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YOUR HOMETOWN GOOD NEWS PAPER

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PAID Adrian, MI, 49221 Permit No. 1

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INSIDE

October 1 - October 15, 2019 • Vol. 23, No. 12• yourgood.news

Sylvania’s Super Hero Learn about Lt. Steve Kahan, the October Sylvania Super Hero.

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14-15A

P6–9B Front: Brynlee Ovall, 4, Miles Berry, 1, Mason Berry, 3, and back: Zachary Ovall, 5, enjoy an evening of apple picking on Sept. 23 at Bennett’s Orchard in Ottawa Lake, Mich.

3B

SIZZLE, SIMMER, SAUTÉ

SUNNYSIDE UP

s e c i o ch

he best expe erience

©2019 Hospice of Northwest Ohio

Noah Dankert attends the event with a large group of his family and friends.

Southview Homecoming Sophia Rees and Tristen Turkopp are the Southview Homecoming Queen and King.

INSIDE

–by Jennifer Ruple

Butternut squash stars in a trio of fall dishes. P11A

Local Fest Fun!

Re-think pink in October. P22A

Community News Food Main Street Activities Business Congratulations Schools Sports Fall Festivities Guide Sylvania Then and Now Business Cards Lives Remembered Real Estate Classifieds

6-9A 10-11A 12-15A 17-20A 21A 1-3B 4B 6-9B 12B 13B 17B 18B 19B

1 .661.4001 hospicenwo.org 419


Ongoing

Alateen Meeting An Alateen meeting for children and teens ages eight and up who are affected by a loved one’s alcohol or drug use is held Sunday nights from 7:30-8:30 pm at the United Church of Christ, 7240 Erie St. Call 419-5377500 for more information. AlzheimerÊs Association An Alzheimer’s Association support group meets the third Thursday of each month from 5:30-6:30 pm at Aspen Grove, 7515 Secor Rd., Lambertville, Mich. Call 800-272-3900 or mready@alz.org. Aquatic Exercise for Survivors CPW and The Victory Center offer aquatic exercise for survivors at CPW, 3130 Central Park West, on Wednesdays from 6-7 pm. Free to all survivors through a grant from The Rotary Club of Toledo. Aromatherapy Aromatherapy takes place the first and third Wednesday of each month from 1-2 pm at The Victory Center, 5532 W. Central Ave., Suite B. This program is free to people with a cancer diagnosis and is sponsored by ProMedica Cancer Institute. Call the Victory Center at 419-531-7600 for details. Boomers Resource Network Boomers Resource Network meets every Thursday at Uncle John’s Restaurant, 11:30 am-1 pm. Call 419-865-8503 or visit boomersrn.com. Cancer Support Group A cancer support group meets the second Monday of each month, 6:30 pm, at Mercy Health, St. Anne Hospital, second floor Cancer Library. Open to patients, family and caregivers. Call Marilyn at 419-865-0659 or Laura at 419-754-1277 for more information. Diabetes Education Support Group Monthly support group for people living with Type 2 diabetes meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 6 pm at the ProMedica Mary Ellen Falzone Diabetes Center, Conference Room A, 2100 W. Central Ave., free and open to the public. Call 419-291-6767 or contact sarah.cordrey@promedica.org. Double ARC Online Parent Support Group A free support group for parents / guardians of children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders facilitated by FASD specialists meets the second Tuesday from 7-8 pm at the Double ARC building, 5800 Monroe St., Bldg. F-5. Food Addicts in Recovery Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous meets every Monday night at 7 pm at Epworth United Methodist Church, 4855 W. Central Ave. Contact Stoney at 734-635-1392, email stoney1g@aol.com or visit foodaddicts.org. God Works! Crossroads Community Church, 6960 Sylvania-Petersburg Rd., Ottawa Lake, Mich., offers God Works!, providing a warm meal to

anyone in need each Thursday. Doors open at 5:30 pm; meal is at 6 pm. Healing Service The Victory Center invites cancer patients and survivors to a healing service on the third Tuesday of each month at Epworth United Methodist Church, 4855 W. Central Ave. The service is free and open to the public. Register by calling 419-531-7600. Mom2mom Mom2mom is a way for moms to get connected with others who are also journeying through motherhood. We meet the first Wednesday of every month from September through May from 9:15-11:15 am at Christ the Word Church, 3100 Murd Rd. Childcare is provided. facebook.com/Mom2momtoledo/ MothersÊ Center of Greater Toledo First and third Thursday meetings for fun, food and friendship from 9:45-11:15 am at West Toledo YMCA, 2110 Tremainsville Rd., Toledo. Developmentally appropriate childcare provided. For info visit motherscenter.net. Nar-Anon A 12-step program for families and friends of addicts meets on Saturdays from 10-11 am at Mercy St. Anne’s, 3404 W. Sylvania Ave, third floor conference room and Wednesdays from 7-8:30 pm at Harvest Lane Alliance Church, 5132 Harvest Ln. Olivet Lutheran ChurchÊs Free Community Meal Olivet hosts a free community meal each Wednesday in the Christian Life Center. Enjoy food and fellowship at 5840 Monroe St. Call 419-882-2077 or visit olivetsylvania.org. Pet Loss Support Group SylvaniaVet hosts a pet loss support group meeting at Christ Presbyterian Church, 4225 W. Sylvania Ave., 7 pm the second Tuesday of each month. Park in the back. 419-885-4421. Prostate Cancer Support Group A prostate cancer support group meets the fourth Monday of each month at 6:30 pm at Cancer Center library at St. Anne’s Hospital. For info, call 419-346-2753 or 419-344-9830. Stamp Collectors Club of Toledo Meets first and third Thursdays, Sept.-May at Perrysburg Masonic Hall - 590 E South Boundary at 7 pm. Each meeting is a program or member auction. Stroke Support Group Monthly support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers. Group meets on the fourth Thursday of the month from 4 - 6 pm at ProMedica Flower Hospital, 5200 Harroun Rd. Contact 419-291-7537 or stroke.support@promedica.org. Survivors of Suicide Support Group Meets on the first Tuesday of the month at the Advent Lutheran Center, 3941 N. McCord Rd. at 7pm. Call Nancy Yunker at 419517-7553 for more information.

TOMASE DENTAL CARE

Friendly and Caring Team, Your Comfort is our Priority! Accepting new patients!

DR. TOMASE AND TEAM

Taizé Service A Taizé Service is held monthly on the third Thursday at 7 pm in SUCC’s Christ’s Chapel, 7240 Erie St. 419-882-0048. TAME Meeting The Toledo Area Miniature Enthusiasts meet the first Saturday of each month from 1- 4 pm in the Sylvania Heritage Museum Carriage House, 5717 Main St. 734-847-6366. TOPS Meetings (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Two chapters of TOPS,1961 and 1672, meet at King of Glory Lutheran Church, 6715 Brint Rd. Meetings are held Mondays from 9-10:30 am and Tuesdays from 6:30-7:30 pm. Call

419-478-1103 or 419-841-6436 for information. TOPS is not church affiliated. Toledo Area Genealogy Society Meets from 7-9 pm the second Monday of the month September through June at Sylvania United Church of Christ, 7240 Erie St. Visit tagstoledo.org for info. Toledo Country Live Band Toledo Country Live Band is in concert the first and third Saturday, 6 pm at the Church of St. Andrew United Methodist, 3620 Heatherdowns Blvd. Light refreshments. Free. Information 419-262-4453.

Sylvania Senior Center Programs

Hours: 8 am- 5 pm Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri • 8 am-7:30 pm Tuesdays Lunch is served from 11:30-12:15 p.m. Mon-Fri; suggested donation age 60+ is $2.50; non-senior is $5.62, make reservation by noon the day before. Tuesday Evening Dinner served from 4:30-5:15, $8.00 per person; reserve by 2 p.m. the Friday before Billiards: Mon-Fri open all day, weekly; Computer Lab: open when classes are not in session; Open Gym: when classes are not in session, please see schedule Quilting & Sewing: Tue & Thu, 8-12 noon, weekly; Woodshop: Tue, Thu & Fri, 1-3, weekly; Woodcarvers: Tue, 3-6 weekly March through December Transportation to Senior Center & Shopping: call Deb, 419-885-3913 10/3 FREE “Here’s to Your Health!” 10/10 Strength Training: Mon & Thu 10Fair: 10-1 11, weekly* Rug Hooking: 1st & 3rd Thu, Chair Yoga: Mon, Tue & Thu 9:30-11:30, monthly 11:30-12:30, weekly* Strength Training: Mon & Thu 10Memory Chat: 2nd Thu, by ap 11, weekly* pointment, memory care profes Chair Yoga: Mon, Tue & Thu sional, monthly 11:30-12:30, weekly* Pathways Consultation: 2nd Thu, 10/ 4 Jazzercise: Mon-Fri call Christy by appointment, monthly for details 419-460-1734 Duplicate Bridge: Thu, 1-4, wkly Strength/Balance: Wed 1-2, Fri 10/11 “An Evening with the Joe LaConey 10:30-11:30, weekly* Band”: $10/ticket, call for avail Scrabble: 1:30-4:30, weekly ability Line Dancing: Fri 2:30-4:00, Jazzercise: Mon-Fri call Christy for weekly details 419-460-1734 10/7 Jazzercise: Mon-Fri call Christy for Estate Review, by appointment, details 419-460-1734 monthly Strength Training: Mon & Thu 10Strength/Balance: Wed 1-2, Fri 11, weekly* 10:30-11:30, weekly* Arbors at Sylvania BP Clinic: Scrabble: 1:30-4:30, weekly 11:30-12:30 10/14 Jazzercise: Mon-Fri call Christy for Chair Yoga: Mon Tue & Thu details 419-460-1734 11:30-12:30, weekly* Strength Training: Mon & Thu 10Woodcarving Class: Mon & Wed 11, weekly,* 1-2:30, weekly, limited occupancy Chair Yoga: Mon, Tue & Thu 10/8 Franciscan Care Center BP/BS 11:30-12:30, weekly* Clinic: Tuesdays, 9-11:30 Woodcarving Class: Mon & Wed Chair Yoga: Mon, Tue & Thu 1-2:30, weekly, limited occupancy 11:30-12:30, weekly* Cardio Drumming: 2nd Mon 2 & Legal Outreach: by appointment, 2:30 workouts, call for details monthly 10/15 Franciscan Care Center BP/BS Adult Coloring: 2nd & 4th Tue, 1Clinic: Tuesdays, 9-11:30 3 monthly Senior Chorus: Tuesday 9:45Current Events: 2nd & 4th Tue, 211:15, weekly 4 monthly O.S.H.I.I.P. Trained Specialist: 3rd Dr. Lam’s Tai Chi for Health: Tue Tue of the month, by appointment 3-4, weekly* Chair Yoga: Mon, Tue & Thu Silver Scholars: 5:30-6:30, call for 11:30-12:30, weekly* details Dr. Lam’s Tai Chi for Health: Tue Hatha Yoga evening practice: 63-4, weekly* 7 p.m. through Oct 22, 2019 Alt. Health Discussion Group: 1st 1-/9 Strength/Balance: Wed 1-2, Fri 1 & 3rd Tue, 4:15-5 10:30-11:30, weekly* Silver Scholars: 5:30-6:30, call for Retirement Specialist: 2nd Wed, details by appointment, monthly Medicare & You: 3rd Tue, 5:30Hatha Yoga: afternoon practice, 6:30, monthly Wed 2:30-4, weekly* Hatha Yoga evening practice: 6Rummikub: 2nd Wed, 3-4, mthly 7p.m. through Oct 22, 2019 10/10 Jazzercise: Mon-Fri call Christy for 10/16 Party Euchre: Wed 10-12, weekly details 419-460-1734 Pinochle: 12:30-3:30, weekly *Call for fee and registration • For more info, call: 419-885-3913

7616 King’s Pointe Rd. • Sylvania Township 419.474.5858 • www.drtomase.com

2A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Sylvania Community Services, a nonprofit agency, manages the Sylvania Senior Center. For a complete listing of all Senior Center activities and programs, visit sylvaniaseniorcenter.org and click on Senior Center Newsletter.

Sylvania Senior Center • 7140 Sylvania Ave. • Sylvania, Ohio 43560


•Through Oct. 8

Sylvania Farmers Market, 3 pm Every Tuesday. Maplewood between Main and Richard Becker Drive.

•Through Oct. 11

Art Exhibition, 10 am-4 pm Canticle Center Gallery 5335 Silica Celebration of artists’ works from the collection of the Toledo Federation of Art Societies.

•Through Oct. 20

Rose sale through the Lions Club Available in red, yellow, pink and orange. Delivered before Thanksgiving. $30 per dozen. To order, email danielmiller6212@gmail.com or call 419-606-9868.

•Oct. 3

Fall Health Fair, 10 am-1 pm Sylvania Senior Center 7140 Sylvania Ave. Information about senior housing, rehab and assisted living, fire safety, health and hearing screenings, door prizes and more. •Ninth annual Zero Waste Lunch, 11:30 am-1 pm Franciscan Center All tableware is compostable and guests are encouraged to bring reusable water bottles. Open to the public. For more information, contact Amy Campbell at 419-824-3515.

•Career Exploration Session, 2-4:15 pm Sylvania Library Owens Community College representatives will share valuable information on Owens Community College program offerings for adults that can lead to rewarding careers. •Transitus Service, 7 pm Queen of Peace Chapel 6832 Convent Blvd. Sisters of St. Francis of Sylvania welcome all at this service commemorating the death of St. Francis and a simple reception that follows in Madonna Hall. •Learn Kung Fu! 4:30-5:30 pm Sylvania Library Want to build self-confidence and control? Learn the basics of Kung Fu with Dr. Aaron Brown to help build a championship attitude. Cricut Features, 6-7:30 pm King Road Library Adults who know Cricut basics, learn how to weld, slice, flatten and more. Familiarity with the Cricut machine and Cricut Design Space basic features is highly recommended. Register.

•Oct. 3, 17

Code IT Club, 4:15-5:15 pm King Road Library Have you ever wanted to create a video game, program a robot or make a website? Come to the library, make some friends, learn more about coding and show others your skills. Tweens (10-13)

•Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24

To advertise, email ads@yourgoodnews.com

5657 N. Main St., Suite 1 Sylvania, Ohio 43560 Telephone: 419-824-0100 Facsimile: 419-824-0112 Email: editor@yourgood.news YOURGOOD.NEWS

PUBLISHER Sharon Lange EDITORS Mary Helen Darah, Jennifer Ruple CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Erika Buri, Gayleen Gindy, Mike Jones, Craig Stough, Erin Palmer Szavuly, Linda Szyskowski, Janis Weber CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS John Crisman of AssetWare COPY EDITING Sarah Groves, Bobbie Ziviski PRODUCTION Susan Utterback ADVERTISING Dave Achen, Mary Rose Gajewski, Molly O’Shea GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Elissa Cary, Penny Collins Views expressed by contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or staff.

Sit, Stay, Read, 7-8 pm King Road Library Books and dogs ... what a great combination! Kids, age 5 to 10 will be improving their reading skills while reading to a gentle, friendly therapy dog. Register.

•Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31

Toddler Storytime, 10-10:45 am Locations Franciscan Center, Lourdes University, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania, 419-824-3707 Olander Park (Nederhouser and Gorman), 6930 W. Sylvania Ave. To register, 419-882-8313, ext. 1013 or programs@olanderpark.com; olanderpark.com Sylvania Libraries 6749 Monroe St., Sylvania 419-882-2089 3900 King Rd., King Branch 419-259-5380 Toledo Museum of Art 2445 Monroe St., Toledo toledomuseum.org Toledo Zoo 2 Hippo Way, Toledo toledozoo.org Valentine Theatre 410 Adams St., Toledo valentinetheatre.com Wildwood Preserve Metropark (Manor House) 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo metroparkstoledo.com

Sylvania Library Have fun at this interactive storytime for children 18 months-3 years old and their favorite grown-up. Talk, sing, read, write and play together as books, songs, rhymes and movement are shared.

•Oct. 3, 17, 24, 31

Teen Gamer's Guild, 3-5 pm Sylvania Library Play the newest games on the Nintendo Switch, such as Fortnite, Super Smash Bros Ultimate, Minecraft, Super Mario Party, and many more. Teen Gamer's Guild meets in the Teen Area. Tweens (10-13)

•Oct. 3, 17, 31, Nov. 7

Baby/Toddler and Me Yoga, 10 am Olander Gorman Parent and child will play and practice yoga while singing, exploring movement. Racha Maheshwari, instructor. Pre-register.

•Oct. 4

Spooky Tea, 11:30-2:30 pm Stranleigh manor house Wildwood Preserve Specially brewed tea, delicious sandwiches and desserts while overlooking the Shipman Garden. Walk-in guests from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Dress for the occasion if you wish. •St. Francis Day Liturgy, 4:30 pm Queen of Peace Chapel 6832 Convent Blvd. All welcomed at the Liturgy. •Make and Take, 1-3 pm All Good Things 6832 Convent Blvd. Hammered wire earrings are made. $10. RSVP 419-824-3749.

•Oct. 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19, 25, 26

Snooze at the Zoo, 6:30 pm-10 am Toledo Zoo During the overnight adventure, guests make enrichment for animals, tour the Zoo, meet animals up close and enjoy delicious meals. Separate fee and pre-registration required. toledozoo.org/snooze.

•Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25

Library Playdate, 10-10:45 Sylvania Library Young children, 0-5, and their favorite grown-up are welcome to experience the Library as a fun, exciting place to play while building early literacy skills.

•Oct. 4 and 6

Macbeth, the opera, by Verdi Valentine Theatre Toledo Opera performances at 7:30 pm on Oct. 4 and 2 pm on Oct. 6. Verdi’s work tells the Bard’s story of a brave Scottish general named Macbeth, destined for a fall in his lust for power.

•Oct. 5

Laughter Yoga with Jenn McCullough, 10-11 am King Road Library

Laughter Yoga is the practice of combining laughter exercises with yogic breathing. Bring a mat if you have one. Adults •Code IT for Adults, 2-3:30 pm King Road Library Have you ever wanted to learn how coding works? This class will take you step-by-step through the process. Come explore coding in an adult intro class.

•Oct. 5, 19

Euchre Saturdays, 11 am-1 pm Sylvania Library Do you enjoy playing cards? How about coffee, conversation and a chance to meet new people? Whether you're a "card shark" or have never played Euchre before.

•Oct. 6

Zoomba, 9-10 am Toledo Zoo, Great Hall Move to Latin rhythms and animal-inspired tunes for an hour of energetic exercise to benefit Raising Up Red Pandas campaign. Separate fee. Ticket includes Zoo admission. toledozoo.org/zoomba •The Greatest Dream, 2:30 pm Franciscan Center iDance Adaptive and Fitness Studio presents its annual showcase. Piano performance by Corey Pappas, iDesign Photography, ArtWalk and Silent Auction. $15 for admission. Call 419-787-1552 or iDance@bex.net for info. •The Music of Richard Rodgers, 3 pm Toledo Museum of Art GlasSalon Singer Judy Dye performs classic works from Richard Rodgers that demonstrates how his music changed with his primary lyricists, Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein. •ALS Walk Promenade Park, Toledo Visit alsaohio.org for more information.

•Oct. 7

Beginners Tai Chi, 6-7:30 pm Elks Lodge #53 3520 N. Holland Sylvania Rd. Tai Chi classes consist of slow movements, gentle turns and graceful stretches. •Sugar Skull Pendants, 3:30-4:30 pm Sylvania Library Paint sugar skull pendants in preparation for Día de Los Muertos. Create a keepsake and lernabout aholiday in the Latino community.

•Oct. 7, 14

Facing and Erasing, 6-7:30 pm King Road Library Learn how to help yourself with ground breaking energy psychology tools that offer relief from daily stresses with a transformative toolkit of techniquesAdults, Register

•Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Preschool Storytime, 2-2:45 pm Sylvania Library Children ages 3-5 (and their favorite grownup) will enjoy stories, songs, movement and more in this fun program designed to get them ready for Kindergarten.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 3A


•Through Oct. 8

Sylvania Farmers Market, 3 pm Every Tuesday. Maplewood between Main and Richard Becker Drive.

•Through Oct. 11

Art Exhibition, 10 am-4 pm Canticle Center Gallery 5335 Silica Celebration of artists’ works from the collection of the Toledo Federation of Art Societies.

•Through Oct. 20

Rose sale through the Lions Club Available in red, yellow, pink and orange. Delivered before Thanksgiving. $30 per dozen. To order, email danielmiller6212@gmail.com or call 419-606-9868.

•Oct. 3

Fall Health Fair, 10 am-1 pm Sylvania Senior Center 7140 Sylvania Ave. Information about senior housing, rehab and assisted living, fire safety, health and hearing screenings, door prizes and more. •Ninth annual Zero Waste Lunch, 11:30 am-1 pm Franciscan Center All tableware is compostable and guests are encouraged to bring reusable water bottles. Open to the public. For more information, contact Amy Campbell at 419-824-3515.

•Career Exploration Session, 2-4:15 pm Sylvania Library Owens Community College representatives will share valuable information on Owens Community College program offerings for adults that can lead to rewarding careers. •Transitus Service, 7 pm Queen of Peace Chapel 6832 Convent Blvd. Sisters of St. Francis of Sylvania welcome all at this service commemorating the death of St. Francis and a simple reception that follows in Madonna Hall. •Learn Kung Fu! 4:30-5:30 pm Sylvania Library Want to build self-confidence and control? Learn the basics of Kung Fu with Dr. Aaron Brown to help build a championship attitude. Cricut Features, 6-7:30 pm King Road Library Adults who know Cricut basics, learn how to weld, slice, flatten and more. Familiarity with the Cricut machine and Cricut Design Space basic features is highly recommended. Register.

•Oct. 3, 17

Code IT Club, 4:15-5:15 pm King Road Library Have you ever wanted to create a video game, program a robot or make a website? Come to the library, make some friends, learn more about coding and show others your skills. Tweens (10-13)

•Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24

To advertise, email ads@yourgoodnews.com

5657 N. Main St., Suite 1 Sylvania, Ohio 43560 Telephone: 419-824-0100 Facsimile: 419-824-0112 Email: editor@yourgood.news YOURGOOD.NEWS

PUBLISHER Sharon Lange EDITORS Mary Helen Darah, Jennifer Ruple CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Erika Buri, Gayleen Gindy, Mike Jones, Craig Stough, Erin Palmer Szavuly, Linda Szyskowski, Janis Weber CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS John Crisman of AssetWare COPY EDITING Sarah Groves, Bobbie Ziviski PRODUCTION Susan Utterback ADVERTISING Dave Achen, Mary Rose Gajewski, Molly O’Shea GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Elissa Cary, Penny Collins Views expressed by contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or staff.

Sit, Stay, Read, 7-8 pm King Road Library Books and dogs ... what a great combination! Kids, age 5 to 10 will be improving their reading skills while reading to a gentle, friendly therapy dog. Register.

•Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31

Toddler Storytime, 10-10:45 am Locations Franciscan Center, Lourdes University, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania, 419-824-3707 Olander Park (Nederhouser and Gorman), 6930 W. Sylvania Ave. To register, 419-882-8313, ext. 1013 or programs@olanderpark.com; olanderpark.com Sylvania Libraries 6749 Monroe St., Sylvania 419-882-2089 3900 King Rd., King Branch 419-259-5380 Toledo Museum of Art 2445 Monroe St., Toledo toledomuseum.org Toledo Zoo 2 Hippo Way, Toledo toledozoo.org Valentine Theatre 410 Adams St., Toledo valentinetheatre.com Wildwood Preserve Metropark (Manor House) 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo metroparkstoledo.com

Sylvania Library Have fun at this interactive storytime for children 18 months-3 years old and their favorite grown-up. Talk, sing, read, write and play together as books, songs, rhymes and movement are shared.

•Oct. 3, 17, 24, 31

Teen Gamer's Guild, 3-5 pm Sylvania Library Play the newest games on the Nintendo Switch, such as Fortnite, Super Smash Bros Ultimate, Minecraft, Super Mario Party, and many more. Teen Gamer's Guild meets in the Teen Area. Tweens (10-13)

•Oct. 3, 17, 31, Nov. 7

Baby/Toddler and Me Yoga, 10 am Olander Gorman Parent and child will play and practice yoga while singing, exploring movement. Racha Maheshwari, instructor. Pre-register.

•Oct. 4

Spooky Tea, 11:30-2:30 pm Stranleigh manor house Wildwood Preserve Specially brewed tea, delicious sandwiches and desserts while overlooking the Shipman Garden. Walk-in guests from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Dress for the occasion if you wish. •St. Francis Day Liturgy, 4:30 pm Queen of Peace Chapel 6832 Convent Blvd. All welcomed at the Liturgy. •Make and Take, 1-3 pm All Good Things 6832 Convent Blvd. Hammered wire earrings are made. $10. RSVP 419-824-3749.

•Oct. 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, 19, 25, 26

Snooze at the Zoo, 6:30 pm-10 am Toledo Zoo During the overnight adventure, guests make enrichment for animals, tour the Zoo, meet animals up close and enjoy delicious meals. Separate fee and pre-registration required. toledozoo.org/snooze.

•Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25

Library Playdate, 10-10:45 Sylvania Library Young children, 0-5, and their favorite grown-up are welcome to experience the Library as a fun, exciting place to play while building early literacy skills.

•Oct. 4 and 6

Macbeth, the opera, by Verdi Valentine Theatre Toledo Opera performances at 7:30 pm on Oct. 4 and 2 pm on Oct. 6. Verdi’s work tells the Bard’s story of a brave Scottish general named Macbeth, destined for a fall in his lust for power.

•Oct. 5

Laughter Yoga with Jenn McCullough, 10-11 am King Road Library

Laughter Yoga is the practice of combining laughter exercises with yogic breathing. Bring a mat if you have one. Adults •Code IT for Adults, 2-3:30 pm King Road Library Have you ever wanted to learn how coding works? This class will take you step-by-step through the process. Come explore coding in an adult intro class.

•Oct. 5, 19

Euchre Saturdays, 11 am-1 pm Sylvania Library Do you enjoy playing cards? How about coffee, conversation and a chance to meet new people? Whether you're a "card shark" or have never played Euchre before.

•Oct. 6

Zoomba, 9-10 am Toledo Zoo, Great Hall Move to Latin rhythms and animal-inspired tunes for an hour of energetic exercise to benefit Raising Up Red Pandas campaign. Separate fee. Ticket includes Zoo admission. toledozoo.org/zoomba •The Greatest Dream, 2:30 pm Franciscan Center iDance Adaptive and Fitness Studio presents its annual showcase. Piano performance by Corey Pappas, iDesign Photography, ArtWalk and Silent Auction. $15 for admission. Call 419-787-1552 or iDance@bex.net for info. •The Music of Richard Rodgers, 3 pm Toledo Museum of Art GlasSalon Singer Judy Dye performs classic works from Richard Rodgers that demonstrates how his music changed with his primary lyricists, Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein. •ALS Walk Promenade Park, Toledo Visit alsaohio.org for more information.

•Oct. 7

Beginners Tai Chi, 6-7:30 pm Elks Lodge #53 3520 N. Holland Sylvania Rd. Tai Chi classes consist of slow movements, gentle turns and graceful stretches. •Sugar Skull Pendants, 3:30-4:30 pm Sylvania Library Paint sugar skull pendants in preparation for Día de Los Muertos. Create a keepsake and lernabout aholiday in the Latino community.

•Oct. 7, 14

Facing and Erasing, 6-7:30 pm King Road Library Learn how to help yourself with ground breaking energy psychology tools that offer relief from daily stresses with a transformative toolkit of techniquesAdults, Register

•Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Preschool Storytime, 2-2:45 pm Sylvania Library Children ages 3-5 (and their favorite grownup) will enjoy stories, songs, movement and more in this fun program designed to get them ready for Kindergarten.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 3A


SAFS to host Ray of Hope Awards

Sylvania Lions Hold Rose Sale

The Sylvania Area Family Services is hosting its 17th annual Ray of Hope Awards on Oct.16 at the Pinnacle in Maumee. This year’s honorees include Dr. Jill HollerArts & Sciences, Brian Yeager-Sylvania Ace Hardware-Business & Industry, Timothy Harrington-Community Leader, Capable KidsCommunity Organization, Sandy Husman and Mark Luetke-Community Service, Steve Swaggerty-Education, Stephanie White-Public Service, Fred LeFebvre-Social Service, Sarah Best-Volunteer of the Year and Nick ChrystYouth Leader. The awards honor businesses and individuals who positively impact the greater Sylvania community. "The night is very meaningful," stated Dottie Segur. "It is an opportunity to thank community members who have made a difference in the lives of others. At SAFS, our mission is to strengthen Sylvania, one family at a time. The individuals and businesses we are acknowledging have selflessly acted on behalf of others

Tom Cole will emcee the 17th annual Ray of Hope Awards. to better their quality of life. It's a wonderful night of food, visiting with community and business leaders and thanking those who serve." This year's event will be hosted by Tom Cole, of Buckeye Cable Sports Network, the Taylor Automotive Family and a 2019 inductee into the St. John's Jesuit Hall of Fame. To order tickets call 419-882-8415 or visit safs.org.

Mobile Meals offers Burgundy, Bubbles & Bling The 32nd annual Mobile Meals Wine Gala, themed Burgundy, Bubbles & Bling this year will take place on Saturday, Nov. 2 at Parkway Place in Maumee. Reservations are suggested by Friday, Oct. 18. Tickets are available on-line at mobilemeals.org/events/ or by calling 419-2557806. Limited tickets will be available at the door. The evening begins with sampling wines from area distributors along with appetizers

from area chefs at 6:00-7:30 pm. Food stations with wine pairings are featured from 6:30-8:00 pm. A silent auction will be featured which includes a wide range of items. The silent auction will be available for bidding throughout the evening. Guests will be using Mobile Bidding for the Silent Auction. For more information on Wine Gala 2019, contact Mobile Meals of Toledo at 419-2557806 or visit the website mobilemeals.org.

Daniel Miller, president of the Sylvania Lions Club, points to the roses that are for sale during the organization’s ‘Thanks a Bunch’ rose sale, which is available through Oct. 20. The sale idea came to the Sylvania Lions Club from the Ashland Lions Club. ‘The Ashland club has done the sale for over 30 years,’ Miller said. ‘Many local businesses purchase the flowers for their employees as a thank you for a great year since it's close to the holidays and they are delivered before Thanksgiving. It's a great way to warm the home and show you care while giving back to the community. We started doing this in 2016 and are looking to grow through individual and business purchases.’ Roses are available in colors red, yellow, pink or orange. The cost is $30 a dozen. For additional information or to order roses email danielmiller6212@gmail.com or call 419-606-9868. —by Mary Helen Darah

Community event? Email editor@yourgood.news

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 5A


Parks: Great for Your Health! BY ERIKA BURI

We often associate parks with summer, but if you’re looking to improve your health, your parks are great year-round! Parks can have a huge impact on your physical and mental health. Here are five reasons why you should be spending more time in yours.

1. Improved general mood and attitude

Have you ever noticed that a walk in the park makes you feel more relaxed? Studies show that spending time in nature lowers frustration and increases brain activity, resembling meditation. Meditative walking in the forest has been shown to be effective at increasing happiness and improving daily life.

2. Stress reduction

We all experience stress, and there are many ways to combat it. However, experiencing

nature is one antidote to stress, and the body’s positive response is remarkably fast, occurring within minutes. The opportunity to stroll through one of our parks or even spend a few minutes sitting on a bench can help prevent stress which can lead to ill health.

3. Better mental health and functioning

Experiences in nature contribute to better mental health and improve one’s productivity and ability to pay attention. Increasing the time of a nature experience (up to 1.5 hours) increases the restorative effect. This is especially important for students, as time spent outside helps restore the mind from mental fatigue and natural settings provide respite from the highly focused attention needed for most tasks in school.

4. Improved creativity

In a study of creative professionals, nature experiences enhanced creativity by evoking new ways of thinking, promoting curiosity and encouraging more flexible thinking. Some time spent at the park may help you solve a problem or gain a different perspective on an issue.

5. Building social capital

Beyond parks’ value as places to gather, the mere presence of landscape or trees appears to promote community connections. Views of green space from homes are linked to greater perceptions of well-being and neighborhood satisfaction. No matter the size of the green space, no matter the time spent in them, your parks can make a solid difference in your health. Olander is here for you. Take advantage of our benefits. See you in your parks! Source: Wolf, Kathleen L., Ph.D. “The Health Benefits of Small Parks.” Parks and Recreation April 2017. National Parks and Recreation Association. Web. April 3, 2017.

Oliver Turner The new Sylvania Township Administrator, Oliver Turner, had no trouble making the decision to relocate his family to the Sylvania area recently. As a graduate student of the University of Toledo, he and his wife lived on Main Street. “I drove by Township hall every day on my way to UT,” he remembered. “Our second daughter, Juliette, was born in Flower Hospital. It feels like coming home,” he said. Turner, who grew up in Celina, Ohio, obtained a bachelor’s degree in psychology in 2008 and a master’s degree in public administration in 2010. He spent three years as the village manager and zoning administrator for the village of Almot, Mich., and another seven as city manager in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. “However, my wife and I had decided that we were ready to move closer to family when the Sylvania Township job became available,” he said. According to Sylvania Township Trustee John Crandall, Turner was one of over 100 applicants. “Oliver really was an outstanding

New township administrator feels right at home in Sylvania Township candidate.” The other two trustees, Neal Mahoney and John Jennewine, agreed. “We were all very happy to hire Oliver,” Crandall remarked. Turner envisions his role as that of a relationship builder. “My staff and I work with the trustees and implement the direction of the board, which actually reflects the will of the voters,” he said. “I have an excellent staff and together we also handle the day-to-day operations of township government as well having oversight of all of the divisions of township government.”

Goals

Turner plans to continue to advance the quality of life in the township. He also wants to work in collaboration with the city of Sylvania and continue to build and promote the community.

Family

Turner’s wife, Anna, is a published author and is completing her degree in family studies. The couple have two daughters, Amelia, 13, a student at Timberstone Junior High School and Juliette, 10, a student at Central Trail.

ProMedica Physicians welcomes new breast surgeon ProMedica Physicians welcomed Jessica A. Burns, M.D., to ProMedica Physicians Breast Surgery and Surgical Oncology, located at 5308 Harroun Rd., Suite 160, in Sylvania. Dr. Burns’ special interests include breast conservation surgery and oncoplastic techniques, nipple-sparing mastectomy, high-risk surveillance, cancer exercise and nutrition, lymphedema prevention, and

social determinants of health. Dr. Burns received her medical degree from The University of Toledo College of Medicine, completed an internship at the University of Michigan Health System, and completed her residency in general surgery at the University of Toledo Medical Center. Dr. Burns also continued on to complete a Breast Surgical Oncology fellowship at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Mich.

Call Sarah to Subscribe

6A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

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Toledo Federation of Art Societies collection is on display at Canticle Center BY ERIN PALMER SZAVULY

Come to the Canticle Center Gallery, 5335 Silica Dr., for a peek at some significant pieces from the art collection of the Toledo Federation of Art Societies, of which Lourdes University is a member.  TFAS has been in existence in the Toledo area for over 100 years, dating back to 1917. For numerous years the "Federation" as it was called historically, purchased pieces at the Toledo Area Artists Exhibition that was held annually at The Toledo Museum of Art.   Works in this exhibition are part of the TFAS collection and include pieces by several well-known artists from the region’s past. Artists include Harvey Littleton, known for organizing the first glassblowing seminar aimed at the studio artist in 1962, on the grounds of the  Toledo Museum of Art. At that time it was believed glassblowing could only be done on the factory floor. Littleton aimed to put it within the reach of the individual studio artist. Also represented is Charles Lakofsky, a midcentury modernist, who was one of the early ceramists to work with high fire translucent porcelain and  Hal Hasselschwert, a jeweler and cooper  enamellist who  studied  at the Government College of Arts and Crafts in Lucknow, India.  In addition, current regional artists are on display like James Boldt, Sally Hobbib Rumman, Oraphan Vichitot and Wanda Zuchowski-Schick. This exhibit displays works purchased between 1949 and 2013. This broad range helps organizers to recognize what type of art was produced and desired during the years acquired and also helps them to note the materials and media that were involved. In addition, the exhibit provides a window

into the archival aspects of materials over time. Visitors will notice in this exhibition, aging with pieces of art is of great concern. A dilemma with any art restoration and conservation involves many questions and thoughts, beginning with the artist’s intent. Did they expect their work to have a shelf life for example? Were they concerned about how the work would hold up for the next 50100 years? Did they use the best materials available or did they use what was easily accessible to them? This is not necessarily a new quandary in the art world … ask any museum that owns a piece by Leonard DaVinci. The exhibition is on display through Oct. 11. Exhibition hours are Monday through Friday 10 am to 4 pm. A reception for the public will be held on Friday, Oct. 4 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm as part of Sylvania’s Red Bird Art Walk. Questions may be directed to Erin Palmer Szavuly at ESzavuly@lourdes.edu.

ALS Walk moves to downtown Toledo

The 16th annual Toledo Walk to Defeat ALS® is moving to a downtown location in 2019. Toledo’s Promenade Park will be a hub of activity Sunday, Oct. 6 with many walkers coming as teams. This group, which is anticipated to be 1,000 strong, will walk to raise awareness for ALS, a deadly neurological disease that strikes many in this area. Families and friends are invited to gather to celebrate the lives of their loved one and to cherish the memory of those passed. Visit alsaohio.org or call The ALS Association Northern Ohio Chapter for further details.

Hal Hasselschwert, Untitled

Marshall Orr, ‘Concert’

Maybelle Muttart Falardeau, ‘The Foolish and the Wise. ’

James Boldt, Untitled clay vessel and jute macrame sleeve

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 7 A


Sylvania Super Hero ... Lt. Kahan

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BY MARY HELEN DARAH

8A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Lt. Steve Kahan has been serving Sylvania for 21 years. “I took the EMT route,� recalled Kahan. “I worked for a private ambulance service for a few years. I was then hired as a paramedic in the emergency department at St. Vincent. In 1996 and 1997, I was one of six paramedics that were hired to start a nurse/ paramedic flight program in Bluffton, Ohio, for St. Vincent Lifeflight. This was the first time in northwest Ohio that a helicopter was staffed with a paramedic instead of a physician. I was hired as a full-time firefighter in Sylvania in 1999. In 2004, I was promoted to Lieutenant." The Sylvania lieutenant has had many memorable moments during his career. One of the most recent was helping to create a new logo for Station #1. “The guys at our station wanted to come up with our own identity,� stated Lt. Kahan. “We solicited the help of the young artist, Brookelyn Duhamel, who painted a mural at Plummer Pool. I coach an elite girls softball team. Brookelyn happened to play on another team. Because she went to Northview, we made that connection. The ideas for the new logo came from ideas from the firefighters at Station #1 about what would best represent us. We are known for responding to calls all night long while most people are sleeping. We are also located right next to a train track and are also close to Northview. We incorporated those elements in a mural on the kitchen wall inside the station. Chief Ramm liked it so much we ended up using the design on our trucks and uniform shirts. I believe it separates our station from the rest. We call it the ‘Night Train.’ Lt. Kahan also finds teaching CPR/ACLS on his days off very rewarding. “It is a passion,� he stated. “We teach in numerous venues including schools, medical offices, and the general public.� In my mind the more people that know CPR, the safer we are as a society. I have been teaching CPR for over 20 years and have seen many changes and technological

advancements. Our department is a test sight for new pieces of equipment that we are currently using. We found that the outcomes with this new technology are incredible.� Like many firefighters, Lt. Kahan faces challenges on the job. “I think one of the greatest challenges is that our scope is huge. We do everything including firefighting, EMS, community service, training, public education, and fire inspections. The most challenging part for me is trying to help the younger firefighters understand what we do is a career and not just a job. We play an important role that is all encompassing. My job is to manage a small group of firefighters on a daily basis and make certain that everyone goes home safe to their families,� he stated. Lt. Kahan believes one of the best aspects of the job is the camaraderie shared with his “work family while away from my family,� and being an integral part of something larger than himself. “We do things as a team. Being a firefighter is not an individual endeavor. We trust each other and have each other’s backs,� he said. Lt. Kahan enjoys spending time with his wife of 22 years, Christine, 15-year-old daughter Emily, 18-year-old son R.J., 30-yearold son Cody, and their dog Tonka. He works out on a regular basis to keep himself in shape for the physical demands of his job. “We are busy planning a wedding for my eldest son and visiting colleges for my senior. My summers are jam packed coaching my daughter’s travel softball team and trying to mix in a vacation or two. I’m looking forward to the positive changes the department has in store,� he said. “I have a lot of respect for Chief Ramm. He is not only our chief, but he is also a friend and someone I trust. He has guided the department in the right direction. This community should be extremely proud of its fire department in providing exceptional fire protection and emergency medical services, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, without exception. It is an honor to be called a Sylvania Firefighter!"


Sylvanians are Part of One Yoga Festival

Ribbon Cut for New Fix-It Station

Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce Welcoming Committee members Bud Crosby retired STFD, Crystal Jordan of Farmers and Merchants Bank, Lyndsey Stough of Stough & Stough Architects, Joe Szafarowicz, PT Link, and Bill Sanford, city of Sylvania, with members of the Ridin’ Late in County 48 committee, Brian Schroyer of Spoke Life Cycles, Ben Malczewski of the Sylvania Library, Kevin Webb of We Are People Too, Jeff Clegg and Josette Snyder of Toledo Memorial Park, Liz Turski and Todd Reckley of Yark Automotive, Ron Finch of Brightz, Alice Dargartz of the Lucas County Health Department, Greg Bonfiglio and Abby Buchhop of the Lucas County Emergency Services join Katie Cappellini of Sylvania City Council to cut the ribbon for the new Fix It Station at the Sylvania Library. Proceeds from Ridin’ Late were used to purchase the station, which contains a variety of tools that can be used for minor bicycle repairs. Cyclists can also add air to their bicycle tires if needed. Sylvania Library Manager Ben Malczewski noted that several bike safety classes are planned for later in the year.

Angela’s Angels Hosts Open House

Gale Clark and Sue Briddell of Harmony in Life and several yoga students from their downtown Sylvania studio joined many others from the area to participate in the ProMedica-sponsored One Yoga Festival held in Promenade Park on Sept. 8. —Photo by Gini Behrendt

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Autumn décor inspiration falls to Mother Nature Sylvania Area Family Services Community Meals 5440 Marshall Rd. Dinner: Oct. 3, 4:30 - 6:30 pm Lunch: Oct. 17, 11 am - noon Once a month Sylvania Area Family Services offers free meals provided by a community partner. Open to the public. For more information, call 419-882-8415. sylvaniaareafamilyservices.org Harvest FEST at Sofia Quintero Art and Cultural Center 1225 Broadway St., Toledo Friday, Oct. 4, 5 - 7 pm Enjoy a meal prepared from the fruit and vegetable harvest from the center’s gardens. Crafts, music and a 50/50 raffle. $7 donation. squacc.org MacQueenÊs Apple Butter Festival 7605 Garden Rd., Holland Oct. 5 - 6, 10 am - 6 pm This annual event features apple picking, food vendors, arts and crafts, live music, children’s activities, carnival rides, and a petting zoo. Don’t miss MacQueen’s homemade pies, fritters, donuts, cider and caramel apples. Sylvania Farmers Market Fall Harvest Celebration Maplewood Ave., West of Main St. Tuesday, Oct. 8, 3 - 7 pm Celebrate the harvest with the last farmers market of the season. Visit with your favorite farmers and vendors who will bring locally grown produce, pumpkins and flowers. Enjoy cider, live music, kids activities, special guest vendors and food trucks. downtownsylvania.org Appleumpkin Festival Downtown Tecumseh, Mich. Saturday, Oct. 12, 9 am - 6 pm

Sunday, Oct. 13, 10 am - 5 pm Tecumseh’s 26th annual festival includes eating and shopping opportunities at local restaurants and shops, arts and crafts, live music, food vendors, carnival games, kids activities, antiques and flea market. CiderFest419 Wildwood Preserve Metropark Ward Pavilion, 4830 Central Ave. Friday, Oct. 18, 5:30 - 9:30 pm Hosted by Toledo Night Market, this event features craft drinks and food pairing. Enjoy tastings of local and regional hard cider, mead, craft beer and fall wine; artisanal food and art vendors; and live music. 21 and over. For tickets, visit ciderfest419.com. HOOVES Chili Cookoff & Craft Beer Tasting Valleywood Golf Club 13502 Airport Hwy., Swanton Saturday, Nov. 9, 6 -10 pm Spend Veterans Day honoring our heroes over a warm bowl of chili, craft beer and cider, live music, dancing, a 50/50 raffle and silent auction. Tickets available at hooves.networkforgood.com TASTINGS SofoÊs Italian Market 5400 Monroe St. Wednesdays, 5 - 7 pm Sip and sample fabulous food by Chef Frankie. Prices vary depending on wines offered. shopsofos.com Bottle Shop at MancyÊs Italian 5453 Monroe St. Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm Weekly tasting event. Pours begin at $2. bottleshopinfo@mancys.com

BY JENNIFER RUPLE When it comes to fall decorating ideas, look no further than Mother Nature. Amy Nolfo of The Butter Barn, a monthly barn sale event in Ottawa Lake, Mich. featuring vintage and reimagined treasures, declared, “This really is my time of year. My favorite thing about fall décor is that Mother Nature provides just about everything you need, pumpkins, gourds and colorful leaves.” The Butter Barn, 5541 Consear Rd., is the creation of designers and curators, Nolfo and Brad Bingley. For Bingley it’s all about the ambiance. “I think about fall decorating in terms of a total sensory experience,” he explained. “The scents of cinnamon and nutmeg, an apple pie baking in the oven, cider warming on the stove and warm flannel shirts… all create that cozy fall feeling.” Nolfo and Bingley were happy to share some of their favorite decorating tips for the season.

JosephÊs Beverage Center 4129 Talmadge Rd. Thursdays, 6 - 8 pm Enjoy a selection of wines for a nominal fee. josephswinestoretoledooh.com

Got foodie events? Email editor@yourgood.news

summer flowers you are now emptying? Well, fill them back up,” smiled Nolfo. “We love perching gourds and pumpkins in garden pots. I always keep Spanish moss on hand to tuck in under the pumpkins,” she added.

“The ‘flower of the season’ is the hardy mum, available in lots of great autumn colors,” stated Nolfo. “Mums are inherently rustic, so they look great in old containers. Head to your barn, garden shed or local vintage shop and pick up old buckets, rustic wooden crates and boxes for unique and fast fall centerpieces and porch décor. Leave the mums in their pots and simply pop them into your containers,” she suggested. Nolfo and Bingley love flannel and like to

“We all have jars, big bowls, favorite vases... fill them with a variety of pumpkins and gourds. Vases look great with cuttings of long twigs with leaves still intact in bold fall colors in lieu of flowers,” said Nolfo. “You know all those pots and urns of

repurpose their old shirts into fall décor. Nolfo explained, “When I want to add some fun decorative touches, I do my ‘snip and rip’ technique to create rag ties for the handles on our buckets of mums, flannel bows around electric candles, ties on vintage coffee mugs and just about anywhere that needs a little kiss of autumn.” The next Butter Barn sale event runs October 17 through 20 from 10 am to 4 pm each day.

10A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS


Butternut squash blossoms in seasonal comfort food Autumn Salad with Maple Balsamic Vinaigrette

Tangy goat cheese and slightly sour cranberries are perfectly balanced by the sweetness of the butternut squash and maple vinaigrette in this colorful autumn salad. Whisk up the dressing a few hours before serving, so the flavors get a chance to fuse. Serves 4. Dressing 1 /2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 /4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 /8 cup maple syrup 1 /4 teaspoon salt 1 /8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 /8 teaspoon cinnamon

BY JENNIFER RUPLE

There’s something about winter squashes that just go hand in hand with comfort foods. Perhaps it’s their meaty qualities that add that extra layer of richness to our seasonal dishes. Or, maybe it’s their versatility in that Jennifer Ruple they can be used in both sweet and savory dishes. The butternut squash takes center stage this week as we focus on the fruit’s savory qualities with three dishes perfect for chilly October evenings. In the first recipe, butternut squash is presented in a spiralized form and paired with spaghetti and spicy-sweet Italian sausage. A fresh autumn salad features roasted squash dressed in a tangy-sweet maple balsamic vinaigrette. Finally, butternut squash amps up the creaminess in a classic – mac and cheese.

Butternut Squash, Sausage and Sage

Light a candle, pull up a chair and dig into the fruits of the season.

Butternut Squash, Sausage and Sage

This recipe relies on a spiralizer to create noodle-like strands of squash. If you don’t have a spiralizer, use a vegetable peeler to make long shreds of squash instead. Since you only need the top half of the butternut squash in this recipe, save the other half for another day and use it to make the Autumn Salad. Serves 4. 8 ounces spaghetti Half of a medium butternut squash, about 12 ounces 2 tablespoons olive oil 8 ounces sweet Italian sausage, casings removed 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 /4 cup fresh sage leaves, chopped 1 /4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 3 /4 cup dry white wine 2 cups kale, chopped 1 /4 cup half-and-half 1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard 2 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded Cook pasta according to directions. Peel the butternut squash and spiralize on a thin noodle setting. Cut any very long strands in half. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add sausage and cook, breaking it up with a spoon until it begins to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic, sage, red pepper and cook, stirring about 1 minute. Add butternut squash and toss to combine. Add wine and cook, covered, until the squash is just tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Add kale and toss to combine. Stir in cream and mustard and simmer until slightly thickened, 1 to 2 minutes. Fold in cheese. (Recipe adapted from womensday.com)

Salad Half of 1 medium butternut squash, peeled seeded and cut into 1-inch cubes 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and freshly ground black pepper 8 ounces fresh spinach 1 /4 cup red onion, thinly sliced 1 /2 cup dried cranberries Crumbled goat cheese 1 /4 cup sliced almonds, toasted In a medium bowl, add dressing ingredients. Whisk until blended. Set aside. Heat oven to 350 F. Coat butternut squash

1 1/2 cups milk 3 tablespoons flour 1 cup shredded Gruyere cheese 4 slices precooked bacon, chopped 1 /2 cup sweet onion, diced 1 /2 cup plain breadcrumbs 1 tablespoon butter, melted Parsley for garnish Heat oven to 425 F. Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain. Set aside. In a medium saucepan, combine squash and 11/4 cups milk and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until squash is soft. While squash is cooking, sauté onion in butter until soft. Combine remaining 1/4 cup of milk and flour and stir into squash mixture. Bring to a boil and cook 2-3 minutes until thickened. Add 3/4 cup gruyere to mixture and stir until melted. In a large bowl, combine squash mixture, onion, half of the bacon and pasta. Transfer to a prepared baking dish. Sprinkle with remaining cheese. Combine butter, breadcrumbs and remaining bacon. Sprinkle over cheese. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until top has browned. Sprinkle with fresh parsley. (Recipe adapted from midwestliving.com)

Autumn Salad cubes with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. On a baking sheet lined with foil, spread squash evenly in one layer. Roast for 15 to 20 minutes or until squash is tender. While squash is roasting, assemble salad. In a large bowl, arrange spinach, onion, cranberries, cheese, and almonds. Once the squash has cooled slightly, add it to salad. Drizzle with vinaigrette. (Recipe by Jennifer Ruple)

Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

The creamy sweetness of the squash is balanced by the bacon’s saltiness in this classic comfort dish. Serves 6. 8 ounces dried pasta such as shells or spirals 2 cups butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into chunks

Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 11A


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Michelle Sprott and her son Ben buy flowers from Jane Berry of Posey Jane’s at the market.

Tim Keil of Louis Keil & Sons Farm makes sure there is a good supply of sweet corn available.

Mike Lieber talks with Steve Colony of Great Lakes Custom Sharpening.

12A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Cooper Linehan enjoys his flavored ice while his brother Jackson gets a spoonful of frozen treats from his mother, Jennifer.

John and Sandy Husman are regular visitors to the Sylvania Farmers Market.


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Beth Doster of Grumpy’s gives Jan Kott the garbage salads she purchases for dinner.

Fatima Mehdi and her children Batoul and Ali buy produce from Donna Farnsel of Farnsel Farms. Jack Carls of Old Tyme Kettle Korn fills an order for Kay Ball, one of his regular customers.

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Nancy and Mike Goettner buy chicken feet dog treats from Tom Kosek of Acorn Hill Farms.

Ragina Johnson and her children Rowan and Ashton enjoy the aromatic soy candles made by Bradlie Simon of Joiful Creations.

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Jean VanHorn learns about the baked goods available from Gary and Patt Morr, the Pie Lady.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 13A


Folks of all ages celebrate the end of summer at Local Fest

L-R: Craig, Bonnie and Brett Griffis make the event a family affair and enjoy the end of summer with craft beers and local music.

Tom and Sandy Nichols, their children Michelle Bork and her friend Stefan Slay, Shawn and Jasmin Nichols, their children Harper and Chase along with Donovan and Alycia Nichols and their son Sawyer meet at Local Fest.

Pat Wahl, of The Village Candy Shoppe, offers guests sweet treats at the Local Fest event held Sept. 21.

Felicia and Benjamin Yacko and their children Chase and Liam waited for the rain to stop before coming to Local Fest.

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Event chairman Brian Kezur talks with beer ticket sellers and volunteers Katie Fields from Inside the Five and Dani Fuller of Fuller Art House.


Enjoying local bands, bites, brews and activities galore!

Marcus Snell and Nicole and Jerald Fairchild find good seats to enjoy the band.

Michael and Madison Stampflmeier and Kennedy Patton find a good spot to enjoy their ice cream treats.

Kolton and Keegan Stokes and Anthony Spinazze have fun in the pool of wheat kernels.

Jessica Wicak, Jane and Bill Weston, Mary Pat Wicak and Sally Jo Nichols make Local Fest a family get together.

Cindy Betz with her parents Emmy and Jerry Jakes greet guests as they enter Local Fest.

Matt Smith, Cara Douglas and Lyndsey Stough serve Upside Brewing and Inside the Five craft beers to the Local Fest crowd.

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WELCOME LOURDES UNIVERSITY

Sylvania Township Trustee

Retired Sylvania Township Fire Fighter/Paramedic And United States Marine Corps Veteran

• I am 100% dedicated to what I do.

• I serve in the best interest of the entire Sylvania community. • I embrace transparency.

• I listen to all with respect and fairness.

OCTOBER 4TH | 5PM-8+ DOWNTOWN SYLVANIA | FIRST FRIDAY ART WALKS MORE DETAILS: VISIT US ON FACEBOOK OR DOWNTOWNSYLVANIA.ORG

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 15A


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Other than a year spent in Texas to gain sales experience, Mary Westphal has always called Sylvania home. She loved growing up here in her parents’ home on Erie Street. “It was pretty quiet back then,” Mary recalls. “We knew just about every car that passed our house. Now my three adult children are the third generation in my family to grow up here!” After attending St. Joseph Grade School and Notre Dame Academy, Mary graduated from Bowling Green State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Journalism and a focus on Public Relations. Her career in marketing and public relations is long and varied: PR Specialist at Toledo Hospital, Director of PR at Flower Hospital, Communications Director at McAuley High School, and VP of Corporate Communications/Client Services at National Emergency Services. After her second child was born, Mary wanted to focus more on her family, so she decided to freelance and became involved at St. Joe’s as well as in the Junior League, where she served in several leadership positions including treasurer and president. It was around this time that a member of Sylvania City Council took notice and asked her to serve on the city’s Planning Commission. After Dr. Read Backus retired in 2008, she was appointed to council. A few months later she was asked to become part of the Susan G. Komen Northwest Ohio organization, where she still serves as Executive Director. “It’s a full-time job,” Mary notes. “We cover 23 Ohio counties and Monroe County, Michigan. In addition to Race for the Cure at the end of September in Findlay and Toledo, we fund local breast health programs serving those who have financial needs as well as educational outreach programs, host fundraising events, coordinate outreach for individual gifts, and more.” Mary is responsible for a $1.1 million dollar budget that is committed to a vision of a world without breast cancer. “This association has been the most meaningful of my life,” relates Mary. “I’ve had many friends touched by cancer, and so many people have been inspiring. I’m truly grateful for the opportunity to help this worthy cause and to serve these communities in need. And I love my work with Sylvania too. We are very fortunate to have such a strong administration. I’ve learned much from my involvement here.”

In 2012, Mary was elected president of City Council. She is currently chair of the Finance and Utilities committees and serves on Safety and Streets. She is also immediate past chair of the board at Notre Dame Academy, and this year was recognized as a Sylvania Chamber Champion of the Year.

Mary has no plans to slow down, however. When her current council term expires in 2021, she plans on running again and continuing to serve Sylvania for as long as possible. She and her husband, Bob, also love to travel every chance they get and plan at least one big trip a year — last year to Africa. “My philosophy is that life is fragile, so do as much as you can,” laughs Mary. And that she does!

16A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Sylvania Advantage, in cooperation with Creative Oxygen is honored to feature this exceptional community leader. She is a true inspiration to us all.


Master framer joins Hudson Gallery Master framer and artist Khrystyne Dewey is a new face in downtown Sylvania. She can be found every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday in the framing department at Hudson Gallery, 5645 Main St., and greeting Art Walk patrons on First Fridays as they stop by the gallery to enjoy the latest exhibition. She can also be found exploring the other shops along Main Street or enjoying lunch on a picnic bench in the corner pocket park on Maplewood Avenue and Main Street. “She was the right person at the right time,” noted Barb Hudson. “We needed someone who was experienced and knowledgeable, and poof, there was Khrystyne.” “She is a perfectionist and she appreciates the fine art that we are privileged to work with,” Scott Hudson agreed. “She is just the person we needed.” “We can count on her to be here and do her job right. She also is able to take the initiative when she needs to and is not afraid to ask questions when she is unsure. Khrystyne has been a big help with our openings and is

wonderful with customers and other artists,” the Hudsons pointed out. Dewey has loved art for as long as she can remember. She earned a bachelor’s degree in fine art from The University of Toledo. Pencil drawings and watercolors have become her media of choice as she evolves as an artist. “I find I love to have my art illustrate the stories I want to tell,” she related. Dewey finds she has many stories to tell. However, she also knew that she had to earn money to support herself so she looked for jobs relating to art. Dewey found that job with a framing company and to her great amazement, she found she really loved learning the craft. “I actually learned by doing, but I also picked up many things from helpful co-workers,” she remembered. “Working at Hudson Gallery is a dream job for me,” Dewey offered. “I get to do what I love to do, be around art, talk about art and meet artists,” she reflected. “This is ideal for me.”

Scott and Barb Hudson welcome Khrystyne Dewey to the frame department at Hudson Gallery.

GenoaBank holds successful golf outing

L-R: Cumulus Radio Host Celebrities: Denny Schaffer, John Guitteau, Timmy Morrison and Chuck O’Shea at the GenoaBank golf outing. The 21st annual GenoaBank golf outing was held Sept. 13 at the Oak Harbor Golf Club. The golf scramble proceeds provide scholarships to local students planning to major in business at a two or four-year college or university of their choice. It was a record-breaking year for the outing, with 64 teams registered. The money collected benefits many local high schools, including Northview and Southview. GenoaBank’s Annual Scholarship Golf Outing has provided scholarships to approximately 215 students since the bank began hosting the event. “Throughout the year, GenoaBank focuses on building relationships with the community; however, we most look forward to the annual golf outing!” said Martin P. Sutter, President and CEO of GenoaBank. “It offers us a chance to bring together local, like-minded leaders,

businesses and school administrators who gather with the purpose of giving back and swinging for education excellence.” The scholarships are presented to students selected by their schools who have demonstrated academic success, have an interest in pursuing a higher education and are seeking a degree in finance or business at a two or four year-college. Students at Sylvania schools should contact their guidance department to be considered. “We believe the lasting impact for these students has not only been personal development but it also provides enhanced stability and growth for their family and for the community as well,” said Sutter. “Thank you to our volunteers, our valued customers, and all the donors and sponsors who continue to support this worthwhile outing.”

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 17A


Weber Clark provides lactation support for working mothers for Wellness Initiative

Melissa Hallenbeck, health educator from Toledo Lucas County Health Department, joins Weber Clark personnel Jim Weber, managing partner, and Katie Moline, senior audit accountant along with Alli VanDorn, audit manager and Debbie Szajna, partner, to cut the ribbon for the ‘Mother’s Room.’

Weber Clark, a full-service CPA firm located 5580 Monroe St. in Sylvania, announced a partnership with the ToledoLucas County Health Department to provide lactation services and support for working mothers as part of the Women’s Workplace Wellness Initiative. Through the initiative, Weber Clark has implemented a policy to support a lactation program at Weber Clark. It has set-up a “Mother’s Room,” complete with furniture, for nursing mothers to express milk and have it stored during the work day. The firm has also had employees engage in one-onone wellness coaching sessions with a certified Health Educator from the Lucas County Health Department. “We are excited to engage in this unique opportunity where we can showcase that

Weber Clark is a modern, accommodating and family-focused firm,” said Katie Moline, CPA, Senior Accountant, who led the initiative within Weber Clark. Katie went on to say, “The personal and financial benefits to promoting wellness and breastfeeding are undeniable. We discovered that a lactation support program lowers medical costs, reduces turnover of employees and absenteeism, improves productivity, and raises loyalty and morale of employees. In a competitive market, where all companies are striving to retain the best talent, we are thrilled to support initiatives that foster the wellness of employees and the success of our firm.” Weber Clark held a ribbon cutting for the new lactation room on Monday, Sept. 23. Weber Clark provides proactive solutions for their clients and business partners. They offer accounting and auditing, tax planning and preparation, business advisory, and accounting and bookkeeping services in a variety of industries.

Zepf Center receives workforce expansion grant

18A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

The Zepf Center was recently awarded a three year grant through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service: Health Resource & Services Administration (HRSA) Opioid Workforce Expansion Program (OWEP) Paraprofessionals. Zepf Center is partnering with Owens Community College to train 70 individuals per year as para- professionals in the behavioral healthcare field. Paraprofessionals provide assistance with living skills, development skills, health maintenance, medication administration, personal care and behavioral health. Deb Flores, CEO Zepf Center, stated, “Zepf will work in a coordinated manner with Owens Community College in developing a strong Community Experiential Learning/Internship component that applies the behavioral healthcare classroom instruction.” Zepf Center has partnered with various community partners including behavioral healthcare organizations, workforce development services, targeted recovery housing organizations, and Peer Operated services to provide guidance in the development of this new training project. Recent policy changes expanding access to mental health and addiction services for millions of Americans are increasing the demand for behavioral health services and reshaping the behavioral health workforce. According to SAMHSA, the demand for behavioral health services exceeds the supply of the workforce, with 55 percent of counties reporting that they do not have behavioral health workers in their counties, and 77 percent of counties reporting unmet behavioral health needs within their communities. Paraprofessionals play a key role in mitigating provider shortages, which has created increased attention on the value of peers and paraprofessionals in behavioral health care delivery. Individuals in the program will have the opportunity to attain Peer Support Certification and Chemical Dependency Counselor Aide Certification along with attaining course work needed to be considered a Qualified Mental Health Professional. It is expected training will start in mid-November 2019. For further information contact Craig Gebers, vocational director at cgebers@zepfcenter.org.


Superior Credit Union cuts the ribbon

Ribbon Cut to Celebrate New Owners Sylvania Town Crier Mike Lieber begins the ceremony with a cry as Tara Mulligan of First Federal Bank, Jenny Engfer of Kingston Residence of Sylvania, Melissa Scott of Mayberry Ice Cream, Lyndsey Stough of Stough & Stough Architects, Robin Mahle of Cool Media Production, Tammie Brainard of Weber Clark, Jennifer Douglas of ProMedica Heartland, Betty Bassett of McCord Road Christian Church, Katie Cappellini of Sylvania City Council, Tiffany Scott of Mayberry Ice Cream and the Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce join Brian and Sarah Best and her mother, Sandy Bourland, to cut the ribbon for Peace, Love and Pottery at 6750 Sylvania Ave. in the Timberstone Commons center.

Tenth Anniversary Celebrated

Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Michelle Sprott and welcoming committee members Katie Cappellini, Dee Szabo, Jan Tidd, Lyndsey Stough and Shawn Murphy along with Sylvania Town Crier Mike Lieber join Superior Credit Union Branch Manager Jamie Riley, Financial Service Rep Nicole Dles, EFT Specialist Luke Wanderlin, Cash Manager Honie Sulier, Director of Member Experience Jodi McDermont and Mortgage Loan Manager Fred Weber to cut the ribbon. Superior Credit Union, 6600 W. Sylvania Ave., celebrated its entry into the Toledo market on Sept. 25 with a ribbon cutting ceremony and open house. “The Toledo community has been wonderful in embracing Superior since we arrived in August of 2018. We are thrilled to be welcomed into the Sylvania Chamber of Commerce,” said Phil Buell, President and CEO of Superior. “Our goal is to provide our members with great service at the most convenient locations and I think our Sylvania branch is an excellent example of that.” The Sylvania location is managed by Jamie Riley who has over 18 years of experience in banking and consumer lending. She started with Superior this spring.

“Superior has a proven track record of providing quality financial products while maintaining the highest level of customer service,” said Riley. “I’m excited to provide that excellent level of service to our Sylvania members for years to come.” Superior Credit Union, Inc., headquartered in Lima, Ohio, is a memberowned financial cooperative that serves nearly 95,000 members at 25 Western Ohio offices. With assets of over $900 million, the credit union provides consumer and mortgage loans, real estate brokerage, investment and retirement planning, insurance services, checking and savings accounts, and small business services and loans.

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held Sept. 18 at Christian Home Care, 5757 Park Center Ct., to celebrate the center’s 10th anniversary. (L-R): Town Crier Michael Lieber; members of the Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce’s Welcoming Committee Crystal Jordan, Betty Bassett and Shawn Murphy; staff members Jill Bucher, Melissa Swartz, Lori Lloyd, Sue Wendt, owner, April Wyse, Dametris Ross-Voet, Cindy Kuhman, Nancy Ruff; and Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Michelle Sprott. –by Jennifer Ruple

Tuff Shed Hosts Ribbon Cutting

Sylvania Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Michelle Sprott and welcoming committee members Jan Tidd, Crystal Jordan, Robyn Mahle and Oliver Turner join Tuff Shed personnel George Bogaert, Cindy Crawford and Jen Knapp along with welcoming committee member Betty Bassett to cut the ribbon to officially open Tuff Shed at 6050 W. Central Ave. The company provides a variety of storage sheds, installed garages, specialty structures and custom buildings.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 19A


Kingston Residence of Sylvania has a new look

Admissions Director Emily Roach and Community Relations Director Margaret Day look over the refurbished dining room.

Ragtime Rick Graffing is a frequent guest entertainer for Kingston residents, filling the community room with lively tunes during regular Happy Hours. The newly renovated living room opens up to the entrainment area allowing residents to remain there and be part of events. Kingston of Sylvania residents, guests and staff are enjoying a whole new look thanks to the refurbishing of Kingston Residence of Sylvania, starting with the new reception desk in the entry, freshly painted walls and new carpeting. In addition, panels were removed from the living room opening the space to the large community area. The dining room boasts a fresh feeling as well, with a new color scheme, including carpeting, chandeliers, furniture and even new table settings. “Plans also include expanding the breezeway connecting the rehab center to the residence to incorporate a new gym/workout area that overlooks the inner

Alzheimer’s Walk planned

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Metro Toledo will experience the largest local gathering of advocates for a cure for Alzheimer’s disease at the Toledo Regional Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Oct. 12. More than 1,700 Lucas and Wood county residents are expected to converge on Promenade Park in downtown Toledo as caregivers, those living with the disease, people who have lost a loved one and supporters come together with one voice and one purpose. The Walk is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. The Walk is sponsored by the Alzheimer’s Association Northwest Ohio Chapter. Julia Pechlivanos, Executive Director, said, "The Walk to End Alzheimer's is a great opportunity for those whose families have been impacted by memory loss to engage in the cause to end Alzheimer's and other dementias. We come together to remember and honor our loved ones, and to celebrate the vision of a world without Alzheimer's." While at the Walk, participants can learn about Alzheimer's disease, advocacy opportunities, clinical studies enrollment and support programs and services from the Alzheimer’s Association Northwest Ohio Chapter. Last year’s event raised more than $300,000. Nashville Singer-Songwriter Jay Allen will be a special guest at this year’s Walk. Allen, who is a Celebrity Champion for the Alzheimer’s Association, is best known for his song “Blank Stares,” which pays tribute to his late mother, who had Alzheimer’s disease. This year’s Walk chair is Steven M. Cavanaugh, Chief Financial Officer of ProMedica. Participants can pre-register for the Walk at alz.org/nwohio/walk. Registration is free. Day-of registration begins at 9 am and the Walk Ceremony begins at 10 am.

courtyard,” Admissions Director Emily Roach pointed out. “And the courtyard showcases the work of our resident members of our garden club,” she added. According to Roach, first floor residents are enjoying new counter tops with rounded corners in their apartments along with bathroom counters which have built-in handles to offer residents options for stability. Those apartment renovations will continue to the second floor residential apartments and will be completed in the next year. A library has been added on the second floor. “The community room renovation included adding a wall of bookshelves to hold the collection of books we have received,” Community Relations Director Margaret Day said. “While we have assembled a nice collection of books, we can always use more and encourage donations from the community.” This area also has a kitchen area with refrigerator and a microwave along with a sink, adding versatility to the room which provides accommodations for families who wish to have parties or events there. “The library is also available for community groups who are looking for a meeting area,” Day added.

Heartfelt Thanks

On Sept. 11, Heather Kelso of the Sylvania Police Department accepts cookies and homemade cards by the residents of Heartland at ProMedica to show their appreciation for the services offered by First Responders.


Good Friends Celebrate Engagements Wagner-Powazki Micsko-Kreuz

Robert and Denise Wagner announce the engagement of their daughter Kaleigh Elizabeth Wagner to Nate Powazki, son of Ed and Debbie Powazki. The bride-elect graduated from The University of Toledo and works at ProMedica headquarters in downtown Toledo. Powazki is a graduate of Southview High School and The University of Toledo. He is employed by The Nature Conservancy at Kitty Todd Nature Preserve. The couple will be married on March 28, 2020.

Gary and Susan Micsko announce the engagement of their daughter Emily Jean Micsko to Zachary Kreuz, the son of John and Maria Kreuz. The bride-to-be is a graduate of Southview High School and Miami University. She is currently in her second year of a Physical Therapy doctoral program at the University of Mount Union. Kreuz is also a graduate of Miami University and is a CPA working for Ernst and Young. They plan an August 2020 wedding. (The two couples are long time friends and were engaged one week apart.)

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 21A


BY MARY HELEN DARAH

RE–THINKING PINK It’s October and for many people the month means visits to the apple orchard, football games and consuming 900 calorie pumpkin beverages. Yet for 3.5 million breast cancer survivors, including those still being treated, October has far greater meaning. It is officially breast cancer awareness month and the iconic pink ribbon will be slapped on everything from laundry detergent to frozen burritos. I know I speak for many survivors and those still in treatment, that we have awareness pretty much covered. What we are in dire need of is a cure. There is also something else survivors crave--understanding. Experiences vary, but I thought it would be helpful to share what my kids would call “no brainers” of what to avoid saying to someone going through the cancer journey. Do not tell us to relax! Cancer makes you feel as if you’re trapped underwater while people are telling you to take a deep breath and stay calm. As I recall, the last thing I wanted to do was “chill out.” I tried to explain this to a neighbor who kept insisting I should sit down and relax. I would have preferred she offer assistance in pulling out my washer and dryer and helping me remove dust bunnies in case I didn’t make it through surgery.

We liked the originals better! I used to be a 36 D. My breasts were one of the few things on my 43 year old body that were still heading north. It was not comforting to hear, “Well, now you can have a perky new pair.” The all-time “ouch” comment after venting about my discomfort and pain during reconstruction was hearing, “All this for a pair of boobs?” Yes, it was a lot, including drainage tubes, needles, and wondering if you will ever feel comfortable in your own skin again. Also, do not judge the decision. I usually responded by asking if my decision would be questioned if it were any other body part. Do not tell someone going through chemo that they are CUTE! I remember hearing Robin Williams explain how male pandas felt so degraded when they come to the USA. They leave China with names like Ping Dong Ma which means “bear with testis of steel.” They arrive here with the expectation to “be the bear” and mate, only to get here and be renamed as Ling Ling. We pink survivors are not just fighting the battle of a lifetime but for life itself. Tell survivors they look kick ass, chic, strong yet feminine, anything but CUTE. A dear friend of mine told me how “CUTE” I looked then whispered to someone in the

room, “I wouldn’t leave the house if that were me.” Now that’s something to shout not whisper. Do remind survivors how tough they are for heading out in the world and showing the “enemy” that it is not going to rob them of living their life to their fullest. Do not ask a stage 4 warrior when their treatment will end! My dear friend Anne responds to that inquiry with, “When I do.” Stage 4 survivors, or the “forgotten fours” as I like to refer to them, will never get a reprieve from the battle. Many have expressed feelings of isolation and often feel as if they are being judged. It’s almost as though somehow the cancer has returned because of something they did or did not do. I have personally watched a marathon running, organic eating, supplement taker,

and a woman who was a beam of positive energy, lowered into the ground. Survivors come in all shapes, sizes and personalities. Take your lead from them. I am a sharer (says Captain Obvious) but others going through the experience appreciate privacy. That being said, the absolute worst thing you could ever do is ignore someone going through the cancer journey because you don’t know what to say. One survivor told me that she would be at parties and people would come up to her husband and ask how she was doing even though she was just a few feet away. Don’t know what to say? Say that! If you don’t have the words, be the arms to hug, hand to hold and the ears to listen.

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Celebrates 101st Birthday

L-R: Linda Cunningham-Ballard, birthday girl Alberta Cunningham and John D. Cunningham celebrate Alberta’s 101st year at MemoryLane Care Services on Sept. 24. Alberta worked as a typist, clerk, receptionist and Notary and owned several businesses with her late husband, William. They were married 72 years until his death in 2006. Her daughter Linda says that family is most important to her mother. She has six grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. —by Mary Helen Darah

Symphony League Presents Check

L-R: Toledo Symphony CEO Zak Vassar and Director of Institutional Giving Mari Davies accept a $5,000 donation from Toledo Symphony League President Kathy Scheer at the opening TSL luncheon held Sept. 19. The donation is part of this year’s pledge of $20,000. –photo provided by Toledo Symphony League

Beautiful Blooms by Jen Hosts Cheers

Betty Bassett of McCord Road Christian Church, talks with Lyndsey Stough and her dad, Craig, right, both of Stough & Stough Architects and Laura Dosch of Waterford Bank,

Jennifer Linehan of Beautiful Blooms by Jen welcomes Chris Mancino of Waterford Bank to Chamber Cheers on Sept. 19.

HOME MOR TGAGES

Lending a hand, too.

Cathy McGuire of the McGuire Insurance Agency and Tara Mulligan of First Federal Bank enjoy the event.

Brandon Fields of Inside the Five talks with City Council member Patrick Richardson. —by Mary Helen Darah

Rotary Meets After Hours

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 23A


Ability Center Luncheon Held

24A | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Ability Center Executive Director Timothy Harrington welcomes guests to the Fall Luncheon held at Highland Meadows Golf Club.

L-R: Charlene Kuhn, Diane Shull and Joan Tobias visit at the Auxiliary to The Ability Center of Greater Toledo event held on Sept. 18.

Brian Hazel Bahrs and Barbara Baumgartner get ready to walk on the wild side at the event featuring a presentation from the Toledo Zoo.

Cookie Westmeyer is all smiles at the event celebrating the Ability Center of Greater Toledo.

Pat Hilfinger is admiring the decorations created by Arlene Whelan for the annual Fall Luncheon held on Sept. 18.

Arlene Whelan and Nancy Jomantas, of the Abiity Center, enjoy the food, fun and a presentation from the Toledo Zoo.

Nancy Miller and Jenny Barlos, client services director at Assistance Dogs for Achieving Independence, catch up at the annual event.

Gwen Ames, president of the Auxiliary to The Ability Center of Greater Toledo, visits with guests and fellow Auxiliary members. –by Mary Helen Darah


YOUR HOMETOWN GOOD NEWS PAPER

SECTION B

October 1 - October 15, 2019 • Vol. 23, No. 12 • yourgood.news

Congratulations to the 2019 Educators of the Year

Back Row, L-R: Rick Fuchs Volunteer of the Year; Cary Rickman, Bus Driver-Support Staff of the Year, Susan Crandall, Second Grade Highland SchoolElementary Teacher of the Year. Front Row, L-R: Chris Awls, Special Education, Southview High SchoolTeacher of Year; Anna Drake-Kotz, Science, Arbor Hills-Teacher of the Year; Pam Thiel, Orchestra, Northview, McCord-Educator of the Year; and Mark Pugh, Principal, Northview-Administrator of the Year. Denise Diguglielino, Special Education Paraprofessional, McCord Junior High-Support Staff of the Year is not pictured.

Health Care for the Universe of You At Mercy Health, you’ll find the compassionate care you need to stay healthy and strong for those who love and need you. Learn more at mercy.com/universe F O R T H E U N I V E R S E O F YO U


Grandparents Day at Sylvan

NV Musician

SV Musician

Sylvan second graders sing several songs to their grandparents before interviewing them, reading to them, and enjoying breakfast together on Sept. 6.

New state graduation requirements starting 2023/2024 Ohio has just debuted its new graduation requirements for current freshmen and students who follow them. These requirements focus less on state testing and more on students finding a path unique to their interests and strengths. Students and families will want to examine these requirements to pick a graduation path that fits. Director of Teaching and Learning Alex

Clarkson will discuss the new requirements and answer questions to help parents understand how to guide their children in their classes and activities on Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7 pm in the Northview Performing Arts Center. This session will primarily focus on the requirements for the classes of 2023 and 2024. However, it is open to all.

School news? Email editor@yourgood.news

Josh Hershberger has been a member of the choir for four years. He has performed as a soloist, receiving superior ratings at Solo and Ensemble competition. He is also involved in the Select Ensemble, has participated in UT and BGSU honors choirs and has been a member of the OMEA District Honors choir. He has been accepted into the Ohio All State Choir. Josh has also been in several theater productions at Southview. He is currently in rehearsals for Southview’s fall play and ‘Frozen,’ through the Sylvania Community Arts Commission. He is a four-year member of the Southview band and plays the French horn. Mrs. Andrews, his teacher, said “Josh always has a positive attitude and a great work ethic. He is one of the most talented singers I have had the privilege of teaching and his performance level has exceeded my expectations. He is an outstanding musician and leader, setting a high standard for others.”

SV Student Named

Kate Mary Bernhardt, a junior in the Southview Construction Trades program, is the Career Tech student of the week. In the classroom, in the shop and on projects, Kate’s desire to learn is always present. As a freshman and sophomore, Kate took Intro to engineering and horticulture class. Kate is also active in the drama department, being on set crew for the past two years. Kate is undecided on a career path but, as she said, “I will have gained important skills for my future.” Kate is also excited to use her construction skills to help refurbish a house her family owns in North Carolina.

2B | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Jadon Thompson has been in the Northview Band program all four years of high school. With his positive attitude and musical skills he not only helps lead the Wildcat Marching Band as a field commander, but also is a leader in the choir program. Jadon has played bass clarinet, baritone sax, tenor sax in the Pep Band, Symphonic Band, Jazz Band and Wind Ensemble. Jadon also sings in the Northview Chorus, A cappella Choir, and Harmony Roadshow. In addition to his musical activities, Jadon is also a founder of the A cappella quartet “SumFour.” Jadon is the son of Jennifer and Christopher Thompson.

Southview Fall Play

The Southview theatre department will present the “Great All American Musical Disaster” on Thursday, Oct. 17 and Saturday, Oct. 19 at 7:30 pm at Southview High School, 7225 Sylvania Ave. In the office of unscrupulous studio producer Junior Dover, Jr. (senior Will King), things have reached an all-time low. He’s been producing flop after flop and is desperate for a hit. He and his secretary, Ethel Kent (junior Megan Dona), come up with a brilliant plan to get back on top. They will con eight major movie stars, Apassionata Abalone (senior Elaina Smith), Baby Bernice Bumble (freshman Baylee Mallin) pushed by her mother Mrs. Bumble (senior Kenna Edwards), Gee-Gee Fontaine (senior Catie Gebers), western star Bronco Whinny (senior Tim Walsh), boy next door Bob Everlove (junior Noah Archer), vampire enthusiast Theo Bartok (senior Tristen Turkopp), loud-mouth comedian Chuckles LaFoon (junior DeNae Bumpus), and pistolpacking Flint Wormwood (sophomore Alex Retholtz), to appear in their new Disasterama flick by tailoring separate scripts to make it seem like they are all the stars. And, with gossip columnist Sylvia Metroland (senior Amanda Cross) charting their every move and the narcissistic direction by Plato Voltaire (junior Alexander Steenrod), the movie can’t turn out to be anything less than a disaster, right? The show is directed by Brandi Shepard, and assistant director Ashley Archambeau. Tickets can be purchased in advance at southviewtheatre.org. and are $7 for students and senior citizens and $9 for adults. Tickets will be available beginning Oct. 1 online and will also be available at the door on the day of performance. Students can purchase $5 tickets by donating two canned goods, which willl be donated to the food pantry at Sylvania Area Family Services.


Student Merit Scholars Honored

L-R: Northview High School students Shrey Gupta, Daniel Klein, Avinash Singh, Anya Wojkowiak along with Principal Mark Pugh visit Sylvania Rotary Club as semi-finalists for the National Merit Scholarship

Southview Principal Kasey Vens and National Merit semi-finalist Manhattan Ellington visit Sylvania Rotary on Sept. 19 at Highland Meadows Golf Club. –by Mary Helen Darah

Homecoming Celebrated at SV

Congratulations to the 2019 Southview Homecoming Queen Sophia Rees and King Tristen Turkopp.

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Northwest Ohio Classical Academy held its official ribbon cutting on Sept. 14 at the Academy’s facility on Glendale Avenue. Friends, donors, faculty, staff and students gathered to celebrated NOCA’s opening–a five-year effort to bring to Toledo and the surrounding area high-quality, tuition-free, classical education. Professor Lee J. Strang, president of the board of trustees, noted that through the board’s efforts, “NOCA has raised over $250,000 from corporations, foundations and friends. The response from the community has been broad, deep and gratifying with over 80 separate donations, an unprecedented accomplishment in the Toledo charter school movement.” As NOCA moved from a vision to reality, it hired a mission-oriented and experienced principal in Phillip Schwenk. Schwenk remarked that, “While opening a new school is always challenging, I feel fortunate that I have the support of a dedicated faculty and staff, with many decades of cumulative

experience.” He also noted that, “Some teachers who joined NOCA are returning to education. All faculty and staff believe in the vision of a content-rich, rigorous curriculum where the mission is to both educate children as well as to rear children to become virtuous citizens and thoughtful leaders. It’s that dual mission which attracted the faculty, staff, and over 200 students for NOCA’s first year.” In his opening remarks, Professor Strang noted that help came from many supporters who made gifts-in-kind including Mr. and Mrs. Cleves Delp who purchased the facility and rent about 32,000 square feet to the Academy. In addition, the Delps have invested generously in repairing and upgrading the HVAC system and parking lot without charge to the Academy. “Without Mr. and Mrs. Delp’s extraordinarily generous support, NOCA would still be a dream,” remarked Professor Strang. NOCA is affiliated with Hillsdale College’s Barney Charter School Initiative.

Notre Dame Academy invites girls in grades 6-8 to come be an Eagle for a Day. Paired with a hostess with shared interests, a visiting student will experience NDA's student-centered block scheduling and welcoming faculty and students, as well as learning how NDA's Pre-IB and International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme develops invaluable lifelong learning skills.

Notre Dame Academy is a Catholic college preparatory school for grades 7-12, sponsored by the Sisters of Notre Dame. NDA promotes the holistic development and empowerment of women for leadership and service by providing an exceptional educational experience permeated with Gospel values. To be an Eagle for a Day, contact NDA Admissions at 419-475-9359.

The Sylvania Chamber of Commerce will be awarding a new scholarship to recognize leadership in young females, 13-18 years old. Called “Miss Sylvania,” the scholarship is not

in any way related to talent or a pageant. The finalists will be recognized at the Sylvania Fall Festival on October 20.

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SV tennis courts dedicated to Tom Laasch

L-R: Paul Ruiz, Bill True, Bill Kyser, Sandy Tiell and Marna Bennett visit at the third annual Sylvania Pickleball Club picnic held at Verterans Memorial Field on Sept. 21.

Pickleball Club Hosts Picnic and Play

L-R: Elizabeth DeMarco, Dianne Walker and Betsy Kenniston are ready to hit the court at the annual Sylvania Pickleball Club

Sylvania Pickleball members Carl and Sandy Tiell celebrate another successful gathering. –by Mary Helen Darah

The Sylvania Cougar welcomes Coach Laasch. The tennis courts at Southview High School have been renamed in honor of Northern Lakes League Coach of the Year, Tom Laasch. He was the SV boys tennis coach from 1978 to 2004, with his teams having over 300 victories. During his tenure, his teams captured 12 Northern Lakes League championships. Seven of his teams also qualified for state tournament play. He recalled that brothers Andy and Tom Keller were one of the state qualifying teams advancing to a quarter finals match. Tom Keller was the state runner-up in 1987. Throughout his coaching career Laasch missed only one match when he was hospitalized with a heart condition.

SV Athlete

The Cougar Athlete of the Week is runner Natalie Nagel. She placed 11th out of 190 girls and led Lady Cougars to a 3rd place finish at the Tiffin Carnival Sept. 7. At the Mel Brodt Invitational on Aug. 31, she placed 10th out of 180 girls. As a senior, Natalie has beaten her previous personal record by 46 seconds in just the first three meets. Head coach Taylor Bosl commented, "After having a successful track season last year, I knew Natalie would improve tremendously this year. Her work ethic and competitiveness is contagious and felt throughout our entire team. Natalie has been a valuable asset and always helps put our team in great scoring position. It's been fun watching her develop and improve as a runner throughout the past three years." In addition to running cross country and track, Natalie is in the National Honor Society, the marching band, the Tri-M Music Honor Society, and has a 4.7 GPA.

4B | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

“I really loved coaching and working with the boys. And, I could do actual coaching,” he said. Laasch also served as the Southview boys golf coach for 24 years. He noted that with that sport, during matches he was only able to actually coach after nine holes had been played. A native of Iowa, Laasch and his wife, Carol, returned to Sylvania, her hometown after teaching two years in Los Angeles and five years in Colorado Springs. He spent the next 35 years teaching business at Southview. His wife taught English at the same school. “We are a Southview family. We love this school,” the couple agreed.

NV Athlete

Adam Czerniakowski has been a varsity member of the Wildcat Golf Team since his sophomore year. He has had a great start to his senior year.  He posted a one under par 71 at the Brandywine Invitational and a 2 under par 70 at the Legacy in the Sylvania Invitational to win medalist honors at both tournaments, leading the Cats to victories in both tournaments. His low 9 hole dual match score was a 4 under par 33 (par 37) at Brandywine vs Springfield, which ties the lowest score in Northview history. Just last week, Adam helped Northview three-peat as NLL Champions earning 1st Team All NLL honors. He carries a 3.6 GPA and plans to play golf at the collegiate level. –by John Crisman, AssetWare Photography


Franciscan Gala honorees

Anne Ruch, M.D., executive director of Compassion Health Toledo, center, is awarded the St. Francis award by Congregational Minister Sister Mary Jon Wagner, left, and Assistant Congregational Minister, Sister Theresa Darga, right.

L-R: Mary Campbell of Canton, Ga., who served as executive secretary for the president of Lourdes from 1990 to 2007, receives the St. Clare award. Nearly 300 guests raise over $100,000 to support the Sisters’ ministries at the gala held Sept. 21.

The Sylvania Franciscan Village, in partnership with St. Joseph Parish, Sylvania, and Knights of Columbus Immaculate Conception Council 5628, will present guest lecturer Sir Jeffrey Abood, Commander in the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem. He will speak on “The Decline of Christianity in the Holy Land” on Monday, Oct. 14, at 7 pm at the Franciscan Center, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania. The Christian communities in the Holy Land go back more than 2,000 years and have been responsible for keeping the faith alive in the land where Jesus lived. Yet, over the last 70

years Christians have gone from 18 percent of the population historically, to less than 2 percent today. Sir Jeffrey will speak on the Catholic Church’s perspective, share his firsthand experience, and provide an overview of Christians in the Holy Land. Sir Jeffrey was knighted by the Vatican and currently serves on the Executive Committee for the North Central Lieutenancy of the order. He recently authored, “A Great Cloud of Witnesses: The Catholic Churches' Experience in the Holy Land,” available on Amazon. This event is free and open to the public.

Lecture examines the decline of Christianity in the Holy Land

Lourdes Science Lab Renovations Lourdes University President Mary Ann Gawelek speaks to lab dedication attendees on Sept. 16. Students and alumni led tours in the Chemistry labs and Biology research rooms.

Biology major Rachel Christensen with Christa Luttmann, Northwest Ohio Regional Director for Governor Mike DeWine. The renovations were done to improve STEM education at the lab.

Lourdes receives nurse education grant Lourdes University Vice President of Academic Affairs, Dr. Terry Keller, and Master of Science in Nursing: Nurse Educator Program Director, Rebecca Zechman, MSN, RN, recently announced that the College of Nursing has been awarded a $156,990 Nurse Education Grant from the Ohio Board of Nursing. The grant funds will be disbursed from September 2019 to August 2021. The purpose of the Ohio Board of Nursing Nurse Education Grant Program is to address the nursing shortage within the state of Ohio by supporting nurse education programs in their efforts to increase enrollment capacity of nursing students and nursing educators.

“The NEGP funds will allow Lourdes to expand enrollment in our online Master of Science in Nursing Nurse Educator program through collaborative partnerships with Kingston Healthcare and HCR ManorCare, and in so doing, will contribute to the nurse workforce and raise the education level of RNs practicing in the local community and throughout the state,” said Rebecca Zechman. The Lourdes Education Grant is projected to increase enrollment in the MSN Nurse Educator program by 75 percent to help reduce the number of unfilled nurse teaching development positions within the state of Ohio.

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LOURDE ES.EDU YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 5B


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L-R: Elli Niejadlik, Brian Hall, Stacey Butts, Mike McMahon, Chris Casper, Katie Cappellini, Jim Collins, Rose Burk, William Niejadlik and Jan Tidd celebrate the dedication of a new Sylvania Lions Club fountain on Sept. 25 at Burnham Park. The ”lion” is the second fountain donated to Sylvania by the Sylvania Lions Club. The first was dedicated in 2011 at Pacesetter Park. The Sylvania Lions hope that the new fountain will bring joy to children and families in the community.


Olander hosts 22nd Halloween Hike

Designer Purse Bingo to support services for visually Impaired The Sight Center of Northwest Ohio and the Sylvania Lions Club are presenting Purse Bingo, an exciting new fundraiser to support services for people in Northwest Ohio who are blind or visually impaired. The inaugural Purse Bingo event will take place at 6 pm on Thursday, Oct. 17 at the Sylvania Elks Lodge, 3520 N. Holland Sylvania Ave. Guests are invited to play 20 games of Bingo in an attempt to win one of 20 purses by famous designers including Kate Spade, Dooney and Bourke, Coach, Michael Kors and more. A d d i t i o n a l books of 20 games of Bingo can be

purchased for $5.00. A beautiful black Coach handbag with matching wallet will also be up for grabs during an intermission cover-all round for an extra $5 for three cards. Space is limited to 250 for this $40 ticketed event, and guests must be at least 18 years old to play. Other evening highlights include a raffle and auction prizes, light refreshments, snacks and homemade cupcakes and a cash bar. Proceeds from the event will benefit Sylvania Lions Club, Inc. and The Sight Center of Northwest Ohio.

Wonder Woman visited the 2018 Olander Park Halloween Hike. This year’s event will be held Saturday, Oct. 26.

Trunk or Treat planned for the area Olivet Lutheran Church is hosting a Trunk or Treat on Sunday, Oct. 20, 2:30-4 pm. The church is located at 5840 Monroe St., in Sylvania. At Toledo Memorial Park, the Girls Scouts will be on hand for its Trunk or Treat on

Saturday, Oct. 12. The event will be held from 3:30-5 pm with set up at 2 pm for those with a trunk. More trunks are always welcomed. Call Tana Ohneck at 419-8827151 for those wishing to participate.

Kingston Residence of Sylvania, 4125 King Road, is holding its annual shopping event on Oct. 2, from 11 am to 2 pm.

Pit smoked Jimmy G’s BBQ food truck will be on hand to feed the hungry visitors.

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CONTINUED

Girl and Boy Scouts of Northwest Ohio’s

Second Annual Trunk or Treat Event Saturday, Oct 12 Toledo Memorial Park (Rain Date Oct. 13)

6328 Monroe St., Sylvania Trunk Treating begins at 3:30 pm (please arrive no later than 3:15 pm)

Trunk Set Up begins at 2 pm • Registration is Mandatory at www.signupgenius.com/go/30e084ba23a4f85-girl Donation of canned food is necessary to participate. All donations will be given to Veterans Matter to feed local hungry vets. BRING PLENTY OF CANDY OR SUPPLIES There were over 1,000 trunk treaters in the past. Each trunk will pass out candy or goodies to the public. All organizations re encouraged to participate! Spread the word about your business!

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JANIS WE B E R

THE MOUSE TRAP

Details on cutting cable TV cord

Tired of paying so much for cable TV? Cutting the cord is easy as long as you know the pros and cons. The average household pays Janis Weber around $200 a month for basic TV and internet only. (Add approximately $6 per tv in the house for cable access. If you only use internet the cost will be around $70. Yippee!!) Perhaps you have Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc. but you only watch them periodically and you have a data cap for streaming these services. Or, maybe you only want to see local programing, including CBS, NBC and ABC. You can just buy an antenna for each TV in the house at around $75 a unit. Good luck in a storm. This is a one-time expense- if all goes right. If you say this is antiquated, well let’s move up to one on the best pay TV deals available to date. YouTube TV (and a few others) offer unlimited watching of all your favorite shows for $50. Great. But now you are streaming every time you turn on any TV in the house. Oops, you just went over your streaming data quota and you have a $15 fee for each increment in time. You seem to be doing this almost every day. We have a problem Houston! So you add unlimited data and streaming on to your internet usage. That $70 just went up another $30, you’re back to $100. Did you forget you have to also pay monthly for Netflix ($9),

Amazon Prime ($13), and Hulu ($8). How’s your math? Internet, $100. If you are in love with some paid channels you also have YouTube TV ($50) + Netflix ($9) + Prime ($13). These are conservative numbers so, if you choose wisely, your new entertainment bill will only be $172. You are in control of your add-ons so if you really want to save, go get an antenna or two and stick to whatever channels you can get through the antenna. You should be able to get 3-5 on a good day. You can go from $200 to only $70 but at what cost? Hardly ever watch TV, turn on your computer and watch some of the local channels. Don’t quote me on these numbers, there are special deals and price hacks all the time.

Next Sylvania Senior Center classes

I will be presenting iPad/iPhone combo classes Nov. 4, 5 and 6 from 1-3 pm for beginners and Nov. 11, 12 and 13 for level two (beyond the basics). Facebook will be covered Nov. 18 and 19, 1-2:30 pm. You MUST HAVE your Apple username and password, for Facebook you MUST HAVE your login username and password unless you are new and starting a new Facebook account. Call 419885-3913 to register.

I make house calls

I will come to your home or office and help you with almost any predicament including repairs, upgrades and general software or hardware issues. I can be your resident “geek.” I have an endless amount of patience and knowledge with years of experience. Give me a text or call at 419-318-9112. Don’t forget to sign up for my free newsletter at OhComputerTraining.com. Subscribers will get a copy of this article plus added hints, tips and trusted/valuable web-links. BACK UP YOUR COMPUTER’S DATA TODAY – Critical action! Janis Weber, B.A., owner of Ohio Computer Training & Support, is a professional computer adjunct instructor. E-mail any specific questions or comments to JwPCtutor@gmail.com or contact her for assistance at 419-318-9112. Private tutoring and repairs are just a phone call, text or email away.

Coffee with cops planned The Sylvania Township Police Department would like you to pull up a chair, have some coffee and get to know them. Tell them about your neighborhood, ask questions, share concerns, or stop by just to chat!. The conversation is informal and the department looks forward to meeting you. The event is Wednesday, Oct. 2, 8 -10 am at the Starbucks, 6975 W. Central Ave.

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10B | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Improving student and school bus safety BY THERESA GAVARONE GUEST COLUMNIST

A growing problem across our state is putting the lives of students at risk—failure to stop for a school bus. According to the Columbus Dispatch, nearly 4,200 drivers in Ohio were ticketed for illegally passing a school bus from 2015-2017. I emphasize the word ticketed because it is often difficult for a school bus driver to capture a license plate number or identify the driver of the vehicle because their main priority is to keep students safe on and off the bus. In fact, I have heard from many drivers who say they experience the problem daily. To combat this critical issue, I introduced Senate Bill 134, the “School Bus Safety Act” earlier this year, and just this week provided testimony to the Senate Transportation, Commerce and Workforce Committee. The issue really came to the forefront for me after learning about two incidents involving schools in my district. The first was a car that crashed into an Eastwood school bus and the second involved a bus from Archbold schools that was hit by a speeding semi-truck. Fortunately, no students were hurt in those accidents, but nearly a decade ago in Sylvania, a 15-year-old was not as lucky. Morgan Duris was hit and killed after a driver going 15 miles over the speed limit failed to stop for her bus. Believe it or not, that driver was never sentenced to a DAY in prison. These incidents are becoming all too common, and I believe this bill will keep our

children safer and hold drivers responsible for their carelessness. The “School Bus Safety Act,” among other provisions, doubles the fine for illegally passing a bus, clearly states that footage from bus cameras can be used as evidence in a legal proceeding, allocates money for school districts to purchase those cameras, and raises awareness of the issue by designating August as “School Bus Safety Awareness Month.” The bill also enhances penalties for drivers who hit or kill a student as the result of failing to stop for a bus. In addition, it creates the felony offense of “vehicular harm.” I added that offense to the bill because I learned that the injuries suffered by two Cleveland-area students after being hit by a vehicle were not severe enough for the driver to be charged with vehicular assault. Quite simply, there is no excuse for illegally passing a stopped school bus. Getting to your destination 15 seconds earlier is not more important than the lives of our children. Without a doubt, this bill will increase awareness of stopping for school buses, make drivers think twice about passing a school bus, and significantly strengthen penalties so that drivers who show little to no regard for the safety of children will be off the road longer. Senator Theresa Gavarone represents the 2nd District in the Ohio Senate, which encompasses all or parts of Erie, Fulton, Lucas, Ottawa and Wood counties. Learn more at www.OhioSenate.gov/Gavarone.

Lake Erie Waterkeeper meeting

Joy Mulinex, Gov. Mike DeWine's chief advisor for Lake Erie, will speak at 7 pm on Oct. 10 at the Toledo Yacht Club, 3900 N. Summit St. Mulinex will discuss plans for the $85 million included in the governor's H2Ohio initiative this year, to be spent on cleaning and protecting Ohio waters. Mulinex is director of the Lake Erie Commission, which includes leaders of six state agencies and private citizens, and makes recommendations about the lake. She is the Governor's primary point person on Lake Erie, the western third of which has suffered for years from massive blooms of harmful algae, which sometimes produces the neurological toxin mycrocystin.

Mulinex was previously director of government relations for the Western Reserve Land Conservancy. She managed the bipartisan U.S. House and Senate Great Lakes Task Force in Washington, D.C. and served as then-Senator DeWine's legislative attorney from 1999 to 2001. The public is invited to hear Mulinex speak and answer questions from 7 to 8 pm at the Lake Erie Waterkeeper meeting in the Toledo Yacht club. Her talk will be followed by the Waterkeeper's roundtable discussion about the health of Lake Erie. For more information visit lakeeriewaterkeeper.org


CRAIG STOUGH MAYOR’S MESSAGE

“Signvania”

With the end of summer comes the start of the fall election campaign season. Because 2019 is an oddnumbered year, local elections are being held this year, including city Craig Stough council, township trustee, township clerk and school board elections. Ten local candidates will be asking for your vote in addition to county funding issues, including the Lucas County Senior Services Levy. That means a lot of political signs will be and already are being posted and will turn Sylvania into "Signvania" until Election Day on Tuesday, Nov. 5. Quality of life is one of the reasons people choose to live in Sylvania, and the visual appearance of the community is part of that quality of life. Political signs do not add to our quality of life. On the other hand, political

MIKE JONES

TOWNSHIP TOPICS

Household goods collection The street-side collection of unwanted household goods this year in Sylvania Township has tentatively resulted in a recordsmashing 220 tons of items collected, according to Rob Nash, township superintendent of roads and services. Nash said that as the collection progressed he became aware that it seemed there were heavier than usual accumulations in some areas of the township and saw that the daily figures were higher than in the past. He regularly got scale tickets from the Republic Services Vienna Junction Landfill, on Hagman Road, where the collection trucks dumped the items collected. Last year the amount of items collected was a total of 120 tons and Nash said that in recent years the amount has been between that and up to 140 tons. Archbold Refuse Service submitted the low bid for work during this annual Sylvania Township household pickup program. The bid for the job is $365 per ton of household items collected. The only other bidder was Stevens Disposal & Recycling Services, which submitted a bid of $450 per ton. Stevens had won the contract for the last several years. Nash said he thought Archbold Refuse did a good job, particularly considering it was its first time and the amount of items discarded.

Zoning review

The Sylvania Township trustees have

signs are an important part of competitive elections and free speech, and they cannot be and should not be legislated away. The real problem is political sign inflation. Some candidates are choosing to put up larger signs earlier in the campaign to establish name recognition. Decades ago, most political signs were 18" x 24" and were put up just a few weeks before Election Day. Competition has resulted in the signs growing to 2' x 3' and in many cases to 3' x 5' billboard signs put up months ahead of the election. In the interest of fairness to all the candidates and to our residents, all candidates on the ballot in Sylvania are sent a letter outlining the regulations established by ordinance in the city of Sylvania for political signs. We ask that the following rules be adhered to for the posting of political signs: Political signs may not be posted on public property or in the public right-of-way. In most cases, signs will not be considered in the public right-of-way if: on streets with public sidewalks, signs are behind the sidewalk on the building side; on streets without sidewalks, signs are a minimum of 15' from the pavement. approved a contract with Reveille, Ltd., of Bowling Green, to update the township's zoning resolution. The zoning resolution is the written compilation or rules and resolutions controlling the use of land in the township. It is the primary source referred to when planners make decisions concerning proposed developments or changes in land use in the township. The document has been added to over time based on resolutions passed by trustees, according to Daryl Graus, township manager of planning and zoning, but it has not had a thorough revision for at least 20 years. The zoning resolution can be found on the township website at the zoning department under the heading of Sylvania Township Zoning Laws. There are 32 articles with subtopics covered, and within most articles there are restrictions noted. Under the general commercial article, as an example, there is a list of permitted business uses, restrictions on building height and how far from the lot line the building must be situated and similar topics. Each of the articles will be redone and brought up to date. Graus added that he would like to see the resolution be made more streamlined for internet use. Reveille was a key consultant in preparing the Sylvania Township Land Use Plan completed last year. Graus said the work differs because the land use plan presents a vision of how certain developments should be sited in certain areas and along major corridors. "The zoning resolution has the specifics. It's the law," he said He added that because of the

Political signs posted on private property must have the permission of the property owner. Political signs are requested to be removed not later than seven days after the election. Every campaign season, signs get posted on public land or in the public right-of-way, and city employees remove them. All candidates are treated equally. We cannot assign employees to full-time "sign patrol," and often the signs are removed as we receive complaints or the offense becomes noticeable and objectionable. Candidates can reclaim

removed signs at the City Maintenance Building. For more information or to register a complaint, call the Sylvania Zoning Office at 419-885-8948. Political signs are a necessary part of our election process. Democracy is competitive and sometimes contentious, but is still the best system in the world. I call upon all candidates to be cognizant of the rules and place their signs in appropriate locations. I also ask all of our Sylvania citizens to be patient and to enjoy participating in the upcoming local elections here in “Signvania.”

land use plan working with Reveille should be smooth. "They know us and we know them," he added. The project is expected to run through 2020 at a cost not to exceed $40,000.

Nov. 20 and by the Sylvania Township Board of Zoning Appeals on Dec. 2. The Planning Commission meeting will be at 9 am on the first floor of Government Center in downtown Toledo. The township board of zoning appeals, which will have the final decision on the matter, will meet at 5 pm in the Sylvania Township administration building, 4927 Holland-Sylvania Rd. Daryl Graus, planning and zoning manager for Sylvania Township, said he was notified of the change by the county planning commission staff.

Special use permit hearing dates changed

The dates for hearings on a request for a special use permit for a proposed residential care facility at 4828 Whiteford Rd. have been changed. The issue currently is scheduled to be heard by the Lucas County Planning Commission

Visit to Toledo Water Plant

Sylvania Mayor and City Council took a tour the Toledo Water Plant to see the improvements made. L-R: Andy McClure, Council Member Doug Haynam, Council Member Mark Frye, Council President Mary Westphal, Mayor Craig Stough, Council Member Sandy Husman and Warren Henry.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 11B


Sylvania–Then and Now BY GAYLEEN GINDY LOOKING BACK

Now we will review the history of the last house on the south side of Erie Street before Main Street intersects it. Originally, there was another house before you came to Main Street, and that house was constructed in 1837, but it was demolished in 1998. So now we have the vacant lot there. Our subject house was constructed in 1905 after Vincent and Mattie Adams purchased the property. They had this catalog home built and the two of them lived here until they died. The list of owners is short, with only three different families owning the house since 1905: June 30, 1905 – Vincent T. Adams Dec.3, 1945 – Mattie M. Adams May 2, 1977 – Thomas and Susan Althoff Nov. 25, 1997 – Thomas Althoff July 14, 1999 – Marybeth Norris Dec. 19, 2012 – Walt and Marybeth Realty Ltd. In the 1910, 1920, 1930 and 1940 census Vincent and Mattie Adams were living in this home. In the 1910 census Vincent was listed as 33 years old, married nine years, employed as a druggist in a store, which he was listed as owning the business. He was also listed as owning his home, free of mortgage. His wife Mattie was listed as 32 years old, with one child born, son Ronald 4 years old. Also living with them was Mattie’s mother, Bine Burns, 63 years old, widowed, listed with six children born, three children still living. Vincent Adams died in August of 1944 while living here and his obituary notice in the Sylvania Sentinel said that he was 68 years old

and that his death was a great shock to his many friends, that it was totally unexpected as he had been enjoying good health. The notice reported that Mr. Adams had been the proprietor of the Adams Drugs Co. in Sylvania for 35 years and retired from active business in February of 1938.He had married Mattie Burns in 1901. They had a son, Ronald, and a daughter Lenore (Mrs. Joseph Polland). Mr. Adams had served on the board of education in Sylvania also. Mattie Burns Adams lived here until she sold the home in 1977. She died in October of 1984 at the age of 106 years old. Her obituary notice said that she and her husband founded Adams’ Drug Store on Main Street, in Sylvania in 1905. She came to Toledo in 1884 from Sugar Creek, Mo., where her father, a lawyer, had moved after losing all his belongings in the Chicago fire. Her family moved to Sylvania in 1886, where her father built a sawmill adjoining the Lake Shore & Southern railroad depot in Sylvania. Their son Ronald Adams was born in 1905, the same year they built this house. He grew up here and then he went on to become the history teacher at Burnham High School in Sylvania for 36 years, and he was the organist at the Sylvania United Church of Christ for 36 years. Their daughter, Lenore Adams-Polland, was married to Joseph Polland and they lived on Garden Park Drive. In 1977 Thomas and Susan Althoff purchased the home, and that same year a building permit was obtained to extend the size of the garage for a radio shop, and another building permit was given that same year to add a second story addition on the rear of the

6619 Erie Street

home. Suburban Directories from 1977 through 1997 show the Althoff’s living in this home. Yearbooks for Sylvania High School feature Mr. Althoff’s photo as a teacher of electronics and vocational education. Court records show that Thomas and Susan Althoff were divorced in 1997, and the home then transferred to Mr. Althoff that same year. He

sold the home two years later in 1999. Since 1999 the Norris’ have owned this home and it appears, from the sign on the front, that they have made it into a Maritime Museum. Recently I may have heard a rumor that there are plans in the near future to possibly demolish the home at age 114 years old.

1997

2018

1940

12B | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS


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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 13B


JANET AMID

THE STARS SPEAK I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.” –L. M. Montgomery Anne of Green Gables

Dear Readers,

The Fall season brings with it a passing of time, as the world and all of nature, in its ultimate glory, brings forth a sense of reality and truth. As the trees shed their leaves, and the sweet smell of wonder permeates air around us, and the cosmos continues on its yearly course, we are indeed reminded that change is imminent within each and every one of us.

Full Moon Oct.13 in Aries

The full moon in this passionate, fiery sign indicates a strong desire to reconnect with yourself, while the desire to relinquish the past is quite intense. Moving forward is the tune beating intensely in your head, the hope of a new day keeping you steady and on your journey. The Aries full moon, though fierce in its expression, allows for personal transformation and the willingness to let go, give way to the burning "rage" and move on to a new day. Those born under the sign of Libra, Capricorn, Cancer and Aries will experience this full moon even greater. Though based on your time of birth, wherever it falls into your zodiac natal chart will determine its influence.

New moon in Scorpio Oct. 27

Breaking down Barriers. Sometimes things become more clear as well as intense under the illumination of the new moon - emotions open up, we are deeply energized when dealing with ourselves as well as others. New moon in Scorpio brings with it the energies of full commitment coming from the heart, and their exact opposite: breaking up and breaking hearts. This new moon supports dedication and commitment to whatever you would like. These energies support what you really want, and not what you tell yourself that you want.

Halloween Day Oct. 31

Mercury turns retrograde until Nov. 21 in Scorpio. When a retrograde occurs in the watery, intense sign of Scorpio, we may see issues relating to finances, most of it perception as opposed to reality. Nonetheless, our fears may kick in. We may feel, mentally overly emotional, going from one extreme to the other extreme. Our perception is altered, and though you may think clearly, words may come out differently. Conversations may become a bit more overheated. You may find

a need to resolve past issues, whether from former relationships, work or romantic related, or even childhood issues that may have plagued you. Either way, transiting in Pluto-ruled Scorpio is all about breaking barriers and rebuilding whatever the issues may be.

Venus moves into Scorpio Oct. 8

With Venus in Scorpio, passion is ignited! We see ourselves more concerned with money, security, and our feelings are dialed up. As Venus moves into Sagittarius on Nov. 2 it takes on a more Pollyanna stance. Where Venus in Scorpio is intense, in Sagittarius she is light and fun. Where Venus in Scorpio wants to possess and control, in Sagittarius it wants to run free and experience everything the world has to offer (and more) preferably with other free spirits. During this month as it transits in Scorpio, it's all about breaking down barriers, allowing situations to be come clearer.

SIGNS Aries (March 21-April 20)

The focus for the month will be placed on securing your finances. In addition, much can be said about the need for resolution with regards to your own personal life. A period of closure is imminent and the need to start on a new path this month is favorable. In addition, there’s a strong focus on health matters, with a desire to regain yourself.

Taurus (April 21-May 21)

Though you are very much a person of habit, with partnerships in both work and fun, you may see yourself feeling a strong sense of intense loyalty, yet also feeling a need to break away from old patterns, and/or people that have left you feeling such strong obligation. Also a good month for getting yourself back on track with business related matters.

Cancer (June 22-July 23)

As productive as you are, this month may prove itself to intensify that need to overcome barriers and obligations that have left you zapped. Deal with old baggage and examine your own knee-jerk responses and actions that may trigger you. Take a better look at compulsions, and focusing on more selfreflection.

Leo (July 24-Aug. 23)

So much of your life depends on what you give to other people, as your heart runs with sentiment. This is clearly a time to pay better attention to your own needs and priorities. Changes are imminent, but much for the better. In addition, Leo's generally do everything in a big way, so it's time to curtail your spending. More importantly, take care when dealing with property or business

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14B |FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Virgo (Aug. 24-Sept. 23) matters. Read between the lines.

It has been said that the secret of life is in a constant motion, and you for one are always constant. However, major planetary influences in your life signify that one chapter in your life has now closed, now it’s on to the next chapter. Relationships, business and personal, during this time have been difficult, though productive Though, this can be a strong cycle where you draw the line where work is concerned. If possible, hold off making decisions until after Dec. 4.

Libra (Sept. 24-Oct. 23)

Now that so much activity is taking place in your own sign, it's up to you to go with the flow. Keep long term goals and perspectives well at hand, the knowledge that you gain during this cycle will allow you to accomplish anything you set your mind to. You're actually in a pretty smooth period right now, a good time to get yourself back in the groove.

Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)

It's all about letting go of matters that have held you back, hopefully allowing you to move forward. This is about clarity on every level. Get yourself situated, then you should be in fine form and ready to meet any of the challenges ahead. Also, your area of friendships may go through a small shift as your sense of obligations can be overwhelming. It's best to just pace yourself, more so during the end of the month through November. Then draw conclusions later.

Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)

This is actually a great period in your life as the planets favor you, both personal and work related. This is your time to actually take the bull by the horns and proceed ahead. It's all about you as you may have the presence of mind to make changes in the work place, a much needed task. Also, your love life may shift a bit, as your tolerance level balances, and things suddenly fall in to place!

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 20) A mixture of challenging yet interesting aspects are transiting your natal sun, providing you with the wherewithal to make changes that are needed. Specifically, it is relating to money and work. Your relationships may feel a bit unsettled causing you to question yourself. Know that perception plays a key role in how you handle everyday situations, and your perception is generally on target.

Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 19)

Pay special attention to your own instincts, focus on what really matters while following your gut. This can and will be a prosperous month for you as long as you walk the talk. A strong yet fruitful stage in your life is about to begin, more so leading into work matters and family. Stand your ground and follow your own path.

Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20)

For many of you, this is a much needed time for introspection, however, the influence of the planets in transit may have you twirling in many different directions. This period will definitely force you out of your cocoon. So with that being said, use this time to work on yourself, while also focusing on taking a better look at yourself and your partnerships. Janet Amid is a columnist & radio/media personality, that writes for Sylvania Advantage and can be heard on 105.5 FM Monday mornings from 8:15 to 8:45 am, answering questions at 419-240-1055. She can reached at 419-882-5510 or by e-mail at JanetAmid@aol.com. Check out her website at JanetAmid.com From Janet’s Desk: Thank all of you for your support with my “Celebrate The Senses” Psychic Event held September 29. I am looking forward to next spring's event.

The Dangers of Attempting to Fix Your Own Dryer

Home maintenance is a task that can lead to large amounts of money coming out of homeowners’ pockets when they rely on professionals. Many times, it seems the smartest idea is to first see if it can be DIY’d, but there are many projects that should only be done by a professional. Repairing or cleaning a dryer vent, for example, can be dangerous for homeowners who do not know the proper techniques to complete the task.

The experts at Dryer Vent Wizard of Greater Toledo, the nation’s leader in dryer vent repair, cleaning and maintenance, share the following consequences of attempting to clean or repair a dryer vent: • Airborne Hazards: A clogged dryer vent can lead to a moisture buildup, causing mold. Additionally, the buildup of lint or other debris blocking the vent can cause bacteria growth or harmful gasses to form like carbon monoxide. Attempting to DIY dryer problems can put home owners in contact with these airborne dangers. • Further Damage to Dryer: If dryer vents are clogged with items, attempting to remove it by yourself can allow them to get pushed deeper inside the vent line, causing more harm than when you started. • Broken and Stuck Cleaning Brushes: Dryer vents can be many feet long with bends. This makes them the perfect place to lose or break off a cleaning brush with no way to retrieve it. • Missed Fire Hazard Warning Signs: If you attempt to clean or repair by yourself, you are more likely to miss warning signs that your dryer has become a fire hazard. Hazards include mold, pet hair and lint buildup, delayed drying times and more.

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 15B


Sylvania Area Crime Reports

Assault Jeremia Martinez, McGregor Lane, victim physically assaulted Maxwell Faulkner, 5400 block Silica, physically assaulted in school Criminal Damage Suzanne Gwozdz, 5900 block Gillingham, vehicle damaged

Harassment Zoe Gwozdz, 5900 block Gillingham, telephone and social media harassment

Identity Theft Michael Wollaston, 7010 Hickory Ridge, personal identity used to open fraudulent account Mia Kajawa, 6600 block Erie, credit card used fraudulently Menacing Tamatha Brandner, 4900 block Burkewood Ct. Erika Drake, 6700 block Monroe, threatening email received Lost Property Braylynn Sternberg, 5600 block Monroe, wallet with credit cars, cash, drivers license lost Theft

Tractor Supply, 7700 block W. Central, merchandise stolen Sydney Dunnom, 4400 block Holland Sylvania, money order stolen Speedway, 5400 block Monroe, cash stolen by fraud Enterprise, 5800 block W. Central, vehicle stolen Meijer, 7200 block W. Central, shoplifting Logan Calevro, 7200 block W. Sylvania, violin stolen Marie Gilson, 6200 block Monroe, cash stolen from wallet Michael Krasula, 5500 block Alexis, cell phone stolen Jacqueline Philo, 4900 block Brinthaven, vehicle stolen Wendy Haudrich, 5600 block Main, credit cards stolen

From the Courts Assault

Samuel Houston, 2512 Clayton, Akron, $150 fine,90 days, 87 days suspended CCW Travis Vaculik, 2105 Simon, Metamora, $150 fine, 60 days suspended

Child Endangering James Banks, 310 Swift, Toledo, $75 fine 90 days suspended Disorderly Conduct

Subscribe for a Cause!! Your organization can earn $5 when you sell a subscription to Sylvania Advantage for $26! Call or email Sarah for details: 419/824-0100 or editor@yourgood.news

16B | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Deslray Liner, 5869 Darnell, Sylvania, $150 fine, 2 days Charles Bradley, 1801 Connecticut, Holland, 30 days suspended

Domestic Violnce John Anderson, 1015 N. McCord, Toledo, $100 fine, 180 days, 134 days suspended Guy Carr, 27 Moorish, Toledo, $150 fine, 180 days, 137 days suspended

DUS Rebecca Pappas, 5850 Graystone, Sylvania, $150 fine, 180 days suspended Kobe Gonzales-Reynolds, 13715 St. Rt. 66, Fayetteville, $350 fine, 60 days suspended Dontae Defoe, 807 Whisperwood, Holland, $100 fine, 180 days suspended

Menacing

Jamie Pacheco, 5044 Seaman, Oregon, $150 fine, 30 days, 20 days suspended Lateisha Fonseca, 1385 Grand, 90 days suspended

No DL

Sebastian Hunt, 4019 Wyse, Northwood, $100 fine, 180 days suspended arias Feagin, 9835 Crises, Holland, $150 fine, 180 days suspended

Obstruction

Pedro Fradera, 9817 Oak Place Ct., Hollland, $100 fine, 90 days, 80 days suspended

OVI

Danielle Braswell, 336 14th, Toledo, $525 fine, 180 days, 157 days suspended William Strickland, 5167 Estes, Sylvania, $375 fine, 180 days, 177 days suspended Keith Kelly, 6814 Oakfield, Toledo, $375 fine, 180 days 177 days suspended Timothy McCarthy, 2915 N. McCord, Toledo, $525 fine, 199 days, 90 days suspended Libby Avalon, 6928 Brint, Sylvania, $375 fine 33 days, 30 days suspended Siditra Shaba, 1562 Saddlebrook Ct., Toledo, $375 fine, 180 days, 177 days suspended Kamiya Reddick, 1723 Balkan Pl., Toledo, $375 fine, 180 days, 177 days suspended Brandon Warren, 2840 Airport, Toledo, $525 fine, 180 days, 170 days suspended Kylie Davis, 0430 Airport, Toledo, $375 fine, 30 days, 27 days suspended Tyler Roemer, 2553 W. Village, Toledo $450 fine, 33 days, 30 days suspended Bailey Cedoz, 2764 Westcastle, Toledo, $375 fine, 30 days, 27 days suspended

OVUAC

Rakai Foster, 6853 Deer Ridge, Maumee, $50 fine, 30 days suspended

Physical Control

Steven Siefke, 71 Rossway, Rossford, $375 fine, 180 days, 177 days suspended

Posession

John Robinette, $150 fine, 180 days suspende

Reckless Op

Damian Marston, 11880 County Road 12, Wauseon, $250 fine, 30 days

Theft

Marilynna Mitchell, 1805 Brownstone, Toledo $200 fine, 90 days, 60 days suspended Tony Rosemond, 915 Willow, Toledo, $300 fine, 270 days, 188 days suspended Curtis Houston, 221 Kevin Pl., Toledo, $150 fine, 90 days, 60 days suspended Lateisha Fonseca, 1014 S. Byrne, $50 fine, 90 days suspended Whitney Anderson, 1162 Country Creek Ln, Toledo, $100 fine, 180 days suspended Janell Chatman, 19 Batavia, Toledo, $50 fine, 90 days suspended Brandon Wheeler, 1201 Champlain, Toledo, $350 fine, 180 days suspended Tonia Atwel, 4859 Airport, Toledo, $150 fine, 90 days, 87 days suspended James Ball, 714 Bemis Ln., Holland, $150 fine Joel Clay, 2748 Moffat, Toledo, $150 fine, 180 days suspended Russell Williams, 2837 Point Pleasant Way, Toledo, $100 fine, 90 days, 84 days suspended Darilyn Richie, 624 Spencer, Toledo, $150 fine, 90 days suspended Dorsey Smith, 6615 W. Bancroft, $200 fine, 20 days suspended Jenny Fowler, 2906 Merrimack, Toledo, $150 fine, 90 days, 87 days suspended

Trespass

Naverra Craig, 3222 Kimball, Toledo, 30 days suspended Justen Morgan, 2616 Elmwood, Sylvania, $150 fine,30 days

Unauthorized Use of Property

Jelena Lewis, 41 Ottawa Landing, 30 days suspended Jason Banas, 310 Swift, Toledo, $75 fine, 30 days suspended Markerra Jackson, 538 Earl, Toledo, $50 fine, 30 days suspended

Information is provided to Sylvania AdVantage. Sylvania AdVantage is not responsible for the contents on this page.


Nancy Schlageter Nancy Helen (Marryott) Schlageter passed away peacefully surrounded by her loving family on Sept. 15, 2019. She was born to Leonard and Helen (Lawrence) Marryott on Aug. 28, 1925. Nancy was the oldest of five children. She was predeceased by her siblings Leonard, Larry (Linda), Mary Janice and Mary Alice. She was also predeceased by her granddaughter Amy Schlageter Nelson; her great-granddaughter Lyla Lewis, and Terry McCready; spouse of her granddaughter Jennifer Gallagher Eriksen. She graduated from Catholic grade school, St. Ursula Academy, and Mary Manse College. Nancy was married to Jack Schlageter for nearly 60 years before he passed away in 2007. She is survived by their nine children: John (Darla), Kitty (Tom) Gallagher, Tom (Sue), Marcia (Don) Grenesko, Laurie (Mike) Neary, Janet (Eric) Prond, Judy (Ron) Erdmann, Mike (Mary), Steve (Andrea), along with 38 grandchildren, 71 great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Nancy was a Eucharistic Minister, attended daily mass, taught CCD, and also enjoyed playing tennis and golf. She and Jack led a vibrant and  active social life with their many friends and large family. Nancy always encouraged her children to bring their friends home. The Schlageter house was where everyone hung out. The more the merrier! Nancy's wish was to be remembered as a good wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, Catholic and friend. The feelings the family have for their mother are perhaps best expressed by the following note sent to her by her son Steve, during her last days: You are the golden standard of motherhood. Your unconditional love for your kids is unmatchable. Your kind spirit and gentle touch nurtures souls. When we opened the front door and entered our home we always felt safe and loved. Thank you for your guidance and understanding amidst our many mistakes. Your genuine love and undeniable spirit will live in the hearts of your kids and grandkids forever. Thank you for your love and wisdom. God Bless.

The family would like to extend a special thanks to the Sunset House and Ashanti Hospice for their compassion and care. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to St. Francis DeSales High School, St. Ursula Academy or Heartbeat of Toledo.

made to ProMedica Hospice 444 N. Summit, Ste. 100, Toledo, Ohio 43604 or to the Alzheimer's Association of Northwest Ohio, 2500 N. Reynolds Rd., Toledo, Ohio 43615, in honor of Jean.

John Stephen Gercak, 84, of Sylvania, Ohio, died peacefully at his home surrounded by his family. Born in Rossford, Ohio, to John and Mary Gercak, John attended Good Shepherd grade school where he was a standout basketball player. He graduated from Central Catholic in 1952 and maintained close friendships with his classmates to this day. John married the love of his life, Jean Martin, on Feb. 23 in 1957. Together they raised their four children. He earned his associate's degree from the University of Toledo and continued on to receive his bachelor's from Sienna Heights University. John started his 37 year career at Dana Corporation in 1960 as a draftsman where he progressed through the company to become district sales manager in Parts Craft division until retirement in 1997. John was a longtime member of Christ the King Parish where he served on parish council. Active in the lives of all his children, John coached his sons in hockey through local area youth hockey leagues. John enjoyed golf and was a member of Whiteford Valley for many years. He made two holes in one of which he was very proud. He was an avid supporter of UT athletics, a season ticket holder for many years for both football and basketball. John and Jean enjoyed travel to many places including Germany, Ireland, Jamaica and others. He was a talented woodworker and enjoyed making golf clubs. He was very interested in his family history and spent much time researching genealogy. John is survived by his children John (Lyn) Gercak, Cathy Gercak-Draheim (Ron Draheim), Ellen (Brent) Welker and James Gercak; grandchildren, Matthew, Mitchell, Kayla, Natalie, Daniel, Megan, Lauren, and Riley; brother, Richard (Karen) Gercak, and special friend Shirley Binns. He was preceded in death by his wife of 58 years Jean, his parents and brother Joseph Gercak. Contributions in memory of John can be

James W. White, Sr., age 93, passed away peacefully Sept. 12, 2019. He was born April 1, 1926, in Toledo, Ohio, to the late Lauretta (Day) and Walter E. White, Sr. Jim attended GESU grade school and graduated from Central Catholic High School in 1944 and immediately joined the U.S. Navy. He spent two years in the South Pacific primarily aboard the USS Kermit Roosevelt, serving as a signal man. Jim was honorably discharged in 1946 and awarded the World War II Victory Medal, American Area Ribbon, and Asiatic Pacific Area Ribbon. Following his service, he joined Buckeye Mercantile Agency, Inc., where he worked for 42 years before retiring in 1988. At Buckeye, Jim had the unique opportunity to work with his late father, and brother Walter White Jr., as well as his daughter Marcia. In retirement, Jim and his wife, Jane, founded Sun Vision of Toledo, a retail sun glass shop located in the Portside Festival Marketplace in Toledo. Together they grew the business to six additional locations in Detroit, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Tampa and Orlando. The sun glass business gave Jim a nice outlet for his energetic and creative nature. Born on April Fool’s Day, Dad always enjoyed good jokes and had a wonderful sense of humor. Sundays especially were good days. Morning Mass followed by afternoon cookouts and pool parties, usually featuring “magic dust” and dum-dum suckers for the younger family members, with salty popcorn and generous libations for the older set, and a good deal of billiards, pinball and poker. Dad (and Mom) both enjoyed traveling, visiting China, Aruba, Ireland, the family cabin in northern Michigan, and especially spending time in Florida’s Siesta Key. Dad also volunteered for Mobile Meals, as an usher at Christ the King Catholic Church and was a lay communion distributor serving residents at various assisted care facilities. He also enjoyed tennis, fast-paced golf, and Wednesdays with the CCHS lunch group.

John Gercak

James White, Sr.

Dad dearly missed Jane, his wife of 50 years, who passed away in 2003. Thankfully, he was blessed with a large and ever expanding family, as well as his precious group of longtime friends who shared in the good and challenging times. The family would especially like to thank the many new friends Dad made during the last few years, the residents and staff of West Park Place, the parishioners of St. Pius X Catholic Church, and countless kind and patient restaurant servers, medical staff, elevator passengers and many others. Dad was proud that each of his five children attended and graduated from the University of Toledo, something he was never given the opportunity to do. Thankfully, Dad has joined the ranks of UT with a plaque in the UT Veteran's Memorial Plaza, recognizing his meritorious military service. Dad fully loved and appreciated each of his children's spouses. He had great times watching and participating with his grandchildren and great grandchildren. Jim is survived by his children James (Kimberly) White Jr., Patricia (Robert) Cabanski, Linda (Scott) Darah, Marcia (Christopher) Davis, and Michael (Anne) White as well as 17 grandchildren Katie (Alfredo Mena-Lora), Christopher Cabanski, Stephen (Gillian) Cabanski, Kelly White, Daniel (Alyssa) White, Joseph White, Michael Darah, Matthew (Melanie) Darah, Ryan Darah, Sean (Katie) Davis, Lisa Davis, Patrick Davis, Erin Davis, Jacob White, Jason White, Aaron White, and Ellie White; and three great grandchildren, Elena and Soren Mena, and Elliott Davis. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Francis de Sales High School or St. Ursula Academy.

W ORSHIP D IRECTORY

Christ Presbyterian Church

Epworth United Methodist Church

Times of Service: 8 a.m. Chapel • 10 a.m. Sanctuary

Times of Service: Sundays, 8:30, 9:45, and 11 a.m.

The Wise Man Built His House Upon a Rock

St. Stephen Lutheran Church

4225 Sylvania

(corner of Sylvania and Talmadge)

419-475-8629 cpctoledo.org

4855 W. Central 419-531-4236

Details at epworth.com

Need help placing your foundation? Visit us This Sunday 10:30 am

7800 Erie, Sylvania, Ohio 419-885-1551

flandersrdchurchofchrist.com

ststephenlutheran.church

Flanders Rd Church of Christ

5130 Flanders Rd • Toledo, Ohio 43623

Times of Service:

8:30 a.m. Traditional 11 a.m. Contemporary

St. Michael’s In The Hills Episcopal Church 4718 Brittany 419-531-1616

Times of Service: Sundays, 8 a.m. and 9:45 a.m. lovelearnserve.org

Zion Lutheran Church

8307 Memorial Hwy., Ottawa Lake, Michigan 49267 734-856-2921

Times of Service, Winter Schedule Adult Bible Study @ 9 a.m. Sunday School @ 9 a.m. Worship Service @ 10 a.m. Winter Hours begin Sept. 10 

Want to publicize your worship services and activities? Contact Sylvania AdVantage for more info! 419-824-0100 or ads@yourgood.news

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 17B


10.01.19B_p18-19.qxp_SAD191001B18-K B19-K 10/2/19 10:17 AM Page 2

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 19B


SERVICES

HELP WANTED HURLEY’S PAINTING Interior/Exterior • Paper Removal Deck Staining Quality Work • Reasonable Prices FREE ESTIMATES CALL 419/882-6753

PEST CONTROL Ants, Termites, Bed Bugs, Mice, Box Elders, Bee/Wasps

TOM’S PEST CONTROL Holland, Ohio

JOHN’S STUMP GRINDING –Stump Grinding– 40 Years Experience! 419-467-9504 HELP IS ON THE WAY! When you feel you need an extra hand for errands, doctors’ visits, shopping or walking your pets. Call Ann Marie 419-356-0589

BOOTH RENTAL

CLEANING SERVICES PROVIDED More than 25 years experience providing high quality performance with a conscientious attitude. Goal oriented to dependability & thoroughness. References provided upon request. Please call Tammy @ 419-882-8258

419/868-8700 www.citytermiteandpest.com

BATHROOM/KITCHEN INSTALLERS NEEDED! TOP Pay, Paid Weekly. No Material Costs! Schedule Flexibility. Join a Winning Team! Call 1-844-Arnolds or email your resume to ahijobs@yahoo.com

BRG PAINT & WALLPAPER Painting - Paper Removal - Wall Repair Wallpapering since 1986 References - Insured - Reliable Free Estimates Brian 419-297-9686 TREE TRIMMING & SMALL TREE REMOVALS Over 30 years experience offering high quality performance with a conscientious attitude. Mention this ad to receive a 10% Discount. Please ask for Jeff e Tree Specialist 419-882-8258 or 419-810-1034

BOOTH RENTAL For hair stylists at Sheer Perfection Hair Studio, 6381 Monroe St. Call Pam at 419-517-4774 or 419-266-2780

Subscribe!

Only $26/year 419/824-0100

PART TIME POSITION AVAILABLE We are looking for good reliable people from Sylvania to clean offices in Sylvania evenings. is position would consist of light duty office cleaning only. Call between 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. at 419/335-3486 Please leave message.

TALENTED MUSICIANS WANTED

Sylvania Community Orchestra –Seeking– Viola, Cello, Percussion and Bass players!

CALL LANE

419.467.3819

ANTIQUES WANTED

Costume Jewelry - Watches Coins - Tools - Postcards Mark Hazlett 419-279-6902 — I Make House Calls —

CLASSIFIEDS $

Buy Local - Sell Local

10 - first 20 words • 35¢ ea. additional word Box/picture/logo: $5

419-824-0100 • ads@yourgood.news

YOURGOOD.NEWS | FIRST OCTOBER 2019 | 19B


I Love Olander Day is a big hit!

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Rosa and Hazel Schwab sign up to win a bicycle at the Spoke Life Cycle booth with grandparents Annette and Tom Pollaut.

Marcus Niachoi and Amber Phillips and her baby Karettella enjoy a snowcone to keep cool on the hot, sunny afternoon.

Eileen Creque and her grandchildren Vance, Emery and Conner explore the flamingos created by Dan and Doris Kelka of DK Birds.

Josh and Maria Newbuy and their daughter Vivian, talk with Maria Schmalzried and her daughters Mia and Riley at her Joyful Creation booth.

Brooke and Matt Janowiecki with baby Kinsley head toward the petting zoo at I Love Olander Day.

Alan and Nicole Flanigan and their 11-day-old baby Reese are joying their first family outing.

Jaxson and Mila Spann and Macy Robet look good in the photo shoot.

Zaheda Mohiaddin creates a henna tattoo for Karen Fritz.

I Love Olander Day volunteers David Black, Dep. Sheriff Jeff Spewese and Mark Luetke talk with Michael Ramirez about traffic in the park.

L-R: Lyndsey Stough is greeted by Dan Marsalek of TOPS.

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Sylvania AdVantage FIRST OCT 2019  

We believe a positive outlook is power against the barrage of negativity all around us and makes for upbeat living while offering cohesive s...

Sylvania AdVantage FIRST OCT 2019  

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