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INSIDE

August 20 - September 2, 2019 • Vol. 23, No. 9 • yourgood.news

Farmers Market Fun!

12-13A Chase Adams has a handsome new backpack to start his school year.

Kaitlyn Stutzenstein and Cora Manthey check out their bus stop.

3B

Connor Decavitch finishes Louie Walker’s back-toschool haircut with a spritz.

Charlie Walker gets his school haircut from Lillie Tulk at the Barber Lounge in downtown Sylvania.

SIZZLE, SIMMER, SAUTÉ

Sit back, relax and ‘Go Pantless’ with Jessica Hopkins!

P11A

Lathrop House History of Underground Railroad comes alive in Sylvania. P16A

4B

Theodore Kaser enjoys a colorful snow cone on a beautiful day at the Farmers Market!

Triathlon at Olander A rowboat is the perfect spot to keep an eye on the athletes competing.

Makeover Magic

Kaydence Sieler gives a magical makeover to an apprehensive Chris Rumph.

INSIDE

Community News Food Main Street Activities Business Congratulations Schools Sports Community News Sylvania Then and Now Business Cards Lives Remembered Real Estate Classifieds

6-9A 10-11A 12-17A 18-20A 21A 1-2B 3B 4-7B 8B 9B 13B 14B 15B


•Through Sept. 15

Life is a Highway: Art and American Car Culture TMA, Canaday Gallery The first large-scale domestic exhibition to provide a historical overview of this topic with an emphasis on the Midwest. Free to TMA members; $12 nonmembers with discounts for seniors, students and military.

•Through Oct. 2

Sylvania Farmers Market, 3 pm Every Tuesday. Maplewood between Main and Becker Drive.

•Aug. 21

First day of school Sylvania Schools Grades 7-8 and 10-12 Sylvania Schools opening day for listed grade levels. •Aromatherapy, 1-2 pm The Victory Center 5532 W. Central Ave., Suite B Discuss the special ways that essential oils can be used for everyday health and wellness. Free to people with a cancer diagnosis. Call 419-531-7600 for details.

•Aug. 21, 28 Ragtime Rick Sodbusters 5758 N. Main St.

Toledo’s own Ragtime Rick and band perform.

•Aug. 22

Stroke Support Group, 4-5:30 pm ProMedica Flower Hospital Conference Center Board Room 5200 Harroun Road Free support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers. Scheduled speakers and topics vary each month and are related to stroke survival. For more information, contact 419-2917537 or stroke.support@promedica.org. •Baby + Me Yoga Storytime, 10 am King Road Library Bond and stretch together through yoga inspired stories. No yoga experience necessary. Bring a baby blanket + yoga mat. •Teen Gamer's Guild, 3-5 pm Sylvania Library Chill out and play the hottest games on the Nintendo Switch, such as Fortnite, Super Smash Bros, Minecraft, Super Mario Party, and many more. Teen Gamers Guild meets every Thursday in the Teen Area.

•Aug. 22, 29

Twilight Thursdays, 7-10 pm Cherry Creek Cellars 11500 Silver Lake Hwy. Brooklyn, Mich. Wine tastings and music

•Aug. 23, 30

Vineyard Jam, 7-10 pm Cherry Creek Cellars 11500 Silver Lake Hwy. Brooklyn, Mich. Wine tastings and music To advertise, email ads@yourgoodnews.com

5657 N. Main St., Suite 1 Sylvania, Ohio 43560 Telephone: 419-824-0100 Facsimile: 419-824-0112 Email: editor@yourgood.news YOURGOOD.NEWS

PUBLISHER Sharon Lange EDITORS Mary Helen Darah, Jennifer Ruple CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Erika Buri, Gayleen Gindy, Mike Jones, Craig Stough, Janis Weber INTERN Sneha Kamath CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS John Crisman of AssetWare COPY EDITING Sarah Groves, Bobbie Ziviski PRODUCTION Susan Utterback ADVERTISING Dave Achen, Mary Rose Gajewski, Molly O’Shea GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Elissa Cary, Penny Collins

Views expressed by contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or staff.

•Aug. 23

Minecraft Meetup, 3:30-4:30 King Road Library Join other Minecrafters at the Library to explore, build, battle, collaborate, and survive in virtual worlds. Recommended ages 7-13. Locations Franciscan Center, Lourdes University, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania, 419-824-3707 Olander Park (Nederhouser and Gorman), 6930 W. Sylvania Ave. To register, 419-882-8313, ext. 1013 or programs@olanderpark.com; olanderpark.com Sylvania Libraries 6749 Monroe St., Sylvania 419-882-2089 3900 King Rd., King Branch 419-259-5380 Toledo Museum of Art 2445 Monroe St., Toledo toledomuseum.org Toledo Zoo 2 Hippo Way, Toledo toledozoo.org Valentine Theatre 410 Adams St., Toledo valentinetheatre.com Wildwood Preserve Metropark (Manor House) 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo metroparkstoledo.com

•ProMedica Concert Series, 6:15 pm Promenade Park 400 Water St., Toledo Tickets are $15 presale or $20 the day of the show. Super fans may purchase VIP tickets for entry closer to the stage for $45. Ticketmaster and promenadeconcerts.com. Martina McBride Baby/Toddler and Me Yoga, 10:30 am Olander Gorman You and your child will play and practice yoga. For ages 6 months to 3 years. Rachna Maheshwari instructs. Pre-register. •Get to Know Your Trails, 3-4 pm Secor, NCNP Parking lot Explore trails at different parks each month. Each session guided by a Metroparks naturalist. Reservations needed. •Feast with the Beasts Toledo Zoo Five-course dinner prepared by chefs from Hollywood Casino, Registry Bistro, Souk and Mancy’s Steakhouse.Advanced registration required. Visit toledozoo.com/feast. •German-American Fest 3624 Seaman Rd., Oregon, Ohio Authentic German food, beer and entertainments. Also Saturday and Sunday.

•Aug. 24

Bug Fest, 10 am-2 pm Secor, NCNP Parking lot Metroparks presents BugFest, a celebration of bugs. Metroparks will be joined by other community partners to entertain, educate and amaze with all things bugs. •Biggie Golf Classic Bedford Hills Golf Club 6700 Jackman Road Annual fundraiser for Jeremy Bigelow. •Temperance Street Fest, 10 am-3 pm Downtown Temperance, Mich. Family-friendly festival featuring bike parade, dog parade, kids activities, food and craft vendors. Event is rain or shine. Proceeds benefit Bedford Township Veterans Center.

•Aug. 24-25

Backpacking 101, 10 am-2 pm Secor, NCNP Parking lot, Explore backpacking basics with Metroparks outdoor skills staff and prepare yourself to hit the trail. Recommended ages 16 and older. All minors must be accompanied by a guardian. Backpacks, tents, sleeping bags, pads, stove and cook sets available to borrow. Meals not included. A mandatory pre-trip meeting is Tuesday, Aug. 20 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Lodge. Co-Sponsored by Mountain Mentors. $35, Reservations.

•Aug. 25

Bobby May & Friends, 6-9 pm Sodbusters 5758 N. Main Music by local musicians each Sunday.

•Aug. 27

Downloads and Desserts, 3-4:30 pm

Sylvania Library Watch any good movies lately? Play any games you love? Want to talk about your favorite songs while making desserts? Downloads & Desserts is a program that does just that! Teens (13-18) •Stranahan Elementary-ESOL Summer Slide Prevention, 3-5 pm King Road Library Weekly reading activity for K-12 students to prevent loss of reading skills, writing skills, and language skills. Kids (5-10)

•Aug. 28

Stand Up Paddleboard Yoga, 5:306:45 pm, 7-8:15 pm Olander Boat Ramp Residents $25; non-residents $30 Ages 10+ can learn with Sally Lyons. Pre-register. •Teens Gamers Guild, 3-5 pm Sylvania Library Chill out and play the hottest games on the Nintendo Switch, such as Fortnite, Super Smash Bros, Minecraft, Super Mario Party, and many more. •Lourdes Life Long Learning Rep. Marcy Kaptur, 11 am -1 pm Franciscan Center Join Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur as she explores current affairs. Lunch $12 per person, registration needed. For more information contact Laura Megeath at lifelong@lourdes.edu or 419-824-3707.

•Aug. 31

Science Fun, 2-4 pm Secor, Secor Lone Oak Playground, Stop by the playground and visit Metropark's experi-tent to see fun mini-experiments. Reservations.

•Sept. 5

Life Garden, Noon Fieldstone Villas Sunset Communities 5850 Manning Way Learn to prepare your garden for the fall season. Call 419-882-8415. •Mothers Center open house, 1011 am West Toledo YMCA 2110 Tremainsville All mothers are invited to attend for support, fun, and to connect with other moms. Visit motherscenter.net for more information. A second open house is scheduled for 7-8 pm at Sip Coffee, 3160 Markway.

•Sept 6

Make and Take, 1-3 pm All Good Things 6832 Convent Make and take homemade cards. $10. RSVP at 419-824-3729. •Live music, 7-11 pm Joseph Diehn American Legion 5580 Centennial Road Music with Kevin Van Sickle and Pure Country. $10 per person. Open to the public. For more information, call 419-882-9080.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 3A


•Through Sept. 15

Life is a Highway: Art and American Car Culture TMA, Canaday Gallery The first large-scale domestic exhibition to provide a historical overview of this topic with an emphasis on the Midwest. Free to TMA members; $12 nonmembers with discounts for seniors, students and military.

•Through Oct. 2

Sylvania Farmers Market, 3 pm Every Tuesday. Maplewood between Main and Becker Drive.

•Aug. 21

First day of school Sylvania Schools Grades 7-8 and 10-12 Sylvania Schools opening day for listed grade levels. •Aromatherapy, 1-2 pm The Victory Center 5532 W. Central Ave., Suite B Discuss the special ways that essential oils can be used for everyday health and wellness. Free to people with a cancer diagnosis. Call 419-531-7600 for details.

•Aug. 21, 28 Ragtime Rick Sodbusters 5758 N. Main St.

Toledo’s own Ragtime Rick and band perform.

•Aug. 22

Stroke Support Group, 4-5:30 pm ProMedica Flower Hospital Conference Center Board Room 5200 Harroun Road Free support group for stroke survivors and their caregivers. Scheduled speakers and topics vary each month and are related to stroke survival. For more information, contact 419-2917537 or stroke.support@promedica.org. •Baby + Me Yoga Storytime, 10 am King Road Library Bond and stretch together through yoga inspired stories. No yoga experience necessary. Bring a baby blanket + yoga mat. •Teen Gamer's Guild, 3-5 pm Sylvania Library Chill out and play the hottest games on the Nintendo Switch, such as Fortnite, Super Smash Bros, Minecraft, Super Mario Party, and many more. Teen Gamers Guild meets every Thursday in the Teen Area.

•Aug. 22, 29

Twilight Thursdays, 7-10 pm Cherry Creek Cellars 11500 Silver Lake Hwy. Brooklyn, Mich. Wine tastings and music

•Aug. 23, 30

Vineyard Jam, 7-10 pm Cherry Creek Cellars 11500 Silver Lake Hwy. Brooklyn, Mich. Wine tastings and music To advertise, email ads@yourgoodnews.com

5657 N. Main St., Suite 1 Sylvania, Ohio 43560 Telephone: 419-824-0100 Facsimile: 419-824-0112 Email: editor@yourgood.news YOURGOOD.NEWS

PUBLISHER Sharon Lange EDITORS Mary Helen Darah, Jennifer Ruple CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Erika Buri, Gayleen Gindy, Mike Jones, Craig Stough, Janis Weber INTERN Sneha Kamath CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS John Crisman of AssetWare COPY EDITING Sarah Groves, Bobbie Ziviski PRODUCTION Susan Utterback ADVERTISING Dave Achen, Mary Rose Gajewski, Molly O’Shea GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Elissa Cary, Penny Collins

Views expressed by contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or staff.

•Aug. 23

Minecraft Meetup, 3:30-4:30 King Road Library Join other Minecrafters at the Library to explore, build, battle, collaborate, and survive in virtual worlds. Recommended ages 7-13. Locations Franciscan Center, Lourdes University, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania, 419-824-3707 Olander Park (Nederhouser and Gorman), 6930 W. Sylvania Ave. To register, 419-882-8313, ext. 1013 or programs@olanderpark.com; olanderpark.com Sylvania Libraries 6749 Monroe St., Sylvania 419-882-2089 3900 King Rd., King Branch 419-259-5380 Toledo Museum of Art 2445 Monroe St., Toledo toledomuseum.org Toledo Zoo 2 Hippo Way, Toledo toledozoo.org Valentine Theatre 410 Adams St., Toledo valentinetheatre.com Wildwood Preserve Metropark (Manor House) 5100 W. Central Ave., Toledo metroparkstoledo.com

•ProMedica Concert Series, 6:15 pm Promenade Park 400 Water St., Toledo Tickets are $15 presale or $20 the day of the show. Super fans may purchase VIP tickets for entry closer to the stage for $45. Ticketmaster and promenadeconcerts.com. Martina McBride Baby/Toddler and Me Yoga, 10:30 am Olander Gorman You and your child will play and practice yoga. For ages 6 months to 3 years. Rachna Maheshwari instructs. Pre-register. •Get to Know Your Trails, 3-4 pm Secor, NCNP Parking lot Explore trails at different parks each month. Each session guided by a Metroparks naturalist. Reservations needed. •Feast with the Beasts Toledo Zoo Five-course dinner prepared by chefs from Hollywood Casino, Registry Bistro, Souk and Mancy’s Steakhouse.Advanced registration required. Visit toledozoo.com/feast. •German-American Fest 3624 Seaman Rd., Oregon, Ohio Authentic German food, beer and entertainments. Also Saturday and Sunday.

•Aug. 24

Bug Fest, 10 am-2 pm Secor, NCNP Parking lot Metroparks presents BugFest, a celebration of bugs. Metroparks will be joined by other community partners to entertain, educate and amaze with all things bugs. •Biggie Golf Classic Bedford Hills Golf Club 6700 Jackman Road Annual fundraiser for Jeremy Bigelow. •Temperance Street Fest, 10 am-3 pm Downtown Temperance, Mich. Family-friendly festival featuring bike parade, dog parade, kids activities, food and craft vendors. Event is rain or shine. Proceeds benefit Bedford Township Veterans Center.

•Aug. 24-25

Backpacking 101, 10 am-2 pm Secor, NCNP Parking lot, Explore backpacking basics with Metroparks outdoor skills staff and prepare yourself to hit the trail. Recommended ages 16 and older. All minors must be accompanied by a guardian. Backpacks, tents, sleeping bags, pads, stove and cook sets available to borrow. Meals not included. A mandatory pre-trip meeting is Tuesday, Aug. 20 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Lodge. Co-Sponsored by Mountain Mentors. $35, Reservations.

•Aug. 25

Bobby May & Friends, 6-9 pm Sodbusters 5758 N. Main Music by local musicians each Sunday.

•Aug. 27

Downloads and Desserts, 3-4:30 pm

Sylvania Library Watch any good movies lately? Play any games you love? Want to talk about your favorite songs while making desserts? Downloads & Desserts is a program that does just that! Teens (13-18) •Stranahan Elementary-ESOL Summer Slide Prevention, 3-5 pm King Road Library Weekly reading activity for K-12 students to prevent loss of reading skills, writing skills, and language skills. Kids (5-10)

•Aug. 28

Stand Up Paddleboard Yoga, 5:306:45 pm, 7-8:15 pm Olander Boat Ramp Residents $25; non-residents $30 Ages 10+ can learn with Sally Lyons. Pre-register. •Teens Gamers Guild, 3-5 pm Sylvania Library Chill out and play the hottest games on the Nintendo Switch, such as Fortnite, Super Smash Bros, Minecraft, Super Mario Party, and many more. •Lourdes Life Long Learning Rep. Marcy Kaptur, 11 am -1 pm Franciscan Center Join Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur as she explores current affairs. Lunch $12 per person, registration needed. For more information contact Laura Megeath at lifelong@lourdes.edu or 419-824-3707.

•Aug. 31

Science Fun, 2-4 pm Secor, Secor Lone Oak Playground, Stop by the playground and visit Metropark's experi-tent to see fun mini-experiments. Reservations.

•Sept. 5

Life Garden, Noon Fieldstone Villas Sunset Communities 5850 Manning Way Learn to prepare your garden for the fall season. Call 419-882-8415. •Mothers Center open house, 1011 am West Toledo YMCA 2110 Tremainsville All mothers are invited to attend for support, fun, and to connect with other moms. Visit motherscenter.net for more information. A second open house is scheduled for 7-8 pm at Sip Coffee, 3160 Markway.

•Sept 6

Make and Take, 1-3 pm All Good Things 6832 Convent Make and take homemade cards. $10. RSVP at 419-824-3729. •Live music, 7-11 pm Joseph Diehn American Legion 5580 Centennial Road Music with Kevin Van Sickle and Pure Country. $10 per person. Open to the public. For more information, call 419-882-9080.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 3A


•Sept 6

Tea and sandwiches, 11:30 am2:30 pm Stranleigh Manor House Wildwood Metropark Tea, sandwich samplings and desserts while overlooking the Shipman Garden. Australian theme. Reservation tables are 11:30 am to 12:30 pm and walk-in guests are from 12:30 to 2:30 pm. Call 419-407-9790. $10.

•Sept. 7

MemoryLane fundraiser Toledo Spirits 1301 N. Summit Music, food and spirits tasting. $75. •Oak Grove School open house, 10 am-1 pm Wildwood Preserve Metropark Take a step back in time and discover how natural resources were used in the classroom of the past compared to how they are used in the classroom today.

•Sept. 8

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasis Walk Olander Park 2nd annual fundraising walk. Registration at 8:30 am, kids fun run at 9:30 am and walk at 10 am. Visit caresfoundation.org. •ONE Yoga Festival, 8 am-4 pm

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Promenade Park 400 Water St. Day includes yoga, music, food, vendors, and other wellness activities such as a meditation tent and Nature Therapy. $20; $30 at the door. Visit oneyogafestival.com •Bobby May & Friends, 6-9 pm Sodbusters 5758 N. Main Music by local musicians each Sunday.

•Sept. 9

Pooch Plunge, 1-4:45 pm Plummer Pool 6940 Maplewood Dogs swim as a fundraiser for the Glass City Dog Park. $5.

•Sept. 11

Sylvania Area Community Improvement Corp luncheon, Noon ProMedica Flower Hospital conference room Barbara Sears, a partner in the national consulting firm Strategic Health Care is the speaker. To join this members group, email jhealey@millerdanberry.com. •Senior Stroll, 2-3 pm Wildwood Metz Center Enjoy a slow-paced nature walk with a naturalist as your guide, as they put your stroll into context with information about the environment. Dress accordingly for the weather and any age is welcome. Reservations.

•Sept. 12

Topical Thursday, 3-4:30 pm West Park Place 3501 Executive Pky. The League of Women Voters present Sam Burnett, who will speak on Social Security and its history. Visit lwvtoledo.org to register. •Tales and Trails, 10-11 am Wildwood Preserve, Metroparks Hall Children learn about the Metroparks trails.

Preschool program designed for 3-5 yearolds. There will be a walk, craft making and a story. Each program features a different topic each time. Register participating children only. $2. •Catholic Conservative-Liberal Divide: Christian Perspectives lecture, 5:30-7 pm Franciscan Center Father Jim Bacik will speak about the how Catholics can find common ground. $10 reserved; $15 at the door. Call 419-824-3515 or at franciscanvillage@sisterosf.org. • Bike and Brew, 6-8:30 pm Wildwood Outside Ward Pavilion Pedal through the parks with Metroparks naturalists and enjoy glow rides, family rides, mountain biking classes, bike maintenance classes. Bring a bike, helmet (required), and a full water bottle. Free. Reservations

•Sept. 13

Whitmer Class of 1969 reunion, 4 pm Tailgate party on the south side of the Career Technology Center

•Sept. 14

Whitmer Class of 1969 School Tour, 11 am Meet at the Clegg Drive entrance in front of the high school. •Whitmer Class of 1969, 5-11 pm St. Clements Hall 2990 Tremainsville Rd. $35 per person. Appetizers at 5 pm and dinner at 7 p.m. Beer and set ups provided. • Autumn Blooms, 1-2:30 pm Wildwood Preserve, Metz Center Stroll with the whole family while on a guided nature tour with a park interpreter. The focus will be the showy fall blooming plants, what they are, why they are important and where they grow. Free. Reservations.

•Sept. 18

•Senior Stroll, 2-3 pm Wildwood Metz Center Enjoy a slow-paced nature walk with a naturalist as your guide, as they put your stroll into context with information about the envi-

ronment. Dress accordingly for the weather and any age is welcome. Reservations.

•Sept. 20

Kingston Blood Drive, 11 am-5 pm Kingston Residence activity room 4125 King Road A blood drive hosted by the American Red Cross. To make an appointment, call 419824-4200.

•Sept. 21

LocalFest, 4-11 pm J&G Parking Lot Local bands, food and craft beer from Upside Brewry and Inside the Five. Craft Show, 10 am-6 pm Joseph Diehn American Legion 5880 Centennial Road Fall craft show. Vendors and crafters needed. Call Terry, 419-265-6099. •Hawk migration bus tour, 9 am-6 pm Wildwood Preserve, Metz Center Hawkfest is an event focusing on birds of prey (eagles, hawks, falcons, and owls) and the annual fall hawk migration over Lake Erie Metropark in Michigan. Bring a lunch and binoculars and hop on board the mini bus for a tour with Metroparks Toledo to celebrate the 30th year of Hawkfest. Enjoy a day of games, crafts, guest speakers, live birds of prey and fun. The registration fee will cover admission, parking and gas. $15. Reservations.

•Sept. 23

Autumnal equinox walk, 3-4 pm Wildwood Preserve, Metz Center Celebrate the first day of fall with a walk at Wildwood Preserve Metropark. Look and listen for signs of fall on this naturalist-led hike. Meet at the visitor center. Free. Reservations

•Sept. 25

•Senior Stroll, 2-3 pm Wildwood Metz Center Enjoy a slow-paced nature walk with a naturalist as your guide, as they put your stroll into context with information about the environment. Dress accordingly for the weather and any age is welcome. Reservations.

Your Go-To Event: Pooch Plunge 2019

Steve and Lindsey Williamson and their daughters Leah and Olivia have fun with their dog George at the 2018 event.

BY SNEHA KAMATH

T

he eighth annual Pooch Plunge will take place at Plummer Pool, 6940 Maplewood Ave., from 1 to 4:45 pm on Sunday, Sept. 9. This event is an opportunity for furry friends to enjoy a swim in the pool before it closes for the winter. While the event is open to dogs of all sizes, small dogs, 0 to 30 pounds, are encouraged to swim from 1 to 2:30 pm while large dogs,

4A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

30 pounds and over, are encouraged to do so from 2:30 to 4:45 pm. Admission is $5 per dog, and proceeds will go towards funding and maintaining the Glass City Dog Park, the only dog park in Toledo. This event is highlighted on the Guy in the 419 Live Show, available on Facebook or by visiting guyinthe419.com.


Ray of Hope nominations requested for annual fall awards program BY MARY HELEN DARAH

Sylvania Area Family Services (SAFS) will be hosting the Ray of Hope Awards on Oct. 16 at the Pinnacle. The event annually recognizes outstanding businesses, individuals and organizations that have significantly contributed to improve the quality of life in the greater Sylvania area. SAFS is seeking nominations in the categories of Arts, Science, Business or Industry, Community Leader, Public Service, Education, Social Service, Volunteer of the Year, and Youth Leader. Last year's winners included Crystal Burnworth/Arts and Sciences, Hickman Cancer Center/Business & Industry, Jeff Traudt/Community Leader, Jackie Moore

of TBIRC/Community Organization, Michael Bonner/Community Service, Barbara Baumgartner/Community Service, Jessica Lynn Minard/Education, Keith Walker/Public Service, LaValley FoundaService, Jordan tion/Social Topoleski/Youth Service, and Cheree' Morris/Volunteer of the Year. The SAFS executive director, Dottie Segur, believes the awards are a meaningful way to honor those who serve. "The event is a wonderful way to recognize those who make the Sylvania community stronger and an outstanding place to work and live," she stated. To nominate an individual, organization or business for a 2019 Ray of Hope Award, visit sa-fs.org, call 419-882-8415 or email dsegur.safs@gmail.com by Aug. 25.

League of Women Voters to host Thursday talks The League of Women Voters of Toledo-Lucas County is offering its third season of “Topical Thursdays.” These community events are held the second Thursday of the month, from Sept. thru April, with no meeting in December. This season’s first Topical Thursday will be Sept. 12 from 3 to 4:30 pm, at West Park Place Senior Living, 3501 Executive Pkwy. The meeting room can be accessed through the north entrance, in the rear of the building, and the topic will be Social Security, a Brief History, Who Utilizes It, and Will It Run Out. The guest speaker is Sam Burnett, Ohio Coordinator for the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare.

Topical Thursdays are informal but informative events designed to educate the community on various subjects. For a complete list of Topical Thursdays, visit lwvtoledo.org. The League of Women Voters is a political nonpartisan organization. The League of Women Voters does not support or oppose any political candidate or party. It does take stands on select issues through study. The League of Women Voters of Toledo-Lucas County has been in existence for over 98 years and welcomes new members. For more information contact Darcy Yates at 419-290-8143.

Mistress of Ceremonies Chrys Peterson and SAFS Executive Director Dottie Segur welcome the crowd to the 2018 Ray of Hope Awards.

Crafters, vendors wanted for American Legion Auxiliary Fall Craft Show Crafters and vendors are wanted to participate in the second annual Joseph Diehn American Legion Auxiliary Craft Show scheduled for Saturday, Set. 21. The show is from 10 am to 6 pm and will be held in the large hall at 5580 Centennial Rd. Booth fees are just $20 for one table and $10 for a second table or spot. Participating crafters and vendors are asked to contribute an item for the door prize. For a booth reservation form, call show organizer Terry, 419-2656099 or Connie, 517-605-3775.

In addition to what organizers anticipate to be a diverse group of crafters and vendors, a large bake sale is also planned. Craft show shoppers will have the opportunity to purchase chicken salad croissant sandwiches and hot dogs, chips and beverages, as well. Proceeds from the event will help pay Buckeye Girls State delegate fees and also benefit the kitchen fund.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 5A


The Dangers of Attempting to Fix Your Own Dryer

Home maintenance is a task that can lead to large amounts of money coming out of homeowners’ pockets when they rely on professionals. Many times, it seems the smartest idea is to first see if it can be DIY’d, but there are many projects that should only be done by a professional. Repairing or cleaning a dryer vent, for example, can be dangerous for homeowners who do not know the proper techniques to complete the task.

Sylvania Super Hero ‘Every day is a new adventure’

The experts at Dryer Vent Wizard of Greater Toledo, the nation’s leader in dryer vent repair, cleaning and maintenance, share the following consequences of attempting to clean or repair a dryer vent: • Airborne Hazards: A clogged dryer vent can lead to a moisture buildup, causing mold. Additionally, the buildup of lint or other debris blocking the vent can cause bacteria growth or harmful gasses to form like carbon monoxide. Attempting to DIY dryer problems can put home owners in contact with these airborne dangers. • Further Damage to Dryer: If dryer vents are clogged with items, attempting to remove it by yourself can allow them to get pushed deeper inside the vent line, causing more harm than when you started. • Broken and Stuck Cleaning Brushes: Dryer vents can be many feet long with bends. This makes them the perfect place to lose or break off a cleaning brush with no way to retrieve it. • Missed Fire Hazard Warning Signs: If you attempt to clean or repair by yourself, you are more likely to miss warning signs that your dryer has become a fire hazard. Hazards include mold, pet hair and lint buildup, delayed drying times and more.

567•202•9089

ToledoDryerVent.com

Mike Szafarowicz

BY MARY HELEN DARAH

Mike Szafarowicz, an EMT/paramedic for the Sylvania Fire Department, has known he wanted to be a firefighter since his youth. “I knew exactly what I wanted to do since I was in the third grade,” he said. “It’s funny. The only connection we could find to anyone else in the family being in the firefighting field was that I had a distant relative who was a Chicago firefighter. I think it was a childhood thing. I saw the big red truck flying down the street, and it progressed from there.” Szafarowicz began his training immediately out of high school, received his EMT certificate and paramedic certification and was hired in February 1998. He has always worked in Sylvania. Szafarowicz enjoys his career choice immensely and believes one of the best aspects of his job is never knowing what is going to happen during each shift. “It could be a quiet day, or we could be out on 13 runs,” he said. “It is always up in the air.” He believes the biggest challenges are keeping up with the training and the standards that are compulsory in the field. “We are required to constantly advance our training and education,” he stated. “That includes everything from ice rescue to hazardous material and mass shooting training. There is always something new that we must be proficient at. The technology has changed as well. We now have laptop computers giving us information as we respond to a call. We get updates as we head to the run, such as how old the person is and any known health history, which prepares us for what we are walking into. It is night and day to what we had available to us before. It is an incredible thing to have that information as you head to a patient/victim.”

6A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

The Sylvania EMT believes that the community does not fully understand the scope of firefighting. “When I was hired, this department averaged 2,000 runs annually. Now we are on track for 7,000 runs this year,” he stated. “There are many ways the community could help us, especially with the increased number of runs. One way is to clearly mark their addresses on their houses and mailboxes. It helps us get to the scene faster when seconds count.” Szafarowicz is married and has lived in Sylvania for the past 20 years. He also feels his station is like a family. “We are a close-knit group. We are a large department but small enough to know everyone, everyone’s families and we are a family within itself,” he stated. The first responder is grateful when people they have assisted return to the station to update them on their progress and say thank you for their service. “We have followed up on a few memorable cases,” he said. “It is nice when people come to the station to let us know how they are doing. For every person that comes in to update us, there are 200 people that do not. It is so rewarding when we see people we have helped. It feels amazing knowing you have made a difference.” Szafarowicz hopes to continue his work for years to come and likes to wake up not knowing what each day will bring. “I enjoy it all,” he said. “We do everything. Heading to work at 7 am could find us going to schools to give public safety talks to the kids. We could be inspecting businesses for potential fire hazards or we could spend the shift responding to emergency calls. We also do special community events such as the Fire Festival coming up in October. Like I said, that’s what I love about my job. Every day is full of new experiences and a chance to make a difference in other people’s lives.”


Expert shares self-defense skills with Sylvania Rotary members BY MARY HELEN DARAH

Rob Fletcher, a Black Belt and combative tactics and fitness expert, spoke to the Sylvania Rotary on Aug. 8 at Highland Meadows Golf Club. Laura Dosch, of Waterford Bank and president-elect for the Sylvania Rotary, felt it was important to have Fletcher speak to the organization. “Rob [Fletcher] is bringing awareness to a need affecting all of us and that is awareness and paying attention to our surroundings on a day to day basis in our busy lives,” stated Dosch. “Rob teaches self-defense and incorporates it into a fitness training program. He has devoted his entire life to changing and saving lives by training others through fitness and self-defense. His presentation was powerful and made an impact on those who heard him speak.” Fletcher, the former North American Kickboxing Champion, and member of the

World Champion USA Kickboxing Team, is also author of “America’s Next Great Trainer” and the creator of the sdi7 HIIT Workout (SelfDefense in 7 Minutes High-Intensity Interval Training). He is listed in the Who’s Who of Martial Arts. He has also been recognized by Action Martial Arts for Outstanding Martial Arts Achievement, inducted into the Black Belt Masters Hall of Fame and is the recipient of the Joe Lewis PKA Eternal Warrior Award. He has been featured on Good Morning America and in the New York Post, where he guided five out-of-shape fathers through and an eightweek Bod Transformation. His life has been dedicated to changing and saving lives by training, teaching and empowering others through fitness and self-defense. Fletcher recently returned from Las Vegas where his documentary “America's Next Great Trainer” was a top contender and his film “Actions Conquer Tragedy-The Reagan Tokes Legacy” received recognition.

Lourdes University’s Lifelong Learning program will host its Fall Kickoff, A Discussion of Current Affairs with special guest Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, ursday, Aug. 29 in the Franciscan Center, 6832 Convent Blvd., in Sylvania. e presentation begins at 11 am with lunch served at 12 pm. e presentation is free; lunch is $12 per person. Reservations are requested by Aug. 20. Call 419-824-3707 or email lifelong@lourdes.edu. Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur is currently serving her 19th term in the House of Representatives, making her the longestserving woman in the United States Congress. A Toledo native, Kaptur is a graduate

of St. Ursula Academy and earned a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Wisconsin. She also earned a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of Michigan. Congresswoman Kaptur’s political career began when she accepted an appointment as domestic policy advisor to President Jimmy Carter. Today Congresswoman Kaptur serves as the first woman to chair the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. She also serves as a senior member of the House of Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense and the House of Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice and Science.

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur featured speaker

Rotary President-elect Laura Dosch, right, introduces guest speaker Rob Fletcher, a Black Belt, combative tactics and fitness expert.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 7 A


M

Sylvania Northview High School special education teacher is ‘going over the edge’ in honor of her mother and others who have battled cancer.

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GOING

BY MARY HELEN DARAH

y daughter is going over the edge … literally! I was recently asked to take part in Over Edge, a the fundraiser for The Victory Center, an that organization helps provide free programs and services to support cancer patients and their families. I often have been accused of having a difficult time saying “no” but in this case, surprisingly, that word came out of my mouth in seconds after being asked to rappel off a 16-story building in downtown Toledo. My middle child overheard my conversation and asked if she could rappel in my honor. I think it is appropriate that the definition of the idiom “over the edge” is “to be in a mental or emotional state that makes someone completely lose control.” That, my friends, pretty much sums up cancer. My daughter Maria had a dream that I had breast cancer when I was 42 years old. I informed her that as a woman who graduated as a drugfree, alcohol-free, virgin, athlete, that I was in contention for receiving a tiara for my “good girl” lifestyle, I most certainly did not have cancer but I would get checked to ease her fears. I then received the news that immediately put me in the “over the edge” frame of mind. Your mortality dangles in front of you as you sway from surgeries to treatment to recovery, feeling as though your safety harness could give way at any moment. Thankfully, after over a decade of being cancer-free, I feel as if I have firm footing but still feel as if a massive tumble off a building could be a scan and a phone call away. One thing that stuck with me after my cancer journey is that feeling of living on the edge. Believe it or not, I now find it a blessing instead of a curse. It has forced me to get out of my comfort zone and experience things I never would have if I were still safety strapped to the delusion that life is infinite and controllable. I have crossed things off my bucket list and changed many of my “what ifs” and “somedays” to “what’s possible.” I have seen a moose in the wilds of Alaska, traveled Europe, pitched the SPANX and let it all hang out, and continually push myself out of my comfort zone. However, dangling off a building just isn’t something I have the desire or need to do. Helena apparently feels differently. I quickly discovered that cancer is not a solo experience. Your loved ones get sucked into its vortex as well. The good news is, that along with the 16-story high of negatives that come with the disease, my children have secured themselves to the need to live fully and purposefully concept after seeing me battle an unknown, uncontrollable foe. Helena is a special needs educator. She has taught and positively impacted lives (sans toilet and running water) in a small village in Kenya. My girl is always up for an adventure and is the only woman I know who could survive in the wild or be put in a room with 29 high octane kids. She would emerge with the kids all smiles and unscathed after tethering their minds to the belief that they are capable of anything and everything. I know I will cling to this belief as I see my precious child go over the edge on my behalf. In the words of Christopher Logue, “Come to the edge. We might fall. Come to the edge. It’s too high! Come to the edge! And they came. And they flew.”


Second-Time Winner, 882, Takes Silver

Nick Dallas of Upside Brewing and J&G Pizza Palace, produced 882 Pale Ale, the 2018 Ohio Craft Brewers Cup Gold Medal winner, which then captured the 2019 Silver medal in the state-wide competition. According to Dallas, “882 is Sylvania’s first telephone number prefix so it is only fitting that a medal-winning beer would bear that name,” he chuckled.

Cleaning Up Downtown

Downtown Sylvania business owner Gabe Ng of SpaceBar, 5687 Main St. in downtown Sylvania, took it upon himself to rid the downtown sidewalk of debris in time for the Aug. 2 Art Walk in the Red Bird Art District.

3315 Centennial Road

• Industrial Flex Suite • 3500sf • Grade Level OH Doors • 480V 3-Phase Power

Gary A. Micsko

CCIM Senior Associate Industrial Properties

3485 Silica Road

• Industrial Flex Suite • 1800sf • Grade Level OH Door • (3) Offices, Conference, Kitchen

5901 W. Sylvania • Retail or Office • 1218sf • 0.7 Acres • Great Exposure

To view our listings, visit www.rkgcommercial.co m. 419.794.3965

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 9A


Sylvania Farmers Market Maplewood Ave., West of Main St. Tuesdays, 3 - 7 pm Visit the market on Maplewood Avenue and Richard Becker Drive in the Red Bird Arts District. Each week features local produce, flowers, honey, coffee, crafts, live music and Food Truck Row. downtownsylvania.org Honey Harvest by Toledo GROWs 900 Oneida St., Toledo Saturday, Aug. 24, 10 am - noon Bring the family and experience the honey extraction process from hive to jar. RSVP required - call 419-720-8714 or email yvonne.dubielak@toledogrows.org. $5 donation per adult supports the organiation’s beekeeping efforts. toledogrows.org Sylvania Area Family Services Dinner with Bingo 5440 Marshall Rd. Thursday, Sept. 5, 4:30 - 6:30 pm Once a month Sylvania Area Family Services offers free meals provided by a community partner. Open to the public. For more information, call 419-882-8415. sylvaniaareafamilyservices.org The Local Food Show Stranahan Theater & Great Hall 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. Tuesday, Sept. 10 Noon - 1:30 pm Support your community by tasting and purchasing local food produced in northwest Ohio and the surrounding area. Hosted by the Center for Innovative Food Technology. Free. ciftinnovation.com Toledo Night Market Toledo Farmers Market 525 Market St., Toledo Saturday, Sept. 14, 6 - 11 pm Eat, drink and stroll through an open air

market at nighttime. The monthly summer events are hosted by Toledo Night Market. September features live music by 56DAZE, local food vendors, handmade items, jewelry, art and live music. Admission $5, military and seniors 55+ $3, Kids under 12 free.

Marinated tomatoes are a savory summertime side

Vibrant Vegan Soul Food Sundays 5255 Hill Ave. Sundays, 11 am - 7 pm Weekly menu includes plant-based dinners, desserts and smoothies. Order online and pick it up on Sundays, or have your order delivered to you. Personal chef services available too. vibrantvegan.net TASTINGS SofoÊs Italian Market 5400 Monroe St. Wednesdays, 5 - 7 pm Sip and sample fabulous food by Chef Frankie. Prices vary depending on wines offered. shopsofos.com Bottle Shop at MancyÊs Italian 5453 Monroe St. Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm Weekly tasting event. Pours begin at $2. bottleshopinfo@mancys.com $5 Martini Thursdays MancyÊs Italian Grill 5453 Monroe St. Aug. 22, 29 and Sept. 5 3-6 pm Savor $5 martinis and food from Mancy’s happy hour menu in the lounge. Special priced cocktails, wine and beer. Half off selected pizzas. mancy.com JosephÊs Beverage Center 4129 Talmadge Rd. Thursdays, 6 - 8 pm Enjoy a selection of wines for a nominal fee. josephswinestoretoledooh.com

Got foodie events? Email editor@yourgood.news Subscribe for the latest area news!

BY JENNIFER RUPLE

So versatile, marinated tomatoes can be enjoyed on their own, spooned over cheesy flatbread and grilled chicken, or mixed into warm pasta. Any type of small tomatoes will do, but I prefer heirloom for their flavor and array of colors. Mix up a batch and store them in a 20-ounce canning jar in the refrigerator for up to three days.

Marinated Tomatoes

1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved ¼ cup olive oil 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1-2 cloves of garlic, minced 2 tablespoons fresh basil, thinly sliced 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste In a medium bowl, add tomatoes. In a separate bowl, add remaining ingredients and whisk to combine. Pour dressing over tomatoes. Let sit for a couple of hours to allow the flavors to meld.

Marinated Tomatoes Parmesan cheese Heat oven to 400 F. Place Naan flatbreads on a baking sheet. Brush with olive oil. Sprinkle half of the shredded cheese over each bread. Top each with 1 ounce of mozzarella balls. Scatter fresh basil over each bread. Bake for 12-14 minutes or until bread becomes crispy around the edges and cheese begins to brown. Spoon marinated tomatoes over breads. Top with a sprinkling of Parmesan cheese.

Cheesy Flatbread

Makes 2 flatbreads One 8.8-ounce package of Naan flatbread Olive oil 1 cup shredded Italian cheese mix 2 ounces mini fresh mozzarella balls, halved 2 tablespoons fresh basil, thinly sliced

Cheesy Flatbread

Hundreds gather at opening of Whole Foods

419-824-0100 • editor@yourgood.news

10A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

About 700 people waited in line for the doors to open at Whole Foods Market in Toledo on Wednesday, Aug. 7. The 30,000 square-foot store, 3420 Secor Rd., features natural and organic groceries, grab-and-go prepared foods and products from local suppliers. “We’re thrilled to open our doors to the Toledo community with the opening of their new Whole Foods Market,” said Ben Moher, store team leader. “Being able to offer our customers greater access to a variety of fresh, innovative and local products is truly gratifying.” Whole Foods has 10 additional stores in Ohio. – by Jennifer Ruple


Sit back, relax and ‘Go Pantless’

By JennifeR RuPLe

It may have a whimsical name, but it’s serious business for Jessica Hopkins. In August 2017, Hopkins created Pantless Jams, a line of homemade jams that are stripped of all unnatural ingredients. Jennifer Ruple The idea for the name came about from a funny family situation. “My daughter was really excited about her baby brother who was on his way,” reminisced Hopkins. “She wanted to earn money so she could buy him things and she set up a lemonade stand outside our house. The only thing was … she didn’t have pants on! She said, ‘It doesn’t matter because no one will see me behind the table anyway,’” Hopkins laughed. Pantless Jams was a great work solution for Hopkins, who left a full-time career in banking to become a stay-at-home mom. Her husband, Tim, is her partner in the business. “He is my master fruit prepper, jam stirrer, and label sticker,” she said. The couple have two children, Makaylah, 10, and Levi, 22 months. “Levi is the whole reason the business started,” said Hopkins. “I loved my job, my clients and my coworkers. I

preservatives. Hopkins makes six unique flavors that are available year-round: Peach Orange Ginger, Black & Blue Jalapeño, Peach Strawberry Vanilla, Triple Berry (strawberry, blueberry, raspberry), Peach Mango Habanero and Grape Trio. “I roll out seasonal flavors and for special occasions. When I partnered with Holey Toledough, I made Banana Fosters to fill one of their doughnuts. I will release Carmel Apple jam in September and Cran Strawberry in November,” she said. Hopkins also offers a few flavors in her black label collection including Pineapple Cherry, Banana Fosters, and Blue Honey Lavender. “We do a lot of testing. I love to cook and throw stuff together and see what comes out,” she commented. Pantless Jams are produced in a commercial kitchen in Ottawa Lake, Mich. Hopkins spends one day a month, for now, in the kitchen at Crossroads Church. “I can make 150 jars of jam in one day, but I will probably have to go two or three days a month soon because we are selling so much,” she said. Pantless Jams are available online at pantlessjams.com. “I do deliver as long as its didn’t get the opportunity to be at home with my daughter though, so we decided it would be best for our family for me to stay home.” Hopkins became interested in making jam when her dad brought her some peaches one day and asked her to make him some jam. “I had never made jam before. I like to cook, so I thought why not? As I was looking at jam recipes, I found that there was an exuberant amount of sugar in them. I knew I could do better,” said Hopkins. With a mission to provide a delicious and healthier alternative to traditional jam, Hopkins explained, “Our product is different than grocery store products because it doesn’t have preservatives or high fructose corn syrup. I use lemon and cane sugar, which is not processed as much. I use about one quarter of the sugar of what traditional jam recipes call for,” she explained. “We strip all of that out of ours, and we still have a great tasting product.” Hopkins mentioned that she doesn’t use pectin because it can cause stomach issues for people. “You don’t need to use it to create a gel product. The process just takes a little longer. You have to heat the product to a higher temperature and cook it longer. It’s worth it because it doesn’t have all the garbage in it.” Hopkins’ products are dairy free, gluten free, nut free, vegan-friendly and never contain artificial ingredients, gels, dyes or

Lemon Tartlets in our region,” she mentioned. Hopkins also participates in the Bedford, Sylvania, Perrysburg and Oregon farmers markets and at special events. Her schedule can be found on her website and her Facebook page. What does the future hold for Pantless Jams? “Eventually we would like to do ecommerce so people can order online, and we can ship it. I am also working to partner with local restaurants. Right now, we are working on T-shirts that say 'Go Pantless,' and everyone’s loving them.” Pantless Jams are not just for toast, try them as a topping for burgers, a glaze for salmon and as a filling for desserts. Here are three ways Hopkins likes to incorporate her jams into dishes.

Jessica Hopkins 1 tablespoon heavy cream 1 /4 teaspoon vanilla extract Pinch table salt Heat oven to 425 F. Use a circle cutter and cut pie dough into rounds. Press into mini muffin tins. Bake for 15-17 minutes until crust is golden. Set aside to cool. Heat lemon juice over medium heat until hot but not boiling. In a small bowl, combine eggs and yolk. Gradually whisk in the sugar. Slowly pour hot lemon juice into the eggs. Return to pan and cook over medium heat. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until it coats the back of the spoon. Remove pan from heat and stir in butter. Once melted, stir in cream, vanilla and salt. If the curd doesn’t come together and thicken, return to heat and cook a bit longer, stirring constantly.  Stir the lemon curd into each tartlet shell. Top with dot of Blue Honey Lavender jam and garnish with a sprinkle of powdered sugar.

Black & Blue Jalapeño Burger

Prepare a burger patty your favorite way. Spread with cream cheese, Black & Blue Jalapeño jam, and crispy onion straws.

Banana fosters Toast

Toast a piece of seeded bread. Spread with peanut butter. Top with Banana Fosters jam (Banana, caramelized brown sugar, dark rum, cinnamon and nutmeg). Drizzle with local honey.

Lemon Tartlets with Blue Honey Lavender Jam Mini muffin tin Circle cookie cutter Pre-made pie crust

Black & Blue Jalepeño Burger

For the Lemon Curd: 1 /3 cup lemon juice 2 large eggs 1 egg yolk 1 /2 cup sugar 2 tablespoons chilled, unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch cubes

A variety of Pantless Jams

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 11A


FARMERS Market shoppers can find fresh fruits, vegetables, honey,

Kyle Baker of Gertie’s BBQ Sauce talks with Nancy and Mike Goettner about his products.

Tracy Stobinski and Angie White stop by the Stevens Gardens booth to check out the produce available.

Hannah Haupracht, dog Zoey, grandmother Cheryl Marckel and cousin Isabella Holston stop by Old Tyme Kettle Korn to buy a bag of popcorn.

Deb Kaltenbach of Majestic Oak Winery talks with Gina Black about the avaiilable wine selections.

Jessica Hopkins of Pantless Jams talks with customers Amelia Turner, right, and her mother, Tiffany.

Michele Robinson and her sons Spencer, Ethan and Aiden with her mother Rory Steingessler and Jennifer Rosenbrook and her son David look over the selection at Sitto Bakery.

12A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Jason LaPorte, a live looping oneman band, entertains visitors at the market. LaPorte will perform again at the market on Sept. 10 and Oct. 8.

Aiden Ashley of Boy Scout Troop 154 sells a jar of Stadium Salsa to Susan Avino.


MARKET

flowers, soaps, lotions, jewelry and much more!

Jillian Golich and her daughter, Vivienne, sample some pure maple syrup at Tom Brickley’s Brick ‘N’ Brecher booth.

Natalie and Derek Dower make some fancy paper fans with help from Becky Ransberger of the Sylvania Library.

Chloe McNear shows her jewelry to Melissa Blanc who is visiting Sylvania from Santa Rosa, Calif.

Barbara Eriksen learns about the value of goats’ milk products from Tom Kosek of Acorn Hill Farms.

Harmony in Life A Healing, Arts & Education Center

Yoga, Reiki, and Massage available at Harmony in Life

Jane Berry of Posey Jane’s selects a bunch of sunflowers for customer Sheila Schoen.

Kelly Houk stocks up on produce at the Louis Keil & Sons booth with help from Tim Keil and Tina Comstock.

The Harmony Shoppe is filled with unique gift items, many made by local artists!

5747 Main St. • 419.517.0047 www.harmonyinlifecenter.com

Angela’s Angels

Angel-Inspired Gifts & Memorials

August 19-24

Bring in an item to donate to the YWCA Women's Shelter and receive 15% off! 15 raffle items to win! One raffle ticket for each $15 spent! Donna Farnsel of Farnsel Farms helps Shirley and Rick Breitzman with their selection of tomatoes. The farm grows a wide variety of vegetables which are brought to the Sylvania Farmers Market weekly.

~ Clearance merchandise 50% - 75% off ~

419-824-4079

5774 Main Street, Sylvania angelasangelsgifts.com

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 13A


Art exhibits, live music, food trucks, games, lots of fun

Pete Diver and Sarah Best enjoy the entertainment at the corner park.

Tom and Ann Mahelas check out the art in Stellar Blooms.

Teri and Tom Walter look over the sculptures at Hudson Gallery.

Kate and Mike Fisher take time out to enjoy the evening.

David Walker stops for a DORA cup from Sodbuster to walk the Red Bird Art District with his wife, Sherry, and their son Jackson.

Jennifer Kujawa, ambassador for Noon Day Collection, shows her favorite earrings to Elissa North and her mother, Ann, at Eden Boutique.

Tim and Marty Grohnke appreciate being able to enjoy a craft beer from UpSide Brewing.

Karen Frain Beasley and Gail Brenner chat wth Cheri Rowe Stansley and her parents, Kathy and Ken Rowe, at Inside the Five during the reunion for the NV/SV classes of 1979.

Jodye Laing and her daughters Juniper, Teagan and Easley check out the offerings at the Village Candy Shoppe.

Lenny Phillips and Cindy Banyas have fun greeting friends on Main Street during the August Art Walk.

Stacey Carter and her daughter Nora along with Colleen Barnhart and Jen Linehan of Beautiful Blooms by Jen look over the recycled paper beads Margaux Ford of Bead for Life has on display.

Steve and Penny Jenkins, and Vickie Busby talk with Dawn Bonfiglio in front of J&G’s Pizza Palace.

14A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS


fill the air in the Red Bird Art District in downtown Sylvania

Diane Belinske, Mike Pfeiffer, Gary Micsko, Don Bondy and Joe Belinske enjoy having DORA cups.

Casey and Sarah Nowicki stop to chat with Barb Gramza on Main Street.

Andrew George and Will Schroder pedal around downtown on the Village Candy Shoppe surrey in their Runnells baseball shirts, promoting the exhibit at Fuller Art House.

Stefanie Schoviak and her son Luca explore all of the fishing equipment and more available at Wildwood Anglers.

Janice and Jim Heller stroll down Main Street to check out the different artists .

Jim Perlman, Kathy and Jim Sack and Diane Perlman start the August Art Walk with DORA cups.

Jeremy and Ann Davis with their daughter Mira talk with Lori Litzer at Signature Look Studio about the musical ‘Godspell’ to be presented at Northview on Aug. 22-23.

Tom Clawson plays guitar for guests in Signature Look Studio. He created the Facebook page ‘Playing tonight in Toledo’ a place where bands can advertise their venues, for which local musicians are most grateful.

L-R: Adam Wisniewski, Dave Wisniewski, Chrys Peterson and her husband, Tom Runnells, admire artist Dave Wisniewski’s painting, which is on display along with the Runnells collection.

Jim and Tammy Banachowski enjoy dinner on the Element 112 patio with her parents Judy and Lloyd Otto.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 15A


History of the Underground Railroad comes alive at the Lathrop House

Yolanda Burgess, who portrays a runaway slave with her barkless dog Shiloh, talks with Jamie and Nora Squibb, Jenna and Jocelyn Sadler and Matt Squibb about the items that are taken for the journey.

bakery and cafe

Abraham Lincoln, aka Robert Brugler, contemplates an upcoming speech he has prepared to present on the porch of the Lathrop House.

Landon and Toni Ballin hear the story of Joseph Morgan, a 1901 land owner in Mississippi, as told by his great-grandson Clark Morgan.

Larissa Lathrop, aka Patti Walcher, and her husband Lucian Lathrop, aka Bob Smith, greet guests from their porch.

Jayne Horner learns about ‘colored’ soldiers fighting in the Civil War from a regular soldier, aka Jim Procter.

Orator Fredrick Douglas, aka Michael Crutcher, is welcomed by Sue McHugh, of Heritage Sylvania.

Karlene Jaquillard learns about a soldier in the 5th United States Colored Troop Company from soldier reenactor Lee Randles.

Brielle White and her dad, Chris, play with some of the wooden toys from the mid 1800s with volunteer Cassie Tenorio.

Harriet Tubman, aka K. LaVerne Redden, greets Larissa Lathrop, aka Patti Walcher, on the path to the Lathrop House.

Patricia Nobles looks over the petticoats worn by female slaves.

419-824-0683

5758 Main St, Sylvania

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NO FRYERS ~ NO MICROWAVES ~ JUST BAKED IN GOODNESS!

Now Serving Breakfast!

SERVED MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 7:30 TO 10:30 AM

Buy 1 Breakfast Entree Get 2nd Entree *1/2 off! *of equal or lesser value Exp. 8/31/19

10% OFF Special Occasion Cakes & Catering Orders!* taken before 8/31/19

WE DELIVER • WE CATER • FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OVER $50

Got Good News? Email Editor@yourgood.news 16A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS


Angela’s Angels celebrates 15 years of business in downtown In commemoration of her 15 year business anniversary Angela Christensen of Angela’s Angels Gift Shop, 5774 Main St., is planning a week-long celebration from Aug. 19 through Aug. 23. There will be 15 percent off on purchases for those who bring in donations for the YWCA’s Battered Women’s Shelter. Donations can include gently used clothing and personal hygiene items. For every $15 spent, shoppers will receive a raffle ticket for one of the 15 items to be given away at the end of the week. In addition, all of the readers will offer 15-minute sessions for just $15 and there will be 15-minute chair massages for $15. Christensen, a spiritual intuitive, also serves as a grief guide to clients. She and Regina Elkhatib co-authored the book “FOCUS: Families of Children United in Spirit,” meant to be of help to people in times of grief. When she is not working with clients, psychic medium and spiritual life coach Katie Decker assists Christensen in the shop. In addition, reader Roxann Phillips is an Intuitive Reiki Master and Healer and also does Access Bars Healing. Francesca Breitner offers intuitive message therapy using doTERRA Essential Oils in her practice. Psychic medium Sharon Kay provides readings. New to the shop and the cadre of readers is Donna Kamann who uses the Crystalline Consciousness Technique to provide healing sessions for pets along with a transition protocol to create an energetic bridge for pets at the time of their crossing over.

“When our readers learned about our 15th anniversary celebration, they all wanted to be part of the event,” Christensen explained. Through the years, Angela’s Angels Gift Shop has been constantly evolving and growing. However, the mission to provide unique, inspirational gifts that bring hope and joy to those in need remains constant as do the many shapes and sizes of angels and angelrelated gifts for everything from joyful celebrations to memorials. There are also classes, events and open houses to educate and uplift those seeking guidance in their life. According to Christensen, there has been a growing demand for funeral gifts and keepsakes. She has also noticed an increased interest in healing stones and crystals along with doTERRA Essential oils and other spiritual items. “There seems to be a growing awareness about the benefits of these products and services,” she noted. “Each of us experiences life challenges and loss at some time or another. I am happy that we have created a place where people can find help navigating these difficulties.” No stranger to personal loss, Christensen and her husband, Mark, opened the store in October, 2004, three years after the death of their 19-year-old son Nick. Rather than letting his death define them, they made the decision to do something meaningful to help others, finding themselves refurbishing the 100-plus year old property in downtown Sylvania to create a warm and caring environment filled with angels for all those who stop by.

BY ERIKA BURI

chairman John Healey jhealey@millerdanberry.com.

Katie Delker gives Angela Christensen a helping hand in the store when she is not scheduled for readings with clients.

Former city/state legislator to speak at September SACIC meeting The Sylvania Area Community Improvement Corp. is fortunate to welcome Barbara Sears, former city and state legislator and currently a partner in the national consulting firm of Strategic Health Care, to its September meeting. The SACIC Board of Trustees will meet at noon on Sept. 11 in the Flower Hospital Conference Room. Before joining her current firm, Sears served as the Director of the Ohio Department of Medicaid, Ohio’s first cabinetlevel state Medicaid agency. She also served as Assistant Director for the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation. In this role she led high priority projects to advance Medicaid modernization and cost containment initiatives. Previously, she represented the 47th House District in the Ohio House of Representatives. While a state legislator, she served as the Majority Floor Leader, Chair of the House Insurance Committee and Chair of the Joint Medicaid Oversight Committee. Most of her legislative and policy work focused on the state’s health and human services, including Medicaid and unemployment reforms. Sears has been honored with more than two dozen ‘legislator of the year’ awards and lifetime achievement awards. She entered public service in 1997 when she was elected to Sylvania City Council. She served on city council for 10 years, the last four as President of Council and Chair of Finance. Sears has two grown sons and three grandchildren and resides in both Ohio and North Carolina. SACIC board meetings are open to SACIC members and lunch is provided. For those interested in becoming a member of the Sylvania Area CIC and joining SACIC during its quarterly meetings, membership information is available at sylvaniaareacic.org or contact membership

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 17A


Casinos Care® distributes funds to national/local charities

Greg Zilba looks over one of the kiosks with the Casinos Care apps in the in Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas. The app offers guests the option to gamble and give back to the community.

Charities and not-for-profits all over the country are benefitting from a new company, Casinos Care, based in Sylvania. The brain child of Sylvania resident Greg Zilba, the company gives participants cashing out their winnings at select casinos the opportunity to donate any change they may have won to one of the four charities designated at that facility. “Typically, each casino will have two local charities along with two nationally based organizations. People have the option of giving their change to one or splitting it between all four,” Zilba stated. Each of the charities has been vetted by Casinos Care, headquartered in Sylvania. “We have a list of criteria that each organization must meet,” Zilba reported. “Each charity that we approve needs to use 30 percent or less for overhead with 70 percent or more used for the organization’s clients. What is amazing is that we get to see the difference this process is making in the lives of people.” The idea of giving patrons the opportunity to repurpose any change they might win was a concept Zilba envisioned over seven years ago. “While I grew up in Ottawa Lake and went to Sylvania St. Joe, I found myself in Las Vegas involved in the gaming business,” he said. He continued on that career path even after returning to Sylvania. It was when his first business had to be closed, that he had his “aha” moment and the Casinos Cares initial organization was created. “The road has been long and hard,” Zilba recalled. “I had to overcome lots of hurdles and navigate many rough patches. But even though it was very discouraging at times, I knew this concept would work.” Zilba credits an “angel” investor who learned about the idea early on and made an investment, allowing the young entrepreneur the ability to persevere. “I have been very blessed on this journey,” Zilba noted. “And,

every time I would be at what I thought was the end, I would happen to meet someone or encounter another person who would point me in a helpful direction.” Finally, in 2014, Zilba connected with Everi, a gaming industry leader in technology with kiosks located in major casinos across the country. They have become the licensee of Zilba’s concept of giving gaming patrons the opportunity to donate change to local and nationwide charities. This process is now in place in those kiosks in 31 casinos in California and Nevada. Zilba anticipates that number growing and to be in every state that has casinos in the next year. However, Cosmopolitan wass the first major Las Vegas strip property to install the product. “The Cosmopolitan is proud to be the first resort on the Strip to offer what we feel is a compelling opportunity to further connect with our guests who are passionate about a cause close to their heart,” said Kevin Sweet, vice president of slot operations and marketing of The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas. “We look forward to watching this initiative grow and not only provide these organizations the much needed financial support they deserve, but to also bring brand awareness.” To date, millions of dollars have been given to charities “and we’re just scratching the surface,” Zilba said. “And even in this short time, we can see the difference this cash is making in the lives of so many people who need help. “This is what I envisioned from the very beginning and it is truly heartwarming to see this idea become reality,” he reflected. According to Zilba, an unintended consequence of Casinos Care is that the casinos are saving lots of money by not having to dispense change to individuals cashing out. “That is a real bonus,” he said.

ProMedica has named two new regional hospital presidents effective Sept. 1. Dawn Buskey has been appointed president, metro region for the Toledo area. Darrin Arquette has been promoted to Buskey’s soon-to-be-former position as president, regional acute care– Michigan and president, ProMedica Monroe Regional Hospital. In her new role as president for the metro region, Buskey will provide strategic direction for the senior hospital leadership teams at ProMedica Toledo Hospital, ProMedica Toledo Children’s Hospital, ProMedica Flower Hospital, ProMedica Bay Park Hospital and ProMedica Wildwood Orthopaedic and Spine Hospital. She has been with ProMedica for 29 years in a variety of operational and executive leadership roles in the acute care and provider settings. She spent several years in the metro region as the chief operating officer and most recently has been serving as president, regional acute care – Michigan and president, ProMedica Monroe Regional Hospital. Neeraj Kanwal, M.D., who has served as the interim president for the metro region will continue in his roles of vice president, medical

affairs of the metro region and system senior vice president, inpatient and retail pharmacy. In his new role, Darrin Arquette will provide strategic direction for the senior hospital leadership teams at ProMedica Monroe Regional Hospital, ProMedica Bixby Hospital, ProMedica Herrick Hospital, and ProMedica Coldwater Regional Hospital. Arquette has been with ProMedica for 18 years in a variety of operational and executive roles in the acute care setting and possesses systemlevel financial experience. Most recently, Arquette has been serving as senior vice president, neurosciences, and heart and vascular service lines. “ProMedica is committed to continuously providing opportunities for its leaders to share their talent and expertise across the system,” said Kevin Webb, President, Providers, Acute & Ambulatory Care at ProMedica. “Dawn, Neeraj, and Darrin are dynamic leaders with exceptional track records, and we are looking forward to the strong contributions they will make in their new roles.”

ProMedica names new leaders in northwest Ohio and southern Michigan

18A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS


New name for local favorite restaurant

Muhamed, Zane, Ali and Jaafer Ismail are excited to launch their new brand. Zane’s Lebanese Grill, formerly known as PitaSub, is the new name chosen by the Ismail sons, who have been working with their father, Zane, since the restaurant first opened 12 years ago. “People have been calling our restaurant ‘Zane’s’ since we first opened as our father is such a presence in this business,” said Ali Ismail, who has taken time off from his studies to help in the family business. “While I have completed my bachelor’s and master’s degrees, and plan to go back for additional training, right now I am so happy to be working with my dad. He is a great cook and prepares the best food, which we know is very healthy. My brothers and I are all very health conscious and this is the food we eat. This is what we serve to our customers.” Ismail continued, “He learned his cooking skills from his mother. This is what we have grown up eating. Our friends all enjoyed coming to our house and sharing meals with us and now many come to our restaurant for the same high quality food.” The younger Ismail introduced the new name during the April 5 Art Walk at Fuller Art House, where guests enjoyed samples from the restaurant. “We are going to make the change slowly and we are going to keep the ‘PitaSub’ name as a tag line as this really describes the pita sandwiches we offer. They are the size of a submarine sandwich,” Ali Ismail said.

Zane Ismail and his three sons, Muhamed, Ali and Jaafer, opened the restaurant at 5155 S. Main St. in the Southbriar Shopping Center, over 11 years ago. In 2017, the Ismails moved their restaurant to Sylvan Plaza, 4900 McCord Rd., next to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles location. “My sons are entrepreneurs and this started as a family business and continues to be,” Zane Ismail said. “Customers choose either a pita or a bowl for one price and add the rest, starting with a meat selection or grape leaves. Those include gyro, chicken, or lamb, Tawook (marinated chicken breast), Kafta (seasoned ground beef and lamb) falafel, or vegetable grape leaves. Next, they select toppings: yellow or brown rice, pickles, grilled vegetables, onions, lettuce, tomatoes, and cheese. Then they can select sauces including my homemade cucumber, my garlic, BBQ or Lebanese salsa,” he offered. Customers can also order a variety of side dishes including veggie grape leaves, hummus, fatoush salad, Greek salad, homemade yogurt and cucumber salad, meat and spinach pies, Lebanese espresso cardamom coffee, special herbal teas and smoothies, grilled pita with cheese, baked, seasoned pita chips and a variety of desserts. “We like to think this is Lebanese food with a Chipolte-style twist,” Zane Ismail chuckled.

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New Rotary President Installed

New Sylvania Rotary President Bill Sanford receives the gavel of office from outgoing President Benton Cole at a recent meeting at Highland Meadows Golf Club.

Call Sarah for your subscription 419-824-0100 YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 19A


Café Donuts new owners offer same award-winning donuts, friendly service

Eidi Family Rehabilitation Center at ProMedica’s Flower Hospital named

ProMedica is grateful for the Eidi family's support of its mission of improving the health and well-being of the community. To honor the Eidi family and their generous support for ProMedica, Flower Hospital has renamed its rehabilitation center to the Eidi Family Rehabilitation Center. Samuel Eidi, Faye Eidi, Ramy Eidi, Daniel Eidi and Joseph Eidi cut the ribbon to celebrate the renaming of the Inpatient Rehab Center to the Eidi Family Rehabilitation Center at ProMedica’s Flower Hospital on Aug. 1. ‘It’s part of our story of faith, prayer and a promise that led to an amazing opportunity to give to the community, a story that culminated in the naming of a unit, where the dedicated hands, skills and talents of a highly trained staff are used in the healing process. And now, the story continues with the hundreds of patients who will come through the doors at the Eidi Family Rehabilitation Center! Thank you to the entire ProMedica Foundation, the physicians, nurses, therapist and staff for allowing our family to be a part of something so near and dear to our heart,’ Ramy Eidi said. The Eidi Family Rehabilitation Center is comprised of nurses, therapists and unit staff, all working to heal patients and make a lasting impact on countless lives in the community.

20A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

New owners Jennifer Reams and Joey Skaff are continuing the traditions established by the former owners of Café Donuts. While Café Donuts, 5330 Monroe St., may have new owners, the award-winning donuts, fritters, croissants along with the coffee, tea and hot chocolate continue to earn rave reviews from longtime and brand new customers alike.

“Bill and Angie Vogiatzis had invested over 40 years of their life in this shop. This is more than just a donut shop. Not only did they offer high quality and delicious standard and specialty donuts, muffins, fritters and more, they were invested in each of their customers, knowing them by name, making them feel welcome and at home here. They really cared about the people who came in. They created an environment and a sense of community along with their donuts and coffee,” noted managing co-owner Jennifer Reams. She and longtime local restaurateur Joey Skaff have teamed up on the venture. “I spent over a month working along side of the Vogiatzises after we purchased the business. I saw first hand how they treated everyone with love and kindness. This was beautiful to watch. And we will continue to cultivate that kind of environment along with maintaining the high standards the Vogiatzises established.” According to Reams and Skaff, the baker who has been making these award-wining donuts and more for the past 20 years remains on staff. “He takes immense pride in what he makes and he really cares about everything he makes,” the new owners agreed. “We are so fortunate to have him working with us.” Six other people are on staff helping customers from 5:30 am to 9 pm Monday through Saturday and 6 am to 8 pm on Sunday in the donut shop that seats up to 24 people inside and another six to eight people outside at the picnic table. While all the recipes remain intact, Reams and Skaff are upping their game a bit. “We know everything is delicious but we’ve just added a few touches and tweaks here and there, making everything even better than it was. We

have added a few new lines, which seem to be doing very well,” Reams pointed out. She cites the vegan offerings including fritters, cookies and more as some of the new items that are growing in popularity. “Every new product we offer has passed our ‘taste’ test before we make it available for our customers.” In addition, Reams and Skaff are finding a growing market for donut products for weddings, showers, birthday parties and corporate events. Recently, Skaff and Reams supplied “wedding donuts,” individually decorated, which replaced wedding cake for guests, “We also have been creating several donut hole trees for corporate events,” she said. In addition, Skaff and Reams are creating donut cakes for birthdays and other special events.

Looking forward, the partners are considering opening a donut kiosk near the food court in the Franklin Park Mall. And, next spring, they plan to have a donut truck so they can bring their baked goods to various events throughout the area. Skaff said he had been thinking about opening a donut shop for some time as an adjunct business to his Star Diners, Premier Banquet facility and Premier Catering business. “This just seemed like a natural fit,” he stated. Reams had also been considering a bakery or donut shop. “I had been looking for a new career and baking has always been a part of my life. My grandmother was a baker and I learned from her,” she said. The two had been visiting donut shops around the country gathering ideas for the past couple of years and were delighted to have the opportunity to acquire Café Donuts. “This is exactly what we were hoping to have,” the two agreed. “The Vogiatzises conducted business just how my family did and how I do,” Skaff noted. “This is very important to me.”


Jakes Celebrate 65th Anniversary

Jerry and Emmy Jakes met at Cornell University and were married in upstate New York on Aug. 7, 1954. They are the parents of three. Their oldest daughter, Linda Jakes, lives in Columbus. Their son, David Jakes, and his wife, Laura, live in Sylvania and have three sons Jared, Evan and Aaron. Their daughter, Cindy Betz, and her husband, Jim, are also of Sylvania and have three children, Jess, Rae and Mike.

Bonnars Commemorate Anniversary

Welcome Newest Crown

Carter Thomas Crown was born April 15 at 3:24 am in Fairfax, Va. Carter was determined to meet Grandma and Grandpa Crown, who were visiting from Ohio, even though he wasn’t due for another six weeks. He weighed in at 4 pounds 13 ounces and was 16.5 inches long. After a brief stay in NICU, he joined mom and dad at home and is doing just fine. He is the son of Kyle and Kelly Crown of Reston, Va. His grandparents are Mary and Brad Crown of Sylvania and Teri and Tom Magennis of Madison, Wisc.

Attention ALL CRAFTERS AND VENDORS

Auxiliary FALL CRAFT SHOW SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 • 10 AM - 6 PM Joseph Diehn American Legion Post 5580 Centennial Rd, Sylvania, OH 43560 For a booth reservation form and more info contact Terry at 419-265-6099 or Connie at 517-605-2775 Proceeds will go to our Buckeye Girls State Fund to help pay for Delegate fees

Map ap Sy aple Syrup & Hon Hoo ey H ey NATUR RE’S HEALT LTH FO OOD Michael and Barbara Bonnar are celebrating 52 years of marriage. He was in the Marine Corps in 1966 and was at Camp Perry for rifle matches. One evening he and his friend went to have beverages and play pool. ‘My friend told me that there were some guys bothering some women,’ he recalled. ‘Being a young Marine and programmed that nothing could hurt me, I set my cue stick down and walked over. I asked the two young women if the men were bothering them and they said they were. I gave the men two options on leaving. They took option one and left. One of the women I assisted has been my wife for 52 years. I asked her to marry me on our third date and she said ‘yes.’ We waited until I got out of the Marine Corps to marry. We have four children, eight grandchildren, two great grandchildren and another great grandchild is on the way. We’re very blessed.’

(Cash or checks accepted - Payable to S.A.V.E. Inc.) Money helps to promote environmental education on all levels.

-

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 21A


A healthy alternative for lunch, after school, or anytime!

Festival of India celebrates culture

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Kalpana, Rhia, Prarad, Rao and Bherkai Gneaboju are looking forward to the cultural programs featured at the Festival of India.

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Sedona Seifert, Krishna Raichura, Maanya Parikh and Rohini Sen are part of the cultural show.

Ruchi Shah applies her art giving Abigail Lever a henna tattoo while Rebecca Demar waits her turn.

Shankar Reddy of Reddy’s foods & Spices helps customers Annika Oestrike, her daughter Angelina Oestrike and granddaughter Ann Lieske with grocery items.

Amber and Kevin Ferrell and their children Cora, Kate and Jake try a little bit of all of the foods available at the Festival of India.

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BY SNEHA KAMATH

The annual Festival of India was held on Sunday Aug. 11 at Centennial Terrace from 11 am to 8 pm. Contributing to the day’s expression of and education about Indian culture were dancers of various ages along with food and clothing vendors. A planning committee made up of members of the Hindu Temple of Toledo, 4336 King Rd. in

Sylvania, make this event possible. Most dance performances this year focused on specific sub-cultures of India, and all performances were followed by explanations of their significance to their respective regions. While some performers demonstrated traditional dances, such as bharatanatyam, a dance native to South India, others featured modern, Bollywoodstyle choreography


Local Agencies Share Resources

L-R: Liz Dickens, of Food for Thought, Sylvania Area Family Services Executive Director Dottie Segur and Social Service Coordinator at SAFS Chelsea Bray, host the Food Pantry Networking Social, held at Sylvania Area Family Services on Aug. 15.

Christine Hampshire, of St. Paul’s Episcopal and Mary Peavy, of ProMedica Community Care, appreciate the opportunity to share ideas with other food pantry providers at the networking event that brought providers from the area together.

‘Be Our Guest!’ is theme of dance Hannah Stagg, Sara Stagg, Alison Cole, Audrey Kandel, Sophie Bucholz, dance instructor Sally Micsko, Sophia Royer and Elli Rydman entertain their audience with a dance to ‘Be Our Guest,’ from ‘Beauty and the Beast’ on Aug. 5 at McCord Road Christian Church. The dancers practiced for their show for several weeks during the summer.

WE NOW ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS!

Polly Gerken, program director at Sophia Center, and clinical social worker Rachel Shields, also of the Sophia Center, located on the campus of Lourdes University, enjoy meeting others who serve the community.

Carrie Hamady, of Bowling Green State University, and Irene Buckenmeyer of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Sylvania, enjoy sharing resources, volunteers and knowledge to better serve their clients.

Brian McCann, a candidate for Sylvania City Council, turns in his petition to the Board of Elections.

Lyndsey Stough thanks Nick and Melissa Dallas of J&G Pizza Palace and Upside Brewing for signing her petition to be on the November ballot for Sylvania City Council.

Candidates Get Ready for Election

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 23A


A ‘Touching’ Treat

24A | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Muddy the Mud Hen meets Nolan Kujawa and his dad, Norman, at Touch-A-Truck.

Event organizers Sarah Best and Jennifer Douglas of ProMedica Heartland check out the crowd.

Thorin Barbour tries making bubbles while his sister Clara looks on.

Noah and Luke Gauchet try their hand steering a backhoe.

Aron and Sarah Stoll and their children Jeromy and Sophie wait in line to explore the police cruiser and sound the siren.

Solomon and Bria Braylock take over the cab while Richmond and Zara Braylock find places to sit nearby.

Bella McCough finds a fun seat in the shovel .

Eric Floyd looks good behind the steering wheel.

Face painter Denise Hellman does her handiwork on Logan Schwartz as his brother Jacob looks on.

Matt Theisen and his son Liam enjoy a chat with Muddonna.


SECTION B

YOUR HOMETOWN GOOD NEWS PAPER

August 20 - September 2, 2019 • Vol. 23, No. 9 • yourgood.news

School superintendent is ready for the year Jane Spurgeon has been named superintendent for the 2019-2020 school year following the resignation of Adam Fineske at the end of July. She will serve in this position for one school year as the Board of Education conducts a nationwide search for a superintendent. Spurgeon has a wealth of knowledge about the district after having held positions as a counselor, assistant principal, principal, director of human resources, and assistant superintendent in the district. She spent seven years as a junior high math and English teacher; four years as a truancy official and program coordinator; and six years as a guidance counselor before coming

to Sylvania Schools. Spurgeon says she is looking forward to the 2019-2020 school year.

What is your primary goal for this school year?

To maintain continuity within the district and to continue to move the district forward while the BOE conducts a nationwide search for the next superintendent.

What steps wil you take to achieve this goal?

I will continue to establish and build positive relationships with all community stakeholders as well as follow best practices for teaching and learning.

Search for permanent superintendent is underway Jane Spurgeon

Earlier in the summer, members of the Sylvania Board of Education noted in a district update that with change comes opportunity and the board is determined to make the most of this opening in the district leadership. “At Sylvania Schools, our deeply established roots have, for decades, helped to define our community. As an educational institution, the city’s second largest employer, and a significant driver of local real estate, Sylvania Schools is considered one of Sylvania’s most

valued assets. Even highly regarded organizations, however, need to reflect, refocus, and reset from time-to-time. For Sylvania Schools, now is one of those times. As we close in on two centuries of serving the Sylvania community, Sylvania Schools is ready for transformative leadership and educational revitalization. To achieve this, we will be conducting an extensive, in-depth search for the next superintendent of Sylvania Schools. Doing so will take time, persistence,

and a willingness to dig deep to determine who we are as a district and which direction we want to head next,” board members agreed. “Our search for a new superintendent will involve staff, students, parents and members of the greater Sylvania community. Public education affects everyone, so we want you, our community, to be with us each step of the way as we write the next chapter of the Sylvania Schools story,” board members stated.

Board Member Named

Dr. Ruslan Slutsky has been selected to fill the seat recently vacated by Stephen Rothschild. Dr. Slutsky is a professor in the Department of Teacher Education at The University of Toledo. He holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology, a master’s degree in child development and a Ph.D. in early childhood education. He has two children in the district and is involved with a variety of community and professional organizations.


A student’s wrong turn 25 years ago leads to help for thousands

Zayyan Ali from Sylvania recalls his recent mission to Guatemala with International Samaritan.

Pass It On Challenge to be held Northview high school will be part of the “Goodwill Pass it on Challenge” in September. This is a friendly competition held each week between two local high schools that battle off the field in a donation drive benefiting Goodwill Industries of Northwest Ohio. The Goodwill donation trailer will be placed at Northview and Anthony Wayne during week four of the challenge, Sept. 16 through Sept. 19. Donations can be brought beginning Monday up to the game time on Friday. Goodwill attendants will accept donations of clothing, household items, even furniture. Receipts for the tax deductible donations

will be available from the attendant. On Friday, the trailers will be weighed and the school that has collected the most weight will be announced as the winner of that week’s challenge. The winning school will receive a $500 scholarship from Goodwill and 13abc.

Sylvanian receives MBA

Travis Mulligan of Sylvania is among the 2,273 who completed associate, bachelor's or graduate degrees at Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kan., in the spring 2019 semester. Mulligan received a Master of Business Administration in finance.

On a spring day in 1994, a group of local teens from St. John’s Jesuit High School on a service trip to Guatemala found themselves lost. Traveling with their school to help renovate an orphanage, they were driving around Guatemala City and took a wrong turn. What they found changed their lives and is still transforming many lives today. The group of boys stumbled upon a massive heap of trash, as large as a mountain. But the size of the garbage pile didn’t disturb them as much as the sight of thousands of people— young and old—working, living and eating inside the dump. Discovering the famous Guatemala City garbage dump was life-altering, and like many who learn about the 15 million people living in garbage dumps around the world, the teens felt they had to do something to help. So they challenged the school’s President, Fr. Don Vettese, to take action and they began giving local presentations to solicit funding to launch a nonprofit that has since grown into an international organization with offices in Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Ethiopia. Twenty-five years later the group, now called International Samaritan (IntSam), headquartered in Ann Arbor, facilitates over 30 international mission trips annually for high school and college students, churches and other organizations. Recently, 18 juniors from St. John’s Jesuit spent 10 days in Guatemala with IntSam. The mission, which marks the 25th anniversary, was typical for International Samaritan and included work to help improve the lives of garbage dump dwellers through upkeep of schools built and funded by the organization. The teens renovated a school and interacted with students who attend with the help of scholarships from International Samaritan. They shared their experiences with IntSam leaders and funders recently at an anniversary event at SJJ honoring the 25 years of service and advocacy to raise the standard of living in garbage dump communities in developing countries. “Words cannot describe what we saw,” said Zayyan Ali, Sylvania resident and soon-to-be senior at St. John’s Jesuit, who has volunteered

for years through the school’s Christian Service Program and wants a future in medicine. “Everything revolves around the dump. The people work there, eat there, and live there. If you dig into the earth anywhere near it you find a layer of trash beneath the soil. The school we were renovating shares a wall with the dump and we even saw garbage tossed into the schoolyard. You can’t escape it.” Dump dwellers in extreme poverty resort to building shelters inside garbage dumps in order to provide a roof over their heads and feed their families. Eating decomposed food and recycling trash to earn a living is common practice for generations born into the dump, many of whom see it as an opportunity to earn a steady living. “One of the most gruesome facts we learned was that families who can’t afford to maintain gravesites for those they lost, throw their bodies into the dump,” continued Ali. “So there are vultures swarming. I will never forget when we were driving away on the bus I saw nearly 50 of them sitting there waiting for the next delivery of toxic trash, and they just looked like evil.” To fulfill its mission to help people living in garbage dump communities break out of poverty, International Samaritan works through locals in the countries it serves to organize service mission trips, medical aid missions, provide school scholarships and facilitate community investments such as construction of new schools and clinics, study areas and homes for families that come from the dump. “Almost 800 million people in the world live on less than $2 per day, which is the World Bank’s definition of extreme poverty, and the garbage dumps of developing nations can often be a way for families to break that threshold,” said Mike Tenbusch, president of International Samaritan. “I made a connection with a boy at the school,” continued Ali. “On our last day he asked if I was coming back. I told him I couldn’t and he hugged me for a long time, trying not to cry. After he left, I started crying. I knew the connection was lost. They don’t have anything digital. No way to keep it.”

Junior High Open House Schedule

McCord Monday August 26 6:30 – 8:00 pm Arbor Hills Tuesday, August 27 7 – 8:30 pm Timberstone Wednesday August 28 6:30 – 8:05 pm

High School Open House Schedule

Northview Southview

Wednesday, August 28 7 pm – 8:30 pm Thursday August 29 7 pm – 8:30 pm

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2B | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS


Golfers Are All Fore ProMedica

Todd Ansberg and Stephanie Kuhlman, co-chairs of the event, celebrate another successful year.

Barbara Baumgartner and Roger Parker visit at the ProMedica Flower Hospital Golf Outing.

Julie Kookoothie, Dasa Dzierwa and Ann Kujawa are thrilled to help raise funds for Hickman Cancer Center.

Chris Morris, David Berland, Dr. Nareej Kanwal, and Terry Benton enjoy beverages from Inside the Five.

Greg Braylock Jr., Barbara Baumgartner and Denise Benton attend the event that raised $163,000 to assist cancer patients.

Lea MacLaren and Christi Ansberg enjoy the Sylvania Country Club atmosphere on Aug. 2. –by Mary Helen Darah

Annual Triathlon Held at Olander

Todd Crandall heads to his bicycle after finishing the swim in the 39th annual triathlon held Aug. 4

Jess Whitley, Gina Bylak and Kristine Kinney cheer on the athletes as they finish swimming.

Maplewood Scouts Troop 154 members Samuel Vines, Logan Zane and Zander Hostettler, with moms Julie Hostettler and Ginny Vines, hand out waters to runners.

Claudia Johnson, her daughter-inlaw Alexis and grandchildren Gavin and Guinevere cheer on son, husband and dad Drew.

One of the event organizers, Gail Cooper, joins the Southview Cougar Soccer team before the second annual event that raises funds for Baskets of Care, held at Whiteford Valley Golf Course on Aug. 10.

The Frame team members, Emily Stechschulte, her son Tyler and husband Brad, Talli Gromes, her son Noah and husband Matt, Jack Dalton and Kim Steyer get ready to play for their second year.

Foot Golf Raises Funds

Daniel Hoehn looks on as his son practices his soccer footwork before the tournament begins.

The Robson family, Megan, Maddox, Mackston and Mark get ready for their round of foot golf.

Julia Koralewski of Team Winners talks with one of the event organizers, Gail Cooper, before play begins.

Brandon Westrick pumps up the soccer ball under the watchful eye of Nicole Mitts.

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 3B


SAFS holds annual Back 2 School backpack give-away

David Puckett and Makayla Van Drison volunteer to distribute over 300 backpacks filled with school supplies to kids living in the Sylvania School District.

L-R: Sylvania Firefighters Truck 63 Jeremy Gillen, Justin Weldon and Scott Perry welcome guests to the event held on Aug. 3, at Sylvania Area Family Services.

Kayden Keller demonstrates his strength at one of the many activities at the SAFS event.

A large crowd enjoys the familyfriendly fun at the Sylvania Area Family Services Back 2 School Event, held at SAFS.

Board members Dr. Phil Kallile and David Puckett take a break from the event that featured free school supplies, food, games, face painting and other family fun.

Jennifer Douglas and Sarah Best, both of Heartland at ProMedica, are all smiles as they volunteer at the SAFS Back 2 School Event. –Mary Helen Darah

Retirement Announced

Janet Amid’s next Celebrate The Senses Psychic Event is Sept. 2 9 , 9:30 am to 4:30 pm with doors opening at 8:30 am at The Pinnacle, 1772 Indianwood Circle, Maumee. Exit Dussel/Salisbury Road off U.S. 23 (I-475) to Arrowhead Road to Indianwood Circle. Next to Brondes Ford.

4B | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Kyrelle Johnson mans one of the outdoor game stations at the family-friendly event.

Congratulations and happy retirement to Juno, a dog of service, who owns Nancy and Paul Jomantas. Juno has served as Hospice Northwest Ohio's Perrysburg therapy dog for the past seven years, proving that often the best therapists have four legs and fur. He began his service at age two. Juno was trained through Assistance Dogs Achieving Independence, a program of The Ability Center. Juno has provided countless hours of support and comfort to not only Hospice patients but to their families and the staff of Hospice Northwest Ohio as well. The Jomantases donated his services to the facility following the death of her father, who resided at the facility during his final days. Mrs. Jomantas felt it would be a great tribute to her father who was a perpetual giver and dog lover. Juno plans on spending his days of retirement relaxing by the family's pond and watching sports with his family. In addition, the Jomantases are attempting to bond with Venus, a mischievous but lovable German Shepherd rescue that was recently adopted by the family.

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Invitations Addressed by Ability Center

Labib and Karen Hajjar, with son Nasri, Joe Pinciotti and Nick Ulrich gather at the Chop House in downtown Toledo before the Killer Queen concert, part of the 2019 ProMedica Summer Concert Series. The next concert will take place on August 23, featuring Martina McBride.

Killer Queen Brings Fans Downtown

Rita Mansour and John Zureich are excited to hear the musical talents of Killer Queen featuring Patrick Myers as Freddie Mercury.

Joe Pinciotti and Martha Vetter enjoy the sound of Killer Queen on July 19. –by Mary Helen Darah

First Methodist Church Holds Block Party

Auxiliary members from The Ability Center, bottom row: Madi Michaelson, Karen Lumm, Charlene Kuhn and Stephanie Betz; Second row: Joan Tobias, Claire Browning, Susan Mason, Diane Shull, Judi Uhrman and Cookie Westmeyer met Aug. 5 to address invitation for the organization's upcoming style show, IMAGINE! The event will be held Oct. 2 at The Pinnacle in Maumee. Fashions from Chico’s Franklin Park, Elegant Rags, Ragazza, J.Jill, Vivian Kate, and The Optical Shoppe will be featured. Sashem Brey, 13abc news anchor, will emcee the event. Money raised will support programs of The Ability Center that positively impact people living with disabilities. Programs include life skills for youth with disabilities, training and placing of assistance dogs, equipment gifting and college scholarships for local high school students. The style show is the Auxiliary to The Ability Center's major fundraiser. This year’s event chairs are Claire Browning and Karen Lumm. Tickets are sponsor level seating at $55 per person (deadline Sept. 6) and general admission seating at $40 (deadline Sept. 20.) To purchase tickets call the reservations chair, Theresa Andrews at 419-517-3130. –by Mary Helen Darah

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Barb Quiqq, Jane Butler, Darlene Porter enjoy chatting with Tom Carter.

Gary Mileham looks on as McKenna Durban, Annie Bartolommeo, Aaron Brady and Michael McCarty have a old-fashioned water balloon fight.

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Tom Rand challenges Collin Clark to a game of cornhole.

Jim Galliers and Amanda Ballard take on Ben and Aaron Brady in a competitive game of picklelball.

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 5B


JANIS WE B E R

THE MOUSE TRAP Computer Viruses

A computer virus is malware attached to another program, like a document, which can duplicate and spread but only if you open the document. Janis Weber infected There is no heads up and you cannot see that documents are infected. Many viruses are harmful, can destroy data and slow down system resources. There are more PC users than MAC users so it appears to be more rampant among them. Cybercriminals aren’t creating new viruses, instead they are focusing their efforts on more sophisticated and lucrative threats. When people talk about “getting a virus” on their computer, they usually mean some form of malware; often a computer worm. The terms “virus” and “malware” are often used interchangeably, but they’re not the same thing. While a computer virus is a type of malware, not all malware are computer viruses. A computer virus requires a program to be the host and a user to transfer it to another program. It attacks on its own, copying itself over and over. Viruses can’t spread without some sort of action from a user, like opening up an infected Word document. Worms, on the other hand, are able to spread across systems and networks on their own, making them much more prevalent and dangerous. WORMS are not viruses. It can be

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY RESOURCE CENTER

mistaken for one but there is no host, therefore it is not a virus. A worm can show up as ransomware. Worms look for a backdoor, like cyber protection software, and get into the computer. RANSOMWARE can be considered a virus. If you appear to be locked out of a file, etc. close it without paying the money demanded. Shut down and unplug your machine. Wait five minutes and cross your fingers. Do not touch anything before shutting down. A SOFTWARE VIRUS is not a virus at all. A software bug refers to a flaw or mistake in the computer code that a given software program is made up of. Software bugs can cause programs to behave in ways the software manufacturer never intended. Remember the Y2K bug that went around in 1999 exploiting computers. It was relatively minor and it’s not like we did not know it was coming. Let me give you a hint. I suggest creating a restore point once a week in your computer. It only takes 5 minutes. Once you have a good point in time where your computer is not infected, you can simply go back in time and remove the malware or virus. Click on the start button. Type “Create a Restore Point”. Follow the prompts until you see “Create A Restore Point.” Click on that. Note the box where you can type in a new name for the recovery point. Give it that day’s date. Simple huh? It will stay there forever if you need it. When activated, it cleans your computer back to the date you set it on. Do this today if your computer is running fine. It is too late if you already have an issue. Need help…let me know. Please download and run the free version of Malwarebytes. You will not be sorry.

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I Make House Calls I will come to your home or office and help you with almost any predicament including repairs, upgrades and general software or hardware issues. I can be your resident “Geek.” I have an endless amount of patience and knowledge with years of experience. Send me a text or call at 419318-9112. Don’t forget to sign up for my Free Newsletter at OhComputerTraining.com. Subscribers will get a copy of this article plus added hints, tips and trusted/valuable weblinks.

Sylvania Business Shout-Outs

I know you drive past it, but have you gone inside the renovated library? Olander Park is free and open year-round

DR. BOB ESPLIN IN THE LICK OF TIME I would like to cover some concerns I have that I feel are affecting our pets. Some of my opinions are not shared by all veterinarians, so use my points to ask questions, not to pass judgment on others. Early age spaying and neutering of both dogs and cats is coming under scrutiny because of some findings published by the veterinary school at Davis California and other institutions. Right now, the findings are only related to large breed dogs, but one can surmise smaller dogs might also be affected. Statistics show that dogs S/N before physical and sexual maturity are showing increases of hip dysplasia, ruptured cruciate ligaments of the knees, Mast Cell tumors, cancer of the lymph nodes and cancer of the spleen (hemangiosarcoma). In cats there are no published issues, but my opinion is that male cats neutered too young have an underdeveloped urinary tract which can lead to urinary blockage. I recommend to my clients that they wait for maturity before S/N or at the very minimum six months of age. With the legalization of marijuana in many states and Ohio opening dispensaries for medical use of marijuana in many forms

to Sylvania residents with ID. Swim, boat and walk the one-mile trail.

Word of the Day

NATATION = Swimming and the act of floating. “The flawless form of her natation made her a natural on the swim team.” BACK UP YOUR COMPUTER’S DATA TODAY – Critical action! Janis Weber, B.A., owner of Ohio Computer Training & Support, is a professional computer adjunct instructor. E-mail any specific questions or comments to JwPCtutor@Gmail.com or contact her for assistance at 419-318-9112. Private tutoring and repairs are just a phone call, text or email away.

one must recognize that the THC component of this potent drug can be toxic to your pet if ingested. Please use the same level of caution when using and storing any THC containing product as you would any other potent medication. On the other hand, the non-hallucinogenic component of the marijuana and hemp plant, CBD oil, has been found to be safe by researchers at Colorado State University vet school. What isn’t known is the proper doses, the conditions that benefit from the oil and its long-term effects. Many claims are made for CBD oil, but none have been scientifically validated. The use of CBD oil may well turn out to be a miracle drug or just another unregulated nutraceutical with only unscientific endorsements, like Laetrile as a cancer treatment. Dogs with a history of seizures should not take any of the available oral flea and tick products. This group of medications, known as “liners,” has been shown to trigger seizures in dogs who have had seizures. For dogs without a seizure predisposition the oral meds are safe and very effective. If you have a dog with seizures our recommendation is topical medications. Buy the brand name, not the knock-off products, as they are not equal. We have all been prescribed generic medication instead of the brand name product by our doctor. I prescribe and dispense generic medications every day for our dog and cat patients. One should know that generics are not necessarily equal to the brand name product. The generics do not go through the rigorous testing for FDA approval that the brand name product must follow. The government has stated that the generic must only be 80 percent equivalent to the brand name to be the same. ( I find that strange and disconcerting). Bioavailability is not part of the requirement for generic medications to be dispensed. We have had dogs on generic anticonvulsants that worked great but when the pharmacy dispensed a generic made by a different company the dog’s seizure reoccurred. When tested the dog did not have a therapeutic level of the medication. We try to always start with the brand name product to observe for efficacy. After this brand name trial, we can switch to generics to see if we get similar results.

Call Sarah to Subscribe 419-824-0100


CRAIG STOUGH MAYOR’S MESSAGE

Back to School in Sylvania

Yes, can you believe it? It is time to go back to school in Sylvania. The Sylvania City Schools are scheduled to open on Aug. 19 for grades 1 through 6 and Craig Stough grade 9, Aug. 20 for grades 7, 8 and 10 through 12, and Aug.26 for kindergarten. Public education is perhaps the biggest contributor to the high quality of life in Sylvania. Many families, including my own clear back in 1961, moved to Sylvania for the quality of the Sylvania City Schools. Add to that our excellent private and parochial schools, and Lourdes University, and it is clear to see education is very important to the success of Sylvania. Beginning Aug. 19, keep your eyes open for more traffic on the roads, children walking and biking to school and school buses in the neighborhoods. Keep a safe

MIKE JONES

TOWNSHIP TOPICS

Hearing date changed

For the second time, the dates for hearings on a request for a special use permit for a proposed residential care facility at 4828 Whiteford Rd. have been changed. The hearings have been postponed about a month and are currently set for Sept. 25 with the Lucas County Planning Commission and Oct. 7 with the Sylvania Township Board of Zoning Appeals. The Planning Commission meeting will be at 9 am on the first floor of Government Center in downtown Toledo. The township board of zoning appeals, which will have the final decision on the matter, will meet at 5 pm in the Sylvania Township administration building, 4927 Holland-Sylania Rd. Daryl Graus, planning and zoning manager for Sylvania Township said he was notified of the change by the county planning commission staff.

Township departments under budget at mid year

At the year’s half-way point, Sylvania Township fiscal officer David Simko told township trustees that departmental spending was below 50 percent of each department’s budgeted funds. He credited, “the work of department heads and employees within those departments for always working hard to keep expenditures down.” There are work places, he said, where budgets are passed with inflated numbers, allowing for much freer spending. Unlike those places, Simko stressed, the township is stringent in setting annual department budgets, “which means it takes effort to stay within the amounts budgeted for each year.” The revenue side of the township’s budget remains stable. It is based on levies and fees which are predictable. “But we're the ones who can control expenditures and that’s what I focus on a lot,” Simko told the trustees. Sylvania Township does not penalize departments for coming in well under budget. “In some places, when a department spends a good deal less than they had budgeted and they come back the next year with a request for about the earlier amount, they’re told they can’t have it. That they showed in the previous year

distance from all, including school buses stopped for loading and unloading. City of Sylvania street construction is winding down for the year. Two-way traffic has resumed on Sylvania Avenue giving full access to Southview High School. Final pavement surfacing and striping is not scheduled for completion until Sept. 14, but it will not obstruct school day traffic. In case you haven’t heard yet, our City Police Department has a new Community Affairs Sergeant, Sgt. Stacey Pack. She has been employed with the Sylvania Police Department for 22 years. She began her career as a patrolman, but was also a School Resource Officer at Northview High School for approximately five years and taught D.A.R.E. at Sylvania Franciscan Academy in the early 2000s. Sgt. Pack oversees her staff of two Student Resource Officers, Ptlm. Gallup at Northview and Ptlm. Beadleat Southview along with the Sylvania Schools D.A.R.E. officer Ptlm. Pooley for the elementary and middle schools located in the city. Also new this year, Sylvania Schools welcomes their new interim Superintendent, Jane Spurgeon. She previously served the district as a counselor, they didn’t need that much. That can lead to departments scrambling to spend every cent budgeted. We avoid that,” Simko added. Sylvania Township trustees, he said, have thorough budget discussions between the administration and the heads of each department. He said the annual budget, when it’s approved, is an honest look at what spending should be over the year. Through the first six months, each township department sits near the expected 50 percent of revenue. Expenditures from the general fund for the same time frame were about $791,000, or 41 percent of the amount budgeted. The road and bridge fund has spent about $860,000, only 31 percent of its annual budget. However, that percentage is certain to increase when bills are paid for summer road projects Simko said. The police department has spent a total of about $3,892,000, or 49 percent of its annual budget and the fire department has spent $4.4 million, or 48.7 percent. Simko also said that in recent years the administration and trustees been very open about finances when dealing with departments as well as unions. Although there are still disagreements, the openness has led to a spirit of cooperation which has resulted in departments and each employee watching the bottom line.

Pickup

It's time for a quick check in the basement, attic or garage by Sylvania Township residents for household items which have been sitting around broken or otherwise unused. What it's really time for is to consider putting those items at the curb or roadside on Sept. 8. The next morning, Monday, Sept. 9, crews will begin a one-time sweep of Sylvania Township streets to collect unwanted household items. Things that will be collected are bicycles, bundled books and papers, carpeting, which must be rolled and no longer than 5 ft., empty containers and drums, appliances with no refrigerants, mattresses and box springs, furniture, with furniture legs over 12 inches removed, miscellaneous items placed in disposable containers and toys. Archbold Refuse Service submitted the low bid for the work done for the annual Sylvania Township household pickup program. The bid for the job is $365 per ton of household items collected. It will be the first year for Archbold Refuse to do the pickup, but Rob Nash, township road superintendent, said he is

assistant principal, principal, director of human resources, and assistant superintendent from 2001-2016. She continued a relationship with the district as a substitute principal through the spring of 2019. She will lead the district for the 2019-

2020 school year. The first day of school is always a big day in Sylvania. We wish all students and staff a great school year. As schools reopen and we return to fall schedules, come out and enjoy all that Sylvania has to offer!

confidant the new service will do a good job. The only other bidder was Stevens Disposal & Recycling Services, which submitted a bid of $450 per ton. Stevens had won the contract for the last several years. Last year's one-time sweep through the township resulted in a collection of 120 tons, Nash noted. The service for Sylvania Township residents is scheduled this year to begin Sept. 9. In order to not be missed, it is recommended that all items should be placed at the curb or edge of the road the evening of Sept. 8.

bought from a dealership in the township. Deputy police chief Jim Rettig said the idea is that detectives don't generally need the highperformance vehicles required as patrol cars and when on surveillance assignments they don’t want an eye-catching car. “The idea is to have a couple of dependable, but kind of run-of-the-mill cars for detectives to use.” he said. Chief Rettig added that the department has already purchased one. “We gave the detectives the guidelines and told them to go shopping. After all, they’re going to be the ones using them,” he explained. After the car was selected, the department had township mechanics look at it and it was purchased. The chief said it fit what the department was looking for and should be dependable for a number of years.

Cars purchased

Sylvania Township trustees have approved the purchase of two vehicles for use by the police department's detective’s bureau. According to the resolution, each car must be at or below a purchase price of $20,000 and

Letter to the Editor

Tick Tock, Where’s My Clock? Many clients would love to hear the chiming of their clocks, but Mitchell’s Clock Shop in downtown Sylvania hasn’t been open for almost two years due to the unfortunate illness of the owner. But enough is enough! When all of us have inquired how we can obtain our long awaited possessions, the Mayor‘s office, the courts, the police

department, and several board members keep passing the buck over and over again. We are sick of being given false hope and are very disappointed in the lack of concern. Heirlooms are irreplaceable and as one elderly client put it, “My heart is sickened by the fact that I will never hear the chiming of my family’s clock again.” Kathie Donahue-Brock

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 7B


Sylvania–Then and Now BY GAYLEEN GINDY LOOKING BACK

William Detling Still on Erie Street, now crossing the street at the railroad tracks to the south side of the street, our next subject house was built in 1906 while William and Mattie Detling owned the home. Lucas County real estate records show the following owners: 1906 – William and Mattie Detling 1911 – Victor B. Halbert 1913 – Elizabeth Durfee 1925 – Lowell and Helen Hackett 1926 – William and Mary Ann Lindsey 1941 – Mary Ann Lindsey 1965 – Lula O. Lindsey 1968 – Wilson and Ruth Edwards 1976 – Ruth A. Edwards 1984 – Mark and Jill Dallas 1990 – Todd and Julie Schultz 1994 – Matthew and Nancy Sloan 1998 – William and Judith Deweed 2007 – Kevin and Jerri Carroll 2012 – Kevin P. Carroll The first owners of this home were William and Mattie Detling. He was a preacher at a local church on Summit Street, and only lived here for a short time before moving on to another church. By the 1910 census they were living in Harpersfield, Ashtabula County, Ohio, even though they still owned this home in Sylvania. The census shows they were renting a home there, so they must have been renting the Sylvania home out to someone else. Records do show that on Sept. 1, 1906 twin daughters were born while they lived in Sylvania, and one of the twins died the following year, while they still lived in Sylvania. They sold the home to Dr. Halbert in 1911. He was a doctor that had offices on the northwest

corner of Erie and Main streets. He only owned the house for a couple of years and sold it in 1913 to Elizabeth Durfee. In the 1920 census Wallace and Elizabeth Durfee were listed living in this home. Wallace was 60 years old and employed as a laborer at a creamery. His wife Elizabeth was 55 years old and immigrated to the United States in 1881 from Canada. Also living with them was John Kay, brother of Elizabeth, 49 years old, single and employed by a dairy company. The Durfees lived here until Wallace died in 1925. In 1925 Lowell and Helen Hackett purchased the home and only owned it for less than one year. During the short time they owned it, they were on a 1926 Sylvania postal carrier address list, shown as L.R. Hackett living at this address. In 1926 William and Mary Ann Lindsey bought the home and owned it until 1964. Then it went to their daughter, and then she sold it in 1968. While the Lindseys owned the home the following items were found: • A classified advertisement in the Sylvania Sentinel dated Dec. 15, 1927 reads: “FOR RENT – Two roomy stalls in new garage. Inquire at 6635 Erie Street or call on Sylvania phone 1214.” • At the 1930 census William and Mary Lindsey were listed living in the home, which was valued at $7,500. William was 68 years old – married – first married at age 25 – born in Ohio – occupation – none. Mary was listed as his wife – 49 years old – first married at age 22 years – born in Ohio. Also living in the home were: LeRoy C. Lindsey – son – single - 23 years old – occupation – clerk – railroad; Ira M. Lindsey – daughter – 19 years old – single – occupation – operator – beauty shop; Ralph B. Lindsey – son – 16 years old – attending school. • A classified advertisement listing in the Sylvania Sentinel dated Jan. 7, 1932 reads: “FOR RENT – 8 room house, modern, 4 car garage, $20 per month. Inquire William Lindsey, 6635 Erie Street.” • William Lindsey died in 1940 and this house transferred into Mary Ann’s name in 1941. • Mary Ann Cory Lindsey died in 1964 and in 1965 it transferred into their daughter’s name. Wilson and Ruth Edwards had been renting from Mary Ann Lindsey. On Jan. 7, 1957 Wilson A. Edwards was granted a sign permit from the Village of Sylvania to erect a 14-foot by 40-foot professional sign in the front of his property at 6635 Erie St. Then the Jan. 31, 1957 Sylvania Sentinel featured an advertisement for Wilson A. Edwards, selling under the name of Iffland Insurance Agency, located at 6635 Erie

8B | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

6635 Erie Street

St. This advertisement features a picture of Edwards as well. The Edwards purchased the home in 1968. The Sylvania Sentinel dated Nov. 5, 1959 reported that David Edwards, 15, son of Wilson Edwards of 6635 Erie St. was seriously injured Saturday night during an attack by four youths on South Main Street. Chief Arthur Cole of the Sylvania Police Department said that he had arrested four youths who were allegedly involved in the incident, which caused young Edwards to suffer multiple contusions and abrasions, lost eyeglasses and severe bruises. In April of 1973 Wilson Edwards obtained a zoning permit to allow Wesson Garage Builders Inc., to build a two-car detached 28 foo-wide by 22-foot-deep garage on the property. Mark and Jill Dallas purchased the home in

1984 from Ruth Edwards. They own J & G Pizza in downtown Sylvania, and Jill is my sister. We had many birthday parties and gettogethers in the backyard of this property during the six years that they lived here with their three boys. The owners after that time all appear to have lived in the home while they owned it. In August of 1998 Bill Deweed obtained a building permit to replace the awning over the side door. Al Rhodes of McCord Road did the work. In the mid November 2008 issue of the Sylvania Advantage, it was reported that Kevin Carroll, A.I.A. and principal of WestCarroll Architecture, had relocated his office to the 101-year old home at 6635 Erie St. in September of 2007. He had moved here from the Main Street Root Learning building, which Carroll designed and developed.

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YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 9B


Sylvania twirler to compete in World Baton Twirling Olympics

Alexa Bader

The 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray to debut in Sylvania The highly anticipated 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray will make an exclusive appearance at Dave White Chevrolet on Sept. 4 from 11 am to 7 pm before it officially goes on sale. This U.S. tour will give enthusiasts around the country an up-close look at the first-ever production mid-engine Corvette – offering a new standard of design, performance, technology and craftsmanship. The tour includes a hands-on look at the new Corvette as well as numerous interactive displays. At the event, vehicle specialists will

host customers interested in learning about the new mid-engine supercar, display customizable parts (seats, wheels, accessories, etc.) and teach people how to personalize their own Corvette. “This exclusive tour gives Corvette enthusiasts the opportunity to engage with the all-new 2020 Corvette Stingray in their own city before it officially hits showroom floors,” said Brian Sweeney, Chevrolet U.S. vice president. “We designed the tour with fans in mind and are thrilled for them to be some of the first to see the mid-engine Corvette at their local dealership.” This one-of-a-kind fan experience is fitting for the first-ever production mid-engine Corvette, a vehicle that invented the American sports car segment when Chevy debuted the first generation in 1953. This Next Generation builds upon, but also refines Corvette’s legacy. The tour, happening concurrently on the East and West Coasts, will stop at more than 125 select dealerships across the U.S., following the reveal, which took place in July, and runs through early 2020.

10B | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Alexa Bader of Sylvania is one of 24 members of the Saline Twirlettes Baton Twirling Team who competed in the National Baton Twirling Association’s Grand National Baton Twirling Championships recently and earned a position on the USA’s World Team 2020. Team USA will compete at the Olympics of World Baton Twirling Championships held in the Netherlands next April. The Saline Twirlettes (24-member) National’s Team clinched their spot by winning the Grand National Show Corps Championship. This is their 21st national title and consecutive year as the overall Grand National Champion. To achieve this level, the team had to win their division of Senior, Small Show Corps and then compete again to win the overall Grand National Championship. During the national title competition, the team again swept all specialty awards, including teamwork, execution, movement and production. Show corps is one of the most challenging categories because it includes choreography of baton and props with dance movements, both stationary and traveling maneuvers, creativity, a high-level of difficulty and originality. Each year, the NTBA hosts American Youth on Parade, a weeklong athletic event, featuring more than 4,500 competitors. This event, held at University of Notre Dame, attracts the best of these athletes from across the U.S. and Canada. World competitions are held every three years and Grand

National winners are invited to compete for gold medals on the world stage representing their home country. In 2017, 19 countries were represented. Only a few athletes from Michigan have earned placements on Team USA. The short list includes Saline Twirlettes’ Hanna Alvarez (2018, Norway) and Nathan Magyar (2000 England and 2006 Netherlands). Others include Gillian Brooks (2014 Italy), Moriah Muscaro Forster (2015), Stacy Leatherberry Rehmann (2003 France), Tiffany Reicosky Miller (2003 France and 2006 Netherlands). This is the first time a team from Michigan has been selected to compete in the world championships. Aside from the importance of a world qualifying year, the timing is special as the Saline Twirlettes celebrated their 50-year anniversary in December 2018. It is Saline’s longest running youth organization. Director Susan Usher said, “Despite our team attracting athletes across Michigan and even Ohio, it is important that we keep the heritage and the founding community in the name of our program.” Usher added, “Beyond twirling, team members are taught confidence, responsibility, discipline and most importantly, how to become one team.” The Saline Twirlettes National’s team representing the USA is comprised of 24 girls, ages 11-20. Twirling experience ranges from 4 -15 years. The team practices 6-12 hours weekly during the school year and 35 hours per week mid-June through July to prepare for AYOP.

Charter Hosts Wine Tasting

Charter Senior Living at Oak Openings Executive Director Sue Johnson greets Regional DIrector of Sales Donna Fisher and Regional Director of Operations Leslie Eldridge who orchestrated the wine tasting.

Memory Care Coordinator Sandy Gaietto joins Marketing Director Amy Klosterman at the event.

Judy Meyer and Lynne DeGroft enjoy the event.


YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 11B


SYLVANIA AREA CRIME REPORTS Burglary Jake Saunders, 6200 block Bonsels Pkwy, garage door kicked open; lawn equipment stolen Criminal Damaging Jill Schupp, 4800 block Woodland Lane, vehicle spray painted

Found Property 4900 block McCord, walletwith bank cards found Cadet/Dornell drives, cell phone found 5000 block Brinthaven, bicycle found

Missuse of Credit Card Michael Behan, 8200 block Sylvania, credit cards fraudulently used

William Ellis, 3400 block Fairbanks, credit cards fraudulently used

Theft Jessica Helis-Milligan, 5800 block Central, cash sent by Western Union for auto parts never delivered Chester Trail,, 3100 block KIng, fweapon stolen from vehicle American Custom Industries, 5000 block Alexis, service provided on vehicle but not paid Mary Estrada, 6800 block KristiLynne Lane, cash stolen by scam Meijer, 7200 block Central, shoes stolen Walmart, 5800 block Central, merchandise stolen Speedway, 6600 block Monroe, fountain drink stolen

Scott Succa, 5600 block Wild Ivy Ct., handguns, knives, clothing stolen from vehicle George Grossmann, 6600 block Monroe, bicycle stolen Claire Gray, 6700 block Sylvania, cash, debit cards stolen Lisa Zilba, 5500 block Sylvania, engagement ring stolen Elizabeth Jamieson, 5600 block Monroe,cash stolen by fraud Family Dollar, 5800 Whiteford, cash stolen Devine Healthcare, 5700 block Whiteford, narcotics stolen Moline Communication, 2500 block Centennial, auto batteries, trailer hitches, tools stolen Chris Urbanski, 4900 block Heather Place, PlayStation 4 stolen Five Below, 5200 block Monroe, book bags stolen Phaett Electrical, 2500 block Centennial, scrap wire, vehicle parts stolen Scott Kilmer, 3800 block Hempstead, cash stolen Melvin Eff, 5700 block Roberts, equipment stolen Kimberly Krasula, 6900 block Brint, cash stolen, auto damaged Willow Creek Salon, 5400 block Monroe, shampoo, essential oils, diffuser stolen Ali Omar Abuhaltam, 5300 block Alexis, wallet with debit, credit cars, cash stolen Michael Zeitler, 7000 block Altara, wallet with credit card, drivers license birth

certificate stolen

From the Courts OVI Brian Duck, 50 Dey, Jersey City, NJ, $375 fine, 33 days, 30 days suspended Mark Schmidt, 6839 WoodMeadow, Toledo, $375 fine, 33 days, 30 days suspended Andres Jimenez-Gonzales, 8862 Falcolm, Detroit, Mich., $375 fine, 180 days, 177 days suspended Alex Regan , 1000 Country View Lane, Toledo, $375 fine, 180 days, 174 days suspended Possession Aaron Price, 2823 Cherry, Toledo, $150 fine, 180 days suspended Kenneth Hawk, 6600 Dorr, Toledo, $150 fine, 180 days suspended Theft Amber Roach, 3127 N, Erie, Toledo, 90 days, 86 days suspended Kyla Woods, 2612 Ledyard, Toledo, $150 fine, 80 days suspended DIsorderly Conduct Jaymar Allen, 6611 Bancroft, Toledo, 30 days suspended Tara Hakeos, 26821 Lakeview, Perrysburg, $100 fine, 10 days suspended Sara Buchholdz, 625 Chatham Ct., Toledo, $150 fine, 90 days suspended Unauthorized Use of Property Tyler Johnson, 159 W. Heather, Holland, $100 fine, 10 days suspended Information is provided to Sylvania AdVantage. Sylvania AdVantage is not responsible for the contents on this page.

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Sylvania AdVantage for $26 to friends, family, neighbors, or anyone who wants to stay connected to our community! Makes a great gift, too!

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Genevieve Underwood Genevieve “Jay” Underwood, 95, passed away peacefully Aug. 7 at ProMedica Ebeid Hospice Residence in Sylvania, Ohio. She was born March 2, 1924, in Kent, Ohio, to the late John and Stefania (Zdrodowska) Kaminski. As a first generation American, Jay grew up bridging the gap between her family’s Polish origins and American culture. She spoke Polish before she spoke English and remained bilingual throughout her life. Kent, Ohio, was one of many thriving Midwest Polish communities in the great immigration wave at the turn of the last century. It provided Jay, her three siblings and parents the best substitute for the extended family left behind and for the grandparents she met in letters, but never in person. Jay studied journalism at Kent State University, and had a voice that, aside from gracing her church choirs, landed her an invitation to train in New York with one of the leading operatic voice coaches of the day. However, she chose to return to Ohio to marry and start a family with her naval veteran sweetheart, William Underwood. They spent several years in Michigan before settling in Dayton where, over the next 58 years they raised four children, six grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Bill and Jay also shared a love for history and learning about other cultures. They traveled to over 33 states and 14 countries. Throughout her life Jay continued to share her voice, singing in multiple choirs and singing groups. It wasn’t until she turned 93, that she stopped accepting requests to sing one of her favorite songs, Ave Maria, at weddings. Jay also greatly enjoyed doing crossword puzzles, watching her Cincinnati Reds and The Ohio State Buckeyes and spending time with family and friends. She especially treasured time spent with not only grandchildren and great-grandchildren but also with her many nieces, nephews and their families. She and Bill loved to entertain. She was usually in charge of these ventures which she always did with grace, style, charm and wit. As is typical of many in the Greatest Generation, she had a pragmatic perspective and incredible strength. Even in the most

difficult times she moved forward determined and without complaints, finding humor and conveying compassion for others with a quiet dignity. These qualities saw her through many health adversities and served as an inspiration to the entire family. Jay was preceded in death by her parents John and Stefania (Zdrodowska) Kaminski, her beloved husband William Underwood, three siblings and their spouses and her son Jeff Underwood. She is survived by children John (Cheri) Underwood of Sylvania, OH, Patricia (Casimir Eitner) Underwood of Castleton, VA , Nancy (Rob Caplan) Underwood of Nipomo, CA, six grandchildren, seven greatgrandchildren and numerous beloved nieces and nephews. We were all blessed to have known her. She will be greatly missed. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Save the Music at crowdrise.com/ donate/project/save-the-music-in-memoryof/vh1savethemusic/0?utm_source=Web&ut m_medium=STM+Site+new+&utm_campaig n=blogpost+Memorial+Giving+. Online condolences may be made at walkerfuneralhomes.com.

to the United States as his bride. Karl and Raymonde enjoyed 72 years together in a marriage built on Christian principles, respect, honor, support and, most importantly, unwavering love for each other. Karl’s life was centered on his family and his church, and was a dedicated Gideon. Karl is survived by his loving wife of 72 years, Raymonde, daughters Chantal Oblander, Michelle Lepiarz and son Steve (Mary Beth) Alberti. Karl will be dearly missed by

grandchildren Eric Oblander, Stephanie, John, and Kimberly Lepiarz, and Alex, Lauren and Jack Alberti and great-grandchildren Miles Oblander, Hayley Bench and Skylar Lepiarz. He is also survived by his brother John Robert Alberti, sister Suzanne Meyer, and many nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donors can consider contributions to King of Glory Lutheran Church. Online condolences to reebfuneralhome.com.

Karl Alberti

Karl K. Alberti passed away July 28, 2019, surrounded by his loving family. Karl was born Nov. 5, 1920, to Karl W and Ruth (MacElphatrick) Alberti in Toledo. He graduated from Libbey High School in 1938 and was a member of the National Honor Society. Upon graduation, Karl and his grandfather Max Benkow started the Findlay Glass Company in Findlay, Ohio. After selling his interests in the company, Karl joined Libbey Owens Ford Glass Company in 1953 serving in several management positions completing 25 years of service. Karl proudly served in the European Theatre during World War II as a staff sergeant in the Ordinance Division of the United States Army Air Corps. Those who were fortunate enough, heard many stories about his time in the war and Karl’s fond memories of England and, most importantly, France. It was in France that Karl met Mademoiselle Raymonde Chopin at a local dance outside of Paris. The two corresponded (though both needed interpreters) and a true love story blossomed. The next time Karl visited France was to marry his pretty little French girl and bring her back

W ORSHIP D IRECTORY

Christ Presbyterian Church

Epworth United Methodist Church

Times of Service: 8 a.m. Chapel • 10 a.m. Sanctuary

Times of Service: Sundays, 8:30, 9:45, and 11 a.m.

Tired of Sugar Coating?

St. Stephen Lutheran Church

4225 Sylvania

(corner of Sylvania and Talmadge)

419-475-8629 cpctoledo.org

Try our bible study Good Stuff, No Fluff! Bible Study This Wednesday 7 pm

Flanders Rd Church of Christ

5130 Flanders Rd • Toledo, Ohio 43623 flandersrdchurchofchrist.com

4855 W. Central 419-531-4236

Details at epworth.com

7800 Erie, Sylvania, Ohio 419-885-1551 Times of Service:

8:30 a.m. Traditional 11 a.m. Contemporary

ststephenlutheran.church

St. Michael’s In The Hills Episcopal Church 4718 Brittany 419-531-1616

Times of Service: Sundays, 8 a.m. and 9:45 a.m. lovelearnserve.org

Zion Lutheran Church

8307 Memorial Hwy., Ottawa Lake, Michigan 49267 734-856-2921

Times of Service, Winter Schedule Adult Bible Study @ 9 a.m. Sunday School @ 9 a.m. Worship Service @ 10 a.m. Winter Hours begin Sept. 10 

Want to publicize your worship services and activities? Contact Sylvania AdVantage for more info! 419-824-0100 or ads@yourgood.news

YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 13B


NEW PRICE! LUXURY ONE-OWNER HOME

HALF ACRE IN BENTBROOK FARMS

COME HOME TO SLEEPY HOLLOW

3531 Southpoint Rd. ~ $869,000 Sylvania Twp. Berman built 5588 sq. . 5 BR 4 full 2 half BA home in Wildewood off Corey Rd. Outstanding quality throughout! Open floor plan. Gourmet island kitchen, 1st floor master. Finished bsmnt. Too many extras to list!  Call, text or email for details! Marcia Rubini, 419/870-2009 RE/MAX Preferred Associates

5303 Bainbridge Rd. ~ $267,000 Beresky built 4 bed, 2.5 bath w/ just over 3,000sf of living space. Beautifully situated on a lushly landscaped half acre lot in one of the area’s most desirable neighborhoods. Sweet sunroom addition. Rear-load garage. Finished basement. Possession at closing. Brad Crown – Realtorman 419/467-7070 RE/MAX Central Group

5504 Bent Oak Rd. ~ $299,000 Cross the covered bridge and come home to Sleepy Hollow. Plenty of room to roam in this 3,300sf, 6 bed, 3.5 bath custom built beauty. Glistening hardwood floors throughout the main level. Eat-in kitchen has solid surface counter tops. First floor master. Brad Crown – Realtorman 419/467-7070 RE/MAX Central Group

BEAUTIFUL COLONIAL STYLE HOME

Find Us On Facebook!

Gary A. Micsko

CCIM Senior Associate Industrial Properties

CALL ME ABOUT MY AREA COMMERCIAL LISTINGS

For more information on area listings, visit rkgcommercial.com or call 419.290.8644

Sylvania AdVantage Newspaper

Beautiful 4 BR, 2 full BA, 2 half BA, 2 story home near Adrian, Lenawee County MI. 2,700+ sq., modern kitchen, all appliances, family rm w/built-in cherry cabinets, fireplace, formal DR, LR, lg 2nd flr master w/dressing area, gorgeous bathroom w/jacuzzi tub, large walk-in shower & walk-in closet. House wired for generator, surround sound, 1st flr laundry, 2 car attached garage, finished bsmnt w/office & 27 x 12 rec rm w/cherry cabinetry, sprinkler system, central air, 36 x 16 inground pool & pool house surrounded by vinyl-fenced yard. $349,900 Call Diana at Faust Real Estate, LLC 517-270-3646

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1-877-697-7223

LOAD IT. MOVE IT. STORE IT. INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION MICHIGAN & OHIO SIDE LIFTER DRAYAGE SERVICES

Realtors: Advertise your listings here!

419/824-0100 ads@yourgood.news

LOOKING FOR CLASS “A” OFFICE SPACE? LIBERTY SQUARE BUILDINGS I, II & III AFFORDABLE OFFICES FOR LEASE

Liberty Square Buildings 1, 2, 3

4149, 4159 & 4169 N. Holland-Sylvania Sylvania Twp.

Monthly rent includes: * Water, gas & electric * Janitorial service * Conference rooms * Storage space

*Beautiful Landscaping *Backyard Pergola *Spacious Parking lot *Friendly Staff

Check out the space available on officespace.com

Liberty Square Partners, LLC. • Bobbie Ziviski – (419) 885-1988 libertysquare123@gmail.com

NEW PRICE $497,750

14B | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS


SERVICES

HELP WANTED Residential House Cleaner 24 years experience; good references Call me at 1-619-370-7324

PesT COnTrOl Ants, Termites, Bed Bugs, Mice, Box Elders, Bee/Wasps

TOM’s PesT COnTrOl Holland, Ohio

419/868-8700

Hurley’s PaInTInG interior/exterior • Paper removal deck Staining Quality Work • reasonable Prices Free esTIMaTes Call 419/882-6753 CLEANINg SERvICES PROvIdEd More than 25 years experience providing high quality performance with a conscientious attitude. goal oriented to dependability & thoroughness. references provided upon request. Please call Tammy @ 419-882-8258

BANK CREdIT ANALyST Metamora State Bank is seeing applicants for a Credit analyst for our Sylvania office. e Credit analyst will support the loan officers by providing credit investigations, financial statements by utilizing internal and external technology, and preparing credit write-ups for diversified types of loans. ese loans include construction, agricultural, commercial, and commercial real estate loans. 2-3 years of previous credit analysis experience required. equal opportunity employer Please email resume to kmossing@metamorabank.com  or by mail to Metamora State Bank, 8282 Erie St., Sylvania, Ohio, 43560

www.citytermiteandpest.com SERVICES Cleaning ServiCeS Provided orough and reliable. over 30 years experience. available every other ursday. references available on request. Call Susan at 419-517-3331

brG PaInT & WallPaPer Painting - Paper Removal - Wall Repair Wallpapering since 1986 References - Insured - Reliable Free Estimates brian 419-297-9686

baTHrOOM/KITCHen InsTallers needed! TOP Pay, Paid Weekly. No Material Costs! Schedule Flexibility. Join a Winning Team! Call 1-844-arnolds or email your resume to ahijobs@yahoo.com

TREE TRIMMINg & SMALL TREE REMOvALS over 30 years experience offering high quality performance with a conscientious attitude. Mention this ad to receive a 10% discount. Please ask for Jeff e Tree Specialist 419-882-8258 or 419-810-1034

BOOTH RENTAL BOOTH RENTAL For hair stylists at Sheer Perfection Hair Studio, 6381 Monroe St. Call Pam at 419-517-4774 or 419-266-2780

Sylvania Area Family Services Strengthening Sylvania, One Family at a Time

5440 Marshall Road • Sylvania, Ohio (419) 882-8415

BOOKKEEPER Part time - 20 - 25 hours weekly. Familiar with Peachtree and Microso Works. West Toledo and Sylvania area!!  Send resume to parttimeacct29@gmail.com SERvERS Part time servers with friendly smiles wanted for morning breakfast and aernoon lunch shis. Flexible hours. great working environment. Please call 419-824-0683 to schedule an interview SALES ASSOCIATE Foot Solutions is looking for sales help, full or part time in our retail store. We sell foot healthy shoes and orthotics and help alleviate foot pain. outgoing, polite candidates who can offer excellent customer service will be considered. Training provided. is a great learning opportunity for students. retired surgeon and Certified Pedorthist on staff. Please call 419-214-3668 or email toledo @footsolutions.com and include your resume

BARN SALE barn sale 16223 state Hwy. 64 Metamora, Ohio Friday, Aug. 23 • Saturday, Aug. 24 9 am - ?? Leovers from estate... Crasman Tool Chest Misc. Tools Pressure Tank Shop vac electronics Medical Supplies Furniture Housewares Men’s/Women’s Clothing Jewelry

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419-824-0100 • ads@yourgood.news YOURGOOD.NEWS | MID AUGUST 2019 | 15B


Sylvania Lions entertain, enlighten prospective new members

Sylvania Lion Jan Tidd shares details on the upcoming Sylvania Lions Club Designer Purse Bingo event that will be held on Oct. 17 at the Elks Club on Holland-Sylvania Rd.

Carol Collins, a member of the Sylvania Lions Club, shares the many service projects the organization does annually with prospective members.

Clockwise L-R: McComb, Ohio Lion and zone chairman, Deb Crawford, visits with Sylvania Lions Ellice Niejaklik and Jan Tidd and guests Sarah Gschwind and Rose Burk, of GenoaBank, during the Sylvania Lions Club New Member Picnic held at Burnham Park on Aug. 14. The park is also the sight of a future Sylvania Lions Club fountain that will be installed in September.

Past president of Sylvania Lions Club, Daniel Miller, catches up with fellow Sylvania Lion Dr. John Kruszewski at the event hosted by the Sylvania Lions.

16B | MID AUGUST 2019 | YOURGOOD.NEWS

Daniel Miller is served by Sylvania Lions Club president Jim Collins at the event that included fun, food and fellowship.

Recently retired Deb Chany enjoys her membership with the Sylvania Lions that keeps her connected to the community and allows her numerous opportunities to serve.

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Sylvania AdVantage Mid August 2019  

We believe a positive outlook is power against the barrage of negativity all around us and makes for upbeat living while offering cohesive s...

Sylvania AdVantage Mid August 2019  

We believe a positive outlook is power against the barrage of negativity all around us and makes for upbeat living while offering cohesive s...

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