax increase, passed unanimously.

Meeting adjourned at 11:10 p.m. Open positions within ASUCD can be found at vacancy.ucdavis.edu. ROHIT RAVIKUMAR compiles the Senate briefs. He can be reached at campus@theaggie.org.

In the Oct. 11 article “Cross Country Preview,” a mugshot of Alycia Cridebring was said to be of Sarah Sumpter. The Aggie regrets this error.

Hudson Lofchie Science Editor

Hannah Strumwasser Managing Editor

Zenita Singh Opinion Editor

Jonathan Wester Business Manager Caelum Shove Advertising Manager Muna Sadek Campus Editor Claire Tan City Editor Elizabeth Orpina Arts Editor Devon Bohart Features Editor Matthew Yuen Sports Editor

Joey Chen Copy Chief Brian Nguyen Photography Editor Janice Pang Design Director James Kim Asst. Design Director Amanda Nguyen Night Editor Irisa Tam Art Director David Ou New Media Director

One Shields Ave. 25 Lower Freeborn, UCD Davis, CA 95616 Editorial (530) 752-0208 Advertising (530) 752-0365 Fax (530) 752-0355

vestment of recycled entertainment? Some will say TV has the potential for greatness; I say TV has done plenty to stake its claim as an art form. Nick Art is a matter of context, Frederici sometimes broad but often specific to individuals and settings. There are schools of thought that would lead some people to understand that anything and everything is art. For the most part, however, art follows certain conventions. ooks brick us up in Art is aesthetic, which houses or quiet cor- means that it has a qualiners of rooms to let ty that can be seen or felt, us enjoy a lonely expebut not necessarily unrience. Movies bring us derstood. Art is thoughtout in the open, where provoking, but the qualwe walk into dark rooms ity of art is that it creates and enjoy an experience a change in our thought with strangers. Art galleror makes us aware of how ies bunch us up with peo- thoughtful we can be. ple who are just as stupid Using this criteria, we but not as dumb, so we’re can plainly see how paintpumped ing, song, with prefilm, litThey challenge convention and erature tentious conversastereotypes to make us question and photion while tography their motivations .... scratching all beour heads at came stacertain things and staring ples of art; they are things in amazement at others. that we can clearly catego Is TV left to the bottom rize under so vague a term. feeders of those searchIt’s odd that TV remains viring for enjoyment? Is TV tually untouched in serious the hobby of the brainthought about art, considdead, the mindless many ering its similarity to these who are able and willing to “standard” artforms. pour hours into a poor in Good television falls

Small screen

B

somewhere between books and film when we consider its usefulness as an art. It allows for much greater characterization than the standard two-hour movie, but it faces the same difficulty in doing so without the use of extensive text, which books can afford. Shows like “Breaking Bad” and “Mad Men” go deep into exploring characters, putting them through trials that show us their weaknesses but also how strongly they can rise above them. They challenge convention and stereotypes to make us question their motivations and where our own loyalties lie after our hero is broken down, or takes a patient and subtle turn toward becoming the villain. This is fiction with all the magic and subtlety of film, with all the depth of the greatest literature. It is just as thought-provoking as the most disturbing forms of art — in that it changes something in us — enjoyed by the masses. Those who understand it eat it up; those who don’t are either the upturned noses of society or the true bottom feeders who live off the facets of television produced just for them. What keeps us from recognizing TV as art? The scraps reserved for the bot-

tom feeders. Certainly not all TV is art: Daily airing soap operas and reality TV shows flood the networks with shit when too much time is left over. Art takes effort and creativity; in the case of television, it can also take a lot of money. A 24hour cycle of never-ending TV is bound to pick up a lot of dead weight in the form of reproducible plot lines on interchangeable sitcoms, repetitive game shows and reality TV, and stories that never end, which is the case for soap operas. Not every picture tacked to the wall can be art, but is a blank canvas not a symbol of art to be? Is a camera not as much a tool for creating art when it is aimed for the small screen than when it is aimed for the big screen? The scraps of television slow the pace of its journey toward being considered a legitimate art form. However, they are a necessary evil, a placeholder for the future, like when someone turns a blank canvas into a beautiful painting and you can’t help but think that before there was art, there was nothing. NICK FREDERICI has never seen Jersey Shore; spam him with clips at nrfred@ ucdavis.edu.

example, when it comes to financial matters, I think the UC should prioritize Californian students because Cont. from front page the UC is a public university. The same goes for admittance. However, - which in this case is tuition hikes I do think having more internationthe UC system will resort to decreasal students can also bring benefits ing the number of California-based students admitted in favor of accept- for the school because they bring in more diversity and a different pering more international and out-ofspective for the campus communistate students.” ty. Our world is so interconnected Despite the negative response, that being open-minded and having many international students remain optimistic about their role on campus a more international perspective is useful for everyone.” and what they can offer. “I think I can empathize with their To help incoming internationviews to some extent,” said fourthal students acclimate to American year design major Madevi Sununiversity culture, new seminars Suon, an international student from are being offered at the Student Cambodia, about the negative reAcademic Success Center that focus sponse from in-state students. “For on American cultural values. In ad-

dition, the International Students Club was recently formed to help students more easily integrate themselves into the campus community. SISS also launched a mentoring program that serves a similar purpose. Delgado said that the presence of international students is an asset to the campus. “International students bring incredible diversity to our campus and it is not only an opportunity for them to learn about U.S. culture but also a wonderful way for U.S. students to learn about other cultures,” Delgado said.

which will put them to the test. Two against Sacramento State, one more against UCSB and two matchups with Cal Poly. The Aggies are 6-4-4 on a fourgame winning streak and in second place in the Big West. We’ll wait and see, a few games more. There may be something there that wasn’t there

before. What we can be certain of, though, is that these games will be intensely electric. A shining new era is tiptoeing nearer, so be prepared.

students

STEPHANIE B. NGUYEN can be reached at campus@ theaggie.org.

Consideration of old legislation

Correction

Janelle Bitker Editor in Chief

The california Aggie

The California Aggie is entered as first-class mail with the United States Post Office, Davis, Calif., 95616. Printed Monday through Thursday during the academic year and once a week during Summer Session II at The Davis Enterprise, Davis, Calif., 95616. Accounting services are provided by ASUCD. The Aggie is distributed free on the UC Davis campus and in the Davis community. Mail subscriptions are $100 per academic year, $35 per quarter and $25 for the summer. Views or opinions expressed in The Aggie by editors or columnists regarding legislation or candidates for political office or other matters are those of the editors or columnist alone. They are not those of the University of California or any department of UC. Advertisements appearing in The Aggie reflect the views of advertisers only; they are not an expression of editorial opinion by The Aggie. The Aggie shall not be liable for any error in published advertising unless an advertising proof is clearly marked for corrections by the advertiser. If the error is not corrected by The Aggie, its liability, if any, shall not exceed the value of the space occupied by the error. Further, The Aggie shall not be liable for any omission of an advertisement ordered published. All claims for adjustment must be made within 30 days of the date of publication. In no case shall The Aggie be liable for any general, special or consequential damages. © 2009 by The California Aggie. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form whatsoever is forbidden without the expressed written permission of the copyright owner.

The California Aggie is printed on recycled paper

yuen Cont. from page 3 ing and they can beat anyone in the country. This is what UC Davis soccer is capable of. The Aggies have five more games remaining in the season, all of

MATTHEW YUEN is feeling the pain of Derek Jeter’s fractured ankle. Send your Get Well Soon cards to him at sports@theaggie.org.

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SUBLIMINAL MESSAGES DO NOT WORK


THE BACKSTOP monday, october 15, 2012

The california Aggie

it’s obvious that it will take more than a soccer juggernaut that is scary beyond all reason to throw it off. The Aggies showed last Matthew year that they can handle Yuen the top teams in the country. UC Davis took down thenNo. 6 UCLA in overtime. Who scored the goal that broke the Bruins? None other than Alex Henry, who is turning out to be quite the giant killer. “UCLA was a huge win because we were relatively Davis is a little town, a qui- young and it wasn’t expected by anybody because they’re et village. Every day like the one of the most storied proone before. But Saturday was different. grams in the country,” Shaffer said. “UCSB has been on the The Aggies, facing off with top of the conference for so eighth-ranked UC Santa long, in a conference that is Barbara, faced quite a tall one of the best in the nation task. The last time UC Davis beat the Gauchos was back in for men’s soccer.” 2008, when they were ranked Yet, the victory over the Big West Conference powerabove UCSB and got to the house UCSB means much second round of the NCAA more to the Aggies. tournament. It’s not just a victory over a That was the Aggies’ only top-10 team in the nation. It’s win over the Gauchos in the past 6 years. UC Davis holds a not just a conference win that 1-8-1 record against UCSB in puts the Aggies in a good position to battle for an NCAA the last 10 matchups. tournament berth and a But what are all these league title. Nor is it just annumbers I’ve thrown at you? other victory that stretched Does it prove that this game UC Davis’ winning streak to was a fluke? By no means. These are to four games. show you that, even though It’s all about where the Saturday’s game was on the Aggies are at this point in time. UC Davis, as Shaffer same level of epic proporsaid, has been getting better tions as the we-blew-upthe-Death-Star moment, or every day as time goes on. Since Shaffer signed the that a-1-year-old-boy-dehuge class of 2014 — the feated-Voldemort incident, class that consisted of Alex it shouldn’t be seen as an Aguiar, Henry, Omar Zeenni, aberration. the Reese brothers and Kevin This should not be looked Schulte to name a few — and at as Aggies playing the best game of their lives today, but the talented class of 2015, UC Davis soccer has been on the a breakthrough, the shatterrise. ing of that wall that was in The Aggies continue to deplace due to many factors, velop and cultivate young none of which are a lack of talent and the lagging wave talent. is starting to really break Once junior Alex Henry through. This could be a drilled his kick into the top turning point in Aggie soccer of the opposite corner of the goal, everyone celebrated like history. This sort of win will be the game was over. good for team morale and But for those last couple players will be able to see minutes, UCSB threatened they have a world-class socto score and send the game cer program here at UC into overtime. If you want to Davis, adding to the prestige set a record for the longest time holding your breath, try of the school and sport. watching the Aggies’ play the A full stadium of 1,344 fans showed that some peoclosing minutes of a game ple have figured out that UC while in the lead. But so far, this is one of the Davis soccer is something greatest wins of the UC Davis special. Beating a team that holds every attendance remen’s soccer program’s record possible — UCSB cent past. This is a trend that we can track, that head coach pulls in over 60,000 fans every year, averaging close to Dwayne Shaffer knew his 5,000 people per game, inteam was capable of. cluding the game against “This is what I projected Cal Poly that brought in that we’re capable of, since close to 14,000 fans (way last year we were so young more than our football stabut played and fought evdium can even hold) — is ery game,” Shaffer said. “We something like a David vs. tied the national record with Goliath story. 11 overtime games and I thought we were on that path But no longer should UC Davis be considered the unagain this year with 11 overderdog that has little chance time games, but now I think of winning. The Aggies aren’t we’re starting to get into a just a thrilling team to watch. groove.” They’re extremely entertain Now, if this groove is anything like Emperor Kuzco’s, See YUEN, page 2

Davis vs. Goliath

3

Aggies split weekend series Sophomore middle blockers display prowess By PK HATTIS

Aggie Sports Writer

The Aggie women’s volleyball team failed to extend their winning streak to three games, but still managed to split the weekend series, providing gritty matches and graceful sweeps for the large fan turnout. Friday kicked off as anticipated — with a tough battle against UC Santa Barbara. UC Davis fought hard but ultimately lost the duel 25-21, 20-25, 25-11, 25-23. Redemption could not come quick enough, as Cal Poly came to town the following night. This time, the Aggies were ready, making it a quick sweep in three games, 25-21, 25-11, 25-20. Senior outside hitter Allison Whitson finished the weekend with a total of 18 kills while junior setter Jenny Woolway served up 73 assists of her own over the weekend. The outstanding play of sophomore middle blockers Victoria Lee and Katie Quinn provided fuel for the Aggies all weekend, tallying a combined 15 blocks. Lee had 17 kills while Quinn had seven of her own for the weekend. Friday — UC Santa Barbara 3, UC Davis 1 UC Davis coach Jamie Holmes predicted a marathon of a match against the Gauchos, and she was right on the money. The box score will provide the stats, but what it can’t display is the quality of each rally that kept both teams on their toes throughout the match. Santa Barbara came out aggressive, taking advantage of the Aggies’ shaky passing and timid serving. “We want to improve the overall tone of how we’re playing the game in terms of our character and our personalities and presence,” Holmes said. “We were really quiet and isolated like six individuals on the court.” In the second set, UC Davis began

Michelle Tran / Aggie

Sophomore Victoria Lee celebrates after the Aggies scored a goal against Cal Poly. UC Davis won the match 3-0. to gel as they rallied for the win behind the play of sophomore outside hitter Valerie Brain, who came alive with five kills in the second set. Each rally seemed to take on a life of its own as each crushing hit turned into a spectacular dig by the opposite team. Ultimately, UCSB’s aggressive attack paid off as their confidence helped them withstand a late surge by the Aggies in the fourth and final set. Saturday — UC Davis 3, Cal Poly 0 Cal Poly may be a disappointing 1-18 for the year, but there was nothing lackluster about the Aggies’ threegame sweep on Saturday night. For Lee and Quinn, it was their chance to establish themselves as legitimate pieces of the Aggies’ arsenal. “They are young middles; this is their first time starting,” Holmes said. “Every time they play they learn about out-of-system play and

about how to insert themselves out of system. That’s the learning curve for any young middle. But when we’re on and they are in system, it is really fun.” Perhaps the biggest difference in the two games this weekend involved the Aggies’ ability to run the offense as designed by Holmes. The Aggies improved their sideout percentage to an impressive 71 percent on Saturday as opposed to their disappointing 50 percent efficiency on Friday against UCSB. The Aggies’ offensive game plan will be put to the ultimate test when they travel next Thursday against the number-one team in the conference, Hawaii. “We’re going to have to have a mindset that we can go there and win,” Holmes said. “Hawaii averages 6,000 to 7,000 fans per game, so we’re going to have to enjoy that and love it.” PK Hattis can be contacted at sports@theaggie.org


classifieds

4 monday, october 15, 2012

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FOR RELEASE JANUARY 9, 2010

california Aggie Los Angeles Times Daily The Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 One making a brief contribution? 10 Missile Command game company 15 Writer painted by Manet 16 Went wild 17 Family racing enthusiast 18 Island where Icarus was imprisoned 19 The Jonas Brothers, e.g. 20 Panini cheese 22 Northwest Passage explorer 23 Actress Paquin et al. 25 Prefix with skeleton 26 “You wish!” 27 Nobelist Hammarskjöld 28 One who refuses to take an oath? 30 Sub builder? 31 Examine closely 32 Parka material 34 Place to pick up a cat 37 Aplenty 38 Fawners 40 Madrigalist’s accompaniment 41 Items in a modern bibliog. 42 Charmers 44 Clock-setting std. 47 Tim of “Private Practice” 48 Steady 49 West Indian sorcery 51 It may be at the end of the line 52 Vivacious wit 54 Erato’s instrument, in some depictions 55 “My Fair Lady” race site 57 Cádiz’s region 59 Put on again 60 Smooth, lustrous quality 61 Bowling pin wood 62 Where you might see a cop aim a gun

By Brad Wilber

DOWN 1 Group of five 2 Historic Nile excavation site 3 Heading up 4 Metal industry acronym 5 Grazing ground 6 Book after II Chronicles 7 Miraculous 8 Delon and Resnais of French film 9 Classic man’sbest-friend novel 10 Chevron competitor 11 Seaman 12 Against 13 Mall tenant 14 Something a Parisian might get stuck on? 21 Deviate from team strategy 24 Netflix genre 26 Jane Eyre’s charge __ Varens 29 Personal or special things 31 Big-headed? 33 Joe Buck’s friend

1/9/10

Thursday’s puzzle solved Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

34 Breeding center 35 The Great Barrier Reef borders it 36 It’s usually a regular one worn backwards 39 Outdo 40 Get no use 43 Root crop high in vitamin C 44 Yellowstone attraction

1/9/10

45 Actress Tomei 46 Daddy Warbucks’s hired muscle 50 Not pulling any punches 52 Infinitive with a circumflex 53 Receipts 56 Drum filler 58 Soup-to-go need

Sudoku

Websites/Internet Overpopulation is sexually transmitted. http://population.sierraclub.org/ population/

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Easy

Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square. Each Sudoku has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing.


October 15, 2012