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SURF LIFE S AVING AUS TR A LI A

Annual Report 2017–18


Contents S E C T I O N 01

SECTION 05

04

74

Introduction

Awards & Honours

SECTION 02

SECTION 06

20

92

SLSA Operations

Statistical Summaries

SECTION 03

SEC TION 07

48

108

Governance & Oversight

Surf Life Saving Entities

SECTION 04

SECTION 08

62

115

Financial Report

Glossary of Terms


S E C T I O N 01

Introduction


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

INTRODUCTION

President’s Report

Our thanks go to the Federal Government for their positive support and funding of our Surf Life Saving movement, and we particularly thank the co-chairs of the PFSLS, the Hon. Sarah Henderson MP and the Hon. Matt Thistlethwaite MP.

CO R P O R AT E PA R T N E R S H I P S

O

n behalf of Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) I congratulate our state and territory entities, 17 branches, 314 surf clubs, and 173,865 volunteer members for your commitment to water safety, drowning prevention and saving lives in Australia. It’s exciting to see that our membership has surpassed 170,000 for the first time in our history, achieving growth of 3% over the previous season. In the past twelve months, our 48,371 proficient surf lifesavers, 67 Australian Lifeguard Services and 83 Support Operations undertook 10,249 rescues, 65,296 first aid treatments and more than 1.5 million preventative actions around the Australian coastline and our volunteers dedicated 1.37 million patrol hours, which is extraordinary and why Surf Life Saving is so highly valued and respected by both our members and the Australian community.

F E D E R A L G OV E R N M E N T In May 2018, the Federal Government signed off on a multi-year Water Safety Funding agreement worth $36.9M of which SLSA will be one of the main beneficiaries. This agreement simplifies

our federal funding, replacing four individual programs: the National Recreation Safety Program, Saving Lives in the Water Program, the Beach Drowning Black Spot Reduction Program and the Beach Safety Equipment Fund and provides welcome funding certainty for our states, territory and clubs. We also negotiated and signed a new Vocational Education Funding agreement worth $10M over three years to make the lives of our volunteer trainers and assessors easier. Our engagement through the Federal Government Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving (PFSLS) and presentation of our National Rescue of the Month at Parliament House in Canberra has lifted the profile of Surf Life Saving nationally. The Government also supported the release of our National Coastal Safety Report in December 2017 with the Health and Sport Minister Greg Hunt lending his personal support. Although we received $1M over four years to replace outboard motors to meet the new clean air emission requirements, there is more work to be done with government to better outline the needs of our IRB rescue operations.

The SLSA partnership team has done an outstanding job this year delivering an ROI of 29:1. We acknowledge and thank them for this achievement. In addition to our existing major partnerships, we also secured SLSA’s first new major partnership in 15 years. This year saw SLSA enter its 43rd year of partnership with Westpac. We were delighted to renew our contract for a further five years covering our national helicopter operations. And, we negotiated a new three year, agreement with Holden Australia. In addition to providing much-needed funding for our operations, Holden also generously offer discounted pricing for members. This year we have negotiated the renewal of the DHL contract for three years commencing 1 September 2018. We thank DHL for their continuous support and extraordinary 15-year partnership. 2018 also saw us renew agreements with our other valued partners: BRP, Dulux, Finz and Kellogg with a number of other new business opportunities in the pipeline. On behalf of SLSA, thanks go to all our valued partners who we are very proud to have as part of the Surf Life Saving family.

SURF LIFE SAVING FOUNDATION The Surf Life Saving Foundation (SLS Foundation) Fundraising MOU has been renewed for three years, and the SLS Foundation continues to deliver a minimum guarantee and net surplus distribution to the state and territory entities. The SLS Foundation is looking


Section 01: Introduction

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at new fundraising channels using digital strategies and multi-layered product offerings for commercial activities. The Grant Seeking Unit (GSU) has hit a major milestone securing $20M in grants for Surf Life Saving entities since its inception in 2010 and over $4.8M in grants the past year. SLSA invested additional funds into the SLS Foundation to support an “Invest to Grow� strategy to support the advancement of their philanthropic programs. Our congratulations and thanks go to the SLS Foundation Chair Martin Walsh, Board, leadership and management teams on a great result for Surf Life Saving.

F I N A N C I A L R E S U LT Thanks go to the SLSA Finance team, Finance Audit and Compliance Chair Mike Martin AM and Committee who gave sound advice and oversight to the SLSA Board on group finances, compliance and risk. We are on track to establish a Corpus Fund of more than $20M by 2020 to ensure the future financial sustainability of SLSA. We successfully completed the divestment of Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd (Northern) which saw the distribution of funds to 18 surf clubs in the Northern flight path, and we have also de-risked the Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd (Southern). We thank the Chair of Northern, Warren Tozer OAM and Chairs of Southern, Dave Owens and Peter George AM and their respective Boards and Management Teams for their dedication and commitment.

ICT UPGR ADE The SLSA Board committed to and invested funds into an upgrade of the SLSA IT infrastructure and systems, and the project is on scope, on time and on budget. This project will see tangible benefits and outcomes for all Surf Life Saving entities.

MEMBERSHIP The SLSA Board is totally committed to making the lives of our volunteers easier. The ICT upgrade will contribute to this with a new Patrol Operations App, Skills Maintenance and Assessor Apps as well as

an improved Members Area interface and improvements to Surfguard. The SLSA Board, with the support of our in-house legal counsel, implemented significant changes to our policies and regulations that saw 51 policies and regulations collapsed or removed to 21, and also reduced 14 categories of membership to five and saw the creation of a Community Membership class which provides an opportunity for surf clubs to better engage with their local communities. The SLSA Board fully supports the Safeguarding Children and Young People Program which is being rolled out into the states and territory entities, reinforcing our commitment to zero tolerance as an organisation in this area. It is sad to reflect on the number of Life Members who passed during the year, real legends of Surf Life Saving. On behalf of the SLSA Board, we pay our respects to their families and thank and acknowledge them for their extraordinary dedication, passion and commitment to making this great organisation what it is today. To our Life Governor Alan Whelpton AO and current Life Members of SLSA, thank you for your continued support and sound counsel.

removal of duplication and delivering efficiency and greater organisational effectiveness across the movement. To our outgoing CEO, Melissa King, who was in the SLSA Leadership Team for five years, we thank her for her outstanding contribution to the betterment of our organisation, and we wish her every success in the future. To the EMG, senior leadership and management teams at SLSA, we thank you for your commitment and dedication to our great organisation. To SLSA Deputy President John Baker ESM and fellow SLSA Board members, thank you for your support and sound counsel. To you, and indeed to all members, it is an honour and absolute pleasure to be your President. On a personal note, I thank my wife, and fellow patrol member, Trish and the rest of my family for supporting me in my endeavours to do the best I can for an organisation to which I am so passionately committed. I am very excited about the future of our great organisation and look forward to the opportunity to further engage with our membership and contribute to the development of the Beyond 2020 SLSA Strategic Plan.

SLSA TEAM

Yours in Surf Life Saving,

At SLSA we welcomed a new CEO in Adam Weir who brings a wealth of knowledge, experience and talent to the role. Adam has positively engaged the Executive Management Group (EMG) and has already taken on the mantra of shared services,

Graham Ford AM President Surf Life Saving Australia


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

INTRODUCTION

Who we are

S

urf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) is Australia’s peak coastal water safety, drowning prevention and rescue authority. With 173,865 volunteer members and 314 affiliated Surf Life Saving Clubs (SLSCs), SLSA represents the largest volunteer movement of its kind in Australia. Since Surf Life Saving was established in 1907 over 660,000 lives have been saved. In 2017/18 our Surf Life Saving active members were involved in 10,249 rescues, 65,296 first aid treatments and more than 1.5 million preventative actions. Surf Life Saving volunteers carried out more than 1.37 million patrol hours. Surf Life Saving is a unique not-forprofit community cause that exists through community donations, fundraising, corporate sponsorship and government grants.

WHY WE EXIST—OUR MISSION Surf Life Saving exists to save lives, create great Australians and build better communities. Australia and its related islands have over 11,500 beaches dispersed along more than 50,000km of coastline and attracts an estimated 300 million visitations annually. Despite significant advancements in technology, techniques and knowledge, people still drown on the coast in unacceptable numbers. The vision of Surf Life Saving is zero preventable deaths in Australian waters and we are committed to further reducing the number of coastal drowning deaths.

WHAT WE DO The Surf Life Saving movement creates a safe environment on and off Australian beaches through a range of support operations. These operations include: 24/7 emergency response groups, rescue helicopter services, jet rescue boats,

offshore rescue boats, rescue water craft, surveillance systems, radio control and coordination centres, and volunteer lifesaving services. Surf Life Saving, through the state and territory centres, operates the Australian Lifeguard Service, the country’s largest lifeguard service, providing essential lifesaving services to local government and other coastal land managers.

OUR STRATEGIES SLSA has developed a strategic plan that will guide the Surf Life Saving movement through to the year 2020. The focus of the 2020 Strategic Plan is to further build the capacity and capability of the movement to save lives, create great Australians and build better communities. The four pillars of strategic intent we pursue to achieve our mission are: 1. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs 2. Develop our people 3. Ensure a relevant and growing movement 4. Engage the community to participate and donate.

OUR STAKEHOLDERS Our principal stakeholders are those who use the Australian coastline, and those who are directly or indirectly impacted by our actions.

COMMUNITY • Members: SLSA has a duty of care to protect its members as they carry out their duties on and off the beach • Potential members: The organisation depends on new recruits to maintain and increase lifesaving services • Beach-going community: SLSA communicates with the community via a variety of different programs and channels, including public advertising and awareness campaigns and the

distribution of educational resources • Donors: SLSA communicates to our donors, the Guardians of the Surf regularly through the SLS Foundation.

GOVERNMENT • Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving (Federal): SLSA invites members to participate in quarterly updates outlining Surf Life Saving’s key issues and activities • Australian Government departments and agencies: SLSA relies on support from the following Australian Government departments and agencies for a number of our programs • Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet • Australian Sports Commission • Department of Health • Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade • Department of the Environment and Energy • Department of Vocational Education and Training


Section 01: Introduction

• Other levels of government: • State centres have direct relationships with state governments, while our clubs liaise with their relevant local government • For particular activities, namely national sporting events, SLSA will form a relationship with state and local government • Parliamentarians: In order to strengthen the reputation of the organisation we engage in proactive advocacy with elected members of parliament, particularly those representing coastal seats.

CORPORATE • Corporate Partners: The majority of our programs are funded by a number of corporate partners. We also actively seek new partners to ensure the long term sustainability of the movement. SLSA encourages all Australian corporates to include Surf Life Saving in their Workplace Giving Program.

INTERNAL • State and territory centres: state and territory centres represent our members on the SLSA Board. SLSA have regular contact with our owners through Board meetings and other forums. • Staff.

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FUNDING As a community cause, SLSA relies on the Australian Government, corporate partners and donors to fund the majority of its activities. One third of the parent entity’s funding comes from the Federal Government. The remaining two thirds is secured via national corporate partners, licensing and fees for competitions. The SLS Foundation actively conducts fundraising around Australia on behalf of SLSA and our state centres while SLSCs also conduct their own fundraising activities. To support their lifesaving activities, the state centres (which report separately) are engaged in commercial activities such as education, training and the provision of contract lifeguard services to local government and other land managers.

STATUTORY OBLIGATIONS AND OVERSIGHT SLSA is a company limited by guarantee under the Corporations Act 2001 (Commonwealth). The SLS Foundation operates under the charitable fundraising legislation in each of the states and territories it is registered. SLSA is also a registered charitable institution under the NSW Charitable Fundraising Act1991 (NSW).

“IN 2017/18 OUR SURF LIFE SAVING ACTIVE MEMBERS WERE INVOLVED IN 10,249 RESCUES, 65,296 FIRST AID TREATMENTS AND OVER 1.5 MILLION PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS.”

ABOUT THIS REPORT This is the Annual Report of Surf Life Saving Australia Ltd. The Surf Life Saving movement is made up of 493 separate legal entities, including state centres, clubs, branches and support operations. The financial accounts of these entities, whose relationship with SLSA Ltd is further described in section four, are not consolidated here. However, the activities and achievements of all Australian surf lifesavers are consolidated and reported.

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Notice is given of the Annual General Meeting of SLSA Ltd. The meeting will be held on Friday 26 October 2018 at SLSA’s Office, Surf House at Bondi Icebergs. All SLSA members are welcome to attend.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual AnnualReport Report2017–18 2018

INTRODUCTION

Highlights

10,249 FIRST AID TREATMENTS

1,529,494 PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS

61,604

VOLUNTEER HOURS ON PATROL

MEMBERS 6,458

377 MISSIONS MEMBERS ENROLLED IN ELEARNING

MEDALLIONS

4,562,858 SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

AUSSIES COMPETITORS

$28.8 MILLION CONTRIBUTIONS TO SURF LIFE SAVING ENTITIES


Section 01: Introduction

11

INTRODUCTION

Surf Life Saving 2020 Strategic Plan

VISION Zero preventable deaths in Australian waters.

MISSION We save lives, create great Australians and build better communities.

Surf Life Saving Strategic Plan Goals 1. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs

2. Develop our people

3. Ensure a relevant & growing movement

4. Engage the community to participate & donate

2.1 Provide and promote the opportunities and pathways in Surf Life Saving to motivate our members 2.2 Provide ongoing leadership opportunities to our people 2.3 Provide efficient, relevant and flexible learning opportunities 2.4 Develop our participation initiatives, including surf sports 2.5 Provide opportunities for our members to participate in activities, including through ILS.

3.1 Protect, manage and promote the Surf Life Saving brand to drive internal and external support 3.2 Utilise evidence-based research to inform development and implementation of safe practices 3.3 Develop effective strategic and operational alignment across all levels 3.4 Ensure sound environment practices at all levels 3.5 Implement efficiencies across the movement 3.6 Understand community expectations of involvement via engagement.

4.1 Promote and celebrate Surf Life Saving’s positive contribution to Australian society 4.2 Promote Surf Life Saving as an organisation in need 4.3 Provide opportunities and encourage community, corporate partners and stakeholders to actively participate in SLS 4.4 Grow revenue from corporate partners and government sectors 4.5 Proactively and transparently communicate how all funds raised are used.

• S urf Life Saving IP protected through application of existing IP legislation for unauthorised use • Liquidity ratio remains positive • State entities sign and participate in memorandum of understanding (MOU) agreeing fundraising and national corporate partnership parameters • Surf Life Saving strategic plans are aligned at national, state and club level. • National and state risk and compliance registers are current and reported • Safety of our people remains first and foremost.

• Non-government revenue increases annually -- National community fund raising campaign secures $1M/annum by 2020 -- Annual increase in nongovernment revenue of up to 5 per cent per year -- Surf Life Saving donors increase by 3 per cent annually • SLSA reports on distribution of funds transparently across the movement annually through owned and earned channels • Brand awareness and economic impact increases annually.

Strategies 1.1 Optimise our resources to always be ‘rescue ready’ 1.2 Apply evidence-based research to determine community water safety requirement 1.3 Enhance and integrate coastal risk management systems 1.4 Promote SLSA as the peak coastal water safety body 1.5 Incorporate Surf Life Saving services into the local, state and national emergency management systems 1.6 Support ILS development activities, particularly through the Asia–Pacific region.

Success Factors • No drowning deaths between the • Learning opportunities equip red and yellow flags our people with the skill set to • Community needs quantified support the achievement of through Total Service Plan (TSP) our vision • Coastal drowning in Australia • Surf Life Saving has a reduced by 50 per cent by 2020 participation pathway • Service delivery measured with that generates sustained delivery reflecting need membership levels to support • All state entities are included community outcomes in state/territory emergency • Boards/senior management at management systems. the national, state, branch and club levels are representative of the movement and community make-up e.g., Gender and CALD.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

INTRODUCTION

Scorecard

1. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

1.1 Optimise our resources to always be rescue ready.

• Finalised a ‘one-specification’ for Inflatable Rescue Boats (IRB) • Undertook further research of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for use in surf lifesaving activities • Progressed development of the Surf Risk Rating program for use by Surf Sport • Delivered the Beach Safety Equipment Fund • Delivered the Beach Drowning Black Spot Reduction program • Delivery of the BRP Powercraft Equipment Grant Program • Patrol Ops app developed and put in place for commencement of season • Finalise deregistration of Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service • Reviewed Total Service Plan (TSP) and its alignment with the National Coastal Safety Report.

• Progress transition of Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service • Continue research around PPE within Surf Life Saving activities • Development of Surf Risk Rating app for use for Surf Sports but potentially for other lifesaving uses • SurfCom systems updated to meet Surf Life Saving service which is inclusive of Patrol Ops app • Deliver the Beach Safety Equipment Fund • Deliver the Beach Drowning Black Spot Reduction Program • Review of first aid kits • Evaluation of equipment to enhance and deliver Surf Life Saving services.

1.2 Apply evidence-based research to determine community water safety requirement.

• Conducted research into participation, risk perception and behaviour to coastal activity, with evidence used to shape reports and initiatives • Developed the National Coastal Safety Report, highlighting key areas to be addressed for drowning prevention • Evidence based research undertaken to deliver a Total Service Plan • Delivery of the ‘Facts about Rips’ campaign from evidence based and behavioural research • Participation in Australian Water Safety Council forums and symposiums • Conducted a forum for shark activity with Taronga Zoo, CSIRO and Flinders University to develop guidelines for shark safety and for further collaboration around research • Established a partnership with Royal Life Saving Society Australia for research into Non-Fatal Drowning in Australia, with report delivered at a national non-fatal drowning symposium/ workshop.

• Undertake research to provide an evidence base to deliver the TSP • Expand the TSP to incorporate other types of coastal fatalities • Risk Management/Health and Safety training to be completed by key personnel to enable SLSA to support improvements in member safety • Conduct research in to ‘bystander rescue’ to determine issues and preventative measures.


Section 01: Introduction

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1. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

1.3 Enhance and integrate coastal risk management systems.

• Applications developed for use in sport and lifesaving purposes including BeachSafe • Delivered facilitator program for event risk management • Threshold systems researched as part of SHR and PPE project plans.

• Enhance existing and develop new applications for sport and lifesaving purposes.

1.4 Promote SLSA as the • Delivered Stage 2 of the Public Safety Awareness peak coastal safety body. campaign - The ‘Facts about Rips’ • Delivered the 2017 National Coastal Safety Report • Identified opportunities to promote Surf Life Saving and plans developed, i.e. non-fatal drowning, bystander rescue, as part of future National Coastal Safety Reports • Represented SLSA at key forums i.e. World Conference on Drowning Prevention, Australian Fire and Emergency Services Authorities Council Conference, National Disaster and Emergency Management Conference, Australian Search and Rescue Conference • Delivered quarterly Surf Life Saving updates and presentations for ‘National Rescue of the Month’ at Parliament House • Delivered Australian Lifeguard Magazine.

• Deliver Year 3 of 5 of the Public Safety Awareness campaign - The ‘Facts about Rips’ • Delivery of the 2018 National Coastal Safety Report • Present ‘National Rescue of the Month’ at Parliament House, Canberra • Deliver Australian Lifeguard Magazine • Provide advice and updates on water safety and drowning prevention initiatives to Federal Government.

1.5 Incorporate Surf Life Saving services into the local state and national emergency management systems.

• Attendance and participation in peak body forums i.e. Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council and Bureau of Meteorology meetings • Support to states in meetings with various Ministers and authorities.

• Implement communication systems and tools that support states in the delivery of services • Collaborate and work with agencies on programs and projects that support Surf Life Saving operations within the emergency service sector • Provide reports and research that support the actions and role of Surf Life Saving within the emergency service and safety sector • Participation in PacWave tsunami exercise.

1.6 Support International Life Saving (ILS) development activities, particularly through the Asia–Pacific region.

• Worked with Royal Life Saving Society Australia (RLSSA) to develop opportunities to enhance lifesaving within the Asia-Pacific region • Provided support for four representatives to undertake a lifesaving training program in Japan • Provided support for the delivery of a lifesaving training program in Korea • Represented SLSA at ILS Federation meetings.

• Continue to develop opportunities to enhance lifesaving within the Asia-Pacific region.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

2. Develop our people 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

2.1 Provide and promote the opportunities and pathways in Surf Life Saving to motivate our members.

• Implementation of various phase 1 projects of the Sport and Recreational Review recommendations to increase participation and engagement • Promoted the opportunities and pathways in Surf Life Saving through SLSA online courses • Radio Operator Certificate added to Surf Rescue Certificate

• Implementation of phase 2 the Sport and Recreational Review recommendations to increase participation and engagement of participants • Develop strategies to increase engagement in minority areas • Improve and increase the offering of online courses.

2.2 Provide ongoing leadership opportunities to our people.

• Completed the National Leadership Program Review • Developed Alumni Management Groups in each state • Conducted multiple stakeholder Sport Workshops that focus on key national strategic items, consulting with a broad diverse group • National Leadership College at YMCA in Sydney (26 participants attended).

• Roll out the revised national leadership programs in partnership with University of South Australia • Continue to engage with key sport stakeholders at the national sport workshops to focus on key national strategic items • Promote opportunities to Alumni to complete Graduate Certificate in Business Administration • Assist states with transition of revised Public Safety Training Package • Review of Learning and Development committees to ensure member voice is heard.

2.3 Provide efficient, relevant and flexible learning opportunities.

• Coordinated delivery of VET Surge Funding to improve training and assessing for volunteers • Applied the National Education Strategy and Framework 2015-2020 • Involvement in Sporting Schools Program by VIC, TAS, SA, QLD, NT and limited areas in NSW, including securing a $25,000 ASC grant for the purchase of PPE • Released updated and reviewed resources: Pain Management, Age Managers, Silver Medallion Advanced First Aid, Advanced Resuscitation Techniques Certificate • Released the updated online Safer Surf Clubs course • Commenced review of the 34th Edition Public Safety and Aquatic Rescue training manual • Released new online modules for the SLSA Officiating and Coaching courses.

• Continue to coordinate the delivery of VET Surge strategy on behalf of the Federal Government and the Surf Life Saving movement • Release new online Coaching and Officiating Coaching modules and High Performance Courses • Continue the review of 34th Edition Public Safety and Aquatic Rescue training manual for scheduled release of 35th edition in the 2019/20 season • Integrations with state third party systems and Surfguard • Release Assessor ‘on the beach’ app


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2. Develop our people 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

2.4 Develop our participation initiatives, including surf sports.

• Explored opportunities to secure new sponsors for key flagship sporting events • Delivered on Australian Sport Commission key deliverables • Delivered key national events; • IRB Championships 2017 • Pool Rescue Championships 2017 • Interstate Championships 2018 • Coates Hire Coolangatta Gold 2017 • Australian Surf Life Saving Championships (Aussies) 2018 • Established joint venture to assist with the 2017/18 Ocean 6 series.

• Explore opportunities to secure new sponsors for key flagship sporting events • Deliver on Australian Sport Commission key deliverables • Deliver key national events; • IRB Championships 2018 • Pool Rescue Championships 2018 • Interstate Championships 2019 • Coolangatta Gold 2018 • Australian Surf Life Saving Championships (Aussies) 2019 • Ocean 6 series • Introduce technology in sport to make events more efficient and engage the community.

2.5 Provide opportunities for our members to participate in activities, including through ILS.

• Maintain the relationship with Lifesaving Japan through the annual Lifesaving Exchange Program • The Australian Life Saving Team competed and placed 2nd at the World Games in Poland (Pool Rescue), SLSNZ Pool Rescue Champs, 1st at the German Cup (Pool Rescue), 1st at the International Surf Rescue Championships (NZ), 1st at the Trans-Tasman Surf Boat Series and 1st at the Sanyo Bussan Cup (Japan).

• Australian Life Saving Team to attend the 2018 Lifesaving World Championships held in Adelaide • Australian Youth Life Saving Team to attend the Youth World Championship in Adelaide • Australian Life Saving Team attend the Sanyo Bussan Cup in Japan • Australian Surf Boat Team to compete in the Trans-Tasman Surf Boat Series • Continued involvement with Lifesaving Japan through the annual Lifesaving Exchange Program • Introduced policy for Recognition of International Qualifications • Nominations submitted successfully to ILS for re-election onto Rescue and Drowning Prevention committees.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

3. Ensure a relevant and growing movement 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

3.1 Protect, manage and promote the Surf Life Saving brand to drive internal and external support.

• Ensured all breaches of Surf Life Saving intellectual property (IP) receive communication no more than three business days after the alert • Built the Surf Life Saving brand presence online to drive further engagement and accessibility for all stakeholders • Undertook annual research survey to measure and track ongoing brand performance and communications impact year on year.

• Continue to ensure all breaches of Surf Life Saving IP are actioned within three business days after the alert • Continue to build the Surf Life Saving brand presence online to drive further engagement and accessibility for all stakeholders • Undertake annual research survey to measure and track ongoing brand performance and communications impact year on year.

3.2 Utilise evidence-based research to inform development and implementation of safe practices.

• Implement communications activities to maintain the momentum of safety as first and foremost in SLSA

• Promote activities to maintain the momentum of safety as first and foremost in SLSA • Continue research for safety management practices with surf sports activity.

3.3 Develop effective strategic, operational alignment across all levels.

• Developed and implemented agreed protocols, hierarchy and communications plans for SLSA to engage with members • Collaborated with all Surf Life Saving entities on key communications and business development activities • SLSA and state entities delivered contractual obligations for national corporate partners • Commenced the SLSA IT Upgrade project • Reviewed all IT service providers with standardised contracts and KPI’s • Business process and ICT review undertaken with direction on simplifying processes.

• Ensure SLSA and state entities deliver contractual obligations for national corporate partners annually • Review and revise direct member communications, including implementing strategy to ensure that members details are updated to maximise member engagement • Implement recommendations from the business process and ICT review • Review outputs of Surf Life Saving ‘Whole of Movement Digital Strategy’ to determine implementation plan.

3.4 Ensure sound environment practices at all levels.

• Communicate research and activities related to climate adaptation.

• Continued research and activities related to climate adaptation.

3.5 Implement efficiencies across the movement.

• Continued to provide new and enhanced IT systems to the frontline to enable our members and clubs to operate efficiently and to reduce paperwork including an updated Sport Event Management System (SEMS) • Worked with states to develop implementation plans for VET Surge Funding • Commenced the SLSA IT Upgrade project.

• Implement employee recognition program • Together with states, territories and subsidiaries, identify areas of duplication and inefficiency.


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3. Ensure a relevant and growing movement 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

3.6 Understand community expectations of involvement via engagement.

• 2017 SLSA benchmarking research and brand engagement undertaken • Conducted ‘Be a Life Saver’ campaign quantitative research, monitoring brand health, positioning and campaign messaging.

• Deliver quantitative research, monitoring brand health, positioning and campaign messaging for any national fundraising activity, and year three of the national public safety awareness campaign, ‘Facts about Rips’ • Develop a new national fundraising campaign with states and territories.

4. Engage the community to participate and donate 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

4.1 Promote and celebrate SLS’s positive contribution to the Australian society.

• Reviewed and updated all Surf Life Saving policies • Continued public contact and communication through philanthropic, commercial and grant programs, highlighting key achievements • Used existing and new technology to communicate key messages and investigate best practice across multiple channels, including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn, as well as the sls.com.au website • Launched the Inclusive Beaches initiative in partnership with Autism Australia making it easier for people with different abilities and backgrounds to get involved with Surf Life Saving.

• Investigate best practices across multiple channels to deliver increased take up and engagement of Surf Life Saving stakeholders and community • Roll out the Safeguarding Children and Young People program across all states and territories.

4.2 Promote Surf Life Saving as an organisation in need.

• Implemented year four of the national fundraising and awareness campaign, ‘Be a Life Saver’ • SLS Foundation Lottery website refresh implemented • Implemented a year round multi-channel strategy focused on recruiting new supporters • Implemented a refresh of the lottery loyalty program “Champions Club” collateral and communications.

• Development of a new national fundraising and awareness campaign to drive donations further • Introduce new digital channels for Australians to support/donate • Continue to secure annual support from corporate partners to aid and generate donations to the national fundraising and awareness campaign • Deliver post campaign research on the national fundraising awareness campaign to track key SLSA brand health metrics • Implement a refresh of the SLS Foundation philanthropic website to assist donor offering and support.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

4. Engage the community to participate and donate 2020 Strategic Intent

What we have achieved in 2017–18

Our priorities for 2018–19

4.3 Provide opportunities and encourage community, corporate partners and stakeholders to actively participate in Surf Life Saving.

• Increased engagement of the community with Surf Life Saving key messages/stories • Identified and secured corporate/community and donor support of events • Created fundraising, community and membership opportunities to engage all Australians • Increased engagement across communication channels • Completed and lodged 372 grant applications through the SLS Foundation Grant Seeking Unit on behalf of Surf Life Saving entities, raising over $5M • Delivered annual philanthropic support program incorporating five national major appeals; ‘Back to the Beach’, Christmas, Australia Day, Easter and tax time appeals • Delivered annual commercial support program incorporating six major ‘House and Land’ package prize lotteries, 11 phone based lotteries and a WA state specific lottery program.

• Leverage existing SLSA activities and events to involve and engage the community • Review performance of SLS Foundation activities against endorsed 5 year growth strategy to create insights into the funding sustainability of the SLS Foundation and SLSA • Invest in growth priorities through the SLS Foundation to achieve the target of $20M by 2020. • Develop a coordinated and professional Grant Seeking Unit to provide intelligence and assist clubs in submissions for government grants, trusts and foundations, in line with the endorsed five year growth plan • Provide up to date database on all available grants which Surf Life Saving activities could apply.

4.4 Grow revenue from corporate partners and government sectors.

• Signed Holden as a major national partner • Re-signed existing partnerships with Westpac, BRP, Dulux and Finz • Maintained corporate partner portfolio and revenue • Held bi-monthly Commercial Working Group forum for optimisation of commercial opportunities in collaboration with the states • National Coastal Safety report launched by the Federal Minister for Health • Engaged Federal Government Members in support of Surf Life Saving initiatives • Delivered quarterly Surf Life Saving updates to Federal Members and Senators in Canberra • Engaged Federal Member support of the Beach Safety Equipment Fund in their electorates.

• Implement the Federal Government Engagement Strategy to build bipartisan support for Surf Life Saving movement • Deliver the corporate partner strategy • Identify new major national corporate partnerships • Continue bi-monthly Commercial Working Group meetings with representatives from each state and the SLS Foundation • Develop revenue opportunities through third party arrangements • Develop clear SLSA value proposition to achieve increased support • Deliver incremental licensing revenue through the continued growth of our licensee base, new product categories and the launch of a public-facing online store • Begin review of the Surf Life Saving 2020 strategic plan.

4.5 Proactively and transparently communicate how all funds raised are used.

• 2017-18 SLSA Annual Report and SLS Foundation Annual Review were distributed • Developed key messaging for the 2018/19 financial year.

• 2018-19 SLSA Annual Report and SLS Foundation Annual Review to be distributed • Develop key messaging for the 2019-20 financial year • SLSA to provide a proforma (written or graphic) for Surf Life Saving states/clubs to recognise SLSA/SLS Foundation support (distributions /funding) for internal and external reporting.


Section 01: Introduction

19

INTRODUCTION

Snapshot

Surf Life Saving Australia

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Change %2

Revenue—sponsorships & grants (,000)

$19,395

$20,422

$21,015

$19,573

$24,683

26.11%

Revenue—total consolidated entity (,000)

$69,599

$72,050

$72,944

$70,973

$70,664

-0.44%

Expenditure—total consolidated entity (,000)

$68,364

$70,365

$70,740

$68,086

$77,876

14.38%

Number of male members

94,039

94,019

93,756

92,727

95,402

2.88%

Number of female members

74,581

75,613

75,450

76,062

78,404

3.08%

168,622

169,633

169,250

168,823

173,865

2.99%

311

313

312

311

314

0.96%

Rescues performed by surf lifesavers and Surf Life Saving support operations

8,572

9,647

9,864

7,567

6,817

-9.91%

Rescues performed by ALS lifeguards

3,139

3,043

3,170

3,312

3,432

3.62%

Total rescues performed

11,711

12,690

13,034

10,879

10,249

-5.79%

First aid administered by surf lifesavers and Surf Life Saving support operations

13,947

19,826

26,288

44,129

30,390

-31.13%

First aid administered by ALS lifeguards

17,946

22,598

30,871

63,915

34,906

-45.39%

Total first aid administered

31,893

42,424

57,159

108,044

65,296

-39.57%

Preventative actions undertaken by surf lifesavers and Surf Life Saving support operations

321,838

346,119

350,400

492,151

433,239

-11.97%

Preventative actions undertaken by ALS lifeguards

694,199

908,971

1,088,160

3,459,277

1,096,255

-68.31%

1,016,037

1,255,090

1,438,560

3,951,428

1,529,494

-61.29%

8,802

7,476

7,133

7,187

6,458

-10.14%

5,080

6,168

7,004

6,806

5,176

-23.95%

Number of competitors at Coates Hire Coolangatta Gold

609

585

548

495

8063

62.83%

Number of competitors at the national IRB Championships

709

623

571

967

971

0.41%

Number of competitors at the national Pool Championships

420

570

552

407

392

-3.69%

Financials1

Membership Statistics

Total membership Number of Surf Life Saving Clubs Lifesaving Statistics

Total preventative actions Education Statistics Number of Cert II Public Safety qualifications issued (Bronze Medallion) Sport Statistics Number of competitors at The Australian Surf Life Saving Championships

Index 1. Consolidated entity includes helicopter rescue service. 2. Indicates percentage change from 2016/17 to 2017/18. 3. Includes Youth Challenge entries.


SECTION 02

SLSA Operations


Section 02: SLSA Operations

23

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Capacity and Capability

OV E RV I E W The Capacity and Capability (CC) portfolio is responsible for coastal risk and safety, lifesaving operations, research, education, participation, learning and development and surf sports. The deliverables of CC include the: • Development of best practice policies to save lives • Improvement of drowning prevention initiatives and lifesaving operations • Management of member development programs • Development of consistent and relevant educational resources/practices • Enhancement of participation • Development of athletes, coaches and officials through national sport operations, events and community resources.

COA S TA L S A F E T Y The 2017/18 season was one of many achievements, with services across the country undertaking the delivery of essential emergency service operations. While we celebrate and acknowledge these successes we also recognise and pause to remember those whose lives were lost on our coastline. The loss of a life is tragic in all circumstances and SLSA continues to explore, innovate and strive to put in place programs and services that have a focus on reducing the loss of life and injury along our coast. Despite best endeavours and performing 10,249 rescues, 65,296 first aid and 1,529,494 preventative actions, 173 lives were lost, 110 of these due to drowning incidents. However, if not for the actions of surf lifesavers this number would have been far greater. Through the Australian Government’s Department of Health, support to states and clubs through the funding of two programs to assist the delivery of front line services and implement initiatives

in key drowning locations around Australia was undertaken. The Beach Safety Equipment Fund was delivered directly to clubs for the purchase of essential lifesaving equipment. The Beach Drowning Blackspot Reduction Program provided funds to states to deliver programs, services and initiatives in high priority areas to reduce incidents in those locations.

D ROW N I N G PR E V EN T I O N Research forms the foundation of SLSA’s National Coastal Safety Report and aids in the development of strategic direction for SLSA’s drowning prevention programs. During this season SLSA conducted its first Coastal Drowning Prevention Forum. The purpose of the forum was to identify future directions for coastal drowning prevention research through the discussion of ideas, emerging issues and views toward the many facets of lifesaving. Furthermore, the opportunity to discuss and listen to diverse concepts

provided a sobering reminder that every individual who has lost their life at the coast is not simply a statistic, but someone’s loved one. This past season has seen a continued drive towards drowning prevention with SLSA committed to evidence-based and behavioural research programs including the collection of evidence from peak authorities to inform and further advance our understanding of behaviours and risk perception in aquatic locations. SLSA maintained its commitment as a leader and contributor to the Australian Water Safety Council, participating and providing leadership and support to various Water Safety Forums to work collaboratively to reduce the number of lives lost in aquatic environments. Continued research partnerships have looked into the impact of non-fatal drowning and bystander rescues, with new research into public access rescue equipment having also commenced. The investigation and research into non-fatal


24

drowning incidents highlights more factors that SLSA needs to consider in the future to ensure both our members and the community are cared for. Partnerships with external agencies are vital to enhance our understanding of the extent of aquatic related incidents occurring outside patrolled areas and our ability to develop initiatives and programs that may reduce these incidents in future.

COA S TA L S A FE T Y D E V ELO PM EN T S Coastal safety research has informed the continued development of SLSA’s rip current public awareness campaign, now entering its third year. The campaign was developed after significant research into rip current-related drowning deaths, behaviour and perceptions and the identification of key contributing factors. The development of other key priority items, as identified as part of the Total Service Plan, has seen coastal safety briefs developed for boating, rock-fishing and water craft, which will form the foundation of education and awareness campaigns. Together with rip currents, these four risk areas account for over 50% of all coastal drowning deaths. Further to this, SLSA has developed a beach-focused coastal safety brief, which explores beach related drowning deaths and both fatal and nonfatal occurrences.

I N N OVAT I O N The development of the Patrol Operations app has been undertaken after extensive collaboration and consultation with clubs and states. The objective, to streamline the ability for members to perform their duties and record essential information in a friendlier and more efficient manner. Safety of members is a key priority and significant work has continued with regards to event risk management. This has resulted in the development of a new risk rating app that has been trialled at a number of state events and the Australian Championships. The app is now in final production for roll out to all for the commencement of the season. A second phase of development will look at applying the technology to patrol risk management.

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

“THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PATROL OPERATIONS APP HAS BEEN UNDERTAKEN AFTER EXTENSIVE COLLABORATION AND CONSULTATION WITH CLUBS AND STATES.”

Investigation into and the development of trial programs for swift water and flood rescue has been conducted and is being further developed with key learnings and opportunities being explored. This has also resulted in engagement with other emergency service agencies at both national and international level.

CO L L A B O R AT I O N SLSA presented papers at key forums including the World Conference on Drowning Prevention, the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council Conference, the World Congress on Public Health and the National Search and Rescue Conference, in addition to presentations to some state government forums. Additionally, SLSA hosted and facilitated the Coastal Drowning Prevention Forum which included key stakeholders from universities and government. Continued collaborative research partnerships remain crucial to drowning prevention work, including those with the Australian Fire and Emergency Services Council, Macquarie University, the Bureau of Meteorology, Flinders University, University of New South Wales - Sydney, OmniPoll, CSIRO and many more.

LE ARNING AND DEVELOPMENT In 2017/18 Learning and Development released new resources, SLSA Guidelines for Safer Surf Clubs, Safeguarding Children and Young People, and reviewed SSV induction (previously known as ATV induction). In person delivery for each course was accompanied by online content for an enhanced learning experience. As a result of the Leadership Program review conducted in 2016-2017, Masterclass 2017 was not held, however we are now preparing for our 2018 program to be run in collaboration with the University of South Australia. Participants will have the opportunity to enrol in a Graduate Certificate of Business Administration. Leadership College 2018 was held in February at YMCA, Sydney Olympic Park Lodge with 26 participants. SLSA offered fully funded scholarship opportunities to members from culturally and linguistically diverse and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds to take part in the College. Federal Government funding to upgrade our volunteer training has commenced, both in the states and at a national level. Development of a webbased app for assessors has commenced ready for implementation this season,


Section 02: SLSA Operations

25

athletes to get familiar with the venue in preparation for Worlds. The Interstate Championship (surf) crowned a new champion in NSW, in a narrow victory over QLD. Implementation of the Sport and Recreation Review initiatives remains a priority. A review into sport competition recommended greater flexibility regarding eligibility requirements to allow more members to access our sporting products. Ocean 6, the new elite series, was launched across six rounds in three states. Community membership was approved for clubs to adopt, opening up membership and product opportunities. Design concepts for the new modified surf sport products have been validated through multiple club and state trials and will be ready for launch in 2018/19 season.

PA R T I C I PAT I O N

which will streamline records capture and increase the efficiency of data recording. This will relieve the administrative burden on volunteers, freeing them up to deliver frontline services.

dominated the international circuit across pool, surf, boats and sand, while sports education going digital has led to more accessibility with an increase in capacity and capability for our members.

SPORT

K E Y H I G H L I G H T S:

The 2017/18 season saw many initiatives across the ‘Whole of Sport’ start to come to fruition. Our strategic focus continues to be removing barriers to entry, taking a member-centric approach in our operational delivery, consulting with purpose through newly formed stakeholder groups and the continued use of technology to maximise efficiency and meet the needs of our membership. The 2018 Aussies was a stark contrast to the previous year which took us to Perth in what was hailed one of the best Aussies in recent memory. Ocean 6 was born out of the Sport and Recreation Review and continues to grow from strength to strength. There was a record increase in participation at The Australian IRB Championships with the introduction of Masters while the Coates Hire Coolangatta Gold (2017) saw a revised short course being implemented, driving participation to a new level. The new look Australian Life Saving Team (ALT)

The ALT had a bumper season, claiming victory for the 14th consecutive time in Japan at the Sanyo Bussan Cup (surf), had a clean sweep at the German Cup (pool) winning all five categories, which no nation has done before. The team went on to win the International Surf Rescue Championship (Surf) ahead of host nation and rivals New Zealand. The ALT Surf Boat team and ALT Development Team had a clean sweep of New Zealand in the Trans Tasman Series winning 12 from 12 races. An improvement in the operational delivery of events saw a record number of athletes compete at the Coates Hire Coolangatta Gold (2017), with an increase in participation in categories such as the Open Elites, Teams, Youth Challenge and Short Course events. Many key learnings were applied to the 2018 Aussies in Perth, which led to a well run event at the newly developed Scarborough precinct. The Pool Rescue Championships saw us travel to Adelaide, home of the 2018 Life Saving World Championships, allowing

The 2017/18 season saw the introduction of some exciting new initiatives in the participation space. In April 2018, SLSA launched the Safeguarding Children and Young People Program aimed at growing awareness and action to protect children from abuse, harm and exploitation. The Safeguarding Children and Young People program represents a best practice approach to the protection of children and young people and includes the development of an online awareness module, an online reporting register and supporting resources to assist clubs to implement strategies at their club. During the 2017/18 season SLSA partnered with Autism Spectrum Australia (Aspect) to undertake a project to partner with 13 clubs across Queensland and New South Wales to assist clubs in being more inclusive for people with a disability. The project was a great success and saw the introduction of an Inclusive Beaches program which supports the inclusion of people of different abilities to join their local club and learn to be safe at the beach.

Greg Meagher General Manager, Capacity and Capability


Section 02: SLSA Operations

27

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Sport Results

National Inflatable Rescue Boat Championships (IRB) 2017 Kingscliff, NSW, 14-16 July 2017 Event

First

Pointscore

Second

Pointscore

Third

Pointscore

Interstate Championships

QLD

52

VIC

46

NSW

44

National Championships

North Burleigh SLSC

51

Kurrawa SLSC

24

Williamstown Swimming and LSC (Inc.)

22

National Pool Rescue Championships 2017 SA Aquatic & Leisure Centre, SA, 4-6 August 2017 Event

First

Pointscore

Second

Pointscore

Third

Pointscore

Interstate Championships

QLD

440

NSW

426

WA

366

National Open Championships

Currumbin Beach Vikings SLSC

581

Maroochydore SLSC

248

BMD Northcliffe SLSC

153

National Masters Championships

West Beach SLSC

186

Bondi SLSC

185

Terrigal SLSC

132

Coates Hire Coolangatta Gold 2017 Gold Coast, QLD, 7-8 October 2017 Category

First

Time

Second

Time

Third

Time

Elite Male - Long Course

Ali Day

3:52:15

Shannon Eckstein

3:58:54

Cory Taylor

4:02:17

Elite Female - Long Course

Courtney Hancock

4:22:54

Allie Britton

4:23:20

Danielle McKenzie

4:24:25

Open Male - Short Course

Ben Cochrane

2:32:40

Kyle Garrett

2:35:27

Matthew Bell

2:35:59

Open Female - Short Course

Kirstie Hardstaff

2:38:48

Carla Papac

2:42:01

Jayde Hardstaff

2:45:01

U19 Male Long Course

Jy Timperley

4:17:13

Hayden Copping

4:23:50

Campbell Guthrie

4:25:57

U19 Male - Short Course

Isaac Smith

2:28:32

Charlie Verco

2:29:26

Corey Cumner

2:35:29

U19 Female - Short Course

Emily Doyle

2:41:48

Lily Costello

2:44:09

Brielle Cooper

2:45:52

19-34 Male - Long Course

Marcus Hughes

4:42:01

Chad Poland

4:45:28

Beau Bailey

4:51:09

19-34 Female – Long Course

Lauren Soars

6:22:06

35-49 Male Long Course

Guy Andrews

4:26:20

Brent McKinnon

4:38:39

Nathan Stewart

4:41:38

35-49 Male Short Course

Brendon Ross

2:38:56

Brent McKinnon

2:39:51

Scott Sewell

2:44:22

35-49 Female Long Course

Tamiel Benjamin

5:20:12

35-49 Female Short Course

Amanda Elson

3:00:38

Heli Murray

3:06:37

Chloe Hardman

3:26:43

50+ Male Long Course

Paul Lemmon

4:26:20

Mitchell Phillips

5:06:15

Mark Kehoe

5:15:39

50+ Male Short Course

Kim Harker

2:43:15

Craig Sly

2:43:45

David Broadbent

2:53:33

50+ Female Short Course

Alison Pegg

3:06:30

Fiona Kirkman

4:12:42

Open Male Teams Long Course

Shaw and Partners

3:53:12

BMD Northcliffe

4:02:35

Manly

4:06:38

Open Male Teams Short Course

North Bondi Movement

2:26:30

Manly

2:28:49

Hecko Gecko

2:34:21

Open Female Teams Long Course

Massie Fam

4:28:48

Manly Retirees

4:49:09

Westies Girls

5:13:30

Open Female Teams Short Course

BMD Northcliffe GON

2:27:36

AH

2:42:41

Big Dawgz

2:50:10


28

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

Coates Hire Coolangatta Gold 2017 Gold Coast, QLD, 7-8 October 2017 Category

First

Time

Second

Time

Third

Time

Open Mixed Teams Long Course

The Mooloolaba Baywatchers

4:32:17

Canistry

5:12:36

Bondi Bras

5:20:09

Open Mixed Teams Short Course

And the Winners are

2:33:05

Team Titanic

2:33:42

Blacklisters

2:40:33

Masters Male 140+ Teams Long Course

Wauchope Bonny Hills – Mis Coast Uniforms

4:45:41

Coolum Blue

4:52:56

Motley Crew

5:14:04

Masters Male 140+ Teams Short Course

Old(er) Freshie Flyers

2:42:10

Splovers

2:42:29

The Hoff & Co

2:43:56

Masters Female 140+ Teams Long Course

Wauchope Bonny Hills – Expressway Spares

5:02:55

S.S. – EMS

5:05:02

Masters Female 140+ Teams Short Course Wauchope Bonny Hills – Fat Fish

2:53:29

NB Masters Chicks

2:57:21

Sunny Girls

2:57:21

Masters Mixed 140+ Teams Long Course

Mixing it with North Bondi

4:27:59

What Ever it Takes

4:42:40

Alex Bluffers

5:19:40

Mixed Masters 140+ Teams Short Course

Four Fast Fried Eggs

2:49:33

Hoff and Puff

3:25:46

Masters Male 190+ Teams Long Course

Terrigal Masters Team FY! (210)

4:25:57

Racing Mullets

4:39:32

Combined Avocas

4:49:24

Masters Male 190+ Teams Short Course

The Original Poster Boys

2:51:22

Wauchope Bonny Hills – Pacific Survey

2:51:53

Old Southport

2:52:02

Masters Female 190+ Teams Long Course

Manly Stingers

5:16:38

Tasyamba

4:52:46

Wauchope Bonny Hills First National North Haven

2:28:00

Masters Female 190+ Teams Short Course Manly Salt Water Girls

3:39:55

Masters Mixed 190+ Teams Long Course

Wauchope Bonny Hills – Beach Hotel

4:33:04

Mixed Masters 190+ Teams Short Course

Terrigal Masters Team Awesome (245)

3:14:23

U19 Male Teams Long Course

Newport 17

4:20:26

Burleigh Boys

4:34:33

U19 Male Teams Short Course

Bone Warriors

2:25:12

Black Swanners

2:25:32

U19 Female Teams Long Course

Alex Bluff Babes 2.0

4:36:51

The Hungry Hippoes

4:56:48

U19 Female Teams Short Course

Team Shine

2:39:28

Little Gon

2:45:52

Ygon

2:47:02

U19 Mixed Teams Short Course

Noosa Heads

2:30:31

Harris Twins

2:53:35

Sawtell 17’Z

2:54:53

National Interstate Championships 2018 Moana, SA, 19 January 2018 First

Pointscore

Second

Pointscore

Third

Pointscore

Overall Pointscore

NSW

280

QLD

271

WA

192

Open Pointscore

QLD

151

NSW

147

WA

105

Youth Pointscore

NSW

133

QLD

120

WA

87

Australian Surf Boat Interstate Championships Elourea NSW, 16 February, 2018 Overall Pointscore *Won on countback

First

Pointscore

Second

Pointscore

Third

Pointscore

NSW

87*

QLD

87

SA

76


Section 02: SLSA Operations

29

The Australian Surf Life Saving Championships 2018 Scarborough, WA,14 April – 22 April 2018 Club

Points

Opens Pointscore

Club

Points

Masters Pointscore

Club

Points

Handicap Pointscore

1

BMD Northcliffe SLSC

360

1

Bondi Surf Bathers LSC

398

1

Newport SLSC

457.3

2

Newport SLSC

258

2

Trigg Island SLSC

247

2

Kurrawa SLSC

439

3

Kurrawa SLSC

153

3

North Cottesloe SLSC

239

3

North Bondi SLSC

437.3

4

Maroochydore SLSC

146

4

BMD Northcliffe SLSC

215

4

Wanda SLSC

429.3

5

Currumbin SLSC

134

5

North Bondi SLSC

200

5

Umina SLSC

6

Alexandra Headland SLSC

132

6

Sorrento SLSC (WA)

161

6

Sorrento SLSC (WA)

425.3

427

7

North Bondi SLSC

111

7

Kurrawa SLSC

153

7

Maroochydore SLSC

418

8

Wanda SLSC

107

8

Coogee SLSC (NSW)

131

8

Cronulla SLSC

412.3

9

Manly LSC

85

9

City of Perth SLSC

114

9

Trigg Island SLSC

412.3

10

Noosa Heads SLSC

82

10

Queenscliff SLSC

105

10

Cottesloe SLSC

402.7

Ocean6 Series Event

First

Club

Point score

Second

Club

Point score

Third

Club

Point score

Nutri-Grain IronMan

Matt Bevilacqua

Kurrawa SLSC

412

Alistair Day

Surfers Paradise SLSC

408

James Lacy

Mermaid Beach SLSC

351

Nutri-Grain IronWoman

Brielle Cooper

Kurrawa SLSC

386

Harriet Brown

Northcliffe SLSC

386

Georgia Miller

Newport SLSC

344

Board Mens

Rhys Burrows

Noosa Heads SLSC

266

Matt Bevilacqua

Kurrawa SLSC

264

Luke Cuff

Mermaid Beach SLSC

238

Board Womens

Lizzie Welborn

North Bondi SLSC

300

Georgia Miller

Newport SLSC

288

Harriett Brown

Northcliffe SLSC

240

Swim Mens

Oliver Signorini

Newport SLSC

288

Daniel Collins

Redhead SLSC

236

Ky Kinsela

Currumbin SLSC

236

Swim Womens

Maddy Dunn

Northcliffe SLSC

300

Lani Pallister

Alexandra Headland SLSC

264

Naomi Scott

Manly LSC

264

Ski Mens

Ben Carberry

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC

288

Jett Kenny

Alexandra Headland SLSC

258

Sam Norton

Burnie SLSC

234

Ski Womens

Bonnie Hancock

Kurrawa SLSC

300

Danielle McKenzie

Northcliffe SLSC

252

Kristy Ellis

Alexandra Headland SLSC

219

Beach Flags Mens

Jake Lynch

Newport SLSC

300

Blake Drysdale

Newport SLSC

248

Sam Zustovich

Mollymook SLSC

226

Beach Flags Womens

Bree Masters

Kurrawa SLSC

300

Alexandra Rampoldi

North Cronulla SLSC

288

Leah Rampoldi

North Cronulla SLSC

244

Taplin Mens

Hayden Hemmens

Kurrawa SLSC

246

Oliver Signorini

Newport SLSC

242

Ky Kinsela

Currumbin SLSC

239

Taplin Womens

Georgia Miller

Newport SLSC

230

Bonnie Hancock

Kurrawa SLSC

226

Megan Kreuter

Northcliffe SLSC

216


30

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

High Performance Results

World Games 2017 Wroclaw, Poland, 21st-22nd July 2017 Australian Life Saving Team

German Cup & Orange Cup 2017 Warendorf, Germany & Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 25th-26th November & 2nd-3rd December 2017

Place

Country

Australian Life Saving Team

First

Italy

Place

Country

Second

Australia

First

Australia

Third

Germany

Second

Italy

Name

Club

Third

Germany

Prue Davies

Currumbin SLSC

Name

Club

Matthew Davis

Currumbin SLSC

Prue Davies

Currumbin SLSC

Tom Montgomery

Currumbin SLSC

Matthew Davis

Currumbin SLSC

Sam Bell

Maroochydore SLSC

Rachel Eddy

Currumbin SLSC

Chelsea Gillett

Maroochydore SLSC

Tom Montgomery

Currumbin SLSC

Pamela Hendry

Maroochydore SLSC

Sam Bell

Maroochydore SLSC

Samantha Howe

Point Leo LSC

Chelsea Gillett

Maroochydore SLSC

Bradley Woodward

Shelly Beach SLSC

Timothy Schofield

Terrigal SLSC

Jake Smith

Trigg Island SLSC

Jake Smith

Trigg Island SLSC

Mariah Jones

Tweed Heads & Coolangatta SLSC

Mariah Jones

Tweed Heads & Coolangatta SLSC

Kurt Wilson

Head Coach

Rachel Wood

Umina SLSC

Garry Mensforth

Team Manager

Kurt Wilson

Head Coach

Nick Marshall

Physiotherapist

Andrew Bowden

Assistant Coach

Jenny Parry

Team Manager

Trans-Tasman Surf Boat Test Series 2018 Elouera Beach, Australia, 17th February 2018 Australian Life Saving Team

Trans-Tasman Surf Boat Development Test 2018 Elouera Beach, Australia, 17th February 2018 Australian Life Saving Team

Place

Country

Place

Country

First

Australia

First

Australia

Second

New Zealand

Second

New Zealand

Name

Club

Name

Club

Emma Gillespie

Elouera SLSC

Amelia Barber

Avalon SLSC

Samantha Hewitt

Elouera SLSC

Elena Di Biagio

Avalon SLSC

Sarah Hill

Elouera SLSC

Lauren Petersen

Avalon SLSC

Tara Lal

Elouera SLSC

Chloe Scott

Avalon SLSC

Grant Wilkinson - Sweep

Elouera SLSC

Nathan Wellings - Sweep

Avalon SLSC

Michael Egan

South Curl Curl SLSC

Jackson Ford

North Cronulla SLSC

Christopher Hughes

South Curl Curl SLSC

Matt Hammond

North Cronulla SLSC

Trent Rogers

South Curl Curl SLSC

Joshua Lea

North Cronulla SLSC

Jordan Thurlow

South Curl Curl SLSC

Tom Mailey

North Cronulla SLSC

Rob Lowery - Sweep

South Curl Curl SLSC

Mark McDonald - Sweep

North Cronulla SLSC

Greg Heard

Team Manager - Opens

Ian Martin

Team Manager - Development


Section 02: SLSA Operations

31

International Surf Rescue Challenge 2017 - Youth Mount Maunganui, New Zealand, 30th November - 2nd December 2017

International Surf Rescue Challenge 2017 Mount Maunganui, New Zealand, 30th November - 2nd December 2017

Australian Life Saving Team

Australian Life Saving Team

Place

Country

Place

Country

First

Australia

First

Australia

Second

New Zealand

Second

New Zealand

Third

South Africa

Third

USA

Name

Club

Name

Club

Keeley Booth

Avoca Beach SLSC

Harriet Brown

BMD Northcliffe SLSC

Mitchell Coombes

BMD Northcliffe SLSC

Maddy Dunn

BMD Northcliffe SLSC

Ky Kinsela

Currumbin SLSC

Hayden White

Currumbin SLSC

Christopher King

Elouera SLSC

Matt Bevilacqua

Kurrawa SLSC

Jake Evans

Elouera SLSC

Nicole Kay

Kurrawa SLSC

Emily Doyle

Manly LSC

Bree Masters

Kurrawa SLSC

Naomi Scott

Manly LSC

Matt Poole

Kurrawa SLSC

Tiarnee Massie

Maroochydore SLSC

Kendrick Louis

Manly LSC

Byron Turton

Maroochydore SLSC

Blake Drysdale

Newport SLSC

Electra Outram

Noosa Heads SLSC

Jake Lynch

Newport SLSC

Alexandra Rampoldi

North Cronulla SLSC

Jordan Mercer

Noosa Heads SLSC

Jamee Smith

Wanda SLSC

Lizzie Welborn

North Bondi SLSC

Brett Dowker

Head Coach

Alastair Day

Surfers Paradise SLSC

Craig Holden

Assistant Coach

Jemma Smith

Umina SLSC

Sam Dick

Assistant Coach

Kurt Wilson

Head Coach

Max Gonzalez

Team Manager

Shannon Eckstein

Assistant Coach

Martin Lynch

Assistant Coach

Garry Mensforth

Team Manager

Kristy Ellis

Assistant Team Manager

Josh Carter

Physiotherapist

Sanyo Bussan Cup 2018 Momochi Beach, Fukuoka, Japan, 23rd-24th June 2018 Australian Life Saving Team Place

Country

First

Australia

Second

New Zealand

Third

Japan A

Name

Club

Prue Davies

Currumbin SLSC

Hayden White

Currumbin SLSC

Bree Masters

Kurrawa SLSC

Max Brooks

Newport SLSC

Lana Rogers

Noosa Heads SLSC

Daniel Collins

Redhead SLSC

Jackson Symonds

Sorrento SLSC (WA)

Jake Smith

Trigg Island SLSC

Mariah Jones

Tweed Heads & Coolangatta SLSC

Jemma Smith

Umina SLSC

Kurt Wilson

Head Coach

Shannon Eckstein

Assistant Coach


Section 02: SLSA Operations

33

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Business Development & Communications OV E RV I E W The Business Development and Communications (BDC) portfolio is responsible for corporate and commercial partnerships, national marketing and communications, brand custodianship, media and public relations, licensing and merchandise. The BDC team are responsible for positioning the future sustainability of the Surf Life Saving movement, driving growth across our platforms, facilitating meaningful community and corporate engagement, and driving government relations to ensure Surf Life Saving remains a relevant and growing movement.

CO R P O R AT E PA R T N E R S H I P S Surf Life Saving acknowledges and thanks our corporate partners for their ongoing commitment and enthusiasm to the movement. As an organisation, SLSA aims to form and maintain partnerships that reflect our own values and vision for the future. SLSA develops partnerships that deliver strategic alignment and create a shared value to the Australian community. A partnership with SLSA reaches all corners of the community, allowing a business to position themselves alongside one of Australia’s most trusted and iconic community organisations. Our partners live and breathe the movement by not only providing vital funds but sharing core values and leveraging opportunities to benefit both parties. The associations we form with our corporate partners work to enhance the profile of both organisations. In January, we were thrilled to welcome Holden into the Surf Life Saving family as a major national partner alongside DHL and Westpac. We are proud of the longevity of our partnerships with DHL and Westpac which reflects their commitment to the movement. We are also delighted to have renewed our

partnerships with BRP, Dulux and Finz in this past year. Our partners, sponsors and supporters are all passionate about the organisation. Their support allows us to concentrate on what we do best, saving lives on Australian beaches. SLSA is extremely proud of our partnership portfolio and we recognise the valuable contribution our partners make to the organisation. We continue to actively seek new partners to support the movement and the vital services that we provide to the Australian community.

MARKETING AND CO M M U N I C AT I O N S Surf Life Saving is one of Australia’s most iconic and loved brands. The marketing and communications department is responsible for brand custodianship, above-the-line and owned platform communications, and the promotion of key safety messages to both our members and the general public. As a deliverable of SLSA’s business

“SLSA DEVELOPS PARTNERSHIPS THAT DELIVER STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT AND CREATE A SHARED VALUE TO THE AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITY.”

plan and the strategic intent to save lives, a five-year public safety awareness campaign, the ‘Facts about Rips’ was launched in October 2016 and continued through 2017 into 2018. Aimed at fit young males between the ages of 15-39 years, the campaign aims to raise awareness and change mindsets and behaviour when it comes to identifying and escaping rips, with the aim to increase the likelihood of people swimming at patrolled beaches, between the red and yellow flags.


34

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

“POST CAMPAIGN RESEARCH SHOWED AN INCREASE IN OVERALL PROPENSITY TO DONATE AND A LARGE INCREASE IN WILLINGNESS TO COMMIT TO REGULAR DONATIONS.”

The campaign was delivered through TV, radio, outdoor, digital, press and cinema over an initial six-week period starting in October 2017 with a follow up two week burst in January 2018. Collectively, the campaign delivered $1.6M in advertising value. Post campaign research has revealed that 84% who saw the campaign are more likely to swim between the red and yellow flags and two in three would be more likely to seek advice before swimming. We continued to promote Surf Life Saving as a community organisation in need. This year, we delivered on year four of the Be a Life Saver campaign goals. Our focus was on increasing and converting new donors to regular longer-term supporters. Launched on the first day of summer, the campaign ran across digital, social media, TV, outdoor and mobile and generated over $1M in advertising value. Corporate partner Havaianas helped draw attention to the launch with Thongs to Save Lives day, promoted in traditional and social media by ambassador Elyse Knowles and resulted in over 144 million consumer contacts. Post campaign research showed an increase in overall propensity to donate and a large increase in willingness to commit to regular donations. Our marketing and communications team continued to promote opportunities

for the Australian community and our members to actively participate in surf lifesaving competition, including the Coates Hire Coolangatta Gold (806 competitors), the Aussie Ocean Swim (265 competitors), the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships which brought 5,176 competitors to Scarborough beach in WA and the Ocean6 series incorporating the Nutri-Grain IronMan and IronWoman competition. Communications with our members are a key focus of the team and were maintained through the monthly eNewsletters Surfline and On Patrol, the member’s portal, and our social channels Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram. This ensures that our members can engage with SLSA and are recognised

for their contributions, and to assist us in communicating our vision of zero preventable deaths in Australian waters.

MEDIA AND PUBLIC REL ATIONS SLSA’s media and public relations (PR) activities continue to position the organisation as Australia’s peak coastal water safety, drowning prevention and rescue authority. Our work over 2017/18 has been influential in driving public and government awareness of the great work our volunteer members and our movement provide to the community. SLSA continues to evolve its digital communications strategy to adapt with the changing consumption patterns of our members and the community. 2017/2018 saw a significant increase in our social


Section 02: SLSA Operations

35

highlight the incredible contributions of our volunteers with presentations of the National Rescue of the Month awards, and act to facilitate a platform for SLSA to communicate updates on funding delivery and promote the work of our movement to parliamentary stakeholders. media presence while maintaining regular direct communications through our traditional channels. The 2017 National Coastal Safety Report was launched to members of the press by the Hon. Greg Hunt MP, Minister for Health and Sport in December 2017 at Seaford Life Saving Club and continues to create conversation directed towards the importance of coastal safety and drowning prevention across our beaches and sharing vital research findings. Government relations were supported through the quarterly Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving updates, co-chaired by Federal Members, the Hon. Sarah Henderson MP and the Hon. Matt Thistlethwaite MP and attended by members of parliament. These updates

LICENSING AND MERCHANDISE Surf Life Saving’s intellectual property (IP) has been built up over a 110-year foundation of service to the Australian community. SLSA owns various registered trademarks, which we manage on behalf of the entire organisation including: the Surf Life Saving logo, red and yellow patrol flags, patrol caps, the iconic red and yellow patrol uniform, and terms such as ‘Surf Rescue,’ ‘Surf Patrol’ and ‘Nippers’. It is our responsibility to ensure that the use of our brand is protected. Surf Life Saving uses these images and marks in a number of places and in many important ways, including on our patrol uniforms and equipment to designate official surf lifesavers and property, and on licensed product.

Licensed application of these marks on retail merchandise assists in generating revenue for the organisation through royalty payments and bringing greater awareness of our organisation. In the past 12 months, SLSA has signed new licenses across children’s publishing, sunglasses, plush toys and homewares to further increase our royalty revenue stream. These complement our established licensed merchandise program which includes sunscreen, towels and sporting goods. Additional product categories continue to be investigated for the coming patrol season and we are excited about the potential for our new public online store which will add an incremental revenue stream to our activities.

Fiona Crockett General Manager, Business Development and Communications


O U R D I G I TA L A N D S O C I A L M E D I A F O OT PR I N T A S AT 30 J U N E 2018

34,676 UNIQUE MONTHLY VISITORS TO SLS.COM.AU

71,500 FACEBOOK FOLLOWERS

17,500 INSTAGRAM FOLLOWERS

13,000 TWITTER FOLLOWERS

107,000 SURFLINE EDM SUBSCRIBERS


Section 02: SLSA Operations

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Partnerships

Surf Life Saving Australia thanks our corporate and government partners who have supported us in 2017–18.

M A J O R N AT I O N A L PA R T N ER S

PA R T N ER

SPONSORS

G OV ER N M EN T PA R T N ER S

E V EN T S U PP O R T ER S

37


Section 02: SLSA Operations

39

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Corporate Services

server consolidation and migration to an improved Cloud platform, resulting in enhanced security and cost savings. • Launch of new electronic forms for safeguarding children and registering complaints. • Enhancements for SurfCom incident response and real time mapping, enabling quicker incident response times.

O U R S TA F F

OV E RV I E W The Corporate Services portfolio is responsible for governance, risk management, finance, human resources and information technology (IT). During the past year, regular risk management group meetings have been held with compliance and risk registers updated and presented to the Finance Audit and Compliance Committee monthly. A risk appetite continuum was developed and is now in place. IT completed a number of enhancements as outlined within this report. In addition, following a whole of movement review by Deloitte, the SLSA Board made a significant investment in upgrading SLSA’s IT infrastructure. The IT Upgrade Project is progressing on budget, in scope and on schedule as at the end of the financial year and will see significant improvements and efficiencies for the movement whilst at the same time encouraging innovative solutions which will ultimately make the lives of members easier.

N AT I O N A L I C T U N I T (N I C T U) The NICTU provides a range of services to the organisation as well as to the SLSA

office. The business and IT support operation is open 7 days a week, 365 days a year to ensure that volunteers and administrators can obtain assistance and support when required. In the last season alone, the team have successfully dealt with more than 8,000 individual support requests from club officers, administrators, patrol members, and duty officers. Our range of services are extensive, covering sophisticated web-based applications, websites, apps, connections between and to other systems, and extending through to the provision of training and support across our vast array of platforms. Some major NICTU highlights of the season include: • The Members Area was upgraded to a new version providing a seamless experience to the members. • The Sport Event Management System (SEMS) has been enhanced further and successfully used at the National IRB Championships. • The new Patrol Operations App with enhanced functionality is ready for release for the 2018-2019 season. • Planned IT upgrade with application and infrastructure updates including

During 2017-18, SLSA’s team of paid staff has continued to collectively demonstrate dedication and commitment to the national organisation. The majority of the staff work at Surf House at Bondi Beach in Sydney, with a number of others based in other states. SLSA continues to place significant prioritisation on developing and implementing people development strategies, ensuring we are enhancing our work environment and workplace practices for our staff. The business plan strategies that have been implemented in 2017/18 include: • Continued development of the SLSA Internal Professional Development Plan and ensuring access to development opportunities by implementation of an e-learning tool for staff. • Robust on-boarding procedures. • Fostering a community atmosphere by the introduction of a social committee and regular team building events. SLSA conducts an annual employee satisfaction survey. The outputs from this survey are used to identify areas of improvement. SLSA will focus on embedding the SLSA values and behaviours into everyday business initiatives in 2018/19. Our organisational structure can be found at the end of this section. Staff in state centres and branches report to their own Boards and management teams and are therefore not included in this section.


40

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

monthly staff meetings where any employment related issues that affect all staff are discussed. 28% of SLSA staff access formal flexible working arrangements.

S TA FF T U R N OV ER Staff turnover during the past year has seen a decrease of 14% (7 FTE) from 2016/17. SLSA has several strategies within the annual business plan which focus on increasing employee satisfaction rates, and the development of and implementation of retention strategies.

EQ UA L O PP O R T U N I T Y SLSA meets all legislative requirements in terms of equal opportunity and a biasfree workplace.

WO R K H E A LT H A N D S A FE T Y

R EM U N ER AT I O N We seek to remunerate our employees consistent with the not-for-profit sector and our formal research indicates that salaries offered are in line with those offered by similar organisations. Our remuneration includes fringe benefit packages which allow us, within Australian Taxation Office guidelines, to provide a proportion of an employee’s income as a tax-exempt fringe benefit.

PER F O R M A N C E R E V I E W S A N D I N D I V I D UA L D E V ELO PM EN T PL A N S All employees participate in formal annual performance reviews. These are complemented by regular progress meetings with their manager throughout the year. Each employee has an individual performance development plan for the year which aligns to the business plan key performance indicators (KPIs). The

individual plans also focus on enhancing the behaviours and competencies of each employee which includes the identification of personal/professional development opportunities. SLSA allocates an amount within the annual budget for professional development for staff.

WO R K PL AC E R EL AT I O N S In 2017/18 our staff operated under an enterprise agreement which covered general terms and conditions of employment and provides the flexibility to deal with non-standard work hours. Our staff have now successfully transitioned from an enterprise agreement to individual contracts, and an overarching staff handbook. The nature of surf lifesaving activities requires significant amounts of weekend work and under the terms of the employment contract, our employees are entitled to time-in-lieu for work undertaken on weekends. We have

For the most part our employees work in normal business office conditions and are not exposed to any undue hazards. We have consistently promoted a healthy and safe work environment, which is ergonomically sound. There were no Workcover claims during the year. SLSA provides staff with work health and safety and risk management training and completed all fire safety warden training requirements. SLSA provides an Employee Assistance Program for all employees. Many of our staff are also volunteer surf lifesavers and from time to time are engaged in high-risk activities in the performance of those duties. In these situations, they are protected by the full range of SLSA policies and insurances that apply to all members.

Adam Weir Chief Operating Officer (2017/2018)

Staff Statistics F/T FTE

P/T FTE

Casual

Fixed term Contracts

Overall FTE

Turnover

Gender

Tenure

1.8

1.2

9

40

12 (31%)

F – 57.5% M – 42.5%

3 yrs

1.8

1.2

14.6

42.6

19 (45%)

F – 61% M - 39%

2.7 yrs

2017–18 28 2016–17 25


Pathways Coordinator

Research Assistant

Events Officer

Learning & Development Assistant

Research Coordinator

Events Officer

Venue Manager

Sport Development Coordinator

Public Safety Coordinator

Lifesaving Officer

Event Manager

Learning & Development Coordinator

Lifesaving Operations Manager

Sport Manager

Learning & Development Manager

Coastal Risk & Safety Manager

Portfolio Admin Coordinator

GM Capacity and Capability

Participation Manager

EA to CEO

Webstore Assistant

Accounts/ Shop Admin

Assistant Accountant

Finance Manager

Data Architect

Senior System Administrator

Senior Systems Analysts

Support Officer

Senior Support Officer

Senior Support Officer

ICT Team Leader

ICT Manager

GM Corporate Services

Chief Executive Officer

People and Culture Manager

Executive Management

Partnerships Executive (Vacant)

Partnerships Manager

Media & Public Relations Manager

Senior Management

Graphic Designer P/T

Senior Graphic Designer P/T

Digital Communications Executive

Marketing Executive

Marketing, Communications & Licensing Manager

GM Business Development and Communications

Management

SLS Foundation Separate Org Chart

Customer Experience Manager

Commercial Manager

People & Culture Manager

Fundraising Strategy & Development Manager

Operational

Head of Foundation

Section 02: SLSA Operations 41

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Organisational Chart


Section 02: SLSA Operations

43

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

The Surf Life Saving Foundation

PH I L A N T H R O PI C AC T I V I T I E S In the 2017/18 financial year we were pleased to have recorded 21,975 Guardians of the Surf in our regular monthly giving program. We also had 18,578 active donors who gave a total of 27,933 single donations and contributed $1.8M. We have seen an increase in the average gift across all national appeal campaigns in 2017/18 which has led to an increase in income for appeals both through renewing past support and acquiring new supporters. The number of our lead supporters (those who give a gift of $1,000 or greater) totalled 38 donors and their collective generosity exceeded $193,193. This year saw the introduction of a Donor Newsletter, focusing on keeping our donors in touch with what is happening in the Surf Life Saving community. Regardless of donation channel or the dollar value, all of our donors are helping to fund vital programs and services that allow us to confidently plan ahead and invest in Surf Life Saving, so that our volunteers can continue their crucial community service now and into the future.

BEQUESTS A bequest to Surf Life Saving is an investment in the future, ensuring our beaches remain safe now and for generations to come. The total number of known ‘Circle of Friends’ program members rose to 535 nationally. Many of those who wish to leave a gift in their Will continue to target their gifts to specific areas of interest, be it equipment, training or priority projects. It is encouraging to see the increased level of engagement. The ‘10,000 Club’ program encourages Surf Life Saving members to leave a minimum of either $10,000 or 10% of their estate to their own club. This allows SLSC members to consider their own club as a beneficiary in their will.

“THE GRANT SEEKING UNIT ACHIEVED EXCELLENT RESULTS AGAIN THIS YEAR SECURING $4.8M IN GRANT FUNDING FOR THE MOVEMENT.”

CO M M E R C I A L AC T I V I T I E S The SLS Foundation operates one of Australia’s largest ‘House and Land’ lottery programs. It comprises six house lotteries, a loyalty program (Champions Club) and a number of smaller ‘limited lotteries’ for gold bullion. The revenue gained from our lottery program remained steady compared to the previous year and the Champions Club membership remained strong with more than 47,000 members actively participating. This financial year saw an exciting change to our Champions Club program following feedback from our members. The change included cash giveaways for the first time. Digital marketing remains a key focus for growth as we continuously review our advertising partnerships and improve the quality of our online content such as virtual tours, more winners’ stories and

website enhancements. We are committed to improving the overall customer experience with an objective to increase revenue and maintain our position as a competitive and attractive offer within the prize home lotteries market.

G R A N T S E E K I N G U N I T (G S U) The Grant Seeking Unit achieved excellent results again this year securing $4.8M in grant funding for the movement and lodging 406 grants, an increase of 9.1% on the previous year. This year has seen a number of ‘firsts’ achieved for the movement with Surf Life Saving New South Wales and their clubs raising an unprecedented $2.1M in grant funding, an increase of $1.2M on the previous year. Record results were also achieved for Surf Life Saving Tasmania and Life Saving Victoria with both states and their respective clubs having achieved their


44

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

highest return in grant funding since the GSU was created in 2009. Surf Life Saving Queensland repeated their outstanding prior year performance with over $1M in grant funding being achieved for their programs and clubs. The GSU, with the support of the states and territories, continues to work closely with the volunteers at a grassroots level, assisting to alleviate the pressure of raising valuable funds that enable them to continue their vital work in communities throughout Australia.

by the SLS Foundation in accordance with the terms of the Trust Deed of the Foundation Perpetuity Trust; and • The withdrawable component ($27.7M) - which includes funds that have been directly invested by Surf Life Saving entities. All of the monies in the Fund are pooled within three investment options (shortterm, medium-term and long-term), all with their own distinct investment allocations. By pooling funds into these three investment options, the Fund is able to access large scale and specialised investment resources that would not otherwise be available to Surf Life Saving entities, to maximise their net investment returns. The cost of administering the Fund is borne by the SLS Foundation, with no fees charged to investors or retained by the Fund. An independent Investment Committee provides oversight and strategic advice on the effective investment of the Fund.

S U R F LI F E S AV I N G R E S C U E FUND The Surf Life Saving Rescue Fund (“Fund”) is a charitable investment scheme operated by the SLS Foundation. The Fund can accept investments only on behalf of Surf Life Saving entities that are members of, or affiliated with, SLSA. The objective of the Fund is to maximise the net (after fees) earnings of the funds under management at an acceptable level of risk that protects the capital value of the investments. The Fund has total funds of $45.7M under management as at 30th June 2018 in two components: • The Perpetuity component ($18.0M) - which includes funds held in trust

Melanie Thompson Head of SLS Foundation

H I G H LI G H T S 2017/18 FINANCIAL YEAR A TOTAL OF

$10.8M DISTRIBUTED TO SURF LIFE SAVING ENTITIES

$6.0M RETURNING TO THE MOVEMENT THROUGH PHILANTHROPIC AND COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES

$4.8M RAISED FOR STATE ENTITIES AND CLUBS THROUGH DIRECT FUNDING REQUESTS FOR SURF LIFE SAVING ENTITIES BY THE SLS FOUNDATION GRANT SEEKING UNIT.


Section 02: SLSA Operations

45

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter Service–Northern OV E RV I E W As reported last year, the delivery of aeromedical services in the Northern Rivers Region was to be assumed by a new operator commencing April 2017. Under the successful stewardship of the

Company’s current and past boards, the need for aeromedical services in northern NSW has been well demonstrated. In early July 2017, proceedings commenced in the Supreme Court of New South Wales by Northern NSW Helicopter

Rescue Service Limited who, on 27th April 2017, commenced its own independent operations to provide helicopter emergency medical services in the North Coast, Northern Rivers and Northern Tablelands region from a new base at Lismore Airport. SLSA joined the action as a co-defendant to our company. The parties settled the proceedings, with the funds being distributed to NNSW and SLSA to be applied to support the helicopter rescue service and surf lifesaving programs in northern New South Wales. Mr Tozer OAM, Chairman of Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd said, “I am pleased that the matter was resolved in accordance with Northern’s constitution and contractual obligations as it has always been the Northern Board’s direction to ensure its staff were re-employed and that all funds raised and assets acquired were distributed in accordance with Northern’s constitutional requirements.”

B OA R D O F D I R E C TO R S

The Board of Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd met through the year ended 30 June 2018 on 13 occasions, including Special General Meetings and at the Annual General Meeting Northern Region Board of Directors Director

Completed years of service

Meetings

Warren Tozer OAM

24

Paul Muldoon

15

Chairman

13/13

13/13

Kevin Gosling

16

13/13

John Griffin

9

3/13

Peter George AM

4

10/13

Geoff King OAM

6

6/13

Peter Fahey

6

9/13

Kris Beavis (ex officio)

9

Company Secretary

13/13

Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors, drawing on substantial business experience across various industries. The Board takes this opportunity to also recognise the awarding of Order of Australia medal to Mr Geoff King for his community work, which includes his volunteer work for Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty. Limited.

Kris Beavis Company Secretary


46

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S L S A O P E R AT I O N S

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter Service–Southern

INTRODUCTION The last twelve months has been challenging in many regards but more search and rescue missions have been flown this year and our reach throughout NSW continues to grow.

AV I AT I O N O PE R AT I O N S The new operating model has been embedded into our systems over the last year and the collaboration of SAR Helicopters Australia and our company has ensured that there has been no impact on our service provision. With the change to the way ambulance helicopters are deployed, we have entrenched ourselves as a state-wide helicopter search and rescue service. This saw our team travelling to many far

locations well outside our traditional coastal fringe in Sydney and southern NSW, responding to requests for assistance from our tasking partners – NSW Police Force, Surf Life Saving NSW, NSW State Emergency Service, Fire and Rescue NSW, Australian Maritime Safety Authority and the Australian Federal Police. Our helicopters spent much of the summer on the north coast of NSW searching for missing swimmers and bushwalkers; we then headed to Taree with the SES to provide flood rescue operations. Our southern NSW base continues to be an important asset to the regional communities and they have undertaken search taskings as far afield as Wagga Wagga and Albury.

SRHRS Snapshot 2017-18 Number of available helicopters

2

Coastal Surveillance Flights Number of missions

5

Coastal Surveillance Flights Number of hours flown

5

Search and rescue Number of missions

247

Search and rescue Number of hours flown

280

Training - Number of flights

15

Training - Number of hours flown

19

Other - Number of flights

34

Other - Number of hours flown

29

Total - Number of flights flown

301

Total - Number of hours flown

333


Section 02: SLSA Operations

Our teams have completed a number of important multi-agency exercises and members of our management team sit on local, regional and state emergency management committees. Our Sydney base hosts the Sydney Metropolitan Regional Emergency Management Committee and the facilities are being proposed as Sydney’s alternate Emergency Operations Centre should a major incident occur in the CBD or greater Sydney Basin. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority conducted a review of our Remote Operators Certificate (ReOC) and Chief Pilot arrangements to operate Remotely Piloted Aircraft (“Drones”) and we have had our ReOC renewed with several improvements to operations allowing us to operate larger RPAs and to operate these aircraft at night.

B U S I N E S S D E V E LO PM E N T Our long-standing partnership with Westpac has been renewed for a further five years, an outstanding announcement as we celebrate our 45th anniversary as Australia’s oldest rescue helicopter service. We recognise the brilliant support and friendship provided to us by the Westpac’s CEO, Brian Hartzer and his marketing & sponsorship team, led by Pat Cunningham. Our Westpac led fundraisers, particularly our Sydney Gala Ball and our annual Golf Day, are vital sources of revenue that are above and beyond our naming rights sponsorship arrangements. The Service featured again in the bank’s latest heartfelt marketing campaign. Our commercial training programs continue to provide industry recognition and many emergency service workers and aviation personnel have been through our Training Academy this year. The Service remains at the forefront of industry training standards with team members sitting on the federal government’s various national industry training reference committees. Our CEO is the Deputy Chair of the Aviation Industry Reference Committee (IRC) and is chairing the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) on RPA training standards. We also have representation on the Public Safety IRC and we are chairing the review intro search and rescue training standards. Cash Bingo (“Housie”) remains a strong

47

and constant program and we thank our registered clubs across Sydney, Central Coast and South Coast for their ongoing support. We acknowledge the great support we receive from our corporate partners particularly Westpac, Club Liverpool, Randwick Council and Thales. Of course, we are very grateful to the NSW State Government through the Department of Justice, Office of Emergency Management for their backing.

B OA R D O F D I R E C TO R S Following the transition to a new operating model, several Directors resigned, including Chairman, Dave Owens APM. To him, Daniel Dwyer and David Donohue APM, we thank you for your leadership and encouragement whilst you were members of the Board. Following this, Peter George AM was appointed as Chairman and SLSA president Graham Ford AM joined the Board as the Member’s Representative. To all Directors, thank you for your guidance and support.

S TA F F Finally, and as I do every report, I extend my sincere gratitude to our wonderful staff. Staff numbers have been significantly reduced following the transition to the new operating model, however the workload has not changed. The team is working at full capacity but remain passionate about working for such a vital community service. Your Herculean efforts are much appreciated and admired. To all my team, thank you!

CO N C LU S I O N Whilst we reflect on a successful twelve months, it’s important to be confident of what our future looks like – it is exciting and it will be a great lead up to our 50th birthday. Only recently the Board has endorsed the strategic direction for the Service: • Border to Border operations • Concentrate on rapid-response search and rescue (SAR) capabilities • Reinforce our expertise in white and blue water and strengthen our inland SAR capabilities • Integrate our aviation operations to include Remote Piloted Aircraft • Three bases – Sydney, Southern and Northern NSW • Our resources – financial, personnel and operational (helicopters, equipment) – allow us to meet the needs, expectations and specifications of our stakeholders. A bright future, growth and a reason to exist will motivate our people. We will work with our tasking agents in specifically developing the next stages of our history – a rescue helicopter service that meets the needs of the rescuers and those that we rescue.

Stephen Leahy Chief Executive Officer, Company Secretary

The Board met formally on eight occasions during the year: Southern Region Board of Directors Director

Directorship

David Owens APM

Chairman (to 2nd October 2017)

Meetings 2/2

Peter George AM

Member’s Representative (to 2nd November 2017)

2/2

Peter George AM

Chairman (from 2nd November 2017)

6/6

David Donohue APM

Director (to 2nd October 2017)

2/2

Daniel Dwyer

Director (to 2nd October 2017)

2/2

Graham Ford AM

Member’s Representative (from 2nd November 2017)

6/6

Guy Ford

Director

4/6

Jim Henry

NSW Government Representative (from 19th November 2015)

3/6

Gordon Lang

Director

8/8

Steven Pearce AFSM

Director (from 2nd November 2018)

6/6

Stephen Leahy JP

Company Secretary, Chief Executive Officer

8/8


SECTION 03

Governance & Oversight


50

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

GOVERNANCE & OVERSIGHT

Governance & Oversight

OV E RV I E W Since 1907, when a small number of Sydney surf lifesaving clubs formed the organisation now known as SLSA, we have evolved into a highly federated and geographically disperse organisation, made up of 493 entities/groups including 314 separately incorporated SLSCs, 17 regional branches (in NSW and Queensland), 83 Support Operations (regional rescue and response teams), 67 paid Lifeguard services and seven state and territory centres. These various separate entities are not subsidiaries of SLSA and have a variety of legal and reporting structures; therefore, their financial results are not consolidated here. We are the peak policy and decision-making body for the Surf Life Saving movement. Under our constitution, our members are: • State centres, represented by their appointed directors have the right to be present, debate and vote at our general meetings. • Affiliated Clubs, which shall be represented by an individual nominated from time to time in writing by the club to the relevant state centre. The nominee shall have the right to be present and to debate on behalf of the Affiliated Club at General Meetings, but shall have no voting rights. • Life Members of SLSA, have the right to be present and to debate at our general meetings, but with no voting rights. • All individual members of affiliated SLSCs, who have the right to be present at general meetings, but with no voting or debating rights. Each year, prior to the commencement of the season, individual members sign an application for joint membership of SLSA, their state centre and their club. Where the members are less than 18 years of age, the membership form is signed by a parent or legal guardian. This detailed membership form meets a number of legal requirements, including indemnification of SLSA in the event of any claim arising from a surf lifesaving activity, as well as outlining a member’s individual liability in the unlikely event of a windup of SLSA. SLSA also operates one subsidiary company to provide rescue helicopter services in NSW. Other rescue helicopter services operate in Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia through their respective state centres. The SLS Foundation which is also a wholly owned subsidiary, undertakes a national fundraising role on behalf of the movement.

PAT R O N S O F S U R F LI F E S AV I N G AU S T R A LI A C H I EF PAT RO N S His Royal Highness Prince Philip KG KT OM GBE AC QSO PC Duke of Edinburgh His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia

PAT RO N S His Excellency General the Honourable David Hurley AC DSC (Retd) Governor of New South Wales His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC Governor of Queensland His Excellency the Honourable Hien Van Le AO Governor of South Australia Her Excellency the Honourable Kerry Sanderson AC Governor of Western Australia Her Excellency the Honourable Kate Warner AC Governor of Tasmania His Honour the Honourable John Hardy OAM Administrator of the Northern Territory

V I C E PAT RO N The Honourable Malcolm Turnbull MP Prime Minister of Australia

L I FE G OV ER N O R Alan Whelpton AO Sir Adrian Curlewis CVO CBE* * Denotes deceased


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GOVERNANCE & OVERSIGHT

Surf Life Saving Australia Board

OV E RV I E W

SLSA Roles and Responsibilities

As one of the largest volunteer organisations in Australia, we depend on the contribution of our volunteer members for everything from patrolling beaches, to providing input for the strategic direction for the organisation. Board and Committee members freely give up their time for the benefit of Surf Life Saving.

The key roles and responsibilities of SLSA are: a. Responsible for the global relationship with ILS. Coordination of activities in the Asia Pacific region. Tracking international activities undertaken by Surf Life Saving movement. b. Responsible for relations with allied agencies (AUSTSWIM, RLSSA, Swimming Australia, Australian Coastal Alliance etc.) and other peak organisations (e.g. Australian Water Safety Council, National SeaChange Taskforce etc.). c. Responsible for the relationship, management and delivery of all representation to Federal government.

S U R F LI F E S AV I N G AU S T R A LI A B OA R D

d. Responsible for the facilitation, coordination and delivery of agreed national administrative programs in insurance.

The peak policy and decision body for Surf Life Saving in Australia, the SLSA Board is made up of the President of SLSA, seven Appointed Directors from each state and the Northern Territory, four Independent Directors and the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of SLSA. The Board delegates the management of SLSA to the CEO who seeks support and advice from the Executive Management Group (EMG).

e. Responsible for the facilitation, coordination and delivery of agreed national administrative programs in Information Technology and Communications (ITC). f. Responsible for the facilitation, coordination and delivery of agreed national administrative framework in disciplinary and grievance. g. Responsible for coordinating the development of a safety framework and guidelines to ensure the protection and benefit of our members. h. Responsible for the facilitation, coordination and development of a national lifesaving, sport and education/leadership development framework and facilitation of national Committees. i. Responsible for the coordination of the development of member training and education through curriculum and resource development with and through the state centres.

Name

Position

Graham Ford AM

President SLSA (Chair)

j. Responsible for all national sporting events and delivery of the national high performance programs with and through the states.

John Baker ESM

Deputy President SLSA Appointed Director SLSSA

k. Responsible for co-ordinating relevant research to foster innovation and achieve our vision.

Mark Fife OAM

Appointed Director SLSQ

David Murray

Appointed Director SLSNSW

Grant Barnett

Appointed Director SLSNT

Stephen Godfrey

Appointed Director SLST

Tom Mollenkopf

Appointed Director LSV

Craig SmithGander

Appointed Director SLSWA

Lyn Barratt

Independent Director

Melanie Evans

Independent Director

Christine Hopton OAM

Independent Director

Martin Walsh

Independent Director

Melissa King

Chief Executive Officer

l. Responsible for developing the national member development programs (such as leadership, recognition and history) and aligning with the states through the creation of national resources to support these programs. m. Responsible for SLSA brand protection, reputation and development. n. Responsible for the management and delivery of national marketing, sponsorship and business development programs. o. Responsible for the management and delivery of national fund raising in accordance with agreed national and state business outcomes. p. Facilitate communication between states.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Board

Graham Ford AM SLSA President Elected Director Graham was elected as President of SLSA in 2010. He brings a wealth of surf lifesaving knowledge, coupled with a strong business background. Graham is a Life Member and Patron of Bronte SLSC and President of the International Life Saving Federation and he has held many senior roles at club, branch and national levels. In 2016, Graham was made a Member of the Order of Australia for his services to Surf Life Saving. Graham is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

David Murray SLSNSW President Appointed Director David was elected as SLSNSW President in May 2016. He is a Life Member of Curl Curl SLSC and has held a number of roles with Surf Life Saving over the years. David has extensive business experience having owned his own business for 35 years, coupled with consulting for Australian Private Boards and is a Director of TNS Distribution.

John Baker ESM SLSA Deputy President SLSSA President Appointed Director

Melissa King Chief Executive Officer

John, a Company Director, has been President of Surf Life Saving SA since June 2011, and was appointed as a Director on the SLSA Board in January 2012. John has been a member of Brighton SLSC in SA since 1977. He is a former state Director of Lifesaving and is a current crew member with the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service.

Melissa was Chief Executive Officer from July 2015 to July 2018. Prior to this Melissa was GM Communications and Business Development at SLSA and an integral part of the change management program. Prior to SLSA, Melissa’s experience spanned Corporate Affairs, Partnerships, Business Development and Marketing for Sydney Opera House, Prime Minister and Cabinet, Governance Institute and Sydney Children’s Hospital Foundation.

Mark Fife OAM SLSQ President Appointed Director

Grant Barnett SLSNT President Appointed Director

Mark is a Life Member of SLSA, a member of SLSA’s Hall of Fame and has been named as the Australian Surf Lifesaver of the Year in 1997 and the Australian Volunteer of the Year in 2007. Mark is also a Life Member of the Broadbeach SLSC, the South Coast Surf Life Saving Branch, and Surf Life Saving Queensland. In 2013, he was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia. Mark was appointed as a director of SLSA in August 2016.

Grant has been active in the surf lifesaving community for the past 14 years. He has held various positions including President of the North Queensland Branch. After relocating to the Northern Territory for work, Grant was appointed to the Surf Life Saving NT Board in 2013 and has since been elected the President of SLSNT.


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Craig Smith-Gander SLSWA President Appointed Director Craig has been in surf lifesaving all his life having had experience as a boat rower and sweep at North Cottesloe, where he is a former Captain and President and is a Life Member. As President of SLSWA since 2014, he has held state and national roles in surf sports. Craig has extensive business and commercial experience, is a company director and business owner.

Stephen Godfrey SLST President Appointed Director

Tom Mollenkopf LSV President Appointed Director

Stephen has worked extensively in the area of public administration and is currently the Manager, Strategic Relations at PSMA Australia Ltd. He has been President of Surf Life Saving Tasmania since September 2011, and was appointed as a Director on the SLSA Board in October 2011. Stephen has been involved with Surf Life Saving since 1967 and is a Life Member of Carlton Park SLSC and SLST.

Tom is Chief Executive Officer of the Peter Cullen Trust and holds a series of Board roles, including with the International Water Association, Dandenong Market and Wyong Water in addition to being President of Life Saving Victoria. He was the CEO of the Australian Water Association from 2007 until 2013. He is qualified B.Juris, LL.B, MBA, FAICD and FGIA. Tom is a Life Member of Point Leo SLSC.

Lyn Barratt Independent Director

Melanie Evans Independent Director

Christine Hopton OAM Independent Director

Martin Walsh Independent Director

Lyn has worked extensively in Occupational Health & Safety and Risk Management for over 20 years in Tasmania, Victoria and NSW. Lyn currently is the Health Safety & Environment Manager for Parks Victoria. She previously was the national Safety, Health, Environment and Quality Manager for an international dredging company specialising in the marine environment. Lyn has been involved in Surf Life Saving since 1985 as cofounder of the Port Sorell SLSC in Tasmania where she filled several roles over 12 years.

Melanie Evans, is currently Head of Retail Banking for ING Direct Australia. Previously she was at the Westpac Group where she had worked for over 14 years. Having grown up in the surf club, Melanie has kept abreast of our organisation over many years and brings with her expertise and experience of Board and Committee corporate governance, financial management, risk management, strategic planning and compliance.

Christine has an extensive media background having worked in the newspaper and television industries, public relations, marketing and communications for more than 30 years. Christine has been involved in Surf Life Saving for over 15 years, joining as a Nipper parent and holding positions on the Avalon Beach SLSC junior committee before gaining her Bronze Medallion in 2000. Christine is a former President of Avalon Beach SLSC.

Martin Walsh is a member of Lorne SLSC and Life Member of Life Saving Victoria. Professionally, Martin is a Non-Executive Director and Consultant. Previously a Partner of both Deloitte and Ernst & Young, he is a current Director of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. He is also the current Chairman of the national SLS Foundation and a previous Director of LSV.


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SLSA Board Governance Charter

B OA R D M E E T I N G S A N D ACC E S S TO M A N AG E M E N T The Board meets at least five times each year. The Appointed Directors are selected by their respective state or territory CEOs.

M ANAGE ME NT OF S IGNIFIC ANT BUS INE SS RIS K S 2017/18 has seen further refinement to our risk management processes with the introduction of a formal risk appetite continuum. The Board regularly considers the Risk Management Reporting and top ten risks, and their mitigation strategies.

CO D E O F CO N D U C T The code of conduct for Directors, setting out expectations and limitations is contained within the SLSA Board Governance Charter.

ACCO U N TA B I LI T Y The SLSA Board has adopted a Governance Charter. Key aspects of the charter are detailed below.

T H E R O LE O F T H E B OA R D A N D CO M M I T T E E S As one of Australia’s largest volunteer movements, our Board and Committee structure is critical to ensuring volunteer representation in key decisions. The various committees outlined in this section are advisory only, however they can be empowered by the Board and meet as required. Their recommendations are considered by either the CEO, the Executive Management Group, or in some instances the Board. The Board, through the CEO, has ultimate supervision of the committees.

T H E R O LE O F T H E D I R E C TO R S A N D M A N AG E M E N T The day-to-day business of SLSA is managed by the CEO, under the direction of the Board. The Board may exercise

all the powers of the company, except any power the Corporations Act or the constitution requires the company to exercise in a general meeting of members. The Board is responsible for the appointment of a CEO to manage and administer the organisation. The CEO is ultimately accountable to the Board however, the CEO is accountable to the President (as Chairman of the Board) on a day-to-day basis.

B OA R D CO M P O S I T I O N The Board comprises seven state centre appointed directors, one from each state and the Northern Territory, (the ‘voting members’ of SLSA) who represent our broader membership; the President (Chairman), who is also elected by the Appointed Directors, and the CEO (nonvoting). Up to four additional Independent Directors may also be appointed to the Board. The current Board has four appointed Independent Directors.

The Board is accountable to the members of SLSA. The Constitution lists the following categories of membership: • State centres – debating and voting rights at SLSA general meetings. • Affiliated Clubs – debating but not voting rights at SLSA general meetings. • Life Members – debating but not voting rights at SLSA general meetings. • All members of affiliated clubs – can be present, but no debating or voting rights at SLSA general meetings. The individual membership category is divided into various other sub-categories set out in the regulations.

I N D E PE N D E N C E At the commencement of each Board meeting, the Chair asks for Directors to declare conflicts of interest in any agenda items. Under the Board’s structure, seven Directors are appointed by their respective state centre. The Chair ensures that all state appointed directors fulfil their fiduciary duties to SLSA.


Section 03: Governance & Oversight

E T H I C A L S TA N DA R DS The Board acknowledges the need for, and continued maintenance of, the highest standards of corporate governance practice, ethical conduct by all Board members and open and transparent processes. Declaring any conflict of interest and/or pecuniary interest in agenda items of Board meetings ensures that, where appropriate, Directors leave the meeting until discussion on the matter is concluded.

CO M PLI A N C E I S S U E S SLSA is a company limited by guarantee under the Corporations Act 2001 (Commonwealth). SLSA is also a registered charitable institution under the NSW Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW). The advisors noted earlier, Legal Counsel Ian Fullagar, BDO and JLT also ensure compliance with relevant legislation and regulation.

O B TA I N I N G I N D E PE N D E N T A DV I C E The Board is assisted in aspects of its operations with external advice. Ian Fullagar was appointed to provide legal services at the Annual General Meeting in October 2017 for a period of 12 months. Our auditors, BDO conduct an annual internal audit, giving the Board independent assurance and advice on financial management matters. Jardine Lloyd Thompson Australia Pty Ltd (JLT) was re-appointed after thorough a tender process to provide insurance advice and services. Throughout the year, SLSA also sought advice from a range of other external consultants including, WattsNext, who conducted reviews of HR policies, Ernst & Young, who provided modelling for the SLS Foundation and MI Associates who provided advice on Surf Sport.

CO M PE N S AT I O N Directors receive no compensation for their services. Travel and accommodation costs associated with meetings are met by SLSA.

TR AINING At times, presentations by outside experts on strategic matters are made to the Board. Directors have also been given

55

the opportunity to attend workshops and other conferences relating to corporate governance at SLSA’s expense.

S U B S I D I A RY E N T I T I E S As noted elsewhere, SLSA wholly owns a number of subsidiary bodies. The SLS Foundation raises funds nationally and in each state for SLSA. Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Services P/L and Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Services P/L (up to April 2017) provided helicopter rescue services in NSW. Surf Sports Australia P/L is another subsidiary of SLSA, primarily concerned with professional sports events. The financial results of these four subsidiaries are included in SLSA’s accounts.

F I D U C I A RY D U T I E S Monthly financial statements for SLSA and subsidiary companies are provided to the Finance Audit and Compliance Committee (FACC). These monthly statements together with monthly accounts are submitted to Directors for endorsement at the subsequent Board Meeting. All financial accounts and reports are overseen by the FACC and, on their recommendation, adopted

or otherwise by the Board throughout the year. The FACC also oversees risk management, compliance and governance including HR reporting. The Board has also established a Governance Group to oversee ICT governance. Since the commencement of SLSA’s IT upgrade project the SLSA board has created additional project oversight groups specific to this project. These groups are the Project Advisory Group and Project Governance Group.

PAT HWAYS TO B OA R D A N D CO M M I T T E E M E M B E R S H I P As one of the largest volunteer organisations in Australia, we are dependent on the contribution of our volunteer members for everything from patrolling beaches, to providing the overall management and operational delivery of frontline services and activities. Broadly speaking a person can become a member of the Board or a committee by being appointed by either SLSA or by a state centre. The skills base required for these positions is set out in the SLSA Board Governance Charter and also in the SLSA Regulations.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

GOVERNANCE & OVERSIGHT

Governance Structure of SLSA

173, 8 65 M E M B E R S

Organisational Structure

Governance Structure

National Body Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) Surf Life Saving Australia Subsidiaries

Executive Management Group SLSA Board

Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service

Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service

The Surf Life Saving Foundation

Surf Sports Australia

Life Saving Victoria (LSV)

Surf Life Saving Western Australia (SLSWA)

Surf Life Saving South Australia (SLSSA)

Surf Life Saving Tasmania (SLST)

Surf Life Saving Northern Territory (SLSNT)

58 Clubs

57 Clubs

31 Clubs

22 Clubs

14 Clubs

3 Clubs

28 Support Ops

9 Support Ops

20 Support Ops

11 Support Ops

5 Support Ops

9 Support Ops

1 Support Op

20 ALS

19 ALS

14 ALS

9 ALS

2 ALS

1 ALS

2 ALS

Surf Life Saving New South Wales (SLSNSW)

Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ)

11 Regional Branches

6 Regional Branches

129 Clubs


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GOVERNANCE & OVERSIGHT

Boards & Committees 1. E X E C U T I V E M A N AG E M E N T G RO U P

FI N A N C E, AU D I T & CO M PL I A N C E CO M M I T T EE

This is the management authority by the SLSA Board and is made up of the SLSA CEO, state CEO’s, SLSA General Managers and SLSA’s Legal Adviser.

Assists the SLSA Board in oversight of the reliability and integrity of accounting policies, financial reporting and disclosure practices. Finance, Audit & Compliance Committee (FACC)

Executive Management Group

Name

Position

Name

Position

Michael Martin AM

Chair

Melissa King

CEO, SLSA (Chair)

Melissa King

CEO, SLSA

John Brennan OAM

CEO, SLSQ

Neil Morarty OAM

Independent Member

Steven Pearce AFSM

CEO, SLSNSW

Melanie Evans

Independent Director, SLSA

Dr. Nigel Taylor ESM

CEO, LSV

Stephen Bennett

Independent Member

Tony van den Enden

CEO, SLST

Lyn Barratt

Independent Director, SLSA

Clare Harris

CEO, SLSSA

James O’Toole

CEO, SLSWA

Samantha Farrow

CEO, SLSNT

Visitors Adam Weir

Chief Operating Officer, SLSA

Greg Meagher

GM Capacity & Capability, SLSA

Fiona Crockett

GM Business Development & Communications, SLSA

Melanie Thompson

Head of Foundation

Ian Fullagar

General Legal Counsel, SLSA

N O M I N AT I O N S CO M M I T T EE Assists the SLSA Board in oversight of the reliability and integrity of accounting policies, financial reporting and disclosure practices. Nominations Committee Name

Position

Graham Ford AM

President, SLSA

Christine Hopton OAM

Independent Director, SLSA

Sarina Bratton AM

Independent Member

2 . G OV E R N A N C E CO M M I T T E E S A PP O I N T M EN T S & R EM U N ER AT I O N CO M M I T T EE Recommends the appointment of the CEO to the SLSA Board, reviews and reports proposed remuneration packages for the CEO and senior executives to the SLSA Board, and ensures adequate human resource levels within the organisation.

3. LE A R N I N G A N D D E V E LO PM E N T A DV I S O RY CO M M I T T E E To represent the views of Surf Life Saving members nationally on matters relating to learning and development. Learning and Development Advisory Committee Name

Position

Appointments and Remuneration Committee

Dr. Dean Dudley

Chair of Learning and Development

Name

Position

Pamela Simon

Learning and Development Manager, SLSA

Graham Ford AM

President, SLSA

Brianna Heaney

QLD (Youth Advisor)

Michael Martin AM

FACC Chair

Sandy Menzies

NSW

Susan Neil

NSW

Kevin Richardson

SA

Nancy Joseph

VIC

David Rylance

VIC

Digby Wilson

WA

Daryl Moss/Caroline Kearney

Volunteer of the Year


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

4 . LE A R N I N G A N D D E V E LO PM E N T M A N AG E M E N T CO M M I T T E E Coordinates the operations of the Australian Lifesaving Academy and discusses issues relating to learning and development.

6 . LI F E S AV I N G M A N AG E M E N T CO M M I T T E E The Lifesaving Management Committee is responsible for the implementation and continual improvement of lifesaving plans, programs and activities.

Learning and Development Management Committee

Lifesaving Management Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Pamela Simon

Learning and Development Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Shane Daw ESM

Coastal Risk and Safety Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Des Kerr

QLD

Murray Copas/Keiran Stone

Lifesaving Operations Manager, SLSA

Louise Cooke

NSW

Peta Lawlor

QLD

Dean Hemburrow/Kate McLauchlan

VIC

Matt Du Plessis

NSW

Leanne Johannesen

TAS

Greg Scott

VIC

Lee Patterson/Belinda Schiphorst

SA

Boyd Griggs

TAS

David Gallagher

WA

Ben Laurenson

SA

Sam Edwards

NT

Nick Pavy

WA

Trevor Radburn/Jody Hall

NT

5. LI F E S AV I N G M E M B E R A DV I S O RY CO M M I T T E E

7. S P O R T M E M B E R A DV I S O RY A N D M A N AG E M E N T CO M M I T T E E

Responsible for the development and implementation of the strategic lifesaving business of SLSA.

Responsible for the development and implementation of the strategic lifesaving business of SLSA.

Lifesaving Member Advisory Committee

Sport Member Advisory and Management Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Christopher Jacobson

Chair of Lifesaving

Andrew Buhk

Chair of Sport

Clint Swanton

QLD

Shane Knight

Sport Manager, SLSA

Stuart Harvey

NSW

Charles Melloy

QLD

Darren McLeod

VIC

Stuart Hogben

QLD

Julian Hickey

TAS

Don van Keimpema

NSW

Neil Bisset

SA

Rob Pidgeon

NSW

David Quimby

WA

Rachel Rylance

VIC

Adam Traugott

NT

Kirsty Clark

VIC

Amy Teal

Independent

Julie Kay

TAS

David Reid

Independent

Boyd Griggs

TAS

Kane Hughes/Scott Summers

Lifesaver of the Year

Pat Larven

SA

Abbey Lindley/Mel Bishop-Davis

SA

Lifesaving Advisors Richard Budd

Powercraft Advisor

Stephen Carrick

WA

Dr. Natalie Hood

Medical Advisor

Chris Inglis/Jason Wright

WA

Adam Weir

Risk Advisor

Samantha Farrow

NT

Chris Stevens

Communications Advisor

Martin Koch

NT

Greg Cahill

Lifeguard Advisor

Sport Advisors Greg Allum OAM

Technical Advisor

Wayne Druery

Event Advisor

Paul Kenny

Officiating Advisor

Kurt Wilson

Coaching Advisor/ALT Head Coach

Kristy Ellis AM

Sport Integrity Advisor

Bert Hunt

Surf Boat Advisor

Danny Short

High Performance Advisor

Dr. Shayne Baker OAM

Selection Chair


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8 . S PE C I A L PU R P O S E CO M M I T T E E S

H I S TO RY CO M M I T T EE

AU S T R A L I A N L I FEG UA R D S ERV I C E M A N AG EM EN T CO M M I T T EE

Advises, comments and submits recommendations on the collection, conservation, management and documentation of the history of surf lifesaving in Australia.

Responsible for standardising the delivery of lifeguarding services around Australia and discussing issues surrounding lifeguarding.

History Committee Name

Position

Australian Lifeguard Service Management Committee

Stan Vesper

Chair

Name

Position

Don Burchill OAM

QLD

Greg Cahill

Lifeguard Adviser (Chair)

Prue Weber

VIC

Keiran Stone/Murray Copas

Lifesaving Operations Manager, SLSA

Ken Knight BEM

TAS

Brent Manieri

NSW

Geoff Moffatt

SA

Briana Newson

VIC

Tim Tucak

WA

Leanne Johannesen

TAS

Peter Orlovich

Honorary Archivist

Ben Laurenson

SA

Nick Pavy

WA

Trevor Radburn

NT

H A L L O F FA M E CO M M I T T EE The Panel meets to discuss SLSA Hall of Fame nominations, and makes recommendations to the SLSA Board about inductions to the Hall of Fame.

M ER I TO R I O U S AWA R DS S EL EC T I O N S CO M M I T T EE Selects individuals, lifesavers, and/or groups for Meritorious Awards. Selects individual lifesavers and/or groups for the Lifesaver of the Year Award and other associate programs, awards and educational tours. Meritorious Awards Selections Committee

Hall of Fame Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Christopher Jacobson

Chair

Graham Ford AM

Chair, President SLSA

Graham Ford AM

President, SLSA

Alan Whelpton AO

NSW

Katie Dixon

NSW

Warren Rennie AM

NSW

Mark Fife OAM

QLD

Rick Wright OAM

NSW

Kirsten Phillips

QLD

Kristy Ellis AM

QLD

Quinta Turton

Portfolio Administration Coordinator, SLSA/Secretary

I C T G OV ER N A N C E G RO U P This Committee makes recommendations to the EMG on IT&T strategy, architecture, standards and policy with Surf Life Saving.

H O N O U R S CO M M I T T EE Initiates nominations to the appropriate authorities on behalf of SLSA members considered eligible for civil, sporting, community and other awards. Honours Committee

Information Technology and Telecommunications Committee Name

Position

Craig Smith-Gander

Chair

Abby Tripathi/Parry Malhotra

IT Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Melissa King

CEO, SLSA General Manager Corporate Services, SLSA (till December)

Name

Position

Mark Fife OAM

Chair

Peter George AM

Elaine Farmer OAM

SA

Adam Weir

Ken Bird OAM

QLD

Chief Operating Office, SLSA (from December)

Richard Lytham OAM

NSW

John Brennan OAM

QLD

Quinta Turton

Portfolio Administration Coordinator, SLSA/Secretary

Stephen Godfrey

Appointed Director, SLST

Tony van den Enden

TAS

Roger Johnson

Independent Member

Victoria Redwood

Independent Member


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

The Project Governance Group

ATHLETE SELECTION PANEL

Name

Position

Gabe Gossage

Independent Member

Responsible for the selection of national teams in accordance with SLSA selection policy.

Victoria Redwood

Independent Member

Melissa King

CEO, SLSA (Project Sponsor - Chair)

Abby Tripathi

ICT Manager, SLSA (Project Owner until March)

Adam Weir

Chief Operating Officer, SLSA (Project Owner since March)

Travis Klerck

Team Leader ICT, SLSA (Project Manager)

Athlete Selection Panel Name

Position

Dr. Shayne Baker OAM

Chair

Jenny Parry

QLD

Keith Caldwell

NSW

The Project Advisory Group Name

Position

David Murray

Appointed Director

Melissa King

CEO, SLSA

9. AUSTR ALIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS COMMIT TEES CO M PE T I T I O N CO M M I T T EE Competition Committee

S U R F B OAT CO M M I T T EE Responsible for overseeing the regulation, development and management of surf boat rowing in Australia. Surf Boat Committee

Name

Position

Michael Martin AM

Chair Competition Committee (Masters and Open Championships)

John Brennan OAM

Chair Competition Committee (Youth Championships)

Shane Knight

Sports Manage/Chief Executive Officer Delegate

Wayne Druery

Championship Referee (Masters and Open Championships)

Stephen Marley

Championship Referee (Youth Championships)

Stephen Leahy

Safety & Emergency Management Coordinator (Chair of S&E Committee) (Youth, Masters and Open Championships)

Name

Position

Bert Hunt

Chair/NSW

Don Cotterill

QLD

Don Alexander

SA

Geoff Wilson

WA

Jay Parkin

VIC

Alan Carville

Host Club Representative (Scarborough)

Grant Wilkinson

NSW

Shane Bowbridge

Host Club Representative (Trigg)

Russell Lamb

NSW

Tony Henderson

Event Manager, SLSA/Secretary

Nathan Perry

NSW

Greg Allum OAM

Technical Adviser

Natasha Tunny

SA

Fiona Crockett

GM BDC, SLSA/Media Representative (observing role)

Paul Chivers

External Risk Consultant (observing role)

Jim Walker, Jeff Lemarsney

Athlete Representatives


Section 03: Governance & Oversight

ORGANISING COMMITTEE Organising Committee Name

Position

Shane Knight

Sport Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Andrew Buhk

Chair of Sport/Deputy Chair

Wayne Druery

Events Advisor/Event Referee

Don Van Keimpema

Deputy Referee – Programming

Craig Williams

Deputy Referee – Contingencies and Logistics

Stephen Marley

Championship Referee - Youth

Jenny Kenny

Deputy Referee - Youth

Stephen Leahy

61

10. I N T E R N AT I O N A L LI F E S AV I N G (I L S) F E D E R AT I O N CO M M I T T E E The ILS Board of Directors oversees the business of ILS between the General Assemblies. Board of Director’s meetings are held on a regular basis at various places in the world. The ILS Committees cover areas across the activities of international lifesaving including Rescue Commission, Business Commission, Sport Commission and Drowning Prevention and Public Education Commission. International Life Saving (ILS) Federation Committee Name

Position

Graham Ford AM

ILS President

Safety and Emergency Management Coordinator

Norman Farmer ESM

President Asia Pacific and Regional Director ILS Board

Powercraft Coordinator

David Thompson

Chair ILS Sport Commission

John Brennan OAM

Championships Advisor/Competition Chair Youth

Peter George AM

Chair ILS Rescue Commission and Committees

Ian Fullagar

Legal Adviser to ILS, ILS Sport Commission and Committees

Michael Martin AM (Observer)

Competition Chair Masters/Open

Dr Natalie Hood

Medical Committee

Greg Allum OAM

Technical Adviser

Pamela Simon

Chair ILS Education Committee/ILS Rescue Commission

Paul Kenny

Officials Advisor

Chris Inglis, Jason Wright

Host State Representative

Adam Weir

Chair ILS Rescue Operations Committee/ ILS Rescue Commission

Alan Carville

Host Club Representative - Scarborough

Greg Allum OAM

ILS Sport Commission

Shane Bowbridge

Host Club Representative - Trigg

Shane Daw ESM

ILS Drowning Prevention Commission

Tony Henderson

Event Manager, SLSA

Ken Bird OAM

Venue Manager, SLSA

Hayley McGreal

Event Officer, SLSA

Kate Theodor-Gallagher

Event Operations Coordinator, SLSA

Cherie Kellett

Partnerships Manager, SLSA

Courtney Lovell

Marketing Executive, SLSA

Mel Flew


SECTION 04

Financial Report


64

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

Financial Report

S U M M A R I S E D F I N A N C I A L R E P O R T F O R T H E Y E A R E N D E D 30 J U N E 2018 The summarised financial report is an extract from the full financial report for the year ended 30 June 2018. The financial statements and specific disclosures included in the summarised financial report have been derived from the 2018 financial report of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries. The summarised financial report cannot be expected to provide as full an understanding of the financial performance, financial position and financing and investing activities of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries as the full financial report. The full financial report and the auditor’s report will be sent to SLSA’s voting members on request, free of charge.

D I S C U S S I O N A N D A N A LYS I S O F T H E S U M M A RY F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S F O R T H E Y E A R E N D E D 30 J U N E 2018 1. S TAT EM EN T S O F PRO FI T O R LO S S A N D OT H ER CO M PR EH EN S I V E I N CO M E The 2018 consolidated surplus from continuing operations was $876,376 (2017: $62,660). Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service (NRHRS) did not operate and was wound up during the year and its net assets distributed in accordance with a deed of settlement. This distribution has been treated as an expense by the consolidated entity and NRHRS classified as discontinued operations. This contributed a deficit of $8,088,218 (2017: $2,824,388 surplus) from discontinued operations resulting in an overall deficit of $7,211,842 (2017: $2,887,048 surplus). Consolidated revenue excluding discontinued operations for 2018 was $70,345,371 (2017: $61,242,241). Sponsorship increased to $11,125,862 (2017: $9,922,538) due to the rollover of existing sponsorship agreements and the addition of new sponsors. Government Grants increased to $13,556,811 (2017: $8,644,059) due to the new VET Surge project. The Foundation’s lottery and trade promotion activities contributed $22,579,143 (2017: $24,596,279) to group revenue. Consolidated expenditure excluding discontinued operations increased from the prior year at $69,468,995 (2017: $61,179,581). This is reflected in expenditure on lifesaving, development and education at $23,295,847 (2017: $13,688,979), which increased due to distributions to SLS club and state bodies from government funding and from the distribution on wind-up of NRHRS. Expenditure on competitions increased slightly to $5,211,574 (2017: $5,030,584). Overall expenditure for helicopter administration and operations increased slightly to $4,210,242 (2017: $4,200,043). Foundation commercial expenditure, which includes the cost of prizes for lotteries and trade promotions, decreased slightly to $17,225,657 (2017: $18,520,349).

2. S TAT EM EN T S O F FI N A N C I A L P O S I T I O N The net assets of the consolidated group have decreased to $32,990,218 (2017: $40,202,060) as a result of the wind-up of NRHRS. The current ratio (current assets: current liabilities) of the group 2.40 (2017: 3.87) continues to be well above the international benchmark of one. Property, plant and equipment decreased by $316,607 to $5,789,050 while assets classified as held for sale and liabilities associated with assets classified as held for sale decreased to nil (2017: $9,629,582) and nil (2017: $257,328) respectively as these assets were sold during the year. Cash increased to $43,809,425 (2017: $30,039,186) while the borrowings increased to $3,310,042 (2017: $2,049,248). Over the twelve-month period, total group assets increased by $3,208,429 while group liabilities increased by $10,420,271. The resulting decrease in group equity was $7,211,842 representing the deficit for the year including discontinued operations. The debt/equity ratio (total liabilities: total equity) of 0.81 (2017: 0.40) of the group increased as some distributions were payable at year end, however this is in line with the increase in cash. There remains a conservative approach to leveraging the business.


Section 04: Financial Report

65

3. S TAT EM EN T S O F C A S H FLOW S For the consolidated group, cash increased by $13,770,239 (2017: $5,773,001). Net cash inflow from operating activities was $123,965 (2017: $1,652,619). Net cash inflow from investment activities was $13,646,274 (2017: $4,120,382) which comprised payments of $340,140 (2017: $651,645) for property, plant and equipment. This was offset by proceeds of $12,986,414 (2017: $2,757,932) from the sale of property, plant and equipment, and proceeds of loans of $1,000,000 (2017: $2,000,000) from the Foundation Perpetuity Trust.

STATEMENTS OF PROFIT OR LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME For the year ended 30 June 2018 Note

Consolidated Entity

Parent Entity

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

CONTINUING OPERATIONS Revenue

2

70,345,371

61,242,241

45,853,318

26,883,221

Expenses

3

(69,468,995)

(61,179,581)

(38,044,923)

(27,746,438)

876,376

62,660

7,808,395

(863,217)

Surplus/(deficit) before income tax expense Income tax expense

-

-

-

-

876,376

62,660

7,808,395

(863,217)

(8,088,218)

2,824,388

-

-

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

-

-

-

-

Total comprehensive income for the year attributable to the members of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited

(7,211,842)

2,887,048

7,808,395

(863,217)

Surplus/(deficit) after income tax expense from continuing operations for the year attributable to the members of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited

DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS Surplus / (deficit) after income tax expense from discontinued operations for the year attributable to the members of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited

4

The above statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.


66

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 2018 Note Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables

5

Inventories Other Assets

6

Assets classified as held for sale Total current assets

Consolidated Entity

Parent Entity

2018($)

2017($)

2018($)

2017($)

43,809,425

30,039,186

13,822,467

6,026,080

1,815,154

2,529,926

10,113,750

2,307,725

312,209

323,511

296,910

309,948

7,656,171

7,495,718

439,362

447,591

-

9,629,582

-

5,014,582

53,592,959

50,017,923

24,672,489

14,105,926

Non current assets Other financial assets

7

-

-

3,300,882

3,300,882

Trade and other receivables

5

196,240

246,240

3,310,042

2,049,248

Property, plant and equipment

5,789,050

6,105,657

1,493,785

1,634,337

Total non-current assets

5,985,290

6,351,897

8,104,709

6,984,467

Total assets

59,578,249

56,369,820

32,777,198

21,090,393

11,846,670

10,952,289

8,168,208

Current liabilities Trade and other payables

8

21,633,194

Employee benefits

9

678,768

812,973

395,459

332,811

-

257,328

-

-

22,311,962

12,916,971

11,347,748

8,501,019

Liabilities associated with assets classified as held for sale Total current liabilities

Non current liabilities Trade and other payables

8

851,617

1,014,396

851,617

1,014,396

Employee benefits

9

114,410

187,145

17,326

83,660

Borrowings

10

3,310,042

2,049,248

3,310,042

2,049,248

Total non-current liabilities

4,276,069

3,250,789

4,178,985

3,147,304

Total liabilities

26,588,031

16,167,760

15,526,733

11,648,323

NET ASSETS

32,990,218

40,202,060

17,250,465

9,442,070

29,889,440

37,101,282

14,149,687

6,341,292

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

32,990,218

40,202,060

17,250,465

9,442,070

Equity Retained earnings Other Reserves

TOTAL EQUITY

14

The above statements of financial position are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.


Section 04: Financial Report

67

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY For the year ended 30 June 2018 Consolidated Entity

Parent Entity

Retained Surpluses ($)

Other Reserves ($)

Total Equity ($)

Retained Surpluses ($)

Other Reserves ($)

Total Equity ($)

34,214,234

3,100,778

37,315,012

7,204,509

3,100,778

10,305,287

2,887,048

-

2,887,048

(863,217)

-

(863,217)

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total comprehensive income for the year

2,887,048

-

2,887,048

(863,217)

-

(863,217)

Balance at 30 June 2017

37,101,282

3,100,778

40,202,060

6,341,292

3,100,778

9,442,070

(Deficit) / surplus after income tax expense for the year

(7,211,842)

-

(7,211,842)

7,808,395

-

7,808,395

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total comprehensive income for the year

(7,211,842)

-

(7,211,842)

7,808,395

-

7,808,395

29,889,440

3,100,778

32,990,218

14,149,687

3,100,778

17,250,465

Balance at 30 June 2016 Surplus / (deficit) after income tax expense for the year

Balance at 30 June 2018

The above statements of changes in equity are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS For the year ended 30 June 2018 NOTE Cash flows from operating activities Receipts from sponsors, donors and customers (inclusive of GST) Payments to suppliers and employees (inclusive of GST)

Consolidated Entity

Parent Entity

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

71,750,676

73,748,425

36,675,395

30,118,168

(72,335,215)

(72,714,070)

(37,307,450)

(29,165,365)

Interest received

708,504

618,264

256,925

53,904

Net cash from / (used in) operating activities

123,965

1,652,619

(375,130)

1,006,707

Cash flows from investing activities Payments for property, plant and equipment Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Refund of bonds paid Loans advanced to related parties

10

Proceeds of loans from related parties

10

Net cash from / (used in) investing activities

(340,140)

(651,645)

(199,897)

(144,380)

12,986,414

2,757,932

8,371,414

15,617

-

14,095

-

-

-

-

(1,000,000)

(2,000,000)

1,000,000

2,000,000

1,000,000

2,000,000

13,646,274

4,120,382

8,171,517

(128,763)

13,770,239

5,773,001

7,796,387

877,944

Net cash from financing activities Net increase / (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year

30,039,186

24,266,185

6,026,080

5,148,136

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

43,809,425

30,039,186

13,822,467

6,026,080

The above statements of cash flows are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.


68

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

N OT E S TO A N D F O R M I N G PA R T O F T H E S U M M A RY F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S For the year ended 30 June 2018 1. S U M M A RY O F S I G N I F I C A N T ACCO U N T I N G P O LI C I E S The Summary Financial Statements have been prepared from the audited financial report for Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and the entities that it controlled during and at the end of the year ended 30 June 2018. The audited financial report for the year ended 30 June 2018 is available to Surf Life Saving Australia Limited’s voting members on request from Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries. The financial statements are presented in Australian Dollars which is Surf Life Saving Australia Limited’s functional and presentation currency. The financial statements, specific disclosures and other information included in the summary financial statements are derived from and are consistent with the full financial statements of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries. The summary financial statements cannot be expected to provide as detailed an understanding of the financial performance, financial position and financing and investing activities of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries as the full financial report. The Summary Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standard AASB 1039: Concise Financial Reports and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. The accounting policies adopted have been consistently applied to all financial periods unless otherwise stated. Consolidated Entity 2. REVENUE Government grants

Parent Entity

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

13,556,811

8,644,059

12,456,811

7,350,880

Sponsorship

11,125,862

9,922,538

10,645,860

9,875,070

Fundraising and donations

15,550,354

14,060,942

15,958,416

6,091,462

Commercial revenue

22,579,143

24,596,279

-

-

Other revenue

1,698,311

1,593,651

1,437,965

1,398,564

Interest

441,370

175,930

256,925

53,904

Sale of goods

1,119,282

1,201,468

1,121,618

1,205,339

Hire of helicopter

204,320

142,856

-

-

Royalty and trademark revenue

189,488

173,320

189,488

173,320

Competition entry fees

702,888

719,065

608,693

719,065

Net profit on disposal of property, plant and equipment

3,177,542

12,133

3,177,542

15,617

70,345,371

61,242,241

45,853,318

26,883,221

Consolidated Entity 3. EXPENSES Lifesaving development and education

Parent Entity

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

23,295,847

13,688,979

24,736,260

15,120,119

Competitions costs

5,211,574

5,030,584

4,687,140

5,030,584

Administration of lifesaving and competitions

2,929,533

3,159,335

2,486,055

3,128,597

Cost of sales

948,300

1,028,267

950,127

1,029,334

Fundraising distribution to states

5,185,023

5,722,109

5,185,341

3,437,804

Philanthropic expense

7,191,620

7,316,879

-

-

Expenses relating to commercial activities

17,225,657

18,520,349

-

-

Administration of Foundation activities

3,271,220

2,510,814

-

-

Helicopter administration and finance

444,053

1,061,194

-

-

Helicopter operations

3,399,555

2,743,933

-

-

Helicopter fundraising

366,634

394,916

-

-

(21)

2,222

-

-

69,468,995

61,179,581

38,044,923

27,746,438

Foreign exchange loss / (gain)


Section 04: Financial Report

69

N OT E S TO A N D F O R M I N G PA R T O F T H E S U M M A RY F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S For the year ended 30 June 2018 4 . D I S CO N T I N U E D O PE R AT I O N S As previously reported, effective 27 April 2017 Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service (NRHRS) ceased operating as a helicopter search and rescue service, and the Board of SLSA authorised the distribution of assets and deregistration of NRHRS in accordance with NRHRS’s constitution. Subsequent to the initial decision to cease operation and deregistration of NRHRS, a claim against the net assets of NRHRS was made by a third party with proceedings commenced against NRHRS in the Supreme Court of New South Wales. As of 30 June 2018 this claim had been settled and the final distribution of the net assets of the entity resolved by the SLSA Board, in alignment with the original wind-up plan agreed with the NRHRS board in 2017. This distribution is funded from the accumulated retained surpluses of NRHRS from its more than 30 years of operation. As required by Australian Accounting Standards, the distribution has been recognised as an expense by the consolidated entity and $8,000,000 has been reflected as a payable in the consolidated entity accounts at June 2018 as the actual payment was not made until after 30 June 2018. A further $3,600,000 was payable by SLSA from its share of the distribution received from NRHRS in accordance with the NRHRS constitution. This is included in other payables in note 10. The remaining net assets of NRHRS at 30 June 2018 of $242,879 were distributed in accordance with the deed during the wind-up of the entity in August 2018. The financial performance of the discontinued operation to 30 June 2018, which is included in surplus / (deficit) from discontinued operations as per the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, is as follows: Consolidated Entity 4. DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

2018 ($)

Parent Entity

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Revenue

318,768

9,730,346

-

-

Expenses

(8,406,986)

(6,905,958)

-

-

Surplus / (deficit) before income tax expense

(8,088,218)

2,824,388

-

-

-

-

-

-

(8,088,218)

2,824,388

-

-

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

1,429,500

2,058,337

1,056,484

1,398,086

Income tax expense Surplus / (deficit) after income tax expense from discontinued operations for the year attributable to the members of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited

5. TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES Current Trade receivables Other receivables

385,654

471,589

9,057,266

909,639

1,815,154

2,529,926

10,113,750

2,307,725

196,240

246,240

-

-

-

-

3,310,042

2,049,248

196,240

246,240

3,310,042

2,049,248

6. OTHER ASSETS

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Prepayments

528,154

642,201

439,362

447,591

Non-current Security deposit Loans to related parties

Fundraising Prize bank

7. OTHER FINANCIAL ASSETS Unlisted investments in subsidiaries at cost (Note 13)

7,128,017

6,853,517

-

-

7,656,171

7,495,718

439,362

447,591

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

-

-

3,300,882

3,300,882

-

-

3,300,882

3,300,882


70

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

N OT E S TO A N D F O R M I N G PA R T O F T H E S U M M A RY F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S For the year ended 30 June 2018 Consolidated Entity 8. TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES

Parent Entity

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

Trade payables

1,486,027

1,732,089

657,148

658,457

Other payables

14,310,855

3,024,889

5,882,320

1,914,741

Income in advance

4,581,884

6,098,047

3,158,393

4,603,365

Public liability claims pool (see below)

1,254,428

991,645

1,254,428

991,645

21,633,194

11,846,670

10,952,289

8,168,208

851,617

1,014,396

851,617

1,014,396

851,617

1,014,396

851,617

1,014,396

Current

Non-current Public liability claims pool (see below)

The public liability claims pool is administered by the parent entity on behalf of the parent entity and all its state centres to manage part of the public liability risk for all of SLSA’s entities covered by the parent entity’s public liability insurance. Current estimates by insurance broker (Jardine Lloyd Thompson) calculated a potential liability of $1,254,428 (2017: $991,645). This amount makes up the current liability portion shown above.

9. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

678,768

812,973

395,459

332,811

Employee benefits

114,410

187,145

17,326

83,660

Aggregate employee benefits

793,178

1,000,118

412,785

416,471

10. BORROWINGS (NON-CURRENT)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

3,310,042

2,049,248

3,310,042

2,049,248

Current Employee benefits Non-current

Borrowings

The borrowings relate to a loan of $3,000,000 (2017: $2,000,000) which was drawn down by the Parent entity during the year from the Foundation Perpetuity Trust and immediately transferred to the Foundation to fund the Invest to Grow initiative. The outstanding balance includes interest payable to the Foundation Perpetuity Trust of $310,042 (2017: $49,248). The principal sum and interest is due to be repaid by 30 June 2020 unless otherwise agreed between the parties. This has been disclosed as a related party transaction at note 18.

11. CO N T I N G E N C I E S PU B L I C L I A B I L I T Y C L A I M S P O O L The parent entity manages a public liability claims pool on behalf of the parent entity and all Surf Life Saving state centres. A review has indicated that the funds held in the pool will be sufficient to cover the cost of all expected claims.

12 . M E M B E R S’ E Q U I T Y I S S U E D C A PI TA L The parent entity is a company limited by guarantee and as such does not have any issued capital. If the company is wound up, the Constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 each towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the company. As at 30 June 2018 the number of members was 173,865 (2017: 168,824).


Section 04: Financial Report

71

N OT E S TO A N D F O R M I N G PA R T O F T H E S U M M A RY F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S For the year ended 30 June 2018 13. DETAILS OF SUBSIDIARIES

Country of Incorporation

Percent of Shares Held 2018 ($) 2017 ($)

Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd

(1)

Australia

100

100

Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd

(1) (2) (4)

Australia

100

100

SLSA Helicopters Pty Ltd

Australia

100

100

Surf Sports Australia Pty Ltd

Australia

100

100

Australia

-

-

The Surf Life Saving Foundation Limited

(3)

(1) C  ompliance with the financial disclosure requirements of the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW) has been disclosed in the financial statements of these entities. (2) Not Audited by BDO East Coast Partnership. (3) The Surf Life Saving Foundation is a company limited by guarantee with Surf Life Saving Australia Limited as the sole voting member. (4) Refer to discontinued operations disclosure Note 4. Northern is expected to be liquidated during the 2018-19 financial year.

Consolidated Entity 14. OTHER RESERVES Acquisition / Disposition Reserve

Parent Entity

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

2018 ($)

2017 ($)

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

3,100,778

The acquisition / disposition reserve represents the net assets of The Surf Life Saving Foundation acquired by the parent entity on 1 July 2013 for nil consideration.

15. F O U N DAT I O N PE R PE T U I T Y T R U S T (F O R M E R LY K N OW N A S S U R F LI F E S AV I N G R E S C U E FUND TRUST) The parent entity is a beneficiary of the Foundation Perpetuity Trust. Funds held on behalf of the parent as at 30 June 2018 were $2,847,301 (2017: $3,486,095). Funds held in the Trust can only be withdrawn at the sole discretion of the Trustee, provided such withdrawal meets the criteria as noted in the Trust Deed.

16. E V E N T S O CC U R R I N G A F T E R T H E R E P O R T I N G PE R I O D Other than the matters covered in Note 4 of the financial statements, no other matter or circumstance has arisen since 30 June 2018 that has significantly affected, or may significantly affect the consolidated entity’s operations, the results of those operations, or the consolidated entity’s state of affairs in future financial years.

17. CO M PA N Y D E TA I L S The registered office and principal place of business of the consolidated entity is 1 Notts Avenue, Bondi Beach NSW 2026.

D I R E C TO R S’ D E C L A R AT I O N In accordance with a resolution of the directors of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited, the directors of the company declare that the summary financial statements of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and Controlled Entities for the financial year ended 30 June 2018, as set out on pages 64 – 71: a. Complies with Accounting Standard AASB 1039: Concise Financial Reports and b. I s an extract from the full financial report for the year ended 30 June 2018 and has been derived from and is consistent with the full financial report of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and Controlled Entities. On behalf of the Directors by

Graham Ford AM Director Sydney, 28 September 2018

Martin Walsh Director Sydney, 28 September 2018


Level 11, 1 Margaret St Tel: +61 2 9251 4100 Sydney NSW 2000 Fax: +61 2 9240 9821 Level 11, 1 Margaret St 11, 1 Margaret St Tel: +61 2 9251 4100 www.bdo.com.au Level Tel: +61 2 9251 4100Australia Sydney NSW 2000Sydney NSW 2000 Fax: +61 2 9240 9821 Fax: +61 2 9240 9821 www.bdo.com.auwww.bdo.com.au Australia Australia

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT INDEPENDENTINDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT AUDITOR'S REPORT To the members of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited To the members Life Saving Australia Limited To of theSurf members of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited

Report on the Concise Financial Report Report Concise Financial Opinion on the Report on the ConciseReport Financial Report Opinion We have audited the concise financial report of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited (the Company) and Opinion its subsidiaries (the Group), which comprises the consolidated statement of financial as at We have audited financial report of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited (theposition Company) andCompany) and We the haveconcise audited the concise financial report of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited (the 30 June 2018, the consolidated statement of profit or loss and statement other comprehensive income, its subsidiaries (the Group), which comprises the consolidated of financial position as at its subsidiaries (the Group), which comprises the consolidated statement of financial position as at consolidated of changes in equity, consolidated statement of cash flows for the year then 30 June 2018,statement theJune consolidated of profit or loss other comprehensive income, 30 2018, the statement consolidated statement of and profit or loss and other comprehensive income, ended, and related notes, from the financial report of Surf Life Australia Limited for the consolidated statement of derived changes in equity, consolidated of Saving cash flows for the year consolidated statement of changes in equity, statement consolidated statement of cash flowsthen for the year then year ended June 2018 and the discussion and analysis. ended, and 30 related derived from the financial of Surf report Life Saving Australia Limited for the ended,notes, and related notes, derived from report the financial of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited for the year ended 30 June 2018 and the discussion and analysis. In our opinion,year the ended accompanying report including the discussion and analysis of Surf 30 June concise 2018 andfinancial the discussion and analysis. Life Saving Australia Limited complies withfinancial Accounting Standard AASB Conciseand Financial In our opinion, concise report including the1039 discussion analysisReports. ofand Surf Inthe ouraccompanying opinion, the accompanying concise financial report including the discussion analysis of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited complies with Accounting Standard AASB 1039 Concise Financial Reports. Basis for opinion Life Saving Australia Limited complies with Accounting Standard AASB 1039 Concise Financial Reports. Basis for opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under Basis for opinion those standards are further described inwith the Australian Auditor’s Responsibilities section ofresponsibilities our report. Weunder are We conductedWe ourconducted audit in accordance Auditing Standards. OurStandards. our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Our responsibilities under independent of the accordance withAuditor’s the auditor independence requirements of the We are those standards are Group furtherindescribed in the section of our section report. those standards are further described in Responsibilities the Auditor’s Responsibilities of our report. We are Corporations Act 2001 and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical independent of the Group in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the independent of the Group in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Standards Board’s APESand 110the Code of Ethics for Professional AccountantsProfessional (the Code) thatEthical are relevant to Corporations Act 2001 requirements of the Accounting Corporations Act ethical 2001 and the ethical requirements of the Accountingand Professional and Ethical our audit of the concise financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 CodeAPES of Ethics for Professional Code) that areCode) relevant Standards Board’s 110 Code of Ethics forAccountants Professional(the Accountants (the thattoare relevant to responsibilities inconcise accordance withreport the Code. our audit of the financial in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical our audit of the concise financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities inthe accordance with the We believe that audit evidence we Code. havewith obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis responsibilities in accordance the Code. for our opinion. We believe that auditthat evidence we have obtained is sufficient appropriate provide a basis Wethe believe the audit evidence we have obtainedand is sufficient andtoappropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Concise financial report for our opinion. Concise financial report The concise financial report doesreport not contain all the disclosures required by the Australian Accounting Concise financial Standards in financial the preparation of the financial report. Reading therequired concise financial report and the The concise report does not contain allnot thecontain disclosures by the Australian Accounting The concise financial report does all the disclosures required by the Australian Accounting auditor’s report thereon, therefore, is not a substitute for reading the audited financial report and the Standards in the preparation of the financial report. Reading the concise financial report and the Standards in the preparation of the financial report. Reading the concise financial report and the auditor’s report report thereon, thereon. therefore, The conciseisfinancial report and the audited financial report doreport not reflect auditor’s a substitute reading the audited and thereport and the auditor’s report thereon,not therefore, is notfor a substitute for readingfinancial the audited financial the effects of events that occurred subsequent to the date of our report on the audited financial auditor’s report thereon. The concise report and thereport audited report do not report reflect do not reflect auditor’s report thereon.financial The concise financial andfinancial the audited financial report. the effects of the events that occurred subsequent to the date of our report on the audited financial effects of events that occurred subsequent to the date of our report on the audited financial report. The financial report. report and our report thereon The financial The report and our report thereon We expressed an unmodified audit opinion the financial financial report and ouron report thereonreport in our report dated 30 June 2018. We expressed We an unmodified audit opinion on theopinion financial in our report Junedated 2018.30 June 2018. expressed an unmodified audit onreport the financial report dated in our 30 report

BDO East Coast Partnership ABN 83 236 985 726 is a member of a national association of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO East Coast Partnership and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved BDO East Coast Partnership ABN 83 236 985 726 is a member of a national association of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd BDO East Coast Partnership is a member of a national under Professional Standards Legislation, other thanABN for 83 the236 acts985 or 726 omissions of financial services association licensees. of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO East Coast Partnership and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO East Coast Partnership and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation, other than for the acts or omissions of financial services licensees. under Professional Standards Legislation, other than for the acts or omissions of financial services licensees.


Responsibility of the Director’s for the concise financial report The directors are responsible for the preparation of the concise financial report in accordance with Accounting Standard AASB 1039 Concise Financial Reports, and the Corporations Act 2001, and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the concise financial report. Auditor’s responsibility for the audit of the concise financial report Our responsibility is to express an opinion on whether the concise financial report complies in all material respects, with AASB 1039 Concise Financial Reports of the based on our procedures, which were conducted in accordance with Auditing Standard ASA 810 Engagements to Report on Summary Financial Statements.

BDO East Coast Partnership

Martin Coyle Partner

Sydney, 28 September 2018


SECTION 05

Awards & Honours


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AWARDS & HONOURS

2017–18 SLSA Hall of Fame Inductees

Geoff Waters (1946-2017) Anglesea SLSC, VIC

Andrew Bowden Bronte SLSC, NSW

Geoff joined Point Leo SLSC in 1962, gaining his Bronze in 1963 and quickly following up with an Instructors qualification. He gained a reputation as coach and mentor with his first national medal in 63/64 as a competitor, a podium finish in 1969 and his first of many gold medals as a coach. He won 15 gold, 13 silver and 15 bronze medals over his career. Geoff made a significant and sustained contribution to coaching R&R at all levels for over 50 years. He focused on the development of youth at the elite competition level to sustain R&R as an ongoing part of sport, along with being a driving force of other aspects such as coaching, mentoring and officiating. Geoff took up the role of Club Captain in 1967, with his efforts and skills enabling the club to dominate the Victorian scene for many years. In addition to club activities Geoff found himself active at the state centre. He was Secretary for the Board of Examiners for many years gaining a reputation as a strong leader, continuing to extend his coaching skills and establishing a national reputation in this area. Geoff was the main driving force in Point Leo gaining the rights to host the national titles in 1985 and was integral to establishing the Helicopter Rescue Service in 1978. He was active in the national R&R panel which he chaired for seven years, and was a wealth of knowledge in R&R. Geoff also coordinated coaching clinics, sharing his expertise across the movement in Victoria and around Australia.

Andrew is a highly decorated surf lifesaver with a remarkable record as an elite athlete. A member of Bronte SLSC, Andrew has won fifteen Individual Open Australian Titles, seven Open Team Australian Titles and two Open Tube Rescue Australian Titles as a rescue swimmer. His distinguished representative career includes winning five gold medals at World Titles with the Australian Lifesaving Team between 2008-2014. Andrew was the Australian Lifesaving Team Captain in 2013 that won the Be Ne (Orange) and German Cups, for the first time. Andrew has been the Head Coach and Team Manager of the SLSNSW Team in 2014, 2015 and 2016, and a mentor for young athletes in the Australian Youth Life Saving Team. He retired from national and international Open competition in 2016. Andrew’s contribution to bring the SLSA and RLSSA international team into one consolidated Australian Life Saving Team is one of major significance, including his individual efforts through holding joint membership with Bronte SLSC and the Hills District RLSS Club. Andrew has also been a key player in the merging of the two National Pool Championships into one Life Saving Championships from 2018, which will have long term advantages for Surf Life Saving membership. His patrol achievements include the Surf Life Saving Meritorious Award with Bronze Insert in 2005 for a rescue at Bronte beach in treacherous conditions.


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AWARDS & HONOURS

SLSA Hall of Fame

SLSA Hall of Fame Surf Lifesaving

Administration

Sport

Sport

Major John Bond

Gregory Arthur Allum OAM

John Bliss

Geoff Waters

Harold John Brown OAM

Cornelius Kennedy Asmussen MBE

Michael Burke BEM

Sir Adrian Curlewis CVO CBE

Ballina Lighthouse & Lismore Open Boat crew

Melissa Cracroft-Wilson (nee Howard)

Professor Tess Cramond OBE AO

Roy Doyle

Bondi R&R team

Simon Harris

Currumbin Patrol Competition team

Theo Haywood

Bundaberg March Past team

Elizabeth Pluimers

Cliff Marsh OAM

Graham Carlisle OAM

Clint Robinson OAM

Jack Dearlove MBE

Donald D McIntyre

Jon Donohoe AM

Kristy Munroe

Bob Gear AM

John West (Jack) McMaster AM DFC

Harold C Evans

Ken Murray

Alan Kennedy MBE

Tom Meagher OBE

Karla Gilbert

Bob Newbiggin

Dr Ian Mackie AM

Lyster Ormsby

Kristy Harris

Harry Nightingale

Graham McKenzie OAM

Charles Davidson Paterson

Trevor Hendy AM

Clint Robinson OAM

Hector McDonald OAM

Ronald E Rankin AM

Dennis Heussner

Barry Rodgers

Warren Allen Rennie AM

Paul Smith OAM

John Robert Holt

Noel P Ryan

Earle Smith AM

Barry Bede (Gus) Staunton MBE

Ky Hurst

Peter Douglas Tibbitts

Ainslie W ‘Sprint’ Walker OBE

Ron Tallon OAM

Brian Hutchings

Ken Vidler

Peter George AM

FO (Frank) Venning MBE

Grant Kenny OAM

Wanda Six Man R&R team

Mark Fife OAM

Ken WC Watson MBE

Bruce Kolkka

Stephen Warren

Alan Brian Whelpton AO

Peter Lacey

Graham Ross White OAM

Dan White OAM

Steve Wilkes

Jack Winders OBE

Killcare Open Mens Beach Relay Team

SW (Bill) Winders MBE

Maroubra SLSC Double Ski Team

Michael Jones

Ian (Rick) Wright OAM

Northcliffe Open Patrol Competition Team

Naomi Flood

Robert Brydon AM

Mona Vale Black Open AW Surf Boat Crew

Shannon Eckstein

North Cottesloe Open Surf Boat—Crew Lenore Grice

Kate Czerny

Lachlan Tame

Andrew Kelckhoven

Alison O’Toole South Port Open March Past Team Andrew Bowden Don Morrison OAM Robert (Rob) Mayo AM


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National Awards of Excellence P R E S E N T E D O C T O B E R 2 0 17

Surf Sports Coach of the Year Jock Campbell Wanda SLSC, NSW

Surf Sports Official of the Year Carolyn Wilson Secret Harbour SLSC, WA

Surf Sports Athlete of the Year Jake Lynch Newport SLSC, NSW

At the World Life Saving Championships, Aussie titles and NSW Championships, Jock’s athletes won half of the gold medals on offer. Jock became the first ever beach coach to complete the SLSA Performance Coaching Certificate, while in December he completed the IAAF Level 4 Athletics Coaching Course. Jock’s greatest strength is to develop his athletes not just as runners, but also as people. This is reflected by the high esteem in which he is held by those he has coached.

Carolyn is an outstanding ambassador for Surf Life Saving and officiating at all levels. She has mentored up and coming officials at over 12 carnivals and has held officiating positions at a club, state and national level. Carolyn is the back to back winner of SLSWA’s Official of the Year. She is a positive, engaging and truly inspiring representative of Surf Sports, officiating and Surf Life Saving in general. Carolyn is the Area Referee at Youth and Aussie Titles.

Newport SLSC’s Jake Lynch made history when he became the first Australian to win the Sprint/Flag double at a World Life Saving event. He was also a member of the Beach Sprint Relay team that secured the silver medal. Jake has also won a gold medal in the World Interclub Challenge wearing the familiar cap of Newport.

Surf Sports Youth Athlete of the Year Jemma Smith Umina SLSC, NSW

Trainer of the Year Rachel Englund Carlton Park SLSC, TAS

Assessor of the Year Stephanie Reindel BonBeach LSC, WA

Rachel is an incredibly motivated and passionate lifesaver with a strong desire to share her skills with others. A naturally gifted trainer both at a club, regional and state level, Rachel ensures that members receive the best quality training. A highlight for 2016/17 is her role as the lead Trainer and Camp Administrator for the SLST Lifesaving Development Camp.

Stephanie’s friendly and engaging approach to training and assessing has been fantastic for the lifesaving community in Victoria. They have seen a substantial increase in the number of trainers and assessors, with 6 new trainers and 10 new assessors and initiatives to network and work together. Introduction of the CALD program is her most rewarding achievement to date; working with 17 children to increase their swimming skills and competence.

Co-Captain of the Youth Team at the World Titles, Jemma’s leadership and athleticism was rewarded with three gold medal wins. She clocked an impressive 21 medals at the Central Coast Championships, 12 at the NSW Titles, and 3 at Aussies. Jemma was also a finalist in the Nutri-Grain IronWoman Series and won the Open IronWoman title at the Summer of Surf Series.


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DHL Lifeguard of the Year Ramon “Max” Pettigrove Sunshine Coast Lifeguard Service, QLD

DHL Surf Lifesaver of the Year Scott Summers Sunshine Beach SLSC, QLD

DHL Volunteer of the Year Caroline Kearney Grange SLSC, SA

Max joined the Lifeguard Service as an 18 year old patrolling beaches in the Noosa region. To date he has completed over 25,000 hours of service in 31 years. Max is locally renowned for the time he devotes to mentoring new staff and is a role model for his peers with his positive attitude, professionalism, presentation and beach presence setting a benchmark to aspire towards. As a mentor Max facilitates fitness training and ocean knowledge sessions for all lifeguards and is also one of the first lifeguards in QLD to complete the Remote Pilot Aerial Surveillance course.

In 2016/17 Scott was honoured with the Sunshine Coast Branch and Queensland Operations Support Member of the Year Award. As a Facilitator, Scott has led and coordinated multiple courses and established the highest number of active patrolling members and award holders in the club’s history. Scott’s tireless efforts on behalf of Sunshine Beach SLSC includes the sourcing of grants, supporters and sponsors to commission the upgrade of club equipment and resources in order to improve patrolling services for both active volunteer members and the local community.

Caroline is a humble member with a huge leadership potential which was recognized by SLSSA in her nomination to attend the National Leadership College in 2016. She is the Grange SLSC coach for all members of the club across activities and events including First Aid, R&R, Champion Lifesaver and Champion Patrol. Caroline demonstrated her leadership and initiative in introducing a social program for female members over 15 with the aim to drive retention and engagement in Surf Life Saving in sport and community.

Community Education Program of the Year Seahorse Nipper Program Wide Bay Capricorn Branch, QLD

DHL Club of the Year Venus Bay SLSC, VIC

Three separate clubs have been working together to deliver the inaugural Seahorse Nipper Program. Elliott Heads, Moore Park and Bundaberg SLSCs ran the program for children with disabilities. There were 16 children in the program, and 40 members from the three clubs who took on various roles. The feedback received post-program showed it was highly successful and it is envisaged that via word of mouth the next program will see an increase in applications. Providing the opportunity for children to experience this type of activity was overwhelmingly positive and brought a profound sense of inclusiveness to the community.

Venus Bay SLSC has been successful in providing lifesaving services in a remote environment and with a diverse membership base. To rise to these challenges the club runs a continuous improvement program which focuses on growth, whilst maintaining the ability to provide lifesaving services at a highly hazardous beach. Lifesaving operations have shown a decrease in the number of rescues by 600%, an increase of 17% in total number of hours patrolled and a record number of education based lifesaving awards.


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AWARDS & HONOURS

National Rescue of the Month

July/August 2017 Trigg Island SLSC Mike Deephouse, Mike Cook, Peter Taylor, Darren Mills, Vanessa Barby, Mark Barlow and John Hardbattle On Sunday the 20th of August, Les Lindsay, emerged from the icy water of Trigg Beach after competing in the weekly Blue Hole club swim. Les walked up to Mike Deephouse and then collapsed. Mike immediately put Les into the recovery position, and called on Mike Cook to get the oxygen resuscitation equipment. An ambulance was immediately called with Vanessa Barby communicating progress during the entire incident. Oxygen therapy was applied as Les’ breathing faltered and as Les did a final exhale, Mike began CPR. John Hardbattle, arrived and took over the chest compressions from Mark Barlow, working in tandem with Darren Mills. Peter Taylor quickly retrieved the defibrillator and the first shock was delivered to Les’ chest. Les didn’t respond. Shortly after a third shock had been delivered, Les was still unconscious, but started breathing on his own. Les was transported back up the beach to the waiting ambulance. Three days later, Les had recovered, and despite the broken ribs, the doctors had given him the all clear. The miraculous revival of Les was due to everyone working together and applying their trained skills.

September 2017 Wide Bay Capricorn Branch Jamie Findlay, Riley McGregor, Donna Wall and Jason Wall On Wednesday 20 September 2017, Elliot Heads 13SURF beacon received a call at 6.46pm describing four tourists had been trapped on Doctor May’s Island. Jamie Findlay actioned Riley McGregor and Elliot Heads SLSC to assist with the retrieval of the tourists. The two male and two female tourists had walked over to the island at low tide and had not realised how quickly the tide would rise. One of them tried to swim across to the mainland but the current was too strong and they returned back to the island. The tourists were able to contact the nearby café to explain their predicament. Jamie was then able to contact the tourists and explained surf lifesavers were on their way. Meanwhile, Donna and Jason Wall at Elliot Heads SLSC had readied the IRB. Utilising the ATV headlights and headlamps, Jamie and Riley drove the IRB from Elliot Head Beach out to sea and then to the Elliot Heads river mouth, navigating around the rock wall. Having located the tourists, Jamie and Riley transported the two female patients across to the mainland before returning to collect the two male patients. This rescue highlights the teamwork and bravery of all lifesavers involved and the importance of the surf emergency response network.

October 2017 Burning Palms SLSC Annabel Braithwaite-Young, Chris Fogwell, Paul Cooper, Eloise Cooper, Eri Shimamoto, Terry Danne, Matthew Braithwaite-Young, Laetitia Cooper, Elizabeth Feletar and Gary Daly On Saturday 15 October, Burning Palms SLSC was alerted to a man that had fallen off a cliff while walking to the Figure Eight Pools. After trekking 1.5km to the scene (which has no road access) the surf lifesavers found the man with severe injuries to his head, arm, legs, ribs and back. Surf lifesavers established radio communications with the State Operations Centre via a radio relay due to the remote location. Surf lifesavers then provided first aid to the man. During this time they kept him calm, administered oxygen and treated his injuries whilst also providing regular radio updates on his condition. In addition, the surf lifesavers managed the crowds and assisted in carrying the victim to a suitable location for extraction via helicopter. Without the professionalism, leadership and lifesaving skills shown by the patrolling surf lifesavers, the outcome for the victim would have been critical.


Section 05: Awards & Honours

81

November 2017 Sunshine Beach SLSC and the Australian Lifeguard Service Olivia Emanuel, Josh Jones and Isaac Smith

December 2017 Sunshine Beach SLSC Lachlan Lansdown, John Reeves, Brad Corby, Allison Johnstone, Steven Boyd and David James

On Sunday 5 November, a 23-yearold female was caught in a rip current between Sunrise and Sunshine beaches in Queensland, approximately 600m from the nearest patrolled location. Off-duty surf lifesaver, Olivia Emanuel, and a surfer rescued the unconscious female from the rip current, dragged the victim up the beach and after initial checks began performing CPR. Sunrise Beach lifeguard, Josh Jones, was alerted to a young female in trouble by a member of the public and immediately dropped his flags and proceeded north to assist. Upon arrival, Josh assessed the situation and began preparing the emergency care equipment. Josh assisted Olivia and the surfer in performing CPR. Lifeguard Isaac Smith, arrived and continued emergency care actions until ambulance crews arrived. The swift response and appropriate lifesaving skills highlight the outstanding teamwork performed in a highly stressful situation.

On 24th December 2017, Lachlan Lansdown and John Reeves were on a roving patrol to Alexandria Bay. The pair noticed a group of four swimmers in distress, struggling to stay afloat. Lachlan grabbed a rescue board and rescued the furthest swimmer, leaving John to assist the closest swimmer back to shore with a rescue tube. RWC operator David James was passing Alexandria Bay and saw Lachlan running into the water and immediately assisted, picking up a swimmer and dropping them back to shore. Lachlan then supported an unconscious patient in the water and waited till David returned, conveying Lachlan and the patient to the beach. Lachlan pulled the unconscious patient up onto the beach and commenced CPR. Due to the unreliable radio reception on scene, Steven Boyd took a jet-ski from the club to the scene where he collected updates on the patients and proceeded out of the bay until he had radio reception to SurfCom. Brad Corby and Allison Johnstone, responded to the incident and assisted monitoring the four patients. The unconscious patient began showing signs of life, with all four patients transferred to hospital. The surf lifesavers involved demonstrated vigilance, teamwork and bravery in a remote rescue environment.

January 2018 Bundaberg SLSC John McGregor and Riley McGregor On 15 January 2018 at 6:15pm John McGregor and his wife Marilyn were at their Bargara, QLD home when they spotted several swimmers being dragged out in a rip at the northern end of Kelly’s Beach. John grabbed a racing board from their house, while Marilyn called her son Riley who lives nearby to assist. John paddled out retrieving the most distressed swimmer, with Riley arriving and swimming out with a rescue tube to the furthest swimmer and returning them to shore. Once John had returned the first swimmer, he paddled back out and retrieved two more swimmers bringing them back into shore safely. Jessie Rodgers and Marilyn provided care for the patients as Riley and some members of the public searched the water for another missing person. However, it was subsequently confirmed that all patients had been safely returned to shore, so the search was called off. Without the quick thinking of John and Marilyn, and John and Riley remaining calm and applying their surf lifesaving skills, the outcome would have been much different for the four swimmers.


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February 2018 Australian Lifeguard Service James Cervi On Saturday 18 February around 5:20pm Stevi Everson was riding on the back of a jet ski with her father, filming her brother surfing off Granite Bay in Noosa. Without warning, a freak wave stood up knocking them both off the craft. Stevi’s father tried desperately to recover the jet ski but was unable to restart it before a second wave hit. This wave washed both Stevi and her father against the rocky alcove. Stevi’s father was washed up onto the rocks by a wave however Stevi was not able to escape the dangerous conditions. Off-duty Australian Lifeguard Service lifeguard James Cervi was passing on his own private jet ski with a friend, when he saw the Eversons come off their jet ski. He immediately called the coastguard and lifesaver rescue helicopter. James was dropped off the jet ski and swam in to the rocky alcove to help Stevi. For 20 minutes, James held onto Stevi and assisted her to dive under the constant incoming waves. Eventually, a large wave pushed the pair up and onto the rocks. James and Stevi were pulled to safety. Without James’ courage and disregard for his own safety, the outcome could have been fatal.

March 2018 Batemans Bay SLSC, Broulee Surfers SLSC & Moruya SLSC Michael Weyman, Shaun Pike, Andrew Edmunds, Anthony Bellette, Ken Bellette, Michael Bellette and Ben Ralston On Saturday 24 March, a vessel holding six people capsized while trying to negotiate the Moruya River bar. Batemans Bay SLSC, Broulee Surfers SLSC and Moruya SLSC were called out by SurfCom to assist. Commercial fishing boats had already pulled two people out of the water by the time lifesavers arrived. A third victim was assisted onto a fishing boat while the IRB rescued two additional victims. A victim with leg injuries was transported to shore by RWC manned by Andrew Edmunds, while Shaun Pike and Michael Weyman waited with the overturned boat and continued to search for missing victim. Lifesaving reinforcements of Ken and Michael Bellette, and Ben Ralston arrived to assist the search. The missing victim was located by the lifesavers and CPR treatment was administered while the IRB raced to shore where she was handed to the care of paramedics. The lifesavers involved showed great strength and courage in the face of adversity, had they not been present this situation could have become even more desperate.


Section 05: Awards & Honours

April 2018 Point Lookout SLSC David Westby and Oliver Meyer On Saturday 7th April around 2:30pm two teenagers were swept into a rip current on unpatrolled Frenchman’s Beach on Queensland’s North Stradbroke Island. A passer-by alerted Point Lookout SLSC to the situation. Club captain Michael Stone, radioed nearby patrol captains to deploy inflatable rescue boats to retrieve the teenagers. The IRB driver at Cylinder Beach decided it was unsafe to proceed through both the 3-metre swells and the group of rocks to access Frenchman’s beach, so remained on standby. A second IRB, crewed by surf lifesavers Dave Westby and Ollie Meyer, struggled through 2-3 metre swells and a strong southeasterly wind to reach the pair. They headed 200-300 metres out to sea to then retreat safely back through the breakers enabling the boat to approach the male and female without rolling. Upon reaching the young pair, they noted the male was floating on his back, exhausted. The difficult sea conditions meant that they had to make multiple runs before finally getting both swimmers on board. The pair were then returned to shore where waiting patrol members Andy and Joel Pryor had been dispatched from Point Lookout SLSC. Oxygen was administered to the male, who was having difficulty breathing, and an ambulance called to transport the pair to hospital for observation. Dave and Ollie safely navigated the return trip back to Main Beach through the challenging conditions and large swells without further incident.

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May/June 2018 Surf Life Saving Central Coast David Smith, Paul Dowdell, Anthony Smith, Michael Dean, Phillip Murphy, John Dosanjh and Warren Evrard On Wednesday 6 June 2018 at around 3pm, an emergency call for assistance was received by the Central Coast Duty Officer after a man was cut-off by a rising tide while exploring Snapper Cave. Two Duty Officers, the Central Coast Support Operations, and members from the local Aquatic Rescue Team all raced to the scene upon receiving the call, joining police and paramedics. Just after 4:30pm, conditions had subsided sufficiently to allow David Smith (RWC Operator) and Paul Dowdell (RWC Swimmer) to launch the RWC from Frazer Beach. This was a particularly hazardous launch given the swell size, difficult currents, wind and chop. Inside Snapper Cave, David saw the swell was too large to attempt a landing of the RWC and made the call to dispatch Paul to swim inside Snapper Cave. Upon Paul’s arrival, the patient was assessed and found to be uninjured and keen to make his escape. Using his surf awareness, Paul and the patient timed the entry back into the water and swam out of the cave and onto the RWC sled. The patient was transported back to shore where he was assessed by paramedics and given a clean bill of health. This was an example of excellent coordination of skilled and professional lifesavers and cooperation’s between agencies resulting in the successful rescue of the patient.


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AWARDS & HONOURS

Meritorious Awards

Meritorious Awards are awarded to affiliated clubs and/or their members and/or members of the public for outstanding deeds of bravery performed in the sphere of surf lifesaving operations. This includes lifesaving, both in and outside designated patrol hours. In 2016/17, Certificates of Merit were awarded to the following:

Sorrento SLSC Group Certificate of Merit Mullaloo SLSC Group Certificate of Merit North Wollongong SLSC Group Certificate of Merit Secret Harbour SLSC, WA Group Certificate of Merit Matt Goddard Broulee Surfers SLSC, NSW Individual Certificate of Merit Sue Dean Member Of The Public Individual Certificate of Merit Phil Traves & Tony Worton Camden Haven SLSC, NSW Individual Certificate of Merit Jennifer Webb Killcare SLSC, NSW Individual Certificate of Merit

Steve & Sam Carroll, Floreat SLSC Individual Certificate of Merit Rachel Eddy Kurrawa SLSC, QLD Individual Certificate of Merit Robert Lemon Noosa Heads SLSC, QLD Individual Certificate of Merit Teisha Towner Queensland Regional Lifeguard Service, QLD Individual Certificate of Merit Jack McNell Gold Coast Dusk Patrol, QLD Individual Certificate of Merit Kay Norris & Doug Hockey Windang SLSC, NSW Individual Certificate of Merit Bronte SLSC, NSW Group Certificate of Merit with Bronze Insert

Lauren Pryor & Cale Callaghan Australian Lifeguard Service, NSW Group Certificate of Merit with Bronze Insert Bronte SLSC, NSW Group Certificate of Merit with Bronze Insert Nicholas Lowe & Lochleigh Thomson Helensburgh-Stanwell Park SLSC, NSW Individual Certificate of Merit with Bronze Insert Jayke Menefy Mermaid Beach SLSC, QLD Individual Certificate of Merit with Bronze Insert


Section 05: Awards & Honours

85

AWARDS & HONOURS

New Life Members

Kevin Larkins Torquay SLSC

Terence Boardman OAM Queenscliff SLSC

Kevin has made an outstanding and conspicuous contribution to the organisation overall, but in particular the development of youth and leadership. He joined Surf Life Saving in 1988 as a nipper parent at Mullaloo SLSC in Western Australia where his skills and abilities were quickly recognised by the club. He was appointed Director of junior activities in 1991, Vice President in 1992 and then President in 1997 until he moved to Melbourne in 2001. Kevin had a major influence in the restructuring and development of Mullaloo SLSC. During his period as Vice President and President he oversaw the rewriting of the constitution to allow full member involvement. Kevin was awarded the WA Volunteer of the Year in 2000, along with National Volunteer of the Year at the SLSA National Awards of Excellence. Kevin’s passion for leadership and people development led him to be part of the team running the SLSA National Leadership College and Masterclass programs. Kevin was elected Chair of the Education and Development Committee following the restructure of the SLSA Operational Boards, a position he held until 2016. His contribution is unique yet it is outstanding and has impacted so many members of the organisation in a positive and supportive manner.

Terence gained his Bronze Medallion in 1977 at Queenscliff SLSC, progressing onto his Gold Medallion in 1986. He currently holds 129 lifesaving awards and has held many positions on the Queenscliff committee since joining the club. He has patrolled over 2,000 hours since 1977, and has held positions such as Patrol Captain, IRB Captain, Vice Club Captain, Chief Instructor, Trainer, Assessor and Facilitator. Terry’s lifelong commitment to surf lifesaving is evident from the number of awards he holds and in which he is still proficient. Terence has had significant impact on Surf Life Saving. As Honorary Secretary he lobbied over several years in regard to admitting women to active membership within the movement. Terry’s lobbying brought pressure to bear and women were finally admitted to membership in July 1980. Terry’s contribution is seen at all levels of the movement, commencing officiating at the World Lifesaving Championships in 1986, and continuing to officiate at the World Rescue Championships. He has been elevated to SLSA Life Membership in recognition of his long-term commitments and achievements.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

AWARDS & HONOURS

SLSA Life Members

R E CO G N I S I N G D I S T I N G U I S H E D S E RV I C E Life Membership of SLSA is awarded to members who have contributed distinguished voluntary service to SLSA for more than 20 years. To be considered as distinguished service, the service must be both sustained, and provide an evident contribution.

Allum OAM, G

Fenner AM, P

Lytham OAM, R

Smith OAM, R

Barratt, LA

Fife OAM, M

Marsh OAM, C

Smith OAM, B

Bartlett, M

Fife, MA

Martin AM, M

Smith OAM, R

Beasley OAM, J

Finch AM, F

Mayo AM, R

Smith OAM, M

Bignold, R

Fitzgerald OAM, J

McGee, E

Stapleton AM, P

Bird OAM, K

Ford AM, G

McGibbon, P

Staunton MBE, G

Blackley, D

Fraser OAM, J

McNaughton OAM, G

Stephens OAM, E

Blake OAM, R

Gaynor OAM RFD, W

McNeilly MBE, M

Strange, S

Boardman OAM, T

George AM, P

Meehan OAM, J

Thompson, D

Boulton OAM, D

Goode OAM, I

Menico OAM, J

Thompson, H A

Brennan OAM, R

Grant OAM, I

Mitchell, R

Thorburn, T

Bruce OAM, B

Halliday OAM, W

Morarty OAM, N

Trethowen, J

Bruce, G

Haven AM, A

Morrison, K

Waters OAM, M

Burchill OAM, D

Heywood OBE, N

Murray, K

Watson AM, J

Burling OAM, J

Howard OAM, R

Owen, B

Welch OAM, R

Butler OAM, R

Hoyland OAM, D

Paton OAM, L

Weldon AM, K

Byrnes OAM, M

Inwood, A

Pearce OAM, P

Whelpton AO, A

Chesher OAM, R

Jaggard OAM, E

Pears OAM, R

White, C

Clark ESM, D

Jamieson AFSM, W

Priest, K

Whitmore OAM, R

Conlin OAM, D

Kelk OAM, N

Purcell OAM, N

Wood, R

Connell, P

Kennedy, K

Rankin AM, R

Worrell OAM, J

Davis OAM, E

Knight BEM, K

Reeves OAM, J

Wright OAM, R

Devlin QC AM, R

Larkins, K

Rennie AM, W

Young OAM, I

Donohoe AM, J

Little OAM, R

Restuccia, J

Edstein OAM, J

Lyne AM, C

Scott OAM, I

Farmer OAM, E

Lyons OAM, G

Singleton OAM, W

Asmussen OAM, CK

Besomo, V A

Brown, R

Buist, RV

Avery, EC

Betts, JJ

Brown OAM, R M

Bullpit MBE, NF

Barlow, JR

Biddulph, R

Brown OAM, G

Bulmer, J

Becher OAM, MH

Bond, KJH

Brown OAM, H

Burke BEM, MJ

Bennett, PI

Bowman, BH

Brown OAM, H

Burrell OAM, RA

Bermingham OAM, PJ

Braund, F

Brydon, R C

Cahill, J

DECEASED


Section 05: Awards & Honours

87

Cameron, J R

Furey, W

Marshall OAM, WG

Scott, H

Canning, JT

Gadsdon , LP Kt

Martin, WE

Scott, W

Carrier, A

Gear AM, RJ

Matheson, Ray

Sellars, JPW

Castleman MBE, AW

Godbee OAM, N

McCarthy, JG

Shanahan, RP

Chapple, R

Goetz , Arnold W

McDonald OAM, H N

Slaven, P

Clark OAM, HH

Goold , WJ

McDonald OAM, L S

Sloane, AD

Claybourn OAM, MC

Gordon , JL

McGrath, HF

Small, HA

Cohen, GS

Grant OAM, GF

McGrory OAM, FH

Smith, Barry

Cohen, M

Gray , JE

McIntyre, DD

Smith AM, EJ

Collins, KJ

Green OAM BEM, D

McKay, L

Smith OAM, PW

Conrick, C

Griffiths, JA

McKenzie OAM, GD

Somers, JF

Costa, SV

Hanley, GR

McMaster AM DFC, J W

Spender OBE, JR

Crain MBE, WAT

Harding OAM, R

McRorie, JS

Stanford OAM, K

Cramond AO OBE, T

Harkness, JB

Meagher OBE, TW

Stephens, PR

Creswick, D

Hart, A

Millar, G

Stewart, J J

Critcher, GF

Hatchett, J

Millett MBE, R C

Sutherland, AC

Cronin, VS

Hayton MBE, N

Molyneux , D

Switzer OAM, JR

Curlewis CVO CBE, A

Haywood MBE, FST

Montgomery, P

Tallon OAM, R

Daley, WJ

Heath, EA

Moran, TF

Taylor, CE

Dann, GL

Henshaw OAM, NJ

Morath, Lou

Taylor OAM, PF

Dargan, FH

Herman, W

Moroney, DRB

Teir, FB

Dart, GW

Hobson, Rex

Morris, Ron

Thompson, DH

Davidson OAM, R

Hodge, JN

Morrison OAM, D P

Titter, G

Davis, F

Hodgson, B

Moseley OAM, A

Trigg OBE, RJ

De Giovanni, M

Hofmaster, EV

Nay, R

Turner, LD

Dearlove MBE, J

Holmes, A

Newman, P

Walker OBE, AW

Dellitt , GS

Honey , C

Nicholson, G

Watson MBE, K W

Dempster , JW

Hoskins OAM, K

Nicklin KCMG, F

Webb, GR

Denison , AG

Howells OAM, RM

Olson, AO

Webb OAM, M A

Dewey, J

Hutchings, Brian

O'Reilly BEM, J E

Webster, R

Dickson, R

Imrie, A

O'Rorke OAM, PJ

Weimer, HJ

Dillon, JB

Jackson OAM, R A

Ovens OAM, EJ

Wells, J

Dixon, N A

Jaggard OAM, EFK

Pallister, R

White OAM, DG

Doener, Herman

Johnson, D L

Parkyn OAM, AB

Whitehead, CW

Doig OAM, V A

Johnson, GH

Parlette, A

Wilcox OAM, S T

Donaldson AR

Johnson MBE, SA

Paterson, A

Wilkes, BF

Donnell OAM, BF

Jones OAM, J

Payne, FT

Williams, AM

Doyle, RD

Kelly, B

Peacock, RJ

Williams, G

Eckstein, B

Kennedy MBE, A ER

Pittard, HA

Williams MBE, VJ

Emms, FG

King OAM, BC

Prior BEM, AE

Wilson, D

Englert, CG

King, J

Ramsay, O

Wilson, GJ

Faulkner, E

Klingner OAM, MJ

Rathborne, H

Wilson BEM, HB

Field OAM, R C

Lacey, P

Rector AM, CE

Wilson OAM, NB

Fielder OAM, CD

Lacey, P

Richards, FC

Wilson BEM, B

Figtree, AS

Lazarus, L

Riley MBE, HK

Winders OBE, JR

Finnelley, P

Lindsay, GA

Roberts OAM, R

Winders MBE, SW

Fitzgerald MBE, A E

Loton, AR

Rodgers OAM, DG

Windmill, Harry C

Flanagan BEM, NJ

Lucas OBE, D C

Rosewell OAM, JWA

Windon, SJ

Fleming, M

Mack, C

Russell, RK

Woodroffe, NS

Foerster, WH

Mackie AM, I J

Sabien, M

Worth OAM, W

Foster, K

Mackney, W

Sargeant, RJ

Frizzell OBE OAM, A B

Marshall BEM, ER

Saunders , R A


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

AWARDS & HONOURS

Vale - SLSA Life Members

Geoffrey (Geoff) Brown OAM Cottesloe SLSC

Harold John Brown OAM North Cronulla SLSC

Jack Dearlove MBE Mooloolaba SLSC

Geoffrey Maurice Brown OAM was a colossus of Surf Life Saving both in WA and nationally as well as being honoured by her majesty with an OAM. Geoff was a Life Member of Cottesloe SLSC, Surf Life Saving WA, and SLSA. In his 76 years at Cottesloe he served in every management position from secretary to captain and was President for nine years. He also was manager of the Australian team that toured to Cornwell in 1970 to compete in the world titles. Geoff was instrumental in setting up the rescue helicopter service in WA in 1980 where he was a part of the crew, until 1985.

Harry Brown was one of the true legends of North Cronulla SLSC and held a variety of leadership positions there including Patron, President, Treasurer, Chief Gear Steward and Boat Captain. Harry was also instrumental in North Cronulla SLSC’s Pool Survival Campaign, an initiative to take lifesaving skills out of the surf club by teaching resuscitation techniques to local parents to address infant drowning in backyard pools. However, Harry is perhaps most respected for his leadership in the development and training of IRBs. Harry Brown was awarded Life Membership of North Cronulla SLSC, Surf Life Saving Sydney branch, Surf Life Saving NSW as well as SLSA. He held the position of Honorary Secretary of the National Council of Surf Life Saving Australia and was also voted into Surf Life Saving’s Hall of Fame. In 1982 Harry Brown was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for his services to Surf Life Saving.

Jack Dearlove MBE, a true pioneer who risked his life to advance resuscitation techniques, passed away in August 2017. From Mooloolaba SLSC, Jack was instrumental in the development of Surf Life Saving Queensland, resulting in Jack being inducted as a Life Member in October 1966. Jack contributed to the introduction of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the lifesaving movement, as well as the use of oxygen. This revolutionary decision has saved many lives across the decades. For Surf Life Saving Queensland’s CEO John Brennan OAM, Jack Dearlove MBE was a true legend of surf lifesaving. “Jack was one of the godfathers of surf lifesaving and had a huge impact on surf. Jack was given the title of Grand Knight in the Order of International Life Saving in 1982 and was also inducted into the SLSA Hall of Fame in 2004 after becoming a SLSA Life Member in November 1966.


Section 05: Awards & Honours

89

Victor (Alan) Doig OAM Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC

Norman (Max) Godbee OAM Yamba SLSC

Ronald (Speed) Harding OAM Yeppoon SLSC

Victor Alan Doig OAM, SLSA Life Member and pioneer of resuscitation techniques, passed away on Sunday 19 November, 2017. Alan joined Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC more than 60 years ago. His contribution to the area of Expired Air Resuscitation (EAR) was instrumental in bringing expired air and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques to the world. Alan was one of four participants anaesthetised, rendered unconscious and revived to demonstrate EAR back in 1961. His work not only helped lifesaving organisations develop better methods of resuscitation, but has also helped humanity reduce the mortality rate resulting from drowning and the many other threats to life.

Norman (Max) Godbee OAM passed away in July 2017 at the age of 86. His illustrious 65 year career as a Yamba surf lifesaver included a host of roles at all levels of the organisation, including on the international stage officiating at World Life Saving Championships. His commitment to Surf Life Saving was recognised when he was made Life Member of Yamba and the Far North Coast Branch in 1971, of Surf Life Saving New South Wales in 1985 and awarded SLSA Life Membership in 2006. Being acknowledged as a Life Member at every level of the organisation shows the commitment and influence he had. In 2003 Max was awarded the Order of Australia Medal for services to surf lifesaving and the Clarence Valley community. This was further reinforced by the establishment of ‘The Max Godbee Award’, an award for outstanding contribution to the sporting landscape in the Clarence Valley at the local annual Community Sports Awards.

Iconic Yeppoon SLSC member Ron ‘Speed’ Harding OAM passed away in December 2018, aged 84. Speed was a member of Yeppoon SLSC for 67 years, obtaining his Bronze Medallion in 1953. During his time he trained, assessed and coached hundreds of quality surf lifesavers. Awarded Life Membership at Yeppoon SLSC, Wide Bay Capricorn Branch, Surf Life Saving Queensland and SLSA, there was not a moment that Speed would pass up to spend time at his beloved club, where the deck was aptly named after him. Ron Harding was awarded an OAM in 2000 for his service to surf lifesaving at club and state levels as an instructor, examiner and at a national level as a carnival official.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

Kevin Hoskins OAM Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC

Kevin Stanford OAM Shelly Beach SLSC

Harold (Binni) Wilson BEM Ulverstone SLSC

It was with much sadness that beloved SLSA Life Member, Kevin Hoskins OAM passed away in June 2018. It was a reflection of Kevin’s contribution to surf lifesaving that he was made a Life Member of not one but two clubs: Bunbury SLSC and Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC. Kevin was also made a Life Member of the South Coast Branch of Surf Life Saving Queensland, SLS Queensland and of SLSA. In 1997, Kevin Hoskins’ contribution was recognised with the award of the Medal of the Order of Australia for more than 40 years of service to the surf lifesaving movement.

Kevin Stanford OAM, passed away in May 2018. Kevin was a founding member of the North Entrance SLSC in 1977, joining Shelly Beach SLSC in 1978 where he held the positions of President (1986-1993), Secretary, Registrar and Chief Instructor. He continued to train and assess right up until recent years, having gained his Instructors’ Certificate in 1954 and his Examiners’ Certificate in 1985. Kevin was also a highly regarded Surf Sports Official both locally and internationally, and was involved at the World Championships in Vancouver – Canada, Southport – Australia, Lübeck – Germany and in the UK. He was awarded the Surf Life Saving Australia 70 Years Long Service Medal in 2017; the only surf lifesaver from the Central Coast Branch to achieve this honour.

With the death of Ulverstone clubbie Harold “Binni” Wilson in August 2017 at the age of 94, surf lifesaving lost a legend in the true sense. “To those with a sense of history, Binni was a walking encyclopedia of surf people and events — a storyteller who could seamlessly bring to life the characters, competition and rescues that played a part in the evolution of the organisation in this country,” Surf Life Saving Tasmania president Steve Godfrey said. “To our patrolling members he was the face of surf lifesaving — a genuine Aussie icon whose achievements and contribution are something to marvel at and perhaps aspire to in some small way.” Binni obtained his Bronze Medallion in 1938 and was an active member of Ulverstone SLSC for 79 years. He stood watch over the state’s beaches for 66 years before retiring from active duty in the 2003-2004 season. He was a State Coach for three years, on the Board of Examiners for 50-plus years, State Superintendent for five years and an official at the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships and World Life Saving Championships for 31 and 6 years respectively.


Section 05: Awards & Honours

91


SECTION 06

Statistical Summaries


94

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Membership

42,740 PATROLLING SURF LIFESAVERS

NSW

INCREASE IN TOTAL MEMBERSHIP

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

Grand Total

Patrolling Surf Lifesavers Male

12,344

5,535

3,752

2,697

1,555

490

86

26,459

Female

6,558

3,256

2,879

2,115

1,138

256

72

16,274

Unknown

2.99%

QLD

1

1

4

1

-

-

-

7

18,903

8,792

6,635

4,813

2,693

746

158

42,740

17,910

8,629

6,220

4,431

2,394

639

148

40,371

Surf Rescue Certificate (CPR Endorsed)

3,513

1,040

1,406

1,324

620

78

19

8,000

Total

21,423

9,669

7,626

5,755

3,014

717

167

48,371

WA

SA

Total Proficient Surf Lifesavers Bronze Medallion

NSW

QLD

VIC

Male

1,905

826

1,156

456

Female

1,356

721

1,067

480

TAS

NT

17/18

16/17

% Change

230

75

259

68

4

4,652

4,368

6.50%

9

3,960

3,723

6.37%

Active (15–18 yrs)

Other

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

3

1

200%

Total

3,261

1,547

2,226

936

489

143

13

8,615

8,092

6.46%

-1.56%

Active (18 yrs or over) Male

8,293

3,538

2,359

1,755

1,071

309

48

17,373

17,648

Female

4,086

1,898

1,721

1,230

709

180

41

9,865

9,971

-1.06%

Other

1

-

2

1

-

-

-

4

7

-42.86%

Total

12,380

5,436

4,082

2,986

1,780

489

89

27,242

27,626

-1.39%

Active Reserve Male

829

84

116

56

12

15

1,112

1,122

-0.89%

Female

381

23

45

14

3

7

1

474

457

3.72%

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

1,210

107

161

70

15

22

1

1,586

1,579

0.44%

Associate Male

5,771

3,823

4,126

1,097

475

173

28

15,493

15,203

1.91%

Female

5,206

4,802

4,909

981

564

206

57

16,725

16,052

4.19%

Other

5

-

-

1

2

-

-

8

6

33.33%

Total

10,982

8,625

9,035

2,079

1,041

379

85

32,226

31,261

3.09%

Male

278

447

192

156

17

12

-

1,102

1,025

7.51% 10.62%

Award

Female

252

461

86

149

31

21

-

1,000

904

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

530

908

278

305

48

33

-

2,102

1,929

8.97%

Cadet (13–15 yrs) Male

1,486

554

891

481

220

73

9

3,714

3,759

-1.2%

Female

1,411

568

1,010

547

225

57

13

3,831

3,720

2.98%

Other

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

3

3

-

Total

2,897

1,122

1,902

1,030

445

130

22

7,548

7,482

0.88%


Section 06: Statistical Summaries

95

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

17/18

16/17

% Change

Male

4,518

64

1,066

2,331

467

28

14

8,488

7,989

6.25%

Female

4,533

62

1,270

2,377

542

36

6

8,826

8,258

6.88%

General

Other

3

-

1

10

2

-

-

16

9

77.78%

Total

9,054

126

2,337

4,718

1,011

64

20

17,330

16,256

6.61%

Male

159

206

32

43

37

1

-

478

497

-3.82%

Female

97

171

31

34

15

2

-

350

359

-2.51%

Honorary

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

256

377

63

77

52

3

-

828

856

-3.27%

Junior Activity (5–13 yrs) Male

14,738

5,650

5,585

3,852

1,331

467

87

31,710

30,332

4.54%

Female

13,541

5,147

5,609

3,721

1,342

457

56

29,873

29,323

1.88%

Other

10

-

9

2

-

-

-

21

7

200%

Total

28,289

10,797

11,203

7,575

2,673

924

143

61,604

59,662

3.26%

1,631

939

604

271

351

81

19

3,896

3,795

2.66% 7.30%

Life Member Male Female

179

114

191

58

80

15

10

647

603

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

1,810

1,053

795

329

431

96

29

4,543

4,398

3.30%

3,159

1,146

106

483

79

1

-

4,974

4,935

0.79%

425

258

41

170

34

-

-

928

855

8.54%

Long Service Male Female Other

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

Total

3,585

1,404

147

653

113

1

-

5,903

5,790

1.95%

Male

74

175

7

3

5

3

-

267

312

-14.42%

Female

28

70

14

1

-

3

-

116

123

-5.69%

Past Active

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

102

245

21

4

5

6

-

383

435

-11.95%

Male

478

269

1,086

193

90

12

15

2,143

1,742

23.02% 5.54%

Probationary

Female

330

197

1,008

148

93

22

11

1,809

1,714

Other

-

-

2

1

-

-

-

3

1

200%

Total

808

466

2,096

342

183

34

26

3,955

3,457

14.41%

2.88%

Total Male

43,319

17,721

17,326

11,177

4,385

1,250

224

95,402

92,727

Total Female

31,825

14,492

17,002

9,910

3,897

1,074

204

78,404

76,062

3.08%

Total Other

20

-

18

17

4

-

-

59

34

73.53%

Grand Total

75,164

32,213

34,346

21,104

8,286

2,324

428

173,865

168,823

2.99%

Membership figures are reconciled periodically and may vary from previously published data.

61,604 JUNIOR ACTIVITY MEMBERS (5-13 YRS)

3.26% INCREASE IN TOTAL JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP (5-13 YRS)


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Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Actions

5,858 SLSC RESCUES

Surf Life Saving Actions (Clubs) NSW

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS PERFORMED BY SLSCs

28,561 FIRST AID TREATMENTS ADMINISTERED BY SURF LIFESAVERS

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

Rescues No Gear

295,573

QLD

749

63

21

47

54

11

-

945

Rescue Tube

1,093

275

84

66

5

20

2

1,545

Board

1,596

253

113

102

30

32

2

2,128

542

216

131

145

46

18

3

1,101

IRB Surfboard

5

-

5

-

-

-

-

10

Other

78

10

8

15

18

-

-

129

4,063

817

362

375

153

81

7

5,858

Lost Children

1,319

-

10

50

47

-

1

1,427

Preventions

140,742

70,133

56,520

16,174

9,432

159

61

293,221

158

53

-

11

26

5

-

253

Total Rescues Preventative Actions

Searches Evacuation Alarm Total Preventative Actions

547

28

4

53

40

-

-

672

142,766

70,214

56,534

16,288

9,545

164

62

295,573

107

26

16

17

5

2

2

175

8,683

8,349

7

1,976

949

9

-

19,973

First Aid Fractures/Dislocation Marine Stings Major Wounds Minor Cuts/Abrasions Other

137

366

62

12

12

2

2

593

2,231

2,387

1,031

526

246

42

7

6,470

696

-

-

299

142

-

8

1,145

Resuscitation

16

2

1

-

3

24

-

46

Spinal

87

41

11

15

4

1

-

159

11,957

11,171

1,128

2,845

1,361

80

19

28,561

158,786

82,202

58,024

19,508

11,059

325

88

329,992

648,872

347,069

177,863

109,116

67,381

18,384

2,770

1,371,455

Total First Aid

Grand Total

Club Patrol Hours Total


Section 06: Statistical Summaries

97

Surf Life Saving Actions (Lifeguards) ALS NSW ALS QLD

ALS VIC

ALS WA

ALS SA

ALS TAS

ALS NT

TOTAL

Rescues No Gear

81

114

18

36

-

-

163

412

Rescue Tube

83

72

105

63

-

-

5

328

Board

707

637

145

92

4

-

4

1,589

-

-

17

-

-

-

-

17

41

862

6

156

-

-

-

1,065

JRB/ORB/RIB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Helicopter

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

IRB RWC

Surfboard

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Other

9

2

-

4

-

-

5

20

922

1,687

291

351

4

-

177

3,432

Lost Children

195

-

6

33

-

-

3

237

Preventions

354,134

623,903

62,123

40,147

141

8,990

6,103

1,095,541

306

31

-

6

1

-

-

344

Total Rescues Preventative Actions

Searches Evacuation Alarm Total Preventative Actions

50

51

4

26

2

-

-

133

354,685

623,985

62,133

40,212

144

8,990

6,106

1,096,255

43

129

5

22

-

-

6

205

5,240

9,012

-

1,167

17

-

29

15,465

First Aid Fractures/Dislocation Marine Stings Major Wounds Minor Cuts/Abrasions Other Resuscitation Spinal Total First Aid

Grand Total

50

341

29

14

2

-

18

454

1,759

14,447

626

1,058

5

-

473

18,368

275

-

-

19

3

-

23

320

5

6

1

-

-

-

-

12

13

47

10

11

-

1

-

82

7,385

23,982

671

2,291

27

1

549

34,906

362,992

649,654

63,095

42,854

175

8,991

6,832

1,134,593

99,926

279,413

36,022

32,630

932

1,768

19,006

469,697

Lifeguard Patrol Hours Total

3,432 RESCUES BY THE AUSTRALIAN LIFEGUARD SERVICE

1,096,255 PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS PERFORMED BY ALS LIFEGUARDS

34,906 FIRST AID TREATMENTS ADMINISTERED BY ALS LIFEGUARDS


98

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Actions

959 RESCUES PERFORMED BY SUPPORT OPERATIONS

137,666 PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS PERFORMED BY SUPPORT OPERATIONS

Surf Life Saving Actions (Support Operations) NSW

PATROL HOURS PERFORMED BY SUPPORT OPERATIONS

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

Rescues No Gear

24

-

39

-

-

-

1

64

IRB

1

-

148

-

-

-

-

149

RWC

263

326

6

-

85

-

-

680

JRB/ORB/RIB

18

-

-

-

8

12

-

38

Helicopter

1

11

1

-

-

-

-

13

Other

7

-

8

-

-

-

-

15

314

337

202

-

93

12

1

959

Lost Children

-

-

16

-

6

-

1

23

Preventions

2,618

7,937

118,643

2,241

1,575

67

61

133,142

52

49

-

27

29

4

3

164

Total Rescues Preventative Actions

Searches

39,369

QLD

Evacuation Alarm Total Preventative Actions

28

-

8

4,245

56

-

-

4,337

2,698

7,986

118,667

6,513

1,666

71

65

137,666

First Aid Fractures/Dislocation

1

-

21

-

-

-

-

22

Marine Stings

1

-

7

-

-

-

2

10

Major Wounds

-

3

91

-

1

-

-

95

Minor Cuts/Abrasions

2

-

1,657

-

1

-

6

1,666

Other

7

-

-

-

-

-

1

8

Resuscitation

4

-

2

-

1

-

-

7

Spinal

-

-

21

-

-

-

-

21

15

3

1,799

-

3

-

9

1,829

3,027

8,326

120,668

6,513

1,762

83

75

140,454

14,736

14,811

-

989

5,280

3,374

179

39,369

Total First Aid

Grand Total Support Operations Patrol Hours Total


Section 06: Statistical Summaries

99

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Equipment

Surf Life Saving Equipment (Clubs) NSW

QLD

VIC

SA

WA

Vehicle (4WD/Tractor)

28

69

18

11

20

Beach Vehicle (ATV)

74

62

62

22

34

TAS

NT

TOTAL

1

147

11

3

268

Land-based

Defibrillator

308

284

209

41

118

25

3

988

Total

410

415

289

74

172

36

7

1,403

Aquatic IRB Hull

393

263

228

65

99

30

8

1,086

IRB Motor

446

349

294

87

113

45

8

1,342

Total

839

612

522

152

212

75

16

2,428

1,249

1,027

811

226

384

111

23

3,831

VIC*

SA

WA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

Grand Total

Surf Life Saving Equipment (Support Operations) NSW

QLD

Land-based Vehicle (4WD/Tractor) Beach Vehicle (ATV)

11

3

-

6

-

-

-

20

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

Defibrillator

10

10

-

3

2

-

1

26

Total

21

15

-

9

2

-

1

48

Aquatic JRB

2

-

-

2

-

2

-

6

RWC

38

24

-

8

25

4

4

103

ORB

1

-

5

-

-

5

1

12

RIB

-

-

7

-

-

2

1

10

IRB Total

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

41

24

12

11

25

13

6

132

Aviation Helicopter

2

2

2

1

2

-

-

9

Other

9

-

-

-

11

-

-

20

Total

11

2

2

1

13

-

-

29

Grand Total

73

41

14

21

40

13

7

209

988 DEFIBRILLATORS HELD BY CLUBS

1,086 INFLATABLE RESCUE BOATS IN USE BY SLSCs


100

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Equipment

311 AUSTRALIAN LIFEGUARD SERVICE ITEMS OF KEY EQUIPMENT

Surf Life Saving Equipment (Lifeguards) ALS NSW ALS QLD

ALS VIC

ALS SA

ALS WA

ALS TAS

ALS NT

TOTAL

Land-based Vehicle (4WD/Tractor)

8

11

3

1

4

-

1

28

Beach Vehicle (ATV)

15

19

1

-

2

-

1

38

Defibrillator

90

42

20

1

11

1

5

170

Total

113

72

24

2

17

1

7

236

Aquatic IRB Hull

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

8

IRB Motor

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

8

RWC

15

26

13

-

5

-

-

59

Total

15

26

29

-

5

-

-

75

Grand Total

128

98

53

2

22

1

7

311


Section 06: Statistical Summaries

101

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Accreditation

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

Total

Core

23

26

13

2

-

-

-

64 405

Official Awards

Technical

134

145

119

3

2

1

1

Senior

32

42

8

4

2

1

-

89

Total

189

213

140

9

4

2

1

558

Foundation

10

2

1

-

1

-

-

14

Development

79

48

28

54

26

-

-

235

Performance

7

2

-

-

1

-

-

10

Total

96

52

29

54

28

-

-

259

Grand Total

285

265

169

63

32

2

1

817

Coach Awards


102

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Awards & Qualifications

NSW Member Comm.

QLD Member Comm.

VIC Member Comm.

WA Member Comm.

Patrolling Lifesaver Awards Bronze Medallion

2,786

10

1,396

-

1,425

Certificate II in Public Safety (Aquatic Rescue) (PUA21012)

-

706

-

3,004

10

1,576

96

1,458

-

430

-

Gold Medallion (Advanced Lifesaving)

123

13

31

-

19

-

-

-

Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue

193

-

24

-

26

-

8

-

Maintain safety at an incident scene (PUAOHS002B)

296

-

24

-

26

-

-

-

Search as a member of an aquatic search team (PUASAR011C)

296

-

24

-

26

-

-

-

Silver Medallion Beach Management

522

1

290

-

113

-

83

-

Undertake beach safety management activities (PUAOPE027A)

622

1

296

-

119

-

1

-

Work autonomously (PUATEA002B)

623

1

296

-

119

-

1

-

Contribute to team effectiveness (BSBFLM312C)

623

1

297

-

119

-

-

-

Surf Rescue Certificate (CPR Endorsed)

1,692

95

830

147

839

-

565

-

Certificate III in Public Safety (Aquatic Search and Rescue) (PUA31312)

101

78

2

-

1

-

-

-

Radio Operator Certificate

1,113

-

488

-

69

-

124

-

Silver Medallion Communications Centre Operator

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3,805

-

1,508

96

1,411

-

430

-

ATV Operator Certificate

12

18

-

-

57

-

11

-

IRB Crew Certificate

803

-

518

-

363

-

139

-

Crew small powercraft in a rescue operation (PUASAR015A)

Operate communications systems and equipment (PUAOPE013A) Powercraft Awards

807

-

546

7

441

-

1

-

ORB Crew Certificate

6

-

3

-

-

-

1

-

ORB Driver Certificate

2

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

Rescue Water Craft Operator Certificate

69

-

81

-

-

-

37

-

Operate and maintain a personal water craft for rescue operations (PUASAR016A)

83

-

87

-

1

-

3

-

Prepare maintain and test response equipment (PUAEQU001B)

393

-

323

-

178

-

-

-

Silver Medallion IRB Driver

307

-

180

-

108

-

67

-

Operate and maintain a small powercraft and motor for rescue operations (PUASAR014A)

315

-

233

7

117

-

-

-

Emergency Care Awards Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID]

1,051

126

815

-

569

-

342

-

Provide advanced resuscitation (HLTAID007)

1,085

503

1,042

499

577

-

76

-

Basic Emergency Care

114

1,571

-

-

-

-

-

-

Basic Life Support [AID]

2

-

-

-

44

124

-

-

3,004

-

1,576

96

1,412

-

427

-

Provide basic emergency life support (HLTFA211A)


Section 06: Statistical Summaries

SA Member Comm.

37

103

TAS Member Comm.

-

82

277

-

-

-

-

NT Member Comm.

Total Member

Total Commercial

Grand Total

-

6,448

10

6,458 6,951

-

16

83

-

17

-

6,845

106

-

-

-

-

173

13

186

-

8

-

5

-

264

-

264

-

-

8

-

5

-

359

-

359

-

-

8

-

5

-

359

-

359

-

-

14

-

-

1,022

1

1,023

-

-

14

-

-

-

1,052

1

1,053

-

-

14

-

-

-

1,053

1

1,054

19

-

14

-

-

-

1,072

1

1,073

17

-

59

-

10

-

4,012

242

4,254

-

-

-

-

-

-

104

78

182

2

-

-

-

-

-

1,796

-

1,796

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

7

-

83

-

17

-

7,261

96

7,357

44

-

-

-

2

-

126

18

144

-

-

37

-

6

-

1,866

-

1,866

80

-

51

-

6

-

1,932

7

1,939

-

-

-

-

1

-

11

-

11

-

-

-

-

1

-

6

-

6

-

-

-

-

5

-

192

-

192

24

-

-

-

5

-

203

-

203

-

-

-

-

8

-

902

-

902

1

-

-

-

3

-

666

-

666

-

-

23

-

3

-

691

7

698

1

-

39

7

-

2,824

126

2,950

66

-

56

11

3

-

2,905

1,013

3,918

-

-

-

-

-

-

114

1,571

1,685

-

-

-

-

-

-

46

124

170

3

-

83

-

17

-

6,522

96

6,618

6,458 BRONZE MEDALLIONS AWARDED

6,627 POWERCRAFT AWARDS


104

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Awards & Qualifications

NSW Member Comm.

QLD Member Comm.

VIC Member Comm.

WA Member Comm.

Emergency Care Awards (Continued) Provide basic life support (HLTAID002)

296

-

-

-

579

5,078

303

First Aid [AID]

500

762

1,253

-

400

4,954

310

-

Apply first aid (HLTFA311A)

103

-

42

-

2

-

-

-

Provide first aid (HLTAID003)

853

11,468

1,566

5,072

514

4,954

309

-

Marine Stinger Management

-

-

53

-

-

-

-

-

Occupational First Aid

-

58

-

-

-

-

-

-

Pain Management Certificate

-

93

41

-

-

-

66

-

Provide pain management (PUAEME005A)

-

58

93

85

18

-

-

-

-

Remote Area First Aid

-

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

Provide first aid in remote situations (HLTAID005)

1

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

Resuscitation [AID]

385

-

1,399

-

349

7,256

29

5,331

47,285

2,895

10,995

1,729

12,334

370

-

60

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

Provide advanced first aid (HLTAID006)

94

278

36

6

-

-

7

-

Spinal Management

443

96

-

-

359

-

-

-

Provide emergency care for suspected spinal injury (PUAEME004A)

37

96

-

-

5

-

-

-

99

-

-

-

35

-

3

-

Assess competence (TAEASS402B)

38

-

-

-

24

-

2

-

Make a presentation (BSBCMM401)

118

-

28

-

48

-

-

-

Make a presentation (BSBCMM401A)

124

-

1

-

-

-

3

-

Participate in assessment validation (TAEASS403B)

38

-

-

-

24

-

2

-

Plan assessment activities and processes (TAEASS401B)

38

-

-

-

23

-

2

-

Provide work skill instruction (TAEDEL301A)

124

-

-

-

36

-

3

-

Provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] (HLTAID001) Silver Medallion Advanced First Aid [AID]

Training and Assessing Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAE40110)

Junior Activity Awards Surf Aware One

3,799

-

1,389

-

616

-

1,138

-

Surf Aware Two

3,241

-

1,251

-

686

-

1,011

-

Surf Play One

3,557

-

1,017

-

239

-

734

-

Surf Play Two

3,673

-

1,266

-

394

-

990

-

Surf Safe One

2,889

-

1,133

-

669

-

913

-

Surf Safe Two

2,329

-

1,009

-

607

-

838

-

Surf Smart One

1,983

-

837

-

575

-

779

-

Surf Smart Two

1,524

-

772

-

438

-

640

-


Section 06: Statistical Summaries

SA Member Comm.

105

TAS Member Comm.

147

-

57

5

-

-

-

-

Total Member

Total Commercial

Grand Total

148,729

-

1,396

5,078

6,474

EMERGENCY CARE AWARDS

8,250

NT Member Comm.

-

14

54

-

12

-

2,534

5,716

-

-

-

-

147

-

147

-

56

294

1

-

3,299

21,788

25,087

-

-

-

-

-

-

53

-

53

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

58

58

-

-

-

-

-

-

107

93

200

-

-

-

-

-

-

143

111

254

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

30

31

-

-

62

-

-

-

2,224

7,256

9,480

305

-

148

335

43

-

10,821

70,949

81,770

1

-

-

-

-

-

62

-

62

-

-

1

1

3

-

141

285

426

-

-

21

-

5

-

828

96

924

3

-

-

-

1

-

46

96

142

1

-

2

-

1

-

141

-

141

-

-

-

-

1

-

65

-

65

-

-

2

-

-

-

196

-

196

5

-

10

-

1

-

144

-

144

-

-

-

-

1

-

65

-

65

-

-

-

-

1

-

64

-

64

-

-

10

-

1

-

174

-

174

227

-

115

-

14

-

7,298

-

7,298

153

-

115

-

9

-

6,466

-

6,466

70

-

5

-

13

-

5,635

-

5,635

91

-

14

-

20

-

6,448

-

6,448

150

-

112

-

8

-

5,874

-

5,874

114

-

101

-

13

-

5,011

-

5,011

124

-

72

-

9

-

4,379

-

4,379

36

-

74

-

7

-

3,491

-

3,491

849 TRAINING AND ASSESSING AWARDS

44,602 JUNIOR ACTIVITY AWARDS


106

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

S TAT I S T I C A L S U M M A R I E S

Service Awards

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

17/18 Total

45

-

-

-

-

-

-

59

National Medal National Medal National Medal - Clasp Total

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

48

-

-

-

-

-

-

62

Patrol Service Awards 5 Year National Patrol Service Award

199

192

312

21

41

16

-

781

10 Year National Patrol Service Award

189

118

198

14

27

6

-

552

15 Year National Patrol Service Award

85

34

77

3

5

2

-

206

20 Year National Patrol Service Award

32

11

46

4

10

2

-

105

25 Year National Patrol Service Award

13

3

22

2

2

-

-

42

30 Year National Patrol Service Award

4

-

15

-

-

-

-

19

35 Year National Patrol Service Award

8

1

11

-

-

1

-

21

40 Year National Patrol Service Award

2

-

5

-

-

1

-

8

45 Year National Patrol Service Award

-

-

2

-

2

-

-

4

50 Year National Patrol Service Award

1

1

2

-

-

1

-

5

533

360

690

44

87

29

-

1,743

25 Year Long Service Award

80

14

95

12

-

-

1

202

30 Year Long Service Award

47

7

72

20

-

-

-

146

Total Long Service Awards (Membership)

40 Year Long Service Award

35

7

43

3

-

-

-

88

50 Year Long Service Award

40

14

67

10

6

-

-

137

60 Year Long Service Award

37

12

17

4

-

-

-

70

70 Year Long Service Award

11

1

-

2

-

-

-

14

75 Year Long Service Award

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

253

55

294

51

6

-

1

660

Total Officiating Service Awards 5 Year Officiating Service Certificate

11

5

4

2

-

-

-

22

10 Year Officiating Service Certificate

6

13

3

1

-

-

-

23

15 Year Officiating Service Certificate

7

4

2

-

-

-

-

13

20 Year Officiating Service Certificate

5

1

2

-

-

-

-

8

25 Year Officiating Service Certificate

1

3

2

-

-

-

-

6

30 Year Officiating Service Certificate

1

1

4

-

-

-

-

6

35 Year Officiating Service Certificate

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

40 Year Officiating Service Certificate

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

7

33

27

24

3

-

-

-

87

Total


Section 06: Statistical Summaries

107

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

17/18 Total

5 Year Coaching Service Certificate

7

3

4

-

1

1

-

16 16

Coaching Service Awards

10 Year Coaching Service Certificate

13

3

-

-

-

-

-

15 Year Coaching Service Certificate

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

20 Year Coaching Service Certificate

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

24

6

4

-

1

1

-

36

Total Assessing Service Awards 5 Year Assessing Service Certificate

3

12

4

3

-

-

-

22

10 Year Assessing Service Certificate

13

5

5

-

-

-

-

23

15 Year Assessing Service Certificate

6

3

3

-

-

-

-

12

20 Year Assessing Service Certificate

3

2

3

1

-

-

-

9

25 Year Assessing Service Certificate

1

-

2

-

-

-

-

3

30 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

2

1

-

-

-

-

3

35 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

40 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

1

2

-

-

-

-

3

45 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

26

26

20

4

-

-

-

76

4

44

-

10

-

-

-

58

Total Age Manager Service Awards 5 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate 10 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

6

Total

6

48

-

10

-

-

-

64

923

522

1,032

112

94

30

1

2,714

Grand Total


SEC TION 07

Surf Life Saving Entities


110

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

SURF LIFE SAVING ENTITIES

Surf Life Saving Entities

National 12 National, State and Territory Centres, SLSA Subsidiaries, SLS Foundation 314 Clubs 17 Branches 83 Support Operations Groups 67 Australian Lifeguard Service Operations 493 Surf Life Saving Entities/Groups

New South Wales 129 Clubs, 11 Branches, 28 Support Operations Groups, 20 Australian Lifeguard Services 129 Clubs

Caves Beach SLSC

Gerringong SLSC

Austinmer SLSC

Clovelly SLSC

Hat Head SLSC

Avalon Beach SLSC

Coalcliff SLSC

Helensburgh-Stanwell Park SLSC

Avoca Beach SLSC

Coffs Harbour SLSC

Kempsey - Crescent Head SLSC

Ballina Lighthouse and Lismore SLSC

Coledale SLSC

Kiama SLSC

Batemans Bay SLSC

Collaroy SLSC

Kiama Downs SLSC

Bellambi SLSC

Coogee SLSC

Killcare SLSC

Bellinger Valley - North Beach SLSC

Cooks Hill SLSC

Lennox Head - Alstonville SLSC

Bermagui SLSC

Copacabana SLSC

Long Reef SLSC

Bilgola Beach SLSC

Corrimal SLSC

Macksville - Scotts Head SLSC

Birubi Point SLSC

Cronulla SLSC

MacMasters Beach SLSC

Blackhead SLSC

Crowdy Head SLSC

Manly LSC

Bondi SBLSC

Cudgen Headland SLSC

Maroubra SLSC

Bronte SLSC

Dee Why SLSC

Merewether SLSC

Broulee Surfers SLSC

Dixon Park SLSC

Minnie Water - Wooli SLSC

Brunswick SLSC

Elouera SLSC

Mollymook SLSC

Bulli SLSC

Era SLSC

Mona Vale SLSC

Bungan Beach SLSC

Evans Head-Casino SLSC

Moruya SLSC

Burning Palms SLSC

Fairy Meadow SLSC

Nambucca Heads SLSC

Byron Bay SLSC

Fingal Beach SLSC

Narooma SLSC

Cabarita Beach SLSC

Fingal Rovers SLSC

Narrabeen SLSC

Camden Haven SLSC

Forster SLSC

Newcastle SLSC

Cape Hawke SLSC

Freshwater SLSC

Newport SLSC

Catherine Hill Bay SLSC

Garie SLSC

Nobbys SLSC


Section 07: SLS Entities

111

New South Wales 129 Clubs, 11 Branches, 28 Support Operations Groups, 20 Australian Lifeguard Services North Avoca SLSC

The Lakes SLSC

Lower North Coast RWC

North Bondi SLSC

Thirroul SLSC

Mid North Coast Branch - Duty Officers

North Cronulla SLSC

Toowoon Bay SLSC

Mid North Coast Branch - RWC

North Curl Curl SLSC

Towradgi SLSC

North Coast Branch - Duty Officers

North Entrance SLSC

Umina SLSC

North Coast Branch RWC

North Narrabeen SLSC

Urunga SLSC

South Coast Branch - Duty Officers

North Palm Beach SLSC

Wamberal SLSC

South Coast Branch - RWC

North Steyne SLSC

Wanda SLSC

Surf Life Saving NSW State Duty Officers

North Wollongong SLSC

Warilla - Barrack Point SLSC

Surf Rescue 30

Nowra Culburra SLSC

Warriewood SLSC

Surf Rescue 40

Ocean Beach SLSC

Wauchope - Bonny Hills SLSC

Surf Rescue 50

Pacific Palms SLSC

Whale Beach SLSC

Sydney Branch - Duty Officers

Palm Beach SLSC

Windang SLSC

Sydney Branch - RWC service

Pambula SLSC

Wollongong City SLSC

Surf Life Saving NSW SurfCom Team

Port Kembla SLSC

Woolgoolga SLSC

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch - CISM TIPS

Port Macquarie SLSC

Woonona SLSC

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch - Duty Officers

Queenscliff SLSC

Yamba SLSC

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch - RWC Service

Red Rock-Corindi SLSC

11 Branches

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch—Duty Officers

Redhead SLSC

Central Coast Branch

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch—RWC Service

Salt SLSC

Far North Coast Branch

20 Australian Lifeguard Services

Sandon Point SLSC

Far South Coast Branch

Ballina Shire Council

Sawtell SLSC

Hunter Branch

Bega Valley Shire Council

Scarborough - Wombarra SLSC

Illawarra Branch

Bellingen Shire Council

Shellharbour SLSC

Lower North Coast Branch

Byron Shire Council

Shelly Beach SLSC

Mid North Coast Branch

Cape Byron Trust

Shoalhaven Heads SLSC

North Coast Branch

Clarence Valley Council

Soldiers Beach SLSC

South Coast Branch

Kempsey Shire Council

South Curl Curl SLSC

Sydney Branch

Magenta Resort & Country Club Lifeguard Service

South Maroubra SLSC

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch

Mid Coast Council

South Narrabeen SLSC

28 Support Operations Groups

Munmorah State Conservation Area

South West Rocks SLSC

Central Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Nambucca Shire Council

Stockton SLSC

Central Coast Branch - RWC Group

Northern Beaches Council

Sussex Inlet SLSC

Far North Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Parramatta City Council

Swansea Belmont SLSC

Far North Coast Branch - RWC

Port Macquarie Council

Tacking Point SLSC

Far South Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Port Stephens Council

Tamarama SLSC

Far South Coast Branch - RWC

Richmond Valley Council

Taree - Old Bar SLSC

Hunter Branch - RWC

Royal National Park Sydney

Tathra SLSC

Hunter Branch Duty Officers

Salt Resort Lifeguard Service

Tea Gardens - Hawks Nest SLSC

Illawarra Branch Duty Officers

Shoalhaven City Council

Terrigal SLSC

Illawarra Branch RWC Team

Tweed Shire Council

The Entrance SLSC

Lower North Coast Branch Duty Officers


112

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

Queensland 58 Clubs, 6 Branches, 9 Support Operations Groups, 19 Australian Lifeguard Services 58 Clubs

Mission Beach SLSC

9 Support Operations Groups

Agnes Water SLSC

Mooloolaba SLSC

Brisbane Lifesaving Service

Alexandra Headland SLSC

Moore Park SLSC

Gold Coast Duty Officers

Arcadian SLSC

Mudjimba SLSC

Gold Coast Surfcom

Ayr SLSC

Nobbys Beach SLSC

SLSQ RWC - Gold Coast

Bilinga SLSC

Noosa Heads SLSC

SLSQ RWC - Sunshine Coast

Bowen SLSC

North Burleigh SLSC

Sunshine Coast Duty Officers

Bribie Island SLSC

North Kirra SLSC

Sunshine Coast Surfcom

Broadbeach SLSC

BMD Northcliffe SLSC

Bundaberg SLSC

Pacific SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Gold Coast

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC

Palm Beach SLSC

Cairns SLSC

Point Lookout SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Sunshine Coast

Coochiemudlo Island SLSC

Port Douglas SLSC

19 Australian Lifeguard Services

Coolangatta SLSC

Rainbow Bay SLSC

Brisbane City Council

Coolum Beach SLSC

Rainbow Beach SLSC

Bundaberg Regional Council

Currumbin SLSC

Redcliffe Peninsula SLSC

Burdekin Shire

Dicky Beach SLSC

Sarina SLSC

Cairns Regional Council

Eimeo SLSC

Southport SLSC

Cassowary Coast Region

Elliott Heads SLSC

Sunshine Beach SLSC

City of Gold Coast

Ellis Beach SLSC

Surfers Paradise SLSC

Douglas Shire Council

Emu Park SLSC

Tallebudgera SLSC

Fraser Coast Regional Council

Etty Bay SLSC

Tannum Sands SLSC

Gladstone Regional Council

Forrest Beach SLSC

Townsville Picnic Bay SLSC

Gympie Regional Council

Hervey Bay SLSC

Tugun SLSC

Hinchinbrook Shire

Kawana Waters SLSC

Tweed Heads Coolangatta SLSC

Livingstone Shire Council

Kirra SLSC

Yeppoon SLSC

Moreton Bay Regional Council

Kurrawa SLSC

6 Branches

Non-Local Government Areas

Mackay SLSC

North Barrier Branch

Noosa Shire Council

Marcoola SLSC

North Queensland Branch

Redland City Council

Maroochydore SLSC

Point Danger Branch

Sunshine Coast Council

Mermaid Beach SLSC

South Coast Branch

Townsville City Council

Metropolitan Caloundra SLSC

Sunshine Coast Branch

Whitsunday Regional Council

Miami Beach SLSC

Wide Bay Capricorn Branch


Section 07: SLS Entities

113

Victoria 57 Clubs, 20 Support Operations Groups, 14 Australian Lifeguard Services 57 Clubs

Mount Martha LSC

LSV Comms

Altona LSC

Ocean Grove SLSC

Marine Rescue - Hastings

Anglesea SLSC

Point Leo SLSC

Marine Rescue - Mallacoota

Apollo Bay SLSC

Point Lonsdale SLSC

Marine Rescue - Mornington

Aspendale LSC

Port Campbell SLSC

Marine Rescue - Port Campbell

Bancoora SLSC

Port Fairy SLSC

Marine Rescue - Port Melbourne

Barwon Heads 13th Beach SLSC

Port Melbourne LSC

Marine Rescue - Portland

Beaumaris LSC

Portland SLSC

Marine Rescue - Waratah

Black Rock LSC

Portsea SLSC

Marine Rescue - Woodside

Bonbeach LSC

Rosebud & McCrae LSC

Mt Martha RWC Service

Brighton LSC

Sandridge LSC

Northern Port Phillip RWC Service

Cape Paterson SLSC

Sandringham LSC

Seaspray RWC Service

Carrum SLSC

Seaford LSC

Southern Peninsula Rescue Squad

Chelsea Longbeach SLSC

Seaspray SLSC

Dromana Bay LSC

Sorrento SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Geelong

Edithvale LSC

South Melbourne LSC

Elwood LSC

St Kilda LSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Melbourne

Fairhaven SLSC

Torquay SLSC

14 Australian Lifeguard Services

Frankston LSC

Venus Bay SLSC

Bass Coast Shire Council

Gunnamatta SLSC

Waratah Beach SLSC

Borough of Queenscliffe

Half Moon Bay SLSC

Warrnambool SLSC

City of Greater Geelong

Hampton LSC

Williamstown Swimming and LSC

City of Warrnambool

Inverloch SLSC

Wonthaggi LSC

Colac Otway Shire Council

Jan Juc SLSC

Woodside Beach SLSC

East Gippsland Shire Council

Kennett River SLSC

Woolamai Beach SLSC

Glenelg Shire Council

SLS Lakes Entrance

Wye River SLSC

Mildura Council

Lorne SLSC

20 Support Operations Groups

Mornington Peninsula Shire Council

Mallacoota SLSC

Bass RWC Service

Moyne Shire Council

Mentone LSC

Bellarine RWC Service

Parks Victoria

Mildura LSC

Central Port Phillip RWC Service

South Gippsland Shire Council

Mordialloc LSC

Frankston RWC Service

Surf Coast Shire Council

Mornington LSC

Surf Coast RWC Service

Wellington Shire Council

South Australia 22 Clubs, 5 Support Operations Groups, 2 Australian Lifeguard Services 22 Clubs

Moana SLSC

Whyalla SLSC

Aldinga Bay SLSC

Normanville SLSC

5 Support Operations Groups

Beachport SLSC

North Haven SLSC

SLSSA JRB Service

Brighton SLSC

Port Elliot SLSC

SLSSA RWC Service

Chiton Rocks SLSC

Port Noarlunga SLSC

SLSSA State Duty Officers

Christies Beach SLSC

Robe SLSC

SLSSA SurfCom

Elizabeth LSC

Seacliff SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service

Glenelg SLSC

Semaphore SLSC

2 Australian Lifeguard Services

Goolwa SLSC

Somerton SLSC

Alexandrina Council

Grange SLSC

South Port SLSC

Holdfast Bay City

Henley SLSC

West Beach SLSC


114

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2017–18

Western Australia 31 Clubs, 11 Support Operations Groups, 9 Australian Lifeguard Services 31 Clubs

Margaret River SLSC

Peel Support Operations

Albany SLSC

Mullaloo SLSC

South Metropolitan Support Operations

Alkimos SLSC

North Cottesloe SLSC

South West Support Operations

Binningup SLSC

Port Bouvard SLSC

SLSWA Emergency Response Beacons

Broome SLSC

Port Walcott SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service

Busselton SLSC

Quinns Mindarie SLSC

SLSWA Surfcom

Champion Bay SLSC

Scarboro SLSC

9 Australian Lifeguard Services

City of Bunbury SLSC

Secret Harbour SLSC

City of Albany

City of Perth SLSC

Smiths Beach SLSC

City of Joondalup

Coogee Beach SLSC

Sorrento SLSC

Cottesloe SLSC

Swanbourne Nedlands SLSC

City of Rockingham (including Department of Parks and Wildlife - Penguin Island)

Dalyellup Beach SLSC

Trigg Island SLSC

City of Wanneroo

Denmark SLSC

Yanchep SLSC

Rottnest Island Authority

Dongara-Denison SLSC

11 Support Operations Groups

Shire of Broome

Esperance-Goldfields SLSC

Kimberley Support Operations

Shire of Busselton

Floreat SLSC

Esperance-Goldfields Support Operations

Town of Cambridge

Fremantle SLSC

Great Southern Support Operations

Town of Cottesloe

Geraldton SLSC

Mid West Support Operations

Mandurah SLSC

North Metropolitan Support Operations

Northern Territory 3 Clubs, 1 Support Operations Group, 2 Australian Lifeguard Services 3 Clubs

1 Support Operation Group

2 Australian Lifeguard Services

Darwin SLSC

Westpac Offshore Rescue Boat Service

Darwin City Council

Gove Peninsula SLSC

Darwin Waterfront Corporation

Mindil Beach SLSC

Tasmania 14 Clubs, 9 Support Operations Groups, 1 Australian Lifeguard Service 14 Clubs

Launceston LSC

Kingborough Volunteer Marine Rescue

Bicheno SLSC

Penguin SLSC

Tamar Sea Rescue

Boat Harbour SLSC

Port Sorell SLSC

Surf Life Saving Tas JRB Service

Bridport SLSC

Scamander SLSC

Surf Life Saving Tas RWC Service

Burnie SLSC

Somerset SLSC

St Helens Volunteer Marine Rescue

Carlton Park SLSC

Ulverstone SLSC

Ulverstone Volunteer Marine Rescue

Clifton Beach SLSC

9 Support Operations Groups

Wynyard Volunteer Marine Rescue

Devonport SLSC

Dodges Ferry Sea Rescue

1 Australian Lifeguard Service

Kingston Beach SLSC

Freycinet Volunteer Marine Rescue

Clarence City Council


Glossary of Terms

115

Glossary of Terms

LI F E S AV I N G Blackspot – An area with a concentration of coastal/ocean incidents and a high probability/risk of ongoing recurrence. Coastal drowning death – Where the location of the death is on the coast, in the ocean up to 3NM offshore or inland up to five times the width of the inlet/river and the cause of death includes drowning or immersion. Drowning – The process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersion/ immersion in liquid; outcomes are classified as death, morbidity, and no morbidity. First aid – Assessments and interventions that can be performed by a bystander (or by the victim) with minimal to no equipment. Lifeguard – An individual who undertakes patrols at a beach or another aquatic environment. He/she is typically a salaried member, qualified in public safety and aquatic rescue.

Lifesaving service – A coordinated group that exists to provide aquatic safety services to the public. This includes Surf Life Saving Clubs, Lifeguards, SurfCom, RWCs, RIBs, JRBs, ORBs, Rescue Helicopters and 4WD units.

Total service plan – An assessment of current and future lifesaving resources, trends, national blackspots and coastal safety issues combined with evidencebased mitigation strategies to address these issues.

Patrolled location – A location supervised by a lifesaving service.

CO M M O N AC R O N Y M S

Preventative action – Direct action taken to reduce or eliminate the probability of a specific rescue, first aid or other reportable incident from happening in the future. Rescue – The retrieval of a person in distress, delivering them to a place of safety and the application of first aid and basic life support as may be required. Resuscitation – Prevention or restoration of life by establishing and maintaining a person’s airway, breathing and circulation. Rip current – A seaward flowing current of water moving through a surf zone.

ACNC – Australian Charities and Not-ForProfit Commission ACPSG – SLSA Australian Coastal Public Safety Guidelines AEMVF – Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum ALS – Australian Lifeguard Service ARC – Australian Resuscitation Council ASC – Australian Sports Commission CPR – Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation EMA – Emergency Management Australia EMG – Executive Management Group FACC – Finance, Audit & Compliance Committee HRS – Helicopter Rescue Service ILS – International Life Saving Federation IRB – Inflatable Rescue Boat JRB – Jet Rescue Boat SSV – Side by Side Vehicle

Surfcom – Surf Life Saving radio communications centre that assists in managing the communications of lifesaving operations and data collection.

Surf Life Saving Australia Ltd Level 1, 1 Notts Avenue, Bondi Beach, NSW 2042 Australia P.O. Box 7773, Bondi Beach, NSW 2026 Ph: +61 2 9215 8000 | Fax: +61 2 9215 8180 | Web: sls.com.au | Email: info@slsa.asn.au | ABN: 67 449 738 159 | ACN: 003 147 180 Limited additional copies of this annual report are available upon request from SLSA. This report is available online at sls.com.au/publications Images: Rob Palmer, Harvpix


SURF LIFE S AVING AUS TR A LI A

Highlights 2017–18

10,249 FIRST AID TREATMENTS

1,529,494 PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS

61,604

VOLUNTEER HOURS ON PATROL

MEMBERS 6,458

377 MISSIONS MEMBERS ENROLLED IN ELEARNING

MEDALLIONS

4,562,858 SOCIAL MEDIA REACH

AUSSIES COMPETITORS

$28.8 MILLION CONTRIBUTIONS TO SURF LIFE SAVING ENTITIES

Profile for SLSA

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2018  

Surf Life Saving Australia Annual Report 2018