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COA S TAL SAFE T Y BRIE F ROCK FIS HING S U R F L I FE S AV I N G AU S T R A L I A


ROCK FISHING SNAPSHOT 2 0 0 4 -17

ANALYSIS On average, at least 12 people drown per year as a result of rock fishing. It’s the third highest number of deaths for an individual activity.

0

RANK

3rd 0.05

AVERAGE DEATHS PER YEAR

4

32 1

103

AVERAGE FATALITY RATE

12

11 7

PER 100,000 POPULATION

LOCATION

KEY DEMOGRAPHIC MEN AGED

4% 3% 7%

FATALITIES

40–65

Australian residents, Australian and overseas born

1%

158 45 95% AVERAGE AGE

20%

PARTICIPATION3

65%

65%

• 1.2 million rock fishers NT SA QLD TAS VIC WA NSW

NSW

• 0.6 million frequent rock fishers (at least once a month) • Frequent rock fishers average 135 hours per year • Occasional rock fishers average12 hours per year

MALE

ROCK FISHING DROWNING DEATHS TREND Rate per 100,000 pop. Total drowning deaths

0.10 0.87 0.07 0.06

0.07 0.05

0.05

0.05

0.05

0.04

0.04 0.03

9

20

4

12

11

16

6

16

18

12

13

12

9

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

0.02

CONTRIBUTING FACTORS

99% 10% NO LIFEJACKET

ALCOHOL OR DRUGS

Reference: SLSA National Coastal Safety Report 2017

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ROCK FISHING IN AUSTR ALIA

Rock fishing is a highly popular past time that many enjoy around the nation daily. It has been dubbed the most dangerous sport in Australia due to the associated high risks of injury and immersion. Furthermore, rock fishing is rated the third highest cause of coastal drowning in Australia, following swimming/wading and boating. For these reasons it remains at the forefront of coastal safety and research initiatives across multiple agencies and state governments. There have been a total of 158 rock fishing deaths in the past 13 years1; 150 (95%) were male individuals with an average age of 45 years. A large portion, 98 (62%), were individuals born overseas, 38 (24%) of who were born in China/Hong Kong, and 16 (10%) born in Korea. A further 22% of rock fishing deaths were Australian born individuals, which highlights the diversity of people engaging in the activity. More than half (65%) of these incidents occured in NSW with the majority concentrated around the shires of Sydney1. The extensive rocky coastlines of NSW, WA and VIC, combined with frequent hazardous surf conditions, create a high-risk environment for fishers. Waves and slippery surfaces are prevalent causal factors in rock fishing fatalities. In addition, lifejackets are not being worn by the majority of participants (only 17% always use one3) and 99% of victims were without a personal floatation device or lifejacket when they drowned1. A coronial inquest in 2015 recommended that mandatory lifejacket wearing be enforced in NSW following consistently high numbers of deaths since 19926. The recommendation has been delivered through The Rock Fishing Safety Act 2016, which is being trialled in the Randwick Local Government Area since 1 December 2016, and involves collaborations between the Department of Primary Industries- Fisheries, NSW Police Force, Randwick Council, National Parks and Wildlife Service and SLS NSW.

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


L O C AT I O N ROCK FISHING FATALITIES 2004-2017 DARWIN 2

0 4 32 1

BRISBANE

2

2

103

3

PERTH

2 2 2

2 3 2 22

SYDNEY 4

5

CANBERRA

MELBOURNE

3 0

2 3

ADELAIDE

4

2

1,000km

SCAL E 2

Indicates number of rock fishing fatalities

Reference: SLSA National Coastal Safety Report 2017

4 22

11

2

HOBART

2004-2017

7

2

ROCK FISHING DROWNING DEATHS BY LOCATION (n=158)

3 3

4% 3% 7%

1%

ROCK FISHING BLACKSPOTS 20%

65% NSW

65% NT SA QLD TAS VIC WA NSW

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NSW

WA

City of Randwick (17) Warringah Council (11) Wyong Shire (11) Sutherland Shire (10)

City of Albany (9)

VIC Bass Coast Shire (6)

COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING

11 3 5 7 8 21 3 8


C A U S A L A N A LY S I S 2 0 0 4 -17

WHERE

WHEN

WHY

99%

45% LIVED MORE THAN 50KM FROM DROWNING LOCATION

NOT WEARING A LIFEJACKET

2-6PM

NSW

65%

10% AT NIGHT (6PM - 6AM)

65%

AFFECTED BY ALCOHOL OR DRUGS

55%

MORE THAN 1KM FROM A LIFESAVING SERVICE

WAVES

APRIL - MAY

Reference: SLSA National Coastal Safety Report 2017

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


C A U S A L A N A LY S I S 2 0 0 4 -17

WHO REGION OF BIRTH

95%

16% 2%

MALE

3% 4%

47%

47% Unknown Africa Oceania Middle East Europe Australia Asia

ASIA

6%

22%

92% 22%

REGION OF RESIDENCE

AUSTRALIAN RESIDENTS 4%

AUSTRALIAN BORN

3%

92%

AUSTRALIA

92% Europe Asia Australia

CAUSAL FACTORS

55% WAVES

23% SLIP OR FALL

99%

NO LIFEJACKET Reference: National Coastal Safety Report 2017

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


C A U S A L A N A LY S I S 2 0 0 4 -17

AGE

21

17

2004-2017

17

16

17 16

ROCK FISHING DROWNING DEATHS BY AGE (n=158)

13 11 10

22%

25%

7

5

4

10%

1 0

2 1

0

0-4

5-9

0

10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84

TIME

15

15

15 12

2004-2017

85+

12

12 11

ROCK FISHING DROWNING DEATHS BY TIME (n=158) 7

7 5

3

4 3

2

MONTHS

0 11 - 12pm

9 - 10pm

8 - 9pm

7 - 8pm

6 - 7pm

5 - 6pm

4 - 5pm

3 - 4pm

2 - 3pm

1 - 2pm

12 - 1pm

11 - 12pm

10 - 11am

8 - 9am

9 - 10am

7 - 8am

0 6 - 7am

5 - 6am

4 - 5am

1 - 2am

2

3

0 3 - 4am

0 2 - 3am

0 12 - 1am

1

10 - 11pm

3

5

21 19 17

2004-2017

ROCK FISHING DROWNING DEATHS BY MONTH (n=158)

14 12

12

11 9

July

7%

12

12 11

8

August September October November December

January

February

March

April

May

June

Reference: National Coastal Safety Report 2017

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P A R T I C I P AT I O N P R O F I L E

PARTICIPATION BY STATE Percentage of state populations who participate in rock fishing

8%

1.2 million Rock fishers

11%

(8% of the population)

14% 4%

0.6 million

12%

Frequent rock fishers (at least once a month)

7%

165 hours

12%

Per frequent fisher (per year on average)

NATIONAL PARTICIPATION 2015-2017

2015-2017

NATIONAL PARTICIPATION IN ROCK FISHING BY GENDER

NATIONAL PARTICIPATION IN ROCK FISHING BY AGE GROUP 50+

Male

Female

35-49

25-34

16-24

Total

4% 5% 8% 11% 12% 8%

0

2

4

6

8

12%

10

0

12

2

4

6

8

10

12

Reference: National Coastal Safety Survey 2015-17 (average)

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P A R T I C I P AT I O N P R O F I L E 2 015 -17

2015-2017

SWIMMING ABILITY IN THE OCEAN OF ROCK FISHERS

59%

8%

9%

OF ROCK FISHERS SAY THEY ARE WEAK OR AVERAGE SWIMMERS

40%

23%

19%

COMPETENT

Highy Competent Competent Average Weak Unable to Swim

40%

2015-2017

ROCK FISHING PARTICIPATION BY ETHNICITY Less often

3-11 times a year

15%

1-3 times per month

1-2 times per week

3-4 times per week

5-6 times per week

7%

19%

11%

26%

22% 43%

20% 52% 25%

25%

59% 16%

20% 12%

3%

9%

13%

European

Oceanian

2% Australian

Asian

2015-2017

HAZARD PERCEPTION OF THE COAST BY ROCK FISHERS

28%

48%

BELIEVE THE COAST IS VERY OR EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS

20% 17% 8% Extremely hazardous

Very hazardous

Somewhat hazardous Not very hazardous

5%

1%

Not at all hazardous

Can't say Reference: National Coastal Safety Survey 2015-17 (average)

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


HAZARD PERCEPTION

2015-2017

HAZARD PERCEPTION OF ROCK FISHING BY ROCK FISHERS 37%

80%

30%

BELIEVE ROCK FISHING IS A HAZARDOUS ACTIVITY

16% 13%

4%

1% Extremely hazardous

Very hazardous

Somewhat hazardous

Not very hazardous

Not at all hazardous

Can't say

2015-2017

HAZARD PERCEPTION OF ROCK FISHING- FREQUENT VS OCCASIONAL ROCK FISHERS

Occassional Frequent

39% 28%

16% 14%

36%

30%

Extremely hazardous

2%

17%

10% Very hazardous

Somewhat hazardous

Not very hazardous

6%

1%

Not at all hazardous

Can't say

2015-2017 41%

FREQUENT AND OCCASSIONAL PARTICIPANT LIFEJACKET USE

24% 17%

15%

3% Always

Most of the time

Sometimes

Never

Can't Say Reference: National Coastal Safety Survey 2015-17 (average)

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


SAFET Y PR AC TISES

31%

CHECK SURF AND WEATHER CONDITIONS ALL THE TIME

37%

41%

NEVER CARRY AN EPIRB, MOBILE PHONE OR RADIO

NEVER WEAR A LIFEJACKET

2015-2017 SAFETY PRACTICES OF ROCK FISHERS Q. How often do you personally follow these fishing practices?

Can’t say

2%

23%

2%

24%

Never

Sometimes

Always

Most of the time

1%

1%

8%

7%

18%

22%

1%

1% 3% 16%

35%

21% 21% 24%

23% 28%

21

18%

36% 20%

19% 59%

54%

50% 42% 30% 27%

Go fishing with at least one other person

Check surf and weather conditions prior to leaving

Check for and obey safety signage on the coast

Wear appropriate clothing and footwear

Carry EPIRB's, mobile phone or radio for emergencies

Avoid fishing under the influence of alcohol and drugs

Reference: National Coastal Safety Survey 2015-17 (average)

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


IN THE NEWS

IT’S TIME FOR US TO HAVE AN OPEN AND HONEST CONVERSATION ABOUT THE REALITY THAT IFEJACKETS DO SAVE LIVES. ABC News, 12 Match, 2017

HOW MUCH IS A LIFE WORTH? IF A PRICE COULD BE PUT ON IT SURELY IT WOULD BE MORE THAN $80. YET HUNDREDS OF NSW ROCK FISHERMEN ARE CHOOSING TO RISK DEATH RATHER THAN SPEND THAT AMOUNT ON THE ONE THING THAT COULD SAVE THEIR LIVES IN AN ACCIDENT — A LIFEJACKET. The Daily Telegraph, 8 May, 2014

MANY PEOPLE WHO DIE ROCK FISHING ARE EXPERIENCED AND SENSIBLE AND TAKE EVERY PRECAUTION BAR THE MOST IMPORTANT ONE, WEARING A LIFEJACKET.

2017

2016

Dangerous surf conditions and Hazardous Surf Warnings continued to be a factor when fishers were being swept off rocks. This highlights the need for coastal visitors to check conditions prior to doing activities. Life jackets not being worn continue to be the key contribution in rock fishing fatalities. In addition, the resistance of anglers toward the possibilty of mandatory lifejacket legislation is commonly discussed again following NSW trials.

There was frequent discussion about the introduction of mandatory lifejacket wearing due to the high number of drowning deaths and rescues as a result of rock fishing. The promotion of implementing ‘shock signs’, which highlight the danger of rockfishing, and ocean lifebuoys for popular rockfishing locations were also prevelant in news articles. Rock fisher incidents were also highly reported with discussions around notorious fishing spots and mitigating the hazard through education and PFD use.

2015 A common theme in news articles regarding rock fishing highlighted a greater push for lifejackets to be legislated as a mandatory item for all rock fishers. Prevalent issues reported over the 12 months of articles often included rock fishers being swept off rocks in dangerous conditions. Authorities reiterated the need for rock fishers to check conditions prior to conducting the activity.

2013 Being swept off rocks by a wave was the most common cause for rock fishing deaths in 2013. A contributing factor to the fatalities was the proportion of rock fishers who were not wearing a lifejacket at the time. Various reports also highlighted the importance of emergency services response times, noting that many of the rock fishing locations were outside phone reception signals. Hence by the time paramedics or help arrived, they had to negotiate rough conditions or factor in time of day to conduct the searches.

2014 News articles this year focused on pointing out the issue that rock fishers should wear lifejackets, recapping the need for lifejackets to be mandatory for all rock fishers. Common issues reported over the 12 months included the fact that often when rock fishers were swept off rocks, there were rough seas and dangerous conditions reported at the time that they went angling. The importance of checking the Beachsafe website (www.beachsafe. org.au) was highlighted along with safety tips such as never going rock fishing alone, monitoring conditions and wearing lifejackets.

2012 The most common cause reported for fatalities occurring during rock fishing activities in 2012 was that the rock fishers were swept off the rocks by waves, dragging them out into the ocean. A coronial request in August 2012 recommended that the Department of Primary Industries consider making lifejackets compulsory for rock fishers. A well reported issue was also the importance of the choice of companion when going rock fishing. Multiple reports included drowning deaths of family members consisting of parents and children, especially families who had little or no swimming ability.

Newcastle Herald, 29 January, 2012

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


K E Y TA R G E T S

WHO ARE THEY? Men 30-59 years Australian residents Asian heritage (Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese)

RISK BEHAVIOUR

POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR4

• Less likely to understand Australian coastal conditions • More likely to fish in unfamiliar locations • Less likely to wear a lifejacket • Less likely to wear appropriate clothing

• Less likely to fish alone

• Less likely to wear a lifejacket • Less likely to believe they’re at risk

• More likely to understand Australian coastal conditions • More likely to fish in familiar locations

• Less likely to wear a lifejacket • Less likely to believe they’re at risk • More likely to have health complications

• More likely to understand Australian coastal conditions • More likely to fish in familiar locations

Men 30-54 years Australian residents Australian-born

Men 55+ years Australian residents Australian-born

THERE ARE 1.2 MILLION PEOPLE THAT CONSIDER THEMSELVES ROCK FISHERS, BUT ALMOST 2 MILLION GO FISHING FROM ROCKS 5.

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


K E Y TA R G E T S

1. Men 30-59 years Australian residents with Asian heritage (Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese)

I CAN’T GET USED TO THE IDEA OF WEARING [A LIFEJACKET], BECAUSE I DON’T BELIEVE IT WILL RESCUE ME WHEN I FALL INTO THE WATER. I THINK IT WILL RESTRICT MY ABILITY TO SURVIVE IN CASE I NEED TO DIVE INTO THE WATER Vietnamese interviewee, Ipsos Research Rock Fishing Report 2016

Rock fishing is a popular sport for many people, specifically 30-59 year old males who are Australian residents with Asian heritage (mostly Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean). Of this demographic, 43% will participate in rock fishing at least once per month, which is considered frequent, and more than half (55%) will spend at least three hours fishing per occassion3. The various levels of skill and experience of these rock fishers does not minimise the risks; incidents and drowning deaths in the past have indicated that those most at risk are both frequent and occasional fishers due to a lack of understanding about the hazardous Australian coast and not carrying a personal floatation device for emergencies1. Lifejackets and safety attire, including shoes and light-weight clothing, are key items that can save a life. Fishers of this demographic are less likely to adopt these items (only 45% will carry or use a lifejacket when rock fishing3) and are exposed to a greater risk of drowning if swept off from rocks. Only 20% and 42% of all rock fishers always wear a lifejacket and appropriate clothing, respectively3. Furthermore, many rock fishers are not confident swimmers, with 67% of all rock fishers claiming that they are average or less than average swimmers in the ocean, and 26% of rock fishers never having formal swimming lessons3. This demographic are also more likely to fish at unfamiliar locations and only 29% will always check the surf and weather conditions3. This group of men are a key target for SLSA due to common false senses of security after gaining experience on the Australian coast, and the lack of preventative actions adopted by these communities. The communication of safety messages are also less effective due to the loss of translation in creative delivery4. Therefore safety campaigns need to consider specific messages and content that will be inclusive of a diverse population.

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


K E Y TA R G E T S 2 . Men 30-54 years 3. Men 55+ years Australian residents, Australian-born Australian men aged 35-54 & 55+ are at a high risk when rock fishing as they are less likely to wear a lifejacket and less likely to consider themselves in a hazardous situation. These target groups are more likely to have a better understanding of the Australian coastal conditions, however they are more likely to overestimate their skills and underestimate the risk. Australian born men that are 55+ years are also more likely to have health complications, which can further inhibit their ability to remain safe while rock fishing4. The use of lifejackets is not considered “normal” attire among these rock fishers and have argued that is restrictive to their essential movements 4. Furthermore, many rock fishers believe that life jackets are only necessary for those who are new to rock fishing or with limited swimming ability4. These behaviours are concerning for their well being, as rock fishing is considered a leisure activity and casual participants may not prioritise the need to invest in appropriate gear and attire.

IT’S A SAD REALITY THAT THE SIMPLE ACT OF WEARING A LIFEJACKET WOULD HAVE MOST LIKELY SAVED MANY LIVES Mornington Peninsular News, March 21 2016.

Almost two thirds (65%) of males believe they are skilled enough to take a few risks when rock fishing, however this confidence slightly decreases with age, with 41% of men over the age of 50 claiming so5. This demographic do not always fish with other people (45% will always go with someone else), and opt to carry a mobile phone (80%) over a lifejacket (28%) as a safety measure2. These key audiences are a target for SLSA as there are many behavioural barriers that prevent Australian men from adopting safe practices. Over-confidence in their ability to avoid being swept off rocks as well as their ability to escape such an incident is a priority for behavioural change.

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


HOW TO REACH ROCK FISHERS

69%

26%

Seek information online

From Surf Life Saving

2015-2017 AUTHORITIES THAT ROCK FISHERS TURN TO FOR COASTAL SAFETY INFORMATION Other

1% 4%

Can't say

6%

Scuba diving company

7%

Swellnet

11%

Beachsafe

16%

Local council

17%

State government maritime agency Swimming, surfing, fishing, boating, snorkelling, diving club or organisation

19% 20%

Marine rescue organisation

25%

Weatherzone

26%

Surf Life Saving/ lifesavers/ surf lifesavers

30%

Coastalwatch

33%

Bureau of Meteorology

2015-2017 MEDIA WHERE ROCK FISHERS USUALLY SEEK COASTAL SAFETY INFORMATION 61%

20%

17% 7%

8%

None/Can't say

Regular email newsletter

23%

22%

10%

11%

2% Other

Magazine

Using an app on smartphone or tablet

Newspaper

Radio

TV

Online

Reference: National Coastal Safety Survey 2015-17 (average)

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


KEY INFLUENCERS

Family Wives/Partners Parents – Many anglers are taught by their fathers who, in turn, are keen to pass on their skills.

Professional Fishers Alex Bellisimo Andrew Ettinghaus

Peers Other rock fishers

Fishing Clubs Clubs greatly influence participation, management of waters, and skills and competitions.

Media Fishing-related television programs such as Hook, Line & Sinker and Escape with ET

State Governments Licensing programs can have great influence on fishing behaviour.

Reference: Ipsos Social Research Institute Rock Fishing Report 2016

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


C O M M U N I C AT I O N S P L A N

TARGET AUDIENCES

DESIRED BEHAVIOUR CHANGE

• Australian men. • Australian born and overseas born.

Always wear a lifejacket when fishing from rocks or exposed shorelines.

What Behaviour Do We Want to Change?

Always wear a lifejacket when fishing from rocks or exposed shorelines.

Why?

On average 12 rock fishers lose their life per year. Most victims were not wearing lifejackets.

Who’s Behaviour are We Trying to Change?

Australian men in their 30s, 40s & 50s of Australian and Asian heritage.

Potential Barriers to Change

Lifejacket wearing is not considered normal. They don’t believe they’re at risk.

Who is the Active Voice? And Why?

The wife or partner, because they are key influencers.

Tone of Voice

Aspirational and relevant.

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COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING


REFERENCES

Surf Life Saving Australia National Coastal Safety Report 2017 The Surf Life Saving Australia National Coastal Safety Report (NCSR) is published annually and contains information on Australian community behaviours and attitudes to the coast; SLS capability and membership capacity; rescues and emergency response; and coastal drowning deaths. The 2017 NCSR represents the statistics from the period of 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017. Trend analyses from 2004-17 are also included. All care is taken to ensure the statistical information included within this report is correct. However, pending the outcome of ongoing coronial investigations and as SLS state/territory entities update their operational information, this data may be amended. Surf Life Saving Australia National Coastal Safety Surveys The annual Surf Life Saving Australia National Coastal Safety Surveys collect Information about community swimming ability, behaviours and attitudes to coastal safety. The survey is conducted by Newspoll Market Research and Omnipoll and is run online over a four-day period each April among a national sample of approximately 1,400 respondents aged 16 to 69. The study is carried out in compliance with ISO 20252 - Market, Social and Opinion Research. To reflect the population distribution, results were post-weighted (on age, gender, geographic strata and education) and projected to Australian Bureau of Statistics data. Ipsos Social Research Institute Rock Fishing Report 2016 The Ipsos Social Research Institute Rock Fishing Report 2016 was a result of research comprised of two distinct methodological phases: a qualitative research component, followed by a quantitative research component. Both phases covered similar topic areas: rock fishing attitudes and

behaviours, risk perceptions and safety strategies, lifejacket use and legislation, and information needs and sources. In addition, the qualitative research explored reactions to potential campaign concepts. The qualitative findings were also used to help shape the subsequent questionnaire for the quantitative component. The quantitative research phase was carried out from August to September 2015. This component comprised an online survey of n=554 rock fishers, followed by comprehensive analysis of the data. This phase consisted of a national online survey of men and women who had participated in rock fishing within the last 12 months. The sample was sourced from two locations: I-View’s online panel, My-view, and an open link accessed either through online ads placed on Facebook and Fishraider websites or by a small number of referrals from online panel members.

Huiqing Hua, Ding Ding Zhang, Young Whan Kim & Jesse Jack Howes (Rock Fishing related deaths) 2 July 2015. Coroners Court New South Wales. Retrieved from http://www.coroners.justice. nsw.gov.au/ Documents/Rock%20fishing%20Findings. pdf on 01/06/2016

Data illustrated in figures may not always add up to 100% due to rounding.

Every attempt has been made to trace and acknowledge copyright, but in some cases this may not have been possible. Surf Life Saving Australia apologises for any accidental infringements and would welcome any information to redress the situation.

References Ipsos Social Research Institute (2016) Rock Fishing Report 2016 . Ipsos: Sydney Surf Life Saving Australia (2016,2017) National Coastal Safety Report. SLSA: Sydney. Surf Life Saving Australia National Coastal Safety Survey (2015, 2016, 2017). Newspoll Online Omnibus 2015, and an Omnipoll online panel in 2016 and 2017.

© 2018 Surf Life Saving Australia This publication is copyright. Except as expressly provided in the Copyright Act 1968 and the Copyright Amendment Act 2006, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval systems or transmitted by any means (including electronic, mechanical, microcopying, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without prior permission from Surf Life Saving Australia. For enquiries concerning reproduction, contact SLSA on: phone 02 9215 8000; email: info@slsa.asn.au

Acknowledgements Surf Life Saving Australia wishes to thank Frederic Anne (Omnipoll) and Anika Martin (Graphic Design) for their contribution to this report.

Page References 1.

SLSA National Coastal Safety Report 2017

2.

SLSA National Coastal Safety Survey 2017

3.

SLSA National Coastal Safety Survey 2015–17 (average)

4

Ipsos Social Research Institute Rock Fishing Report 2016

5.

SLSA National Coastal Safety Survey 2016

Forbes, C (2015). Inquest into the deaths of Myassar Ayoub,Donald White, Zheng Wang, Sung Su Cho, Greg Walter Reardon,

6.

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Suggested Citation Ryan, A., Rijksen, E., Stone, K., Daw, S. , (2018) Coastal Safety Brief: Rock Fishing. Surf Life Saving Australia: Sydney.

COASTAL SAFET Y BRIEF – ROCK FISHING

Coastal Safety Brief - Rock Fishing  
Coastal Safety Brief - Rock Fishing  
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