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Conference shake-up?

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Should UC Davis find a new conference? Read about it on page 5.

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VOLUME 131, NUMBER 41

News iN Brief

Federal court upholds California affirmative action ban The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Proposition 209, the state’s ban on using race, ethnicity and gender in college admissions for public colleges and universities yesterday. The ruling marked the second time this court has turned back a challenge to California’s voter initiative Prop 209, which was passed in 1996. Proponents of affirmative action requested that the court reconsider its 1997 decision after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2003 that affirmative action could be used in admissions decisions, and said they would continue their fight. Attorney George B. Washington, who is representing the minority students and advocacy groups that filed the latest challenge to Prop 209, said he would ask the full appellate court to review the case since this decision was issued by a threejudge panel. In its ruling, the court rejected the plaintiffs’ arguments that a new ruling is needed and said the previous decision still applies. At least six states have adopted bans on using affirmative action in state college admissions decisions. Other than California, they include Michigan, Arizona, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Washington. — Angela Swartz

Summer Abroad expedited enrollment this week This week, students can apply for UC Davis Summer Abroad and secure their spot in one day. The UC Davis Summer Abroad program is usually 4 weeks and students receive 8 units. The programs are led by UC faculty. There are still spots open in programs in Argentina, Australia, the United Kingdom, Chile and more. For more information, students can visit summerabroad.ucdavis.edu or the UC Davis Summer Abroad Office located in the UC Davis Education Abroad Center on the corner of Third and A Street. The expedited enrollment deadline is this Friday. — Hannah Strumwasser

Today’s weather Chance of showers High 69 Low 44

TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 2012

Students reveal best lesser-known jobs on campus Drive golf carts, plan children’s fair, repair buses

Evan Davis / Aggie

Odd jobs around campus range from route supervisors for Unitrans to working as an assistant for the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

By DEVON BOHART Aggie Associate Editor

Bus driver, ASUCD Coffee House vendor and Dining Commons worker are only a few of the various jobs held by UC Davis students on

campus. There are even more jobs held by students that are less common to the public eye. While it is almost common knowledge that students are the bus drivers for Unitrans, they are also the mechanics that service the buses and the instructors that test the drivers of the

various buses. It is also students’ jobs to ensure that all is running smoothly; these students are referred to as route supervisors.

See JOBS, page 5

CSU freezes Spring 2013 enrollment System will reduce enrollment further if tax increase fails students in Fall 2013 if Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposed tax increases are not approved by voters in November, officials added. “I fear that I will not gain admission to my local CSU if Brown’s tax proposal does not pass,” said David Owen, a junior at San Diego High School. “Without funding they can’t possibly cater to all of the Irisa Tam / Aggie qualified students in the region, including myself.” Brown’s proposal, informal-

By SARA ISLAS

Aggie News Writer

California State University (CSU) will cancel spring admissions for the 2013 year in an attempt to lower CSU-wide enrollment by 16,000 students. The reduction is part of a drastic cost-cutting effort that has been initiated in response to the recent budget cuts, said CSU officials at a Regents meeting in San Francisco last month. CSU will have to reduce enrollment by up to 25,000

ly known as the Millionaire’s Tax, calls for a sales tax increase in order to pull more revenue from high earners, particularly millionaires. Backed by labor unions and students, the plan would raise sales tax by a quarter cent and expire after four years. It would also raise personal income tax for people earning more than $250,000 a year. State finance officials estimate the tax measure would bring in about $9 billion into the state’s general fund the first year and $7.1 billion each succeeding year. The 23 CSU campuses, which have collectively faced budget cuts totaling up to $750 million in the past year, will lose $200 mil-

Education for Sustainable Living Program offered Spring quarter Students can receive units while learning about local sustainability By MICHELLE MURPHY Aggie News Writer

Sustainability has been an increasingly hot topic in recent years throughout many California universities, and at UC Davis the Campus Center for the Environment (CCE) aims to promote environmental awareness and a sustain-

able lifestyle. This quarter, UC Davis students can participate in the Education for Sustainable Living Program (ESLP), a two-unit seminar series that provides students with the opportunity to listen

Forecast Mother nature is throwing a curveball at us this week with the shower chance and the partial cloudiness, but it makes for more interesting small talk ... if you’re into that sort of thing. Tyson Tilmont, atmospheric science major Aggie Forecasting Team

to dis-tinguished guest lecturers and learn more about sustainability in Davis and across California. “The class is Irisa Tam / Aggie a combination

See CCE, page 6 Wednesday

Thursday

Partly cloudy

Partly cloudy

High 67 Low 45

High 66 Low 43

lion more if the governor’s tax increases are not passed. Reducing enrollment is the key component of the 417,000-student system’s plan to survive in the wake of more cuts. The uncertainty of the situation has left CSU administration to guess the number of students it can afford to admit and the number of employees it can afford to pay. “It’s made planning very difficult — and it’s made serving our students as they ought to be served very challenging,” said Robert Turnage, CSU’s chief budget administrator, during a press conference at the Capitol last week.

See CSU, page 5

ICC’s Countdown to summer! How many times were you asked during spring break if you had a job or internship for the summer? Did the question raise your stress level? Did it make you want to hide or go back to sleep? For many, the process of landing a position is daunting and easily brushed aside for more pressing issues like getting into classes for Spring quarter, buying books and reconnecting with friends. Help is available! The labor market is tight, but there are companies and organizations that want to hire UC Davis students. There are simple steps you can take to be one that is selected and make progress on your professional path. This is the first in a 10-week series called “Countdown

See ICC, page 5

How to make it through the first week of the new quarter: utilize all of the facilities in which you can purchase coffee. Amanda Nguyen


page two

2 tuesday, april 3, 2012

daily calendar dailycal@theaggie.org

TODAY Diabetes Advocacy and Awareness Group Meeting 6:10 to 7 p.m. 263 Olson Join DAAG in their first meeting of Spring quarter to help spread awareness of diabetes.

WEDNESDAY

Summer Abroad Info Session: Israel, “Arab-Israeli Relations” Noon to 1 p.m. Education Abroad Center, Third and A Street Come listen to the instructor talk about this summer’s UC Davis study abroad program in Israel!

Shinkoskey Noon Concert

UC Davis Summer Abroad Expedited Enrollment Period 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Education Abroad Center, Third and A Street For students interested in taking their college experience global this summer, UC Davis Summer Abroad is introducing a new expedited enrollment period, allowing students to secure their spots in a program in a single day.

Student Farm Introductory Tour 10 to 10:50 a.m. North entrance to the Bowley Center Take this tour to learn more about how to get involved at the student farm.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous 7 to 8:30 p.m. Davis United Methodist Church, 1620 Anderson Road Free yourself from excess weight and/ or obsessional thoughts about food and body image. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a 12-step fellowship based on the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Meetings are open and free to the public. Visit foodaddicts.org for other meeting locations.

Shakespeare Reading Group — Richard III 7 to 8:30 p.m. Pence Gallery — “Learning Center” Upstairs, 212 D St. The next Reading Group is right around the corner to broaden your knowledge of Shakespeare by reading Richard III. No prior knowledge is necessary. Students $8, Adults $10. RSVP by e-mailing davis. shakespeare@gmail.com or calling (530) 802-0998.

Jordan’s Beard and Yogoman Burning Band 8 to 10 p.m. Luigis, 213 E St. Jordan’s Beard and Yogoman Burning Band will be laying down grooves for a funky dance party, welcome to all.

THURSDAY

12:05 to 1 p.m. 115 Music Watch this free performance of Jonathan Nadel on tenor, Laura Reynolds on oboe and Megumi Chen on piano. Works include Vaughan Williams’ Ten Blake Songs for voice and oboe, and songs by Schumann, Strauss and Donaudy.

Biomedical Seminar Series 4:10 to 5 p.m 1005 GBSF Listen to this seminar about Cardiac CaMKII signaling in heart failure, arrhythmias and transcriptional regulation, given by Dr. Donald M. Bers.

The Counter-Cinema of the Berlin School 4:10 to 5:30 p.m. 53A Olson Listen to a talk given by Professor Marco Abel, Associate Professor, University of Nebraska about the Counter-Cinema of the Berlin School, filming the nation in the age of neoliberalism.

Jess Meets Angus 8 to 10 p.m. Lab A, Wright UC Davis Ph.D. candidate in performance studies Jess Curtis will perform his latest work, Jess Meets Angus, at UC Davis as part of the UC Davis Institute for Exploration in Theatre, Dance and Performance. Performance will continue through Friday at the same time and location.

The Poetry Night Reading Series
 8 to 10 p.m. John Natsoulas Gallery, 521 First St. Scot Siegel and Laurie Glover will be giving a poetry reading followed by a performance of Relapse by the Davis Shakespeare Ensemble. To receive placement in the AGGIE DAILY CALENDAR, e-mail dailycal@theaggie. org or stop by 25 Lower Freeborn by noon the day prior to your event. Due to space constraints, all event descriptions are subject to editing, and priority will be given to events that are free of charge and geared toward the campus community.

police briefs WEDNESDAY

was safe and to answer the door on Tallow Place.

Track city Someone had set up a camp near the railroad tracks at F Street.

Two thumbs down A man was trying to hitchhike on Interstate 80 near Mace Boulevard.

FRIDAY Say what? A woman was going door to door asking about a “Hard of Hearing” survey on Hamel Street.

Sounds like a Superbad idea

THURSDAY Playing squash Someone threw a gourd on a vehicle on Drexel Drive.

Ding dong don’t A man was shouting that the neighborhood

Children were throwing a party while their parents were out of town on Spruce Lane. Police Briefs are compiled by TRACY HARRIS from the City of Davis daily crime bulletins. Contact TRACY HARRIS at city@ theaggie.org.

accuracy The California Aggie strives to ensure that all of its facts and details are accurate. Please bring any corrections to our attention by calling (530) 752-0208.

Jason Alpert Editor in Chief

Amy Stewart Science Editor

Becky Peterson Managing Editor

Melissa Freeman Opinion Editor

Alex Tervo Business Manager

Joey Chen Copy Chief

Grace Sprague Advertising Manager

Jasna Hodzic Photography Editor

Hannah Strumwasser Campus Editor Angela Swartz City Editor Elizabeth Orpina Arts Editor Erin Migdol Features Editor Trevor Cramer Sports Editor

Michelle Huey Design Director Janice Pang Asst. Design Director Mimi Vo Night Editor Amanda Nguyen Asst. Night Editor Irisa Tam Art Director

One Shields Ave. 25 Lower Freeborn, UCD Davis, CA 95616 Editorial (530) 752-0208 Advertising (530) 752-0365 Fax (530) 752-0355

The California Aggie is entered as first-class mail with the United States Post Office, Davis, Calif., 95616. Printed Monday through Thursday during the academic year and once a week during Summer Session II at The Davis Enterprise, Davis, Calif., 95616. Accounting services are provided by ASUCD. The Aggie is distributed free on the UC Davis campus and in the Davis community. Mail subscriptions are $100 per academic year, $35 per quarter and $25 for the summer. Views or opinions expressed in The Aggie by editors or columnists regarding legislation or candidates for political office or other matters are those of the editors or columnist alone. They are not those of the University of California or any department of UC. Advertisements appearing in The Aggie reflect the views of advertisers only; they are not an expression of editorial opinion by The Aggie. The Aggie shall not be liable for any error in published advertising unless an advertising proof is clearly marked for corrections by the advertiser. If the error is not corrected by The Aggie, its liability, if any, shall not exceed the value of the space occupied by the error. Further, The Aggie shall not be liable for any omission of an advertisement ordered published. All claims for adjustment must be made within 30 days of the date of publication. In no case shall The Aggie be liable for any general, special or consequential damages. © 2009 by The California Aggie. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form whatsoever is forbidden without the expressed written permission of the copyright owner.

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shake, smile and the lies we have on our resume (Tip #1: Do not lie on your resume). How do we build ourselves up from the bottom? For one thing, don’t let that weird ego Jazz trip where our cockiness levTrice els shoot to Kanye proportions after graduation take over. Come to terms with reality, ASAP. There are thousands of people who studied the same thing we did and they WILL get jobs over us. Or someone’s father works at CBS and they handed them the job instead of hiring you. Personal experience? Of course. But you have to learn from it instead of crying like I did. ollege is absoluteGet prepared for the slap ly amazing. There’s a of reality on a daily basis. party every five minCoverage under our parent’s utes and the sex is just as medical insurance runs out prevalent as Smirnoff vodjust at the right/wrong time. ka. My tenure was occuThe friends we left behind pied with track, theatre, at Davis will forget about us work, wine nights, sitcoms while we try to reach out to and tons of them. We’re “studying.” I lonely all got to learn The truth is that our college the time. a lot while reputation doesn’t matter after There’ve surprisingbeen so graduation ly sleeping many injust as much. stances in Seriously, college is amazing. the last year that I found myExcept, it didn’t prepare me self wondering, “Shit, why for many things. wasn’t there a class on that?” Don’t get me wrong, there I’m sure you’re stoked to are things I can do now that graduate now, aren’t ya? I couldn’t before, thanks to Stop hyperventilating! college. I know just as much You’re not the first or the last about psychological disorperson to have fears about ders as I do about the histostarting your life. The time ry and evolution of dramatic to get prepared is right now. art, acquired a deeper appre- If you don’t have any plans ciation for 19th-century liter- for the next phase in your ature and can drink all of my life, get them situated quickfriends under the table, no ly. Want to move back in question. None of these skills with the fam? Don’t let your have proven useful thus far. pride get in the way of such L.A. is a ruthless beast, a smart decision. They love y’all. I relocated here after you and won’t charge you working my ass off for sevrent, utilities or food. Just en months and it’s a horrimake sure it’s for a finite peble, horrible place where ev- riod. Instead of going to aneryone is insanely beautiother Theta Xi party and beful, no one wants to be your ing hungover all weekend, friend and dreams come to schedule meetings with your die. It’s also the place to be favorite teachers to help figif you want to do anything ure out what to do next. in the entertainment indusTaking knowledge from try. Finding where to start is those who’ve been through it a pain in the ass. Like most before is your best asset. Use people moving to a new it. Everyone has a different city, I had to metaphorically path after graduation, but whore myself out to anyone better to be over-prepared with influence or a job to than not ready. give. I’ve also been through I’m sure you’re thinking, some of the roughest days of “Who does this toolbag think my life and it’s only been two he is, telling me what to do?” months. Don’t be rude. You’re about After commencement, to graduate college. Namewe’re dumped into this calling’s beneath us. The situation where no one first year is critical. It means knows us. In college, peothe difference between freeple zip through their mental loading and having no monRolodex of how they know ey and landing a job and us. “Yup, I definitely saw this the chance to smile everyguy in a play before.” “I voted day knowing you’re better for her for ASUCD last year!” off. Check back in to this col“I slept with her, didn’t I? No. umn every week for my firstBut it almost happened.” The hand tips, musings and adtruth is that our college repvice on how to dodge everyutation doesn’t matter after thing that life is gearing up graduation. We become the to throw at you. Kitchen sink social equivalent of a newincluded. born baby. People can’t judge us based on our previous ac- Contact JAZZ TRICE at jazztrice526@gmail. colades or the four-year long com or twitter.com/Jazz_Trice. Replies will friendships we’ve created. be in the form of funny YouTube videos. It’ll all be based on our hand- Promise.

After graduation day?

C

The california Aggie

dents get paid to be in college while undergrads have to pay … wait, how much is tuition these days? That much!? Man, you guys are suckers, but more on that in Matan a later column. Shelomi Now that you know who that funny-looking guy with the ponytail sitting in the front row of your poetry class probably is (the correct answer is “unemployable”), allow me to introduce myself. Name’s Matan, pronounced the way you are not pronouncing it. Born in New York City, I got my bachelor’s degree in organismic (stop giggling) and evolutionary biology in 2009 waken, my column, from Harvard University. and embrace the glory Yes, that Harvard. No, I nevthat is your birthright. er met Zuckerberg. I’m curKnow that I am the Graduate rently a third-year Ph.D. stuStudent, the eternal will of dent in the Department of lab and library, and that you Entomology, which means have been created to serve I’ve been dodging the job me. market successfully for Undergraduates often three years get all the and have a press when You only take the classes you year or two it comes to like, you’re working on your left before universiI officialties, though thesis and you can drink legally ly become not without the lesscause. Of the cool and less-paid type of more than 32,000 students “Doctor.” currently enrolled at UC Why did I come to Davis? Davis, about 25,000 of them The number-one entomoloare undergrads. The undergy department in the nation grad years are what we speak was one draw, and the othof when we talk of Animal er was location. Four years of Houses, toga parties, girls go- Massachusetts winters take ing wild and the best years of their toll, so I was looking our lives “if only we could re- forward to doing a Ph.D. in member them.” Most of the sunny California, spending classes, clubs and commumy free time sunbathing on nities on campus cater to the beaches and learning how to college cohort or the teachsurf. Clearly, I had never acers that tutor them. So who tually looked at Davis on a are the graduate students? map before I got here. I just Simply, we are the missassumed California was one ing link between faculty and giant coastline. Whoops. undergrad. Not quite emWhy am I getting my ployees, but not fully stuPh.D.? The truth is, I love dents either. We toil behind school. Always have. the scenes, in your periphAcademia suits me, and eral vision, making your sovice versa. I want to be a briety-based college experiprofessor, and a Ph.D. is ence go as smoothly as posthe first step on that ivosible. Besides the occasional ry-paved road from gradlecture, we set up labs, send uation to tenure. Could class e-mails, hold office I be making more monhours, write exams, hand out ey in industry, or consultexams, proctor exams, grade ing, or as a doctor or lawexams, answer your quesyer or plumber or striptions about your exams, seper? Absolutely. Could I cretly laugh at the horrible have gotten those careers responses you gave on your after graduating? Probably exams, post your exams to (though I can’t tell which funnyexam.com and, most of the latter two jobs importantly, do research. would have the harder inWe may do a lot of things terview). Clearly, I’m not for you while we’re your doing this for the money: TAs, but otherwise our I do it for the thrill of remain goal is to do our dissearch. For the pursuit of sertation research and earn pure knowledge. For sciour advanced degrees, pub- ence. Sweet, wonderful, lishing papers and gaining glorious Science! I’m doteaching experience along ing what I love and getthe way while, yes, occating paid for it: What more sionally taking classes. (If could I want? you’re wondering about There is much about bePost-docs … they can write ing a grad student that I want their own column!) to share with you, and so few Overall, grad school is like columns to do so in. What half a decade of your senior are we waiting for, then? year of college. You only take Allons-y! the classes you like, you’re working on your thesis and MATAN SHELOMI has a lot more obscure you can drink legally. The gamer references for you at mshelomi@ main difference is grad stuucdavis.edu.

Meet the Grad Student

A


OPINION

The california aggie

tuesday, april 3, 2012 3

editorials

Task force delays

Really? In light of the recent delays in the release of the findings from Justice Cruz Reynoso’s Task Force, let’s review the last five months. Students sitting down with heads bowed in the center of the UC Davis Quad in the middle of a Friday in broad sunlight were pepper sprayed by UC Davis Campus Police. REALLY? Then Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi organized a private press conference and had to do a silent walk of shame before she would apologize to the students. REALLY? Then the University showed remorse, placing the police officers responsible for the pepper spraying on PAID administrative leave while the incident was investigated. Next, a total of five task forces were created in order to complete the investigation, promising the campus community full transparency and insight into the events of November 18th in no more than three months. We still have not seen any of them. And when the report from Reynoso’s task force was

ready to be released, the union representing campus police waited until the last possible moment to “request” to HALT public disclosure of the report presumably in order to protect the names of the officers who stood by and WATCHED while students were being pepper sprayed. REALLY? REALLY??!! And now that the Alameda County Superior Court Judge has ordered that the report may be released in near entirety, we are asked to wait three weeks to allow the union ample time to APPEAL. It’s been delayed again even though we already have the names of all the police officers working at UC Davis and have photos of their involvement in the incident. REALLY? There’s photographic and video evidence of what happened on November 18th and you’re asking us to pretend we don’t know what happened. The longer the union delays the report, the more guilty the police officers appear. Really.

Editorial Board Jason Alpert Editor in Chief Becky Peterson Managing Editor Melissa Freeman Opinion Editor

Hannah Strumwasser Campus Editor Angela Swartz City Editor Erin Migdol Features Editor

Elizabeth Orpina Arts Editor Trevor Cramer Sports Editor

Amy Stewart Science Editor Jasna Hodzic Photography Editor

Editorials represent the collective opinions of The California Aggie editorial board. The Opinion page appears Tuesdays and Thursdays.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

GUEST OPINIONS

The California Aggie welcomes letters from its readers. Letters must be typed and no longer than 200 words. As The Aggie attempts to represent a diversity of viewpoints on its letters page, we reserve the right to edit letters for length and clarity. Publication is not guaranteed, and letters become the property of The California Aggie. All correspondence must be signed with the author’s name and telephone number. Unsigned letters will not be considered for publication, although names may be withheld upon request.

The California Aggie welcomes guest opinions from its readers. Guest opinions must be typed with an approximate word count of 400 to 600. The same standards of letters to the editor apply to guest opinions. Guest opinions may reflect a variety of viewpoints. Any member of the campus community is eligible and encouraged to highlight issues regarding UC Davis, regional or national issues. Address letters or guest opinions to the Opinion Editor, The California Aggie, 25 Lower Freeborn, UC Davis, CA 95616. Letters may also be faxed to (530) 752-0355 or sent via e-mail to opinion@theaggie.org.

courtesy newsday.com

guest opinion

ASUCD can operate more efficiently without Shared Service Center By MARK CHAMPAGNE I read with interest the article on taxing ASUCD $235,560 for the university-mandated Shared Service Center based on processed transactions. Inevitably, the state budget crisis was bound to create ethical challenges for the University administration. Here we go. Unlike any other unit on the campus, ASUCD fees can only be raised after a student vote. This has helped keep the ASUCD general fee at $8.00 per a quarter since it was last raised in 1978. Unitrans, a unit within ASUCD, has raised its fee three times in the last 32 years; each increase followed a vote of the undergraduate students. On the other hand, the University can raise fees via the UC Regents without a student vote. Because of the lack of state resources, the university seeks to make monetary cuts from campus units. As a result, the University administration wants to tax ASUCD $235,000+ to help offset state budget cuts. In order to pay this tax, ASUCD student leaders would have to take resources from ASUCD fees

I

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than the current decentralized system that ASUCD already manages itself. Because ASUCD can achieve the same results as the Shared Service Center for less than half the cost, the University administration should exempt ASUCD from paying the $384,249 if the issue is truly about efficiency. A press release from the University Communications office in February of 2011 stated that the efficiencies from the Shared Service Centers will save $39 million between 2010 and 2015-2016. Is the $39 million really from efficiencies or generated merely by charging ridiculously high assessments (taxes) to campus units? The University needs to stand up for efficiency and exempt ASUCD from the Shared Service Center concept, as well as the $235,560 tax. Taxing a large sum of money to ASUCD under the guise of “efficiency” and taking that money from fees voted on by students for specific purposes is not ethical or efficient. MARK CHAMPAGNE retired from the position of ASUCD Business Manager in June 2011 after 32 years of service to UC Davis. He can be reached at his e-mail address, which happens to be the UC Davis school fight song: aggiefight@yahoo.com.

would seek damages for business munity who were trying to use losses and the initial cost of outfit- their bank. Clearly, the school ting the branch.” holds some level of responsibility given these facts. And the notion More startling than the vitthat the bank was in charge of its riol flying behind the scenes is Jonathan own security becomes laughable the university’s response to the bank’s decision to close. The Aggie when, after the bank hired private Nelson security, the school intervened and quotes Stephen Downs, chief counsel for the university, saying, said that was not acceptable, as reported in The Aggie. “Our position is that the termination is not effective; they didn’t It is also worth pointing out that follow the requirements.” the situation was quite unsafe. One custom That’s all good er had her wrist and well — he’s Clearly, the school holds some smashed in the merely stating a door due to an disagreement belevel of responsibility given t is old news now about the overeager barritween the two these facts events transpiring around the cader, while the parties that won’t barricade and eventual closure carry into tangible employees often of the U.S. bank in the Memorial had to have a police escort to leave action, right? Union. In brief, 10 to 15 students the bank. Not to mention, the bar Wrong. It turns out that recentbegan forming a human blockade ricade was probably a fire hazard. ly the administration is considerin front of the bank’s doors starting ing taking legal action against the Finally, there’s the simple fact early January. After two months of bank in response to its closure. In that being trapped inside the bank waiting for the UC Davis adminother words, the university could each day was humiliating for the istration to take tangible action to sue the bank. employees, akin to animals in a remove the barricaders, the bank – Specifically, in a letter that has cage — a situation that shouldn’t be tired of having its employees virtu- not been publicly disclosed, the tolerable given the importance the ally trapped inside and daily havcampus officials presumably place university wrote to U.S. Bank ing to leave their jobs to go elseon our “principles of community.” headquarters, placing blame on where – said enough is enough the bank for the mess. The admin- Yet none of these points apparand closed the branch. istration accuses the bank of viently bothered Downs, Katehi or Given the circumstances, it is olating contractual agreements the other top officials who signed not surprising that there was tenand not reaching out to school of- the letter. All this leads me to wonsion behind the scenes between ficials. Also, in an effort to remove der: what planet is our administrathe bank and the university adany obligation of responsibility, tion leadership currently on? Does ministration. What is surprising is the administration charged that it have logic on this strange planet? the incompetent nature of the ad- the bank is responsible for its own Between the shocking lack of ministration’s response and the security, thereby shifting the task foresight exhibited by the adminextent university officials went of handling the protesters from the istration with regards to the pepto shift the blame off their own university to the bank. per spray incident last fall – did no shoulders and onto the bank’s. one think to place any restrictions These allegations are simply ri On March 19, The Aggie pubat all on what the police could and diculous. First of all, the bank lost lished an article noting that U.S. the ability to conduct business due could not do? – and the complete Bank officials were “upset with the to the barricade. This clearly is a incompetence of its handling of university’s handling of the situaviolation of any contractual agree- the bank barricade, I have to wontion.” Officials called the blockade ment between the two parties. der why we’re paying the leaders of “intolerable” and argued out that Charges that there was not enough this school so much money. the administration hadn’t been dialogue between the bank and If I kept batting zeros at my job, I afraid to take action to remove the administration might be valwould be fired. Shouldn’t the same protesters before — a pointed refid, yet it’s worth remembering that rules apply to Katehi and Co.? erence to the pepper spray incithe barricaders were UC Davis student of last fall. dents, sitting in a UC Davis buildMiss the bank? Ready to siege Mrak Hall? Send your The end result? The Aggie artiing and violating the rights of oth- thoughts, ideas, rants and raves to jdnelson@ucdavis. cle goes on to say that “U.S. Bank er members of the UC Davis com- edu.

U.S. Bank got punked

feeling strongly about something?

that were previously voted on by students to go to specific areas or the $8.00/quarter general fee. Whether referendums or ASUCD fees, is there an obligation to honor past commitments by campus administrators who guaranteed to students that there was a legal and moral obligation to follow the provisions within each fee increase vote? For the purpose of this article, let’s not focus on the potential loss of hundreds of student jobs, a 42 percent cut to annual cultural days, devastating cuts to Unitrans, the impact on the Coffee House or a myriad of other potential impacts to other ASUCD units. Rather, we have a situation where the University administration mandates that ASUCD pay a $235,560 fee for which they receive NOTHING. The University administration additionally wants to fold ASUCD into this “efficient” processing of payroll and payables through the Shared Service Center at a cost of $384,249 for 2012-2013. ASUCD, however, only pays around $150,000 to process these same transactions. In other words, the Shared Service Center is more than two and a half times more costly


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The california Aggie

Trevor Cramer

Conference shake-up

T

imes are changing in college sports. Texas A&M is moving to the Southeastern Conference, Syracuse is heading to the Atlantic Coast Conference and the conference landscape in major college sports will never be the same. And now that change is starting to trickle down to the smaller conferences. The Big West Conference – which UC Davis is a part of in the majority of its sports including basketball, baseball, softball and soccer – is going to be completely revamped over the next several seasons. Starting next year Hawaii will become a member of the Big West, followed by San Diego State in 2014. But just when it looked like UC Davis may find itself in a division that is on the rise, Pacific announced last week that it would be leaving the Big West in favor of the West Coast Conference at the start of the 2013-14 school year. With the departure of the Big West’s only other Northern California team, UC Davis now finds itself nearly 300 miles away from its nearest conference foe — Cal Poly. That is the largest distance for any school in the conference other than Hawaii (which is forced to play far-off opposition for obvious reasons). With such a wide gap between the Aggies and the almost exclusively Southern California teams in the Big West – six of the conference’s 10 teams come 2013 will play south of the Grapevine – the question is now: Should UC Davis follow the trend of other teams and find a new conference? The Dempsey Report outlined potential processes for a UC Davis move to the Mountain West Conference or the Pacific 12 Conference. With the current state of UC Davis athletics, however, the Aggies are simply not capable of making the transition to a conference of that high standard at this point in time. So that leaves UC Davis with three viable options. The first would be to follow the lead of Sacramento State and move to the Big Sky Conference. UC Davis football will already be moving to the league starting next season, and a move to the Big Sky for all sports would reunite the Aggies in the same conference as their strongest and most historic rival: Sac State. While Sac State would be an opponent close to home, the other members of the Big Sky stretch across several states – including Washington, Idaho and Montana – making travel highly expensive for teams in the conference. Additionally, the Big Sky does not offer several sports UC Davis maintains, such as men’s soccer, softball and women’s water polo. The second option is to follow Pacific to the WCC. This would place UC Davis in a conference that contains four other Northern California teams, potentially allowing the Aggies to form new regional rivalries. The WCC certainly features a higher level of competition than the Big West in certain sports, namely basketball where Saint Mary’s and Gonzaga are regular tournament teams, and the relatively moderate increase in the level of play could ultimately prompt UC Davis to elevate itself. At the same time, the WCC does not facilitate track and field, softball or women’s water polo, which would leave three UC Davis teams in a precarious position. While there is a chance the Aggies could place these teams in new conferences, it would be a difficult task and could prove to be troublesome. UC Davis also does not fit the mold of the schools in the WCC, which are all private colleges with relatively low enrollment. With this in mind, it’s hard to imagine UC Davis transitioning to the WCC any time soon. UC Davis’ final option is to remain in the Big West. While it is true that UC Davis will not have any remaining nearby foes in the conference, there are several important benefits to sticking with the status quo. The Big West fits UC Davis’ level of play fairly well in most sports. It is certainly true that the Aggies have not been particularly competitive in men’s basketball over the past few seasons, but the skill level of the teams atop the Big West is certainly one UC Davis could realistically reach in upcoming seasons. Additionally, while the Big West is not known as a strong basketball conference, it is one of the stronger leagues in the nations in terms of both men’s soccer and baseball — two sports that UC Davis will be looking to excel in over the next few years. And with the majority of UC Davis’ sports already supported by the Big West, it seems only logical for the Aggies to stick with their current conference for at least the foreseeable future. With the current standing of conference realignment and the potential advantages of remaining in the Big West, it looks like UC Davis’ best option right now is to simply stay put. TREVOR CRAMER can be reached at sports@theaggie.org.

Tuesday, april 3, 2012

5

Aggies finish fifth in prestigious Arizona tournament Runas takes co-medalist honors By MATTHEW YUEN Associate Sports Editor

The UC Davis women’s golf team traveled to Arizona to compete in the Ping/ ASU Invitational, which coach Anne Walker cites as “one of the country’s oldest and most famous tournaments.” With a playing field stacked with five of the top 10 ranked teams in the nation, No. 26 UC Davis had its hands full. But the Aggies did more than just hold their own at Karsten Golf Course. UC Davis tied for fifth place with third-ranked USC, behind teams such as top-ranked UCLA and No. 5 Arizona State. “Every year it’s stacked with top teams and it’s a very competitive field,” Walker said. “It felt like we were playing in the NCAA tournament.” The Aggies posted a total team score of

881 over the tournament, but were in a good position to place even higher, if not for a rough last day in which they posted a 19 over par as a team. “We’ve had one big round that might have cost us our titles a couple times this year,” Walker said. “We just explode sometimes, and we need to be more consistent all three rounds.” UC Davis was led by juniors Demi Runas and Amy Simanton, who posted a one-under and 11-over, respectively. Runas’ performance was good for comedalist honors, her second career tournament title. Excluding the aberrational final day of competition, the Aggies put forth strong performances across the board. Their first round was their best, when they shot two-over as a team. Their eight-over on the second day was one of the top three

Aggie Digest Baseball The UC Davis baseball team closed its nonconference schedule with a trip to Hawaii, winning the first game of the series before losing three straight to the Rainbow Warriors. UC Davis heads in to BigWest Conference play with an 11-13 record. Senior starter Dayne Quist struck out nine batters in seven innings and redshirt freshman Tino Lipson went 3-for-5 with two runs to lead UC Davis to a series-opening win Thursday. Freshman Kevin Barker was hit by a pitch to lead off the game, marking the 21st consecutive game that UC Davis has been hit by a pitch. Sophomore Nick Lynch was later hit by a pitch with the bases loaded to bring in Lipson, and senior David Popkins

JOBS Cont. from front page Junior plant sciences major Kevin Moss describes his job as having two parts. The first is as a dispatcher working in an office, sending for buses on call and dealing with shift changes, or what Moss referred to as the paperwork side of the job. Moss said his favorite part of the job, though, is actually being on the road, doing anything from driving observations to ensure that drivers are being safe on the road to taking pictures of accidents. However, there are no limits to what the route supervisor will have to do on the job. “You can’t sum up an average day. We are responsible for ensuring that Unitrans maintains its normal service for anything that may arise,” Moss said. “One time a guy took a duck that got hit by a bus to the hospital. It’s basically anything that happens out on the road. I prefer the route supervisor work, going out and doing stuff. I don’t really like sitting behind a desk so much.” Hugo Jimenez, a fifth-year senior mechanical engineering major, is the Unitrans operations manager in charge of all of the route supervisors. He said that students working with Unitrans learn a lot from these jobs. “It provides a lot of experience, like leadership, which I believe is necessary,” Jimenez said. “It also gives hands-on experience, getting skills that will help in a future career.” Another job held by students that involves driving is with Mobility Assistance. Cody Chapman, a senior psychology major minoring in communication and Chinese, works as a student assistant

CSU

scored on a groundout from senior Scott Kalush to give the Aggies a 3-0 lead after one inning. That was all the help Quist needed, as the Aggies took a 5-3 win. In Friday’s match-up senior starter Anthony Kupbens struck out five in seven and a third innings of work, but the Hawai’i pitching staff quieted the Aggie bats to even the series with a 4-0 win. On Saturday Lynch hit a two-run homer in the sixth inning to tie the game at four runs apiece, and senior starter Tom Briner struck out a career-high 10 batters in seven innings of work, but UC Davis couldn’t salvage the extra-inning win as it fell 5-4 in 11 innings. Sophomore Evan Wolf struck out a career-high five batters in four-and-a-third driving a golf cart to pick up injured or disabled individuals. “Whenever there is a student, staff or faculty member that is injured or has a disability, we give them rides to academic locations, like class, office hours or tutoring on campus,” Chapman said. “It can be anything from sports students or someone with a permanent injury or disability.” A student, staff or faculty member gives their schedule to Mobility Assistance and rides are scheduled to pick them up. Chapman said that his job as a student assistant is the best on campus. “You drive around in a golf cart all day, but you also get to meet everyone from freshmen who twist their ankles from intramural sports or staff members or grad students,” Chapman said. “The hours are pretty flexible, too, because you only drive when students aren’t in classes.” Chapman also said that having students work this job proves to be beneficial because it helps the UC Davis student population as a whole. “It’s students helping other students rather than someone doing it as their job. There’s more of a connection,” Chapman said. “Some of the kids I drive I am actually friends with now. It’s kind of cool.” Another student job position on campus belongs to Jasmine Nasser, a senior community and regional development major. Picnic Day is run nearly entirely by students. Nasser is the director of the Multicultural Children’s Fair, which involves a stage, exhibits, activities and arts and crafts geared towards kids. “It’s fun,” Nasser said. “I like kids and doing crafty things. I just thought it was something to do.” The board consists of 16 students, all

“I think it’s pretty clear that the tolerance around the state, the enthusiasm for fee increases, is not there,” Turnage said. Many students have voiced disappointment that their future is uncertain because of the state’s economic crisis. “This state has so much wealth, but its not being properly taxed,” said Alma Sanchez, senior biology major at CSU Northridge. “I hope Brown’s proposition passes; it will be a step in the right direction toward healing the wound created by Proposition 13 in the 70’s,” Sanchez added, referring to the 1978 tax reform that capped property tax at one percent of purchase price and limited yearly increases to 2 percent. Property taxes, which made up more than half of California school budgets prior to Prop 13, only contribute about 20 percent of education costs today. “Public education needs to be funded through public sources, or taxes,” said Sanchez. “Otherwise I fear the system will fail or become privatized.”

Cont. from front page CSU’s budget gap stands at half a billion dollars, Turnage added. Turnage said the CSU system has to have a plan in place to deal with the uncertainty of the election outcome. “If the CSU waits to see what happens in the election before reacting, then it will be too late,” he said. He said reducing enrollment is the only practical solution to deal with the potential budget cuts. “It comes down to either revenue or spending,” he said, adding that the system, which has raised tuition steadily over the past few years, has no plans to ask for additional increases. Currently, CSU tuition costs $5,472 annually. This is almost double the $2,772 it cost to attend in 2007-08. An increase approved in November will take the total to $5,970 in Fall 2012. Students and others around the state have protested the increases. SARA ISLAS can be reached at city@theaggie.org.

scores after two rounds, but their 19-over dropped them down to fifth to conclude the tournament. “[Runas] and [Simanton] have been very key to our success this year — when they play well, we do well,” Walker said. “We had very good contributions from our younger classmen, like [freshman] Blair Lewis got better every day, and it was a whole team effort.” Despite the last round, Walker and her team are very proud of their performance. “We’re where we want to be, we’re playing great golf, and we just need to work hard,” she said. The Aggies will have a couple weeks off before returning to action on April 16 in the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate in Half Moon Bay. MATTHEW YUEN can be reached at sports@theaggie.org.

innings, but the Aggies were limited to just two hits in the series finale as they fell 7-1. UC Davis held an early 1-0 lead in the top of the third, but the Warriors responded with seven straight runs in the final six innings. The Aggies begin Big West play at No. 14 Cal State Fullerton on Thursday. — Russell Eisenman Men’s golf UC Davis finished last in the 17-team field at the U.S. Intercollegiate held at Stanford. The tournament featured six teams ranked in the top 15 nationally, according to golfstat.com. The Aggies shot 73 over par in the threeday tournament, 72 strokes behind tournaments winner No. 12 Oregon. Sophomore Matt Hansen finished tied for 40th, the best placing by any UC Davis golfer. Junior Josh Granger tied for 65th while freshman Luke Vivola finished 86th. Sophomore Johnny Baxter tied for 53rd, but was not counted toward the UC Davis team score because he entered the event as an individual. The Aggies will return to the course Monday at the Cowboy Classic in Scottsdale, Ariz. — Trevor Cramer of whom work toward a common goal of putting on a successful Picnic Day for their fellow students. Nasser was hired over the summer and has been working throughout the year with the board to organize the children’s aspect of the famous Davis event. “Everyone knows about Picnic Day, so I thought it would be fun to actually be a part of it,” Nasser said. Another hidden student job is located at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) in the financial annex. First-year student Haley Goldlist works as an assistant, collecting mail and matching patients’ payments electronically. She said the job is unique because of the flexibility. “I can go in whenever I want and I work two hours a day. It’s flexible, which is good because I am a student,” Goldlist said. “It’s like the perfect job.” As an undeclared biological sciences major, Goldlist aims to work in the medical field, therefore using this job as a stepping stone to her future career. “Everyone is really friendly and it’s good to get to know people if I want to go into animal science,” Goldlist said. UC Davis has various jobs for its students, which most believe to be a benefit of the campus, bringing students together. “It’s students working with students,” Chapman said. “It makes a bigger community.” Jobs with Picnic Day and Unitrans are posted on the ASUCD website at vacancy.ucdavis.edu. Openings with Mobility Assistance may be found at campusrecreation.ucdavis.edu. Positions such as those at the VMTH are posted on Aggie Job Link. DEVON BOHART can be reached at features@theaggie.org.

ICC Cont. from front page to Summer!” Each week the ICC will highlight steps you can take to prepare yourself for a summer that helps you to explore and gain experience in potential careers.

Week 1 – Connect to ICC services Aggie Job Link: If you do not have one yet, create an Aggie Job Link (AJL) account to access the database of jobs and internships: iccweb. ucdavis.edu/students/AJL. htm. If you already have an AJL account, be SURE to update three items every time they change. 1. Year in school. If you haven’t updated your account since you created it, the system has no way of knowing your status. Some positions are only open to juniors and seniors; don’t miss out on them! 2. Graduation year. Same idea here. This is another search field common-

ly used by employers. 3. Major. Recruiters are often looking for students with specific skills associated with certain majors. Make sure yours is current. If you do not find positions in AJL, you should try visiting the ICC between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, our peer advisors can teach you some “tricks.” Listserv Messages: Signing up for a listserv is a step that requires little energy yet yields great rewards: iccweb.ucdavis.edu/students/ ListServSignup.htm. You will get a weekly message that highlights upcoming workshops and events. Listservs are also a way that the ICC informs students about new job and internship postings (some that are not in AJL). The UC Davis Internship and Career Center (ICC), located on the second and third floors of South Hall and online at iccweb.ucdavis. edu, has decades of success helping launch Aggies on their professional paths, and their services are FREE to currently enrolled UC Davis students.


6 tuesday, april 3, 2012

The california Aggie

Davis business newcomers bring diverse offerings Video game shop and T-shirt company among new stores

weeks. As older businesses are closing, new businesses emerge to cater to the city’s needs. Among the newcomers is El Toro Bravo, which has replaced Baja Fresh on

237 D St. In place of the closed-down Blockbuster on Third and F Street will tentatively be a Panera Bread, though not much construction work has been done yet. Similarly, another Blockbuster — once located at the Marketplace on 1411 West Covell — will become the home of Leslie’s Pool Supply. Vini Wine Bar is still waiting in the wings to be opened. It seems that the delays have been due to a pending liquor license approval. The owner, Jeff Day, said in an email that it wouldn’t be much longer until the bar receives its liquor license. Gizmo’s Rolling Video Games will be bringing an entirely new definition to the term mobile gaming. Starting at $199 an hour, Gizmo’s will bring a trailer touted as a mobile game theatre. In it, you will find four 46-inch Sony 1080p widescreen T.V.s. The three main gaming consoles will be available for use — PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Wii — and up to 16 players will be allowed to play against each other or separately. In addition, vibration-rocking stadium chairs will be included. To relieve post-midterm stress, Loving Aquatic Bodwork will be providing Watsu, or water-shiatsu, massages as soon as midApril. Watsu takes place in a private, warmwater therapy pool that is coupled with stretches and massage. Newmann Enterprises, a Sacramento

valet service, tested its waters in Davis during the Davis Chamber of Commerce’s Taste of Davis. Pending results, there may be future downtown Davis valet services. Though Island Barber Spa in Davis has closed its doors, Robin Graham, the owner, can still be found in Dixon at Wild Hair Salon and Pine Time Barber Shop, both located on South First Street. Jason Dayne, of Jeeba Jewelry Studio, returns from an extended vacation abroad. Ronbina D. Slizeski of Pavone Designs had been using the Jeeba space since December. Dayne will continue to sell Slizeski’s jewelry at the shop. The studio is located on 712 Third St. and features handcrafted, semi-precious stones. James Besser, a graduate of Davis Senior High School and UC Berkeley, has launched an online T-shirt company titled 6 Legged Tees. The tees are designed to repel insects via a process that involves binding permethrin to clothing. Besser said the tees are reported to repel “mosquitos, ticks, ants, flies and chiggers.” Delivery will begin in June. Girlgonegreen skincare, which previously operated within Smooth as Silk, moved four doors down to 331 D St. Girlgonegreen provides organic skincare products with an emphasis on locally produced/grown ingredients.

spectives, Garth Lenz on the “True Cost of Oil,” Melanie Madden and Annie Main on agricultural land preservation and more. The unique class set-up offers students different perceptions on sustainability. In an interactive environment with relatively few requirements, the class is catered to what students want to know, said Hannah Oakes, president of the California Student Sustainability Coalition, UC Davis Chapter. In addition to participating in the lectures, students have the opportunity to form an Action Research Team (ART) for an additional two units. The team will work on topics ranging from sustainable transportation, food systems, energy and green building.

Lipari participated in the program and participated in an ART her first year at Davis and fell in love. Her ART project consisted of gleaning fruit off trees around Davis that usually go to waste. She and her teammates picked the fruit and donated them to local food banks. The program is open for all majors and offers an introductory level of sustainability. The CCE encourages all students to sit in on any of the lectures. “ESLP provides a well-rounded, studentled approach to sustainability education, and is perfect for students who are just becoming interested in sustainability to those who are passionate about it. I really recommend that everyone take it at least once in

their time at UC Davis. It’s important for students to get involved because it is an easy, fun way to learn about sustainability,” said Unit Director for CCE Tessa Artale in an e-mail interview. The funding for this program is sponsored by the Agricultural Sustainability Institute, Society of Conservation Biology, John Muir Institute of the Environment, Environmental Policy and Planning Commission, the CCE and the Geography Graduate Group. Students can register on Sisweb under PLS 198 (CRN 87711), ESP 198 (CRN 73785) or ESP 298 (CRN 73841).

Evan Davis / Aggie

Davis has been anticipating the opening of Vini Wine Bar for a while, but the bar cannot open until the owner receives approval on a liquor license.

By ANDREW POH Aggie News Writer

Davis has received a healthy influx of new businesses over the past couple

CCE Cont. from front page of a guest speaker who talks on a range of ideas about sustainability and discussion. We have people coming to talk about agricultural sustainability, oil and drilling, environmental justice and much more,” said CCE intern and Sustainable Education and Research Coordinator Genna Lipari. Each week will consist of a new speaker discussing various topics, all revolving around sustainability. Guest speakers include Anisha Desai ­on environmental justice­, Melissa Nelson on indigenous per-

ANDREW POH can be reached city@theaggie.org.

MICHELLE MURPHY can be reached at campus@theaggie.org.

Study: Hiring may increase in 2012 By Rachel Gottfriend

Arizona Daily Wildcat (University of Arizona)

The economy is looking up as more U.S. employers expect to grow this year. One in three companies predict renewed growth and increased hiring in 2012, according to a survey done by Right Management. This is a large increase from last year, when only one in five U.S. employers reported feeling confident about growth or hiring. Right Management surveyed senior executives at 631 organizations across the U.S. representing the government, nonprofit, public and private sectors. Thirty-six percent of these companies said 2012 will be a year of growth and recovery, marked by increased hiring and new talent development initiatives; 55 percent said it will be similar to 2011 with sluggish hiring and postponed HR initiatives and 11 percent said it will be a year of stagnation with more cutbacks and restructurings. “(Hiring is increasing) because the economy is improving,” said Marshall J. Vest, U. Arizona Economic and Business Research Center director. “When the economy wasn’t doing well, companies had been cautious to control their costs and of course they ended up laying off a lot of people and reducing hours.” Vest said that in recent months, more companies are increasing hours. There are only a limit-

ed number of hours an employee can work and this means companies need to hire if they want to expand. Vest also said demand in all industries is going up with the economy. More income means more demand. “It would appear at this point that economic recovery is well in place,” Vest said. At the end of 2011, Arizona had 2,415,000 nonfarm jobs. This was up 1.1 percent from December 2010, when there were 2,387,800 jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, there are still some industries that continue to suffer. The pace of hiring for some health care-related jobs is slowing because hospitals and other providers feel the effects of recent cuts to Arizona’s Medicare system, or Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System. Government jobs are also suffering, with the number of positions expected to drop 1.4 percent in 2012. Hiring is different at a university than at a company, as it is in the department level, and is mainly based on grants or funds in that department, said Leslie Porter, UA human resources consulting and talent management director. “That is a difficult question to answer because the whole hiring process is at the (department) level,” Porter said. “It’s hard for us to know when a department is going

to start hiring more people. Some departments have people leaving and retiring. Some departments rely on state funding, while others are more dependent.” Porter said people hear things about cuts and falsely assume that the university is not hiring, but the university is still one of the state’s biggest employers. Human Resources currently has 394 jobs posted on the Career Track website. Susan Miller-Pinhey, UA Career Services senior marketing and special events coordinator, said that although the improvement is slow, she is definitely seeing more employers hiring more UA graduates this year than previous years. There were about a dozen more companies at this year’s UA Career Days.One in three companies predict renewed growth and increased hiring in 2012, according to a survey done by Right Management. This is a large increase from last year, when only one in five U.S. employers reported feeling confident about growth or hiring. Right Management surveyed senior executives at 631 organizations across the U.S. representing the government, nonprofit, public and private sectors. Thirty-six percent of these companies said 2012 will be a year of growth and recovery, marked by increased hiring and new talent development initiatives; 55 percent said it will be similar to 2011 with slug-

gish hiring and postponed HR initiatives and 11 percent said it will be a year of stagnation with more cutbacks and restructurings. “(Hiring is increasing) because the economy is improving,” said Marshall J. Vest, UA Economic and Business Research Center director. “When the economy wasn’t doing well, companies had been cautious to control their costs and of course they ended up laying off a lot of people and reducing hours.” Vest said that in recent months, more companies are increasing hours. There are only a limited number of hours an employee can work and this means companies need to hire if they want to expand. Vest also said demand in all industries is going up with the economy. More income means more demand. “It would appear at this point that economic recovery is well in place,” Vest said. At the end of 2011, Arizona had 2,415,000 nonfarm jobs. This was up 1.1 percent from December 2010, when there were 2,387,800 jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, there are still some industries that continue to suffer. The pace of hiring for some health care-related jobs is slowing because hospitals and other providers feel the effects of recent cuts to Arizona’s Medicare system, or Arizona Health Care

Cost Containment System. Government jobs are also suffering, with the number of positions expected to drop 1.4 percent in 2012. Hiring is different at a university than at a company, as it is in the department level, and is mainly based on grants or funds in that department, said Leslie Porter, UA human resources consulting and talent management director. “That is a difficult question to answer because the whole hiring process is at the (department) level,” Porter said. “It’s hard for us to know when a department is going to start hiring more people. Some departments have people leaving and retiring. Some departments rely on state funding, while others are more dependent.” Porter said people hear things about cuts and falsely assume that the university is not hiring, but the university is still one of the state’s biggest employers. Human Resources currently has 394 jobs posted on the Career Track website. Susan Miller-Pinhey, UA Career Services senior marketing and special events coordinator, said that although the improvement is slow, she is definitely seeing more employers hiring more UA graduates this year than previous years. There were about a dozen more companies at this year’s UA Career Days.

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SUBLIMINAL MESSAGES DO NOT WORK


April 3, 2012