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Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013-14


Message from His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia With the vast majority of Australia’s population living in cities and towns on, or near, the coast, the beach is inextricably woven into the fabric of Australia’s way of life. It is part of our history, part of our culture, and part of how we define who we are in the world. Surf Life Saving Australia has been on our beaches, keeping swimmers and beach-goers safe for over 100 years. During this time, you have become an iconic and vital part of Australian life. My own memories of the beach as a child, young man and father are marked by the feeling of reassurance that was provided by the knowledge that Surf Life Saving Australia members were on patrol to provide me, my family and all others on the beach, with the safest environment possible. This is why I am very pleased to be your Patron, and to have the opportunity, on behalf of all Australians, to thank you for your voluntary service, bravery, skill, and thoughtful care. I congratulate Surf Life Saving Australia for all that it has achieved over the past year.

His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia


Contents 004

084

110

Section 01 Introduction

Section 04 Financial Report

Section 06 Statistical Summaries

022

100

126

Section 02 Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

Section 05 Awards & Honours

Section 07 Surf Life Saving Entities

062

134

Section 03 Governance & Oversight

Section 08 Glossary of Terms


Section 01 Introduction


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Who we are

S

urf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) is Australia’s peak coastal water safety, drowning prevention and rescue authority. With 168,622 members and 311 affiliated Surf Life Saving clubs, Surf Life Saving represents the largest volunteer movement of its kind in Australia and the world. The Surf Life Saving movement creates a safe environment on and off Australian

Surf Life Saving exists to save lives, create great Australians and build better communities.

beaches, through patrols, training programs, research and education. Every year, Surf Life Saving active members are involved in over 11,700 rescues, 31,000 emergency care treatments and 1 million preventative actions. Our volunteers deliver more than 1.2 million patrol hours each year. Since Surf Life Saving was established in 1907, over 620,000 lives have been saved.

largest lifeguard service, providing cost recovery lifesaving services to local government and other coastal land managers. Our movement prides itself on offering mateship, education, experience and giving back to the community. We are inclusive and accepting. We welcome participation from people of all backgrounds, beliefs and ages and encourage everyone to share our positive ‘can do’ attitude.

Surf Life Saving is one of Australia’s most trusted and recognised brands and is loved the world over. Surf Life Saving is a unique not-for- profit charity and community service that exists through community donations, fundraising, corporate sponsorship and government grants.

Operations

History

Surf Life Saving operates a wide range of support operations including: 24/7 emergency response groups, rescue helicopter services, jet rescue boats, offshore rescue boats, jet skis, surveillance systems and radio control and coordination centres. Surf Life Saving, through the State and Territory Centres, operates the Australian Lifeguard Service, the country’s

Australia’s first volunteer Surf Life Saving clubs appeared on Sydney’s ocean beaches in 1907. By-laws which had banned bathing in daylight hours since the 1830s were gradually repealed between 1902 and 1905, in response to the increasing popularity of surf-bathing, and a growing conviction that bathing in appropriate clothing was not an immoral


Section 1

Introduction

007

act. The impact these changes had on local beach culture was dramatic: beachgoers entered the surf in rapidly escalating numbers. The surf was new to most surfbathers and many could not swim, so with its increasing popularity came more drowning and consequent attempts at rescue. By the summer of 1906-07, the population of Sydney was obsessed with the question of the safety of the surf. It was in this environment that Surf Life Saving

Our Mission - why we exist Surf Life Saving exists to save lives, create great Australians and build better communities. Australia has over 11,500 beaches dispersed along 36,000km of coastline. Every year, Australian beaches receive an estimated 100 million visitations and the task of ensuring the safety of all visitors is one that Surf Life Saving is committed to. Despite significant advancements in

(SLS2020) is to further build the capacity and capability of the movement to save more lives, create great Australians and build better communities. There are four pillars of strategic intent we will pursue to achieve our mission: 1. Extend lifesaving coverage to meet community needs. 2. Develop our people. 3. Ensure the movement’s long term sustainability. 4. Involve all Australians and make a valued contribution to the Australian society

How we fulfil our mission Our total membership of 168,622 is spread across 311 affiliated Surf Life Saving clubs and 101 support operations. Of our members, 47,080 actively patrol our beaches and 61,946 are Nippers (junior activity for members aged from 5 to 13). The majority of our services are provided by surf lifesavers who complete surf patrols in their own time – usually a half-day patrol every three to four weeks during the surf swimming season. We also operate the country’s largest lifeguard service, contracting to local government and other coastal land managers. In the 2013/14 season our volunteer patrol members were involved in 7,327 rescues. In addition, our paid lifeguards rescued 3,139 people and our support operations an additional 1,245. This takes the total number of lives saved since 1907 to over 620,000. clubs first emerged; their regular patrols a welcome relief to local authorities and nervous bathers alike. On 18 October 1907, representatives from these clubs, together with members of other interested groups, met to form the Surf Bathing Association of New South Wales, the organisation now known as SLSA.

technology, techniques and knowledge, people still drown on the coast in unacceptable numbers. We are committed to reducing the coastal drowning toll.

Our strategies SLSA has developed a strategic direction that will guide the Surf Life Saving movement through to the year 2020. The focus of our Surf Life Saving Strategy

Our stakeholders It is estimated there are more than 100 million beach visitations each year, making Australia’s beaches and coastline the country’s favourite playground. Our principal stakeholders are those who use the Australian coastline, and those who are directly or indirectly impacted by our actions.


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Who we are

Who are our stakeholders? Community • Our members: We have a duty of care to protect our members as they carry out their duties on and off the beach. We are constantly developing and improving our lines of communication with our members through an integrated suite of online platforms. • Potential members: We depend on new recruits to maintain and increase lifesaving services. We don’t have a regular national recruitment campaign targeting new members, and rely on media, informal networks and the efforts of state centres and clubs to attract new members. • Beach-going community: We communicate with the community via a variety of different programs and channels, including public advertising and awareness campaigns and the distribution of educational resources. • Donors: We communicate to our donors, the Guardians of the Surf, regularly through the Surf Life Saving Foundation.

Corporate Sector • Corporate Partners: We rely on a number of corporate partners to fund the majority of our programs. • We actively seek new partners to ensure the long term sustainability of the movement through association with our brand and assets. • SLSA encourages all Australian corporates to include Surf Life Saving in their Workplace Giving Program.

Government Sector • Federal Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving who participate in quarterly updates outlining key issues and activities for Surf Life Saving and present the National Rescue of the Month Awards. • Australian Government departments and agencies: We rely on support for

many of our programs from the following Australian Government departments and agencies: • Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. • Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development. • Australian Sports Commission. • Department of Health. • Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. • Department of the Environment . • Tourism Australia • Other levels of government: Our state centres have direct relationships with state governments, while our clubs liaise with their relevant local government. On occasion, SLSA will form a relationship

As a charity, we rely on the Australian Government and our Corporate Partners and donors to fund the majority of our activities.


Section 1

Introduction

009

Funding

with state and local government on particular activities, especially when organising sporting events. • Parliamentarians: In order to strengthen our reputation we engage in proactive advocacy with elected members of parliament, particularly those representing coastal seats.

Internal • Staff • Our owners: Our state and territory centres represent our members on the SLSA Board. We have regular contact with our owners through Board meetings and other forums.

As a charity, we rely on the Australian Government and our Corporate Partners and donors to fund the majority of our activities. 25% of the parent entity’s funding comes from the Federal Government. The remaining 75% is secured via national corporate partners, licensing and fees for competitions. The Surf Life Saving Foundation actively conducts fundraising around Australia on behalf of SLSA and our state centres while Surf Life Saving clubs also conduct their own fundraising activities. To support their lifesaving activities our state centres (which report separately) are engaged in commercial activities such as education, training and the provision of contract lifeguard services to local government and other land managers.

Statutory obligations and oversight SLSA is a company limited by guarantee under the Corporations Act 2001 (Commonwealth). The Surf Life Saving Foundation operates under the charitable

fundraising legislation in each of the states and territories it is registered. SLSA is also a registered charitable institution under the NSW Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW).

About this report This is the Annual Report of SLSA Ltd. The Surf Life Saving movement is made up of over 500 separate legal entities, ranging from state centres, branches, clubs and support operations. The financial accounts of these entities, whose relationship with SLSA Ltd is further described on pages 86-99, are not consolidated here. However, the activities and achievements of all Australia’s surf lifesavers are consolidated and reported.

Notice of Annual General Meeting Notice is given of the Annual General Meeting of SLSA Ltd. The meeting will be held on Friday 24 October, 2014 at 4pm at SLSA’s Rosebery Office. All SLSA members are welcome to attend.


Surf Life Saving Australia

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Highlights

1,016,037 PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

11,711 RESCUES

VOLUNTEER HOURS ON PATROL

1,214,205

$20 MILLION DISTRIBUTED TO SLS STATES AND CLUBS

PAGE VIEWS ON BEACHSAFE SITE

61,946

MEMBERS

21 NATIONS DEVELOPING

RECEIVED LIFESAVING AID AND ASSISTANCE

AUSSIES COMPETITORS

980 MISSIONS

OVER 1,200 HOURS OF FLYING


Section 1

Introduction

011

Surf Life Saving Strategy (SLS2020)

The SLS2020 framework defines the strategic direction for where we, as the total SLS movement, want to be in 2020. It provides a summary overview of what the SLS movement will look like and what we will be doing in 2020 so that everyone and every entity in SLS is aligned to a shared goal, working in the same direction and making decisions with a view of positioning the SLS movement in the future.

Mission To save lives, create great Australians and build better communities.

2020 Strategic Intent for SLS A. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs

B. Develop our people

C. Ensure the movements long term sustainability

D. Involve all Australians & make a valued contribution to the Australian society

1. We have lowered the per capita coastal drowning rate by 50%

1. Our development and leadership programs are offered internally and externally and are highly valued

1. All SLS clubs receive coordinated support

1. We provide opportunities for all Australians to choose how they can be involved and feel valued for their contribution

2. We are the recognised accreditor of safety and coastal lifesaving services

2. We provide members with a full range of opportunities within SLS

2. The SLS movement operates effectively and as one

2. Over 3 million Australians are engaged with SLS in an ongoing and meaningful way

3. We are rescue ready and integrated into the national, state and local emergency management systems

3. We offer diverse physical recreation and sport pathways

3. We are relevant in the eyes of the community and government

3. We have a massive social impact on our community and are proud to be building greater communities

4. We use effective risk management

4. We deliver efficient and flexible learning opportunities in a time efficient manner

4. We are resilient and sustainable in terms of people and finances

5. We are recognised as the peak advisory body in coastal safety

5. Leadership reflects the diversity of our membership

5. SLS is recognised as a leading agile, adaptive innovator


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Scorecard

A. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs 2020 Strategic Intent

What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

1. We have lowered the per capita coastal drowning rate by 50%

• Frontline surf lifesavers, lifeguards and support operations groups performed 11,711 rescues, 31,893 first aid treatments and 1,016,037 preventative actions. • Patrolling members completed a total of 1.2 million volunteer hours on patrol. • Provided support, through the states, to our frontline lifesavers, lifeguards and services to reduce coastal drowning. • Delivered the 2013 National Coastal Safety Report. • Delivered an annual Australian Lifeguard Magazine. • Developed the Coastal Safety Hub (to display and enable graphical consideration of vital drowning prevention information). • We minimised the national drowning toll to 84 which is 10 below the five year average.

• Distribute, manage and report on the Beach Safe Equipment Fund. • Analysis of drowning data to develop effective intervention strategies to reduce death by drowning around our coastline.

2. We are the recognised accreditor of safety and coastal lifesaving services

• Continued to develop research project, Rocky Coasts: a framework for risk assessment in order to reduce drowning. • Completed a research project with Griffith University titled Adapt between the flags: enhancing the capacity of Surf Life Saving Australia to cope with climate change and to leverage adaptation within coastal communities. • Delivered the Australian Disaster Forum to coincide with the United Nations International Day for Disaster Reduction at Questacon, Canberra. • Delivered the 34th edition of the Public Safety and Aquatic Rescue training manual for introduction in the 2014/15 season.

• Advocate Surf Life Saving (SLS) interests to the National Aquatic and Recreational Signage Style Manual in partnership with the Australian Water Safety Council.

3. We are rescue ready and integrated into the national, state and local emergency management systems

• Completed the development of the Tsunami Community Education Strategy on behalf of the Australian Tsunami Advisory Group, as part of our contribution to the National Tsunami Community Education Strategy. • Continued our representation on groups and international committees including the Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Summit, the Australian Water Safety Conference, the Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum (AEMVF), the Australian Tsunami Advisory Group (ATAG) and the Australian New Zealand Safe Boating Education Group (ANZSBEG).

• Deliver a comprehensive assessment analysis to inform the Total Service Plan.


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A. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs 2020 Strategic Intent

What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

4. We use effective risk management

• Created and communicated a framework of risk control measures for SLSA. • Established new safety initiatives for surf lifesavers including compulsory wearing of helmets for surf boat rowers in certain conditions, the wearing of lifejackets for all IRB drivers in training and competition and minimum entry requirements for competitors at The Aussies (Bronze Medallion and Cert II Public Safety). • Continued to develop up to date smartphone and android software for existing risk management and assessment programs and applications. The Beachsafe app (3.0) was relaunched in November 2013. • Continued research and development of an appropriate standard personal flotation device (PFD) to provide an appropriate flotation device that meets the needs of members. • Continued the development of the personal protective equipment (PPE) project and determined a number of key safety initiatives for SLS members throughout lifesaving practice and competition. • Through Surf Life Saving New South Wales (SLSNSW), continued the development of Project Blueprint - seeing the coastal public safety risk assessment for every beach and rock platform in NSW. • Achieved significant developments in sport risk management including new smartphone risk applications, enhanced training and preparation of event volunteers and officials and the development of new processes and systems as part of event planning. • Reviewed SLSA Policy 1.1 and Procedure 1.1 Water Safety to enhance our risk management practices. • Our Beachsafe suite of public safety resources logged 1,120,774 unique visitors. • A comprehensive Compliance Scorecard was introduced for SLSA and subsidiaries. • Revised and updated the risk management policy and risk management procedures and framework.

• Ongoing representation to Australian Standards Committee regarding Under 50 buoyancy aids standard. • Review safety initiatives introduced in 2013/14. • Present comprehensive response to Coronial Inquest from 2012 Australian Surf Life Saving Championships. • Implement new safety measures recommended by PFD trial.


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Scorecard

A. Extend lifesaving coverage to match community needs 2020 Strategic Intent

What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

5. We are recognised as the peak advisory body in coastal safety

• Provided lifesaving aid and assistance in 21 developing nations. • Continued ACFID and AusAID accreditation processes. • SLSA President Graham Ford continued in his term as the World President of the International Lifesaving Federation (ILS). • Completed the RIPSAFE research project and presented findings at the 3rd International Rip Current Symposium, winning the Best Presentation award. • Held a Rip Current Forum with the water safety industry to discuss the outcomes of the RIPSAFE project and develop a long term strategy for rip current safety education. • Delivered the first National Coastal Safety Survey that will provide an ongoing analysis of the community’s participation in aquatic activities, as well as attitudes, comprehension and adherence to coastal safety concepts. • Established a project to deliver a dynamic surf hazard rating system for Australian beaches to enable individuals to manage their own risk exposure when visiting the coast.

• Consolidate and communicate amendments to the Water Safety Policy.

2020 Strategic Intent

What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

1. Our development and leadership programs are offered internally and externally and are highly valued

• Delivered a successful National Leadership College in Sydney in February 2014. • Delivered a successful Leaders Masterclass in Victoria in May 2014. • Continued participation, facilitation and support of the AEMVF Young Leaders Emergency Services Forum and the AEMVF Volunteer Leadership Programs.

• Continue to grow SLS membership and participation. • Develop a SLS leadership pathway and alumni.

2. We provide members with a full range of opportunities within SLS

• Continued the implementation of the “As One” Change Management Plan - a Workforce Transition Plan. • Developed the team managers education framework into different online courses for each layer of the framework. • Updated the Harassment and Bullying policies following changes to the Fair Work Act 2009.

• Maintain and enhance the SLS awards and recognition program. • Finalise the Workforce Transition Plan. • Implement AVETMISS compliance requirements across education programs.

B. Develop our people


Section 1

Introduction

015

B. Develop our people 2020 Strategic Intent

What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

3. We offer diverse physical recreation and sport pathways

• The Australian Life Saving Team enjoyed strong success winning the 2013 International Surf Rescue Challenge in Japan in September 2013 and then continued its rebuilding progress with a victory at the 2013 German Cup in November 2013. • For the first time women were eligible to compete in the long course race format at the Schick Hydro Coolangatta Gold 2013 and were awarded equal prize money with their male counterparts. First prize was $25,000. • Delivery continued of the Rescue 2014 campaign, ‘On the Road to France.’ • Re-development of the sport consultative model which saw the former Sport Standing Committee (SSC) disbanded and replaced with a Board Appointed Chair of Sport (Mr Dick Bignold) supported by eight national sport advisors. • Implementation of the new National Coach Accreditation System commenced with national train the trainer workshops attended by all states in June 2014 for Foundation Coach and Development Coach courses. • Delivered two national sport workshops which were attended by national sport advisors, state sport directors, state sport managers and SLSA management.

• Success for the official Australian Life Saving Team, regaining the World Lifesaving title at Rescue 2014 in France in September, 2014. • Successful implementation and subsequent review of the inaugural Youth Championships at The Aussies. • Successful implementation and subsequent review of the revised Interstate Championships format. • Archive all Australian Sports Commission metrics in respect of Participation and High Performance.

4. We deliver efficient • Developed an eLearning Strategy, procedures and guidelines for use across national eLearning and flexible learning platform continued. opportunities in • Developed an online Bronze Medallion course. a time efficient • Established the preferred SLSA culture and values through manner a series of workshops at both SLSA and the Surf Life Saving Foundation. 5. Leadership reflects the diversity of our membership

• SLSA delivered a National Awards of Excellence on Saturday 26 October, 2013 in Sydney. • Launched a quarterly National Rescue of the Month award presentation as part of our Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving initiative.

• Develop an SLS education pathway with alignment between SLSA and state/territory bodies. • Represent SLS interest in Vocational Education and Training (VET) forums.


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Scorecard

C. Ensure the movements long term sustainability 2020 Strategic Intent

What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

• Continued to provide new and enhanced IT systems to 1. All SLS clubs the frontline to enable our members and clubs to operate receive coordinated efficiently and to reduce paperwork. support • Facilitated the BRP gear and equipment grant through which BRP donated $360,000 worth of lifesaving equipment to 34 SLS Clubs and affiliated services around Australia at a subsidised cost. • The Federal Government committed to an election funding promise of $15 million for Australia’s peak water safety agencies as part of its policy to reduce drowning across Australia. This equates to an average $5,000 each year for five years or $25,000 for SLS clubs across Australia. • Analysed research undertaken by Griffith University throughout the year, ‘Adapt between the flags: Enhancing capacity to cope with climate change and to leverage adaptation’, which will provide important information and direction for clubs subjected to extreme weather events and climate. • Patrol uniforms to the value of $300,000 were provided to SLS clubs.

• Review processes and policies in respect of Gear and Equipment.

• The Members Portal was launched and 4,680 Portal 2. The SLS accounts were created as at June 30, 2014. movement operates effectively • We deliver a communications calendar in conjunction with all states. and as one • A revised Member Advisory Committee structure was implemented. • 113,301 Lifesaving Online accounts and 19,114 new memberships created using Lifesaving Online.

• Develop and implement an Event Management system that can be used by all sections of SLS from clubs to the National Body to run both carnivals and special events including mass participation events, such as ocean swims. • Conduct a review and scope costs of short and long term IT infrastructure needs.

3. We are relevant in the eyes of the community and government

• Maintain our Quarterly Update for Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving. • Develop strong ties with Federal Government.

• SLSA maintained its status as a tier one water safety body. • Prime Minister of Australia, The Hon. Tony Abbott MP launched our 2013 National Coastal Safety Report at Parliament House in Canberra, ACT on Thursday 2 December, 2013. • We re-launched our Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving initiative, co-chaired by Sarah Henderson MP and Matt Thistlethwaite MP, at Parliament House in Canberra, ACT.


Section 1

Introduction

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C. Ensure the movements long term sustainability 2020 Strategic Intent

What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

4. We are resilient and sustainable in terms of people and finances

• Continued the 18 month roll out of SLSA’s “As One” Change Management Plan - a workforce transition plan. • Appointed new organisational structure inclusive of four General Manager (GM) positions in line with the new starting structure and functions as per the “As One” Change Management Plan - a workforce transition plan. • Reviewed the value proposition for Surf Life Saving Corporate Partnerships • Launched a fundraising awareness campaign to position SLS as top of mind as a cause that needs donations. • Integrated Surf Life Saving Foundation as a wholly owned subsidiary of SLSA. • Introduced a Human Resources scorecard outlining employee statistics (movements in Full Time Employment), Workplace Health and Safety checks and monitoring of any issues, outstanding leave accruals and employee entitlements, and internal grievances. This report is monitored on a monthly basis by the Finance, Audit and Compliance Committee (FACC). • Developed and implemented a three year business plan linked to the SLS2020 Strategy that was endorsed by the SLSA Board.

• Implement SLSA Property Strategy 2014-2018. • Finalise recommendations from the Helicopter Operations Review regarding Southern Region Helicopter Rescue Service and sale to SLSNSW, and Northern Region Helicopter Rescue Service ceasing Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) operations. • Secure financial support through engagement of new corporate partners. • Position Surf Life Saving as top of mind for community donations.

5. SLS is recognised as a leading agile, adaptive innovator

• Continued collaborative research project with UNSW, Rip Currents: An evidence based approach to safely navigating the beach’s greatest drowning hazard.

• Develop and communicate key research findings related to climate change adaptation.


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Annual Report 2013 - 2014

Scorecard

018

D. Involve all Australians & make a valued contribution to the Australian society 2020 Strategic Intent What have we done in 2013-14?

What are our priorities in 2014-15?

• Delivered a successful national fundraising event to the wider 1. We provide Australian community through Boardies Day on Friday 28 opportunities for March, 2014. all Australians • Supported, through the states, the delivery of a successful to choose how Surf Club Open Day 2013 in NSW and QLD on Sunday 29 they can be September, 2013. involved and feel • SLSA’s History Committee continued projects to capture and valued for their commemorate SLS members who served in war as well as the contribution full collation of Australian Championships results in line with the upcoming centenaries in 2015 of ANZAC landings at Gallipoli and surf sports competition. • Undertook research to understand community drivers for engagement with Surf Life Saving.

• Create a fundraising and awareness campaign strategy for 3 - 5 years that positions SLSA as top of mind for community engagement and support. • Launch the history book, ‘Those Who Served.’

2. Over 3 million Australians are engaged with SLS in an ongoing and meaningful way

• Our Beachsafe website received 1,214,205 page views with 4,017 Beaches’ information viewed. • We launched a national awareness/fundraising campaign to mark the first day of summer on 1 December, 2013 which received over $2.5 million in media exposure.

• Review the Youth Policy • Implement and monitor impact of Youth Engagement Program (YEP). • Participation research conducted internally and externally with the aim to grow and enhance the SLS participation offering.

3. We have a massive social impact on our community and are proud to be building greater communities

• Finalise and communicate the • Delivered a highly successful Australian Surf Life Saving social impact research. Championships 2014 at Scarborough Beach in Perth, WA where • Conduct an organisation wide audit 5,080 members competed supported by 400 volunteers, officials of child safe practices and review all and SLSA staff. related policies. • Through the UTS research study ‘Attributing the Social Contribution of Surf Life Saving Australia: Valuing the Social Capital of an Iconic Institution,’ identified that SLS’s social and human capital contributes to the wider community through its individual members and the organisation itself; demonstrating our valuable role in creating great Australians and building better communities. • Through our retail program, we donated discontinued stock to affiliated lifesaving organisations in third world countries to help them build their respective services. • Expanded the number of volunteer surf lifesavers in developing nations through the Australian Volunteers for International Development (AVID program). • Obtained results and analysed the report from UTS on ‘Delivering, Identifying and Developing Social Inclusiveness through Surf Life Saving.’ • Implemented ‘The Aussies Review’ to bring our national movement and the community together in a safe and spirited celebration of the best of our lifesaving traditions, culture and sport.


Section 1

Introduction

019

Snapshot

Surf Life Saving Australia Ltd2

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Change %1

Revenue - sponsorships & grants ($,000)

19,121

19,794

19,536

19,395

-0.72%

Revenue - total consolidated entity ($,000)

33,504

36,459

37,340

69,599

75.68%

Expenditure - total consolidated entity

33,250

35,899

37,023

68,364

84.65%

FTE employees - parent entity (i.e SLSA)

44

47.6

40.3

41

1.74%

89,357

93,377

93,249

94,039

0.85%

Surf Life Saving in Australia Membership Number of male members Number of female members

69,449

72,473

73,674

74,581

1.23%

Total membership

158,806

165,850

166,923

168,622

1.02%

310

310

311

311

0.00%

Rescues performed by surf lifesavers + SLS support operations

12,042

12,610

8,048

8,572

6.5%

Rescues performed by ALS lifeguards3

2,394

2,818

3,485

3,139

-9.9%

45,860

17,652

34,097

13,947

-59%

Number of Surf Life Saving clubs Lifesaving

First aid administered by surf lifesavers + SLS support operations First aid administered by ALS lifeguards

21,659

17,326

30,548

17,946

-41.3%

Preventative actions undertaken by surf lifesavers + SLS support operations

247,102

298,866

284,013

321,838

13.32%

Preventative actions undertaken by ALS lifeguards3

486,614

629,712

621,561

694,199

11.69%

Number of Cert II Public Safety qualifications issued (Bronze Medallion)

8,830

8,333

7,404

8,082

8.39%

% of junior members receiving SLSA awards

49%

66%

71%

77%

8.45%

6,717

6,525

6,518

5,080

-22.06%

3

Education

Sport Number of competitors at The Australian Surf Life Saving Championships 2014 Number of competitors at Schick Hydro Coolangatta Gold 2013

543

502

529

609

15.12%

Number of accredited officials

3,161

3,478

3,761

2,911

-22.6%

Number of accredited coaches

2,701

2,790

2,817

2,810

-0.25%

47,952

48,500

50,705

55,634

9.72%

Community Number of Guardians of the Surf (Donors) Index 1 Indicates the percentage change from 2012/13 to 2013/14 2 Consolidated entity includes helicopter rescue service 3 Refers to services provided by SLS managed Australian Lifeguard Services


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President & CEO’s Report

I

t is with great pride that we present the 2013/14 Annual Report of Australia’s peak coastal water safety body, Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA). SLSA is an iconic Australian organisation of which we are justly proud. Our purpose is to save lives, create great Australians and build better communities. As such, we are always striving to improve the services we deliver. In 2013/14: • Our frontline surf lifesavers, lifeguards and support operations groups performed 11,711 rescues, 31,893 first aid treatments and 1,016,037 preventative actions. • We increased total membership numbers by 1% to a total of 168,622. • Our patrolling members completed a total of 1.2 million volunteer hours on patrol. • We distributed $20million to Surf Life Saving states and clubs from the Surf Life Saving Foundation ($11m), Federal Government ($6.6m) and commercial activities ($2.4m). The safety of the public, and our members, remains first and foremost, and our safety initiatives were a key priority in 2013/14. We continued extensive research and development of an appropriate standard personal flotation device (PFD) that meets the needs of members in lifesaving and competition. We continued the development of the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) project and implemented a number of key safety initiatives for Surf Life Saving members throughout lifesaving practice and competition. Our team worked with Standards Australia and independent experts to implement changes that put the safety of our members and the public as the highest priority. During the year we mandated helmets for IRB patients in IRB training and competition. We also introduced helmets for use in surf

boat rowing and life jackets for IRB training, competition and lifesaving operations to be implemented from 1st October 2014. We resolved that all competitors at the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships must hold a Bronze Medallion with Certificate II in Public Safety (Aquatic Rescue) to participate from 2015 onwards. We have also separated the U15 age group category from the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships to participate in a youth championship prior to the Open Championships. During this past year, we successfully implemented all of the projects outlined in the first 12 months of the “As One” Change Management Plan - a Workforce Transition (18 month) plan. We will continue to roll out steps in the “As One” Plan in 2014/15. We re-launched our Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving initiative, cochaired by Sarah Henderson MP and Matt Thistlethwaite MP, at Parliament House in Canberra, ACT in December 2013. As part of the Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving events, we profile and

Our patrolling members completed a total of 1.2 million volunteer hours on patrol.


Section 1

Introduction

021

award our National Rescue of the Month winners, a program that recognises national excellence in lifesaving and rescues. This program was launched at the Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving in February 2014. The Prime Minister of Australia The Hon. Tony Abbott MP launched the National Coastal Safety Report at Parliament House in December 2013. We completed the 34th edition of the Public Safety and Aquatic Rescue training manual, which reflects our commitment to Surf Life Saving training techniques. Thank you to all who contributed to its development. Other key milestones included our completion of the Tsunami Community Education Strategy, our contribution to National Tsunami Community Education Strategy on behalf of the Australian Tsunami Advisory Group. In October 2013, we launched our systematic online Members Portal to streamline communications to our members. We will continue to improve

this communication system over the next 12 months. We also delivered a highly successful Australian Surf Life Saving Championships 2014 at Scarborough Beach (Perth, WA) with over 5,000 members competing, supported by almost 400 volunteers, officials and SLSA staff. We also continued our Rescue 2014 campaign, ‘On the Road to France,’ supporting our Australian Life Saving Team who will compete at the Lifesaving World Championships in France in September 2014. We would like to take this opportunity to thank and acknowledge the following directors; Michael Crismale, Bob Creek, Kevin Larkins, Mark Fife OAM and Rick Wright OAM who have retired from the SLSA Board and thank them for their positive contribution to SLSA. We also thank all of the members of the SLSA Board and subsidiaries for their positive commitment, contribution and high levels of performance. The strength of SLSA is due to the hard work and dedication of our volunteers who are supported by our directors, staff, officers and committees as well as our states, branches and clubs. While this year has presented some challenges, we are proud to have reached a number of milestones, and thank our members for their ongoing support, in our mission to save lives, create great Australians and build better communities.

Graham Ford President SLSA

Greg Nance Chief Executive Officer

Key Dates 2013 18 - 21 Jul

National Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) Championships (Mindil Beach Darwin, NT)

16 - 18 Aug

National Pool Rescue Championships (Brisbane, QLD)

14 - 15 Sept

2013/14 Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain Trials (Salt Beach, QLD)

29 Sept

Surf Club Open Day (NSW, QLD)

14 Oct

Australian Disaster Forum (Canberra, ACT)

18 Oct

SLSF AGM

19 - 20 Oct

Schick Hydro Coolangatta Gold 2013 (Coolangatta Beach, QLD)

20 - 22 Oct

International Water Safety Conference (Potsdam, Germany)

26 Oct

SLSA AGM

26 Oct

National Awards of Excellence (Sydney, NSW)

5 - 9 Dec

AEMVF/AEMI Volunteer Leadership Program

1 Dec

National Summer Fundraising Campaign launch

2 Dec

2013 National Coastal Safety Report launched by Prime Minister of Australia, The Hon. Tony Abbott MP

2014 23 - 24 Jan

Interstate Surf Life Saving Championships (Sydney, NSW)

2 - 8 Feb

National Leadership College (Sydney, NSW)

8 Feb

Trans-Tasman Test Match for Surf Boats (Stockton, NSW)

13 Feb

Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving re-launch (Parliament House, Canberra, ACT)

28 Mar

Boardies Day (national fundraising day)

31 Mar 6 Apr

Australian & Masters Surf Life Saving Championships (Scarborough Beach, WA)

3 Apr

Annual Life Members Dinner

29 May 1 Jun

National Leaders’ Masterclass (Mt Macedon, VIC)

15 May

Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving Quarterly Update (Parliament House, Canberra, ACT)

12 - 15 Jun

Gatorade Clash of the Paddles (Hamilton Island, QLD)


Section 02 Surf Life Saving Australia Operations


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

Capacity & Capability

Overview The newly formed Capacity and Capability portfolio is responsible for Coastal Risk and Safety, Lifesaving operations, Surf Sports, Research and Education and Development. In 2013/14, as a part of the SLSA change management program, we combined the previously distinct units into an aligned Capacity and Capability portfolio in order to deliver an integrated service. This was to ensure that we are as effective and efficient as possible in delivering to our mandate, which spreads across all four pillars of the SLS2020 vision. Our deliverables include development of best practice policies to save lives, the quality of national public coastal safety education and operations, management of member development programs, development of consistent and relevant educational resources and practices, and enhancement of the participation, development and performance of athletes, coaches and officials through national sports operations, events and resources.

Coastal Risk and Safety Over the 2013/14 summer, our surf lifesavers and Australian Lifeguard Service (ALS) lifeguards delivered a vital emergency service to the Australian community. Our impact in reducing drowning and reducing injury has been enormous with over 11,700 rescues, 31,000 first aids and 1,000,000 preventative actions. This work is keeping us on track to achieving our goal of 50% reduction in drowning by 2020, though we must remain vigilant to our goal, maintain our high levels of service and relentlessly innovate to ensure we succeed. With the support of the Australian Government, SLSA continues to be empowered to deliver an annual work plan strategically designed to fulfil our parent body responsibilities to the Surf Life Saving movement, and peak body responsibilities for the industry and the Australian

community. The Government reinforced it’s commitment to reducing drowning by granting an additional $10 million to SLSA under the Beach Drowning Black Spot Risk Reduction Program and the Beach Safety Equipment Fund. In 2013/14, the Total Service Plan remained at the foundation of our drowning prevention strategy. It focusses on delivering lifesaving services to meet community needs, ensuring safety is paramount, enhancing innovation within Surf Life Saving and making certain our movement operates efficiently. This year the Plan underwent a review, and it’s now part of an important process underpinning all of our drowning prevention decisions at SLSA. Embodied in a Coastal Safety Hub at SLSA designed to display and consider key information, and enhanced through new elements such as the annual National Coastal Safety Survey, the Total Service Plan will continue to inform the next generation of innovation in drowning prevention.

025

Our impact in reducing drowning and reducing injury has been enormous with over 11,700 rescues, 31,000 first aids and 1,000,000 preventative actions.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

Capacity & Capability

We continued to research the hazards and conditions that present risks to the public, our membership and employees alike. All fieldwork was completed for the Rip Current Swimmer and Floater Experiment (RIPSAFE) Research Project with the University of New South Wales, Sydney University and the United States Naval Postgraduate Institute supported by an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant. The Research Team is now publishing findings across a range of journals. This critical research has delivered valuable insights to assist our understanding of rip current behaviour. The findings have been incorporated into the 34th edition of the Public Safety and Aquatic Rescue training manual to be released for the 2014/15 season. Safety is paramount across our operations, and we are committed to the safety and wellbeing of our members. The Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) project has continued with groundbreaking research being delivered into low-buoyancy lifejackets that enable lifesavers to complete necessary tasks but provide additional security and

flotation if necessary. This research has broad implications for coastal safety and has been incorporated into the ongoing revision of the Australian Standard for Personal Flotation Devices. Consistent with this commitment to safety, SLSA determined that lifejackets must be worn during all IRB operations from 1 October, 2014. This is a significant decision that ensures surf lifesavers, as role models for the community, are displaying best practice in vessel operation. Lifejackets are not worn in almost all coastal boating drowning incidents, and increasing their wear is critical to achieving our goal of reducing drowning. A number of key operational projects commenced in 2013/14 to review and enhance efficiency across the organisation including the Surfcom Review, Data Management Analysis, Lifesaving Services Capability Analysis, the Gear and Equipment Certification and Compliance Program Review, and the Policy and Procedure reviews. These projects are designed to deliver clear understanding of the issues facing the movement, and develop simple solutions

026

to minimise administrative burdens on the membership. Collaboration, partnerships and engagement with our broad range of stakeholders remained critical to underpinning SLSA’s holistic approach to drowning prevention. We are pleased to report that this year SLSA was granted associate membership to the Australian Fire and Emergency Services Council (AFAC). Established as the peak body for Australasian fire, land management and emergency services, AFAC creates synergies across the industry and provides a valuable forum for SLSA to identify best practice and collaboratively find solutions to common problems faced by other emergency services. Finally, we would like to extend our thanks and gratitude to all our stakeholders and partners who have helped us achieve our goals over the past year, particularly the Australian Government, the Lifesaving Member Advisory Committee, Lifesaving Management Committee, Working Groups and Technical Advisors, members and staff across the country, and also industry and corporate partners. Together we can achieve our goal of a 50% reduction in coastal drowning by 2020, by saving lives, creating great Australians and building better communities.

Development & Education Development Membership during the 2013/14 season remained steady with an increase of 1% bringing our membership to a total of 168,622. SLSA’s role and ability in both engaging and developing youth was demonstrated through our membership figures with 46.5% (78,490) of our members under the age of 18 years. Of our members, 61,946 (36.7%), are junior activities members (5-13 years). These members are engaged in nipper


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

027

168,622 Surf Life Saving members

46.5% of our members are under the age of 18 years

36.7% are junior activities members (5-13 years) engaged in nipper programs

2,180 accredited Surf Life Saving coaches

2,911 programs that develop personal, lifesaving and competition skills in a fun and safe aquatic environment. In 2013/14, SLSA’s leadership programs continued to strengthen, develop and improve. Both the Leadership College and Leaders Masterclass successfully engaged the members involved and inspired them to act. In addition to internal programs, our engagement in broader community emergency management leadership programs continued to expand through the participation, facilitation and support of the AEMVF Young Leaders Emergency Services Forum and the AEMVF Volunteer Leadership Programs, both delivered by the Australian Emergency Management Institute (AEMI). The National Awards of Excellence was delivered as a successful standalone event in October 2013, both celebrating and

recognising the outstanding achievements of our members (please see page 106 for 2013 winners list). The evening acknowledged the accomplishments of our members through the presentation of National Recognition Awards, Honours, Hall of Fame and Meritorious Awards.

Education The focus in 2013/14 was the development of the 34th edition of the Public Safety and Aquatic Rescue training manual, ready for release in the 2014/15 season. This involved a number of volunteers and staff and our thanks are extended to everyone involved. With the move towards a more streamlined approach to education across the portfolios of Coastal Safety, Sport and Development, we are confident that this will result in consistently high quality training and assessment resources and practices.

accredited surf officials


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

028

Capacity & Capability

Surf Sports

Participation

2013/14 was a time of positive activity for sport at SLSA. It is important to acknowledge the superb support offered by the many volunteers who make our sport happen. Thank you to our officials, coaches, team managers and those who have supported our sport development projects on committees and working groups. In particular we recognise the outstanding contribution of the National Sport Advisors who were appointed early in 2014 and have worked hard to enhance our sport for the future benefit of our members.

This past year, we reviewed SLSA’s participation strategy to ensure we have a clear purpose in driving participation projects and associated targets, and also align our strategy to the Australian Sports Commission’s (ASC) approach in growing and retaining participation in sport and physical activity. A number of major research projects were completed to ensure factors that trigger entry and retention into Surf Life Saving participation products are recognised, and appropriate enhancements are made to existing models. This important piece of work will continue through 2014/2015 and will unearth opportunities to consider additional participation models or products not currently provided.

Sport Education – People Development A number of enhancements were made to SLSA’s sport education environment during 2013/14 following various evidence based reviews that were undertaken. Highlights from the year included: • Curriculum developed to support the new National Coach Accreditation System (NCAS) which gained endorsement by the ASC. • Production of the Foundation and Development coaching courses which include a combination of online eLearning modules, online resource library of print, audio and video resources and practical discipline specific workshops. • A National Officiating Accreditation System (NOAS) review was completed and the first meeting of the solutions phase was conducted, with the project working group in October 2013. A number of state sport development initiatives were supported, designed to build increased capacity and capability relative to specific state needs including

coaching clinics, sport workshops/ conferences and illicit drugs in sport education. • As at 30 June 2014, the total number of accredited Surf Life Saving coaches was 2,180. The total number of accredited surf officials was 2,911.

Events The national sporting events portfolio for the 2013/14 year saw strong entries, growth in participation and strengthened relationships with event partners. • The National IRB Championships, 2013 took place at Mindil Beach, Darwin, NT, in July 2013. • The National Pool Rescue Championships were held in August, 2013 at the Sleeman Complex, Brisbane. • The Schick Hydro Coolangatta Gold 2013 attracted 609 competitors over the long and short courses, individuals and team categories. • The National Interstate Championships were held in January, 2014 in NSW at the Ryde Aquatic Centre and Newport Beach. • The Australian Surf Life Saving Championships were held in April, 2014 at Scarborough Beach, WA. • The Gatorade Clash of the Paddles was run over four exciting days at Hamilton Island, QLD in conjunction with Hamilton Island Events and Australian Outrigging Canoe Association (AOCRA), in June 2014. • In collaboration with Kellogg’s Australia, we delivered another successful Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain IronMan and IronWoman Series with Shannon Eckstein and Courtney Hancock being crowned the Series Champions. 93 athletes attended the series trial at Salt Beach on the Tweed Coast in September, 2013 and competed for four series positions.


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

029

Australia had a successful year on the international stage, winning all three major events on the 2013/14 calendar.

High Performance: The Next Wave – SLSA Olympic Pathway Program 2013/14 was another successful year for SLSA’s Olympic pathway program known as ‘The Next Wave’. Highlights from 2013/14 included: • Redevelopment of the Open Water Swimming pathway model in collaboration with Swimming Australia which will give talented SLSA members the opportunity to enter a structured pathway to support their Olympic aspirations • In 2013 there was a requirement from within the Australian Canoeing partnership to develop activities to deliver more quality female athletes and 200m paddlers into the athlete pathway. November 2013 saw the first ‘all-female’ clinic delivered at Terrigal SLSC with the attendance of 24 female paddlers. In total nine clinics were delivered by Jim Walker, on behalf of SLSA, across Australia throughout 2013/14 • 47 surf boat coaches attended a rowing technical workshop facilitated by seven time Olympic coaching veteran Tim McLaren.

The Winning Edge - SLSA High Performance Program SLSA was successful in gaining financial support from the ASC for the next World Championship cycle. Under SLSA’s High Performance ‘Winning Edge’ strategy, the National High Performance program is geared towards success at the biannual Lifesaving World Championships. A key component of this was appointing a head coach, Danny Short, who, with the support of SLSA management, is responsible for the implementation of the world championship strategy. As part of developing a winning culture and a pathway for our membership,

significant gains were made in developing a new identify for the Australian Life Saving Team. 2013/14 saw the introduction of the new Australian Life Saving Team brand. This brand formally recognises SLSA and RSSLA as joint entities in international lifesaving competition and equips the Australian Life Saving Team with a recognised logo at international and domestic events and associated media activations.

International Competition Australia had a successful year on the international stage, winning all three major events on the 2013/14 calendar. The International Surf Rescue Challenge in Japan saw victories to both the Australian Life Saving Team and the Australian Youth (Under 20) Life Saving Team. In November 2013, the Australian Life Saving Team competed in the German Cup, a pool lifesaving event that Australia has never won. The welcoming of 2012 London Olympic Games swimmer, Ryan Napoleon, along with a world record breaking swim by Pamela Hendry and the extraordinary efforts by the rest of the team, saw Australia create history by finishing first overall. The third event of the year was in Stockton, Newcastle, NSW where the Australian Surf Boat Team competed in the Trans-Tasman Surf Boat Test Series. Both the men’s and women’s crews performed brilliantly clean sweeping the New Zealand crews in an excellent display of high performance surf boat racing.

Kitty Chiller General Manager, Capacity and Capability


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

030

Sport Results

National Inflatable Rescue Boat Championships (IRB) 2013 Mindil Beach, Darwin, NT, 18-21 July, 2013 Event

First

Pointscore

Second

Pointscore

Third

Pointscore

Interstate Comp

QLD

59

NSW

49

VIC

47

National Championships

North Burleigh

37

South Maroubra

24

Kurrawa

23

National Pool Rescue Championships 2013 Sleeman Sports Complex, Brisbane, QLD, 16-18 August, 2013 First

Pointscore

Second

Pointscore

Third

Pointscore

Terrigal

321

Maroochydoore

314

Northcliffe

268

Schick Hydro Coolangatta Gold 2013 Gold Coast, QLD, 19-20 October, 2013 Category

First

Time

Second

Time

Third

Time

Open Men - Long Course

Alistair Day

3:54:40

Nathan Smith

4:01:13

Josh Minogue

4:01:37

Open Women - Long Course

Elizabeth Pluimers

4:19:39

Brodie Moir

4:27:07

Courtney Hancock

4:28:27

Open Men - Short Course

Kendrick Louis

3:11:20

Pierce Leonard

3:14:32

Bradley Doughan

3:37:53

Open Women - Short Course

Alyssa Bull

3:32:01

Jess Suriano

3:35:44

Olivia Hall

3:47:53

U19 Men - Short Course

Lindsey Lawry

3:15:54

Max Brooks

3:17:21

Alex Wright

3:17:55

U19 Women - Short Course

Peggy Harris

3:44:08

Georgina McDermott

3:45:15

Karlee Nurthen

3:48:07

Masters Men 30-39 - Long Course

Brent McKinnon

4:31:34

Tim Jennett

4:36:31

Boyd Conrick

4:36:46

Masters Men 40-49 - Long Course

Ashley Massie

4:40:26

Glenn Clatwworthy

4:42:50

Dean Hyland

4:43:29

Masters Men 50+ - Short Course

Glen Lawrence

3:44:19

Kim Harker

3:48:54

David O’Grady

4:01:21

Masters Women 30-39 - Short Course

Tamiel Benjamin

4:14:02

Paula Stone

4:19:44

Fiona Day

5:17:36

Masters Women 40-49 - Short Course

Kylie Zikarsky

4:05:29

Heli Murray

4:10:43

Jodi Kappler

4:51:37

Men’s Relay- Long Course

The Z Chills

3:56:06

Redhead

3:58:40

Pair of Fives

3:58:49

Mixed Relay - Long Course

Three Men and a Lady

4:12:33

Delta 6

4:30:58

Coffs Force

4:34:02

U19 Men’s Teams - Short Course

Slippy and the Fat Whale

3:20:48

Fat Whale Fins

3:21:54

Alex Black

3:23:11

Under 19 Mixed Teams - Short Course

Team Elouera

3:35:41

Choose Life

3:50:37

Open Women’s Teams - Short Course

Maroochydore Swans

3:28:28

Team Kozii

3:34:20

AMPD

3:34:53

U19 Women’s Teams - Short Course

Maroochydore Cygnets

3:43:51

#NCChargettes

3:57:03

Currumbin Girls

3:58:44


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

031

National Interstate Championships 2014 Sydney Olympic Park Aquatic Centre, NSW and Newport Beach, NSW, 23-24 January, 2014 First

Pointscore

Second

Pointscore

Third

Pointscore

Overall Pointscore

QLD

833

NSW

824

WA

564

Handicap Pointscore

WA

887.5

QLD

853.1

TAS

848.6

Pool Rescue Trophy

NSW

341

QLD

340

WA

215

Ocean Trophy

QLD

493

NSW

483

WA

349

The Australian Surf Life Saving Championships 2014 Scarborough Beach, Perth, WA, 31 March - 6 April, 2014 Club

Points

Opens Pointscore

Club

Points

Masters Pointscore

Club

Points

Handicap Pointscore

1

Northcliffe SLSC

481

1

Northcliffe SLSC

206

1

Northcliffe

481

2

Manly LSC

181

2

Noosa Heads SLSC

177

2

Newport

416

3

Mooloolaba SLSC

164

3

Queenscliff SLSC

171

3

Queenscliff

370.5

4

Newport SLSC

150

4

City of Perth SLSC

170

4

Currumbin

366.3

5

Currumbin SLSC

124

5

Trigg Island SLSC

165

5

City of Perth

360.8

6

Alexandra Headland SLSC

120

6

Sorrento SLSC, WA

153

6

Swansea Belmont

355.5

7

City of Perth SLSC

101

7

Scarboro SLSC

112

7

Henensburgh-Stanwell Park

354.3

8

Maroochydore SLSC

93

8

Cottesloe SLSC

108

8

North Cottesloe

352

9

North Cronulla SLSC

91

9

Byron Bay SLSC

107

9

Redhead

351.8

10

Swansea Belmont SLSC

79

10

Coogee SLSC, NSW

103

10

Trigg Island

349.9


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

032

High Performance Results

International Surf Rescue Challenge Onjuku Beach, Chiba, Japan, September, 2013 Australian U20 Development Team

International Surf Rescue Challenge Onjuku Beach, Chiba, Japan, September, 2013 Australian Life Saving Team

Place

Country

Place

Country

First

Australia

First

Australia

Second

New Zealand

Second

New Zealand

Third

Japan

Third

Japan

Name

Club

Fourth

Canada

Elyssia Gasparotto

Terrigal

Fifth

USA

Emma Dick

Mermaid Beach

Sixth

Korea

Gabrielle Murphy

City of Perth

Seventh

Hong Kong

Maddy Anne Dunn

Mooloolaba

Name

Club

Miranda Davies

Currumbin

Shannon Eckstein (c)

Northcliffe

Tiarrn Raymond

Mooloolaba

Kendrick Louis

Newport

Jackson Symonds

Sorrento - WA

Dean Scarff

Collaroy

Isak Costello

Redhead

Jake Lynch

Newport

Luke Cuff

Kurrawa

Lachlan Tame

Avoca Beach

Stefaan Demopoulos

Northcliffe

Tim Schofield

Terrigal

William Bain

Mooloolaba

Dev Lahey

Northcliffe

Phil Clayton

Head Coach - Kurrawa

Kristyl Smith

Northcliffe

Martin Lynch

Beach Coach - Newport

Rachelle King

Terrigal

Stephen Fry

Team Manager - BMD Northcliffe

Naomi Flood

Manly

Troy Eady

Physiotherapist – Byron Bay

Miranda Bell

Northcliffe

Melissa Howard

Kurrawa

Eliza Smith

Northcliffe

Danny Short

Head Coach - Maroochydore

Martin Lynch

Beach Coach - Newport

Keith Caldwell

Team Manager - Bulli

Troy Eady

Physiotherapist - Byron Bay


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

033

German Cup Warendorff, Germany, November, 2013

Trans-Tasman Surf Boat Test Series Stockton Beach, Newcastle, January, 2014

Australian Life Saving Team

Australian Surf Boat Team

Place

Country

Place

Country

First

Australia

First

Australia

Second

Germany

Second

New Zealand

Third

Italy

Name

Club

Name

Club

Don McManus

Bilgola

Andrew Bowden (c)

Bronte/The Hills RLSSA

Anthony O’Toole

Bilgola

Sam Bell

Maroochydore/Port Hacking Life Guards

Jarrad King

Bilgola

Tim Schofield

Terrigal/The Hills RLSSA

Mitch Foran

Bilgola

Matt Davis

Moore Park

Brendan Murray

Bilgola

Ryan Napoleon

Northcliffe

Bruce Zillman

Tugun

Pamela Hendry

Maroochydore/Port Hacking Life Guards

Sascha Lahey

Tugun

Rachelle King

Terrigal/The Hills RLSSA

Lisa Webber

Tugun

Mariah Jones

Tweed Heads Coolangatta

Genevieve Bassingthwaighte

Tugun

Christina Ruiz

Northcliffe

Marianne Bassingthwaighte

Tugun

Danny Short

Head Coach - Maroochydore

Mick Lang

Team Manager - Tacking Point

Wade Sinclair

Ass. Coach/Team Manager - Picnic Bay

Nick Marshall

Physiotherapist - Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

Communications & Business Development

035

We are iconically Australian and are born of a can do attitude. We are eternally optimistic and we are proud of our activities, partners and results.

Overview

Corporate Partnerships

The Communications and Business Development portfolio is responsible for corporate and commercial partnerships, communications and public relations, national marketing and brand guardianship, licensing and merchandise programs and our fundraising arm, the Surf Life Saving Foundation (see page 51). Our aim is to ensure the long term sustainability of the Surf Life Saving movement. In 2013/14, as a part of the change management program, we began our journey to create a solid platform to deliver long term value. Our focus is to achieve greater corporate and community engagement. We delivered positive revenue results but we need more to continue to achieve our mission of saving lives, creating great Australians and building better communities. We are iconically Australian and are born of a can do attitude. We are eternally optimistic and we are proud of our activities, partners and results.

SLSA forms partnerships that deliver strategic alignment and shared community value. The relationships we have with our Corporate Partners are not just sponsorships – they are true partnerships which we hold in high esteem. We have reviewed our value proposition and have worked harder to better identify and position our assets to existing and new partners to ensure the long term sustainability of the movement. We have a wealth of opportunity for partners and we have worked with them to renew their engagement with us. We are proud to renew Major Partner Westpac Banking Corporation and are excited to be seeking new Major Partners to support the movement. One of the measures of our success is reflected in our long term partners – Westpac who celebrated 40 years in October 2013 and DHL and Telstra who celebrated 10 years over the 13/14 season. We acknowledge and thank all our valuable Corporate Partners for their

support. We are incredibly proud of our partnership portfolio and recognise the valuable contribution they make to the organisation. We encourage you to engage with our National Partners and support them where best you can.

Communications and Public Relations We continued working towards positioning SLSA, in the eyes of the public, as one of Australia’s largest volunteer movements and the peak water safety organisation whose mission is to save lives, create great Australians and build better communities. Key to our communications framework was to openly communicate our safety initiatives to members and the general public, public safety awareness messages and to confirm our position as a charity that relies on the support of the community to help save lives. This was achieved through a full PR strategy including social and digital media, media releases, stakeholder events and video campaigns. Media


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

036

Communications & Business Development

coverage results included prime time TV, radio segments, print and online articles and leverage through SLSA owned digital and social channels. We worked on a number of PR and stakeholder events including the reinvigoration of Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving, launched in December 2013. We now host a quarterly event at Parliament House in Canberra, ACT, co-chaired by Federal Members, Sarah Henderson MP and Matt Thistlethwaite MP. At each event, SLSA awards National Rescue of the Month winners (see page 108). SLSA’s 2013 National Coastal Safety Report was launched at Parliament House in Canberra, ACT by active Surf Life Saving member and Prime Minister of Australia, The Hon. Tony Abbott MP who re-committed his election funding promise of $15 million for Australia’s peak water safety agencies as part of its policy to reduce drowning across Australia. This equates to an average of $5,000 each year for five years for Surf Life Saving clubs across Australia. Communicating our coastal safety and education message to the public remained a primary communications objective through tools including the Beachsafe smartphone app, now with 147,000 users (658,805 unique visitors for html version), rip current awareness activities and school beach safe activities delivered through the SLS State bodies. Internal communications with our membership remains paramount. The launch of the Members Portal in 2013 aims to streamline all internal communications into a one-stop-shop, easily accessible and user friendly for our members. We encouraged all members to keep their details on SurfGuard up-to-date to ensure smooth and current information exchange.

We continued, and will continue, to grow our digital and social media footprint. An outline as at 30 June 2014 is below: • Our website sls.com.au attracts an average of 30,000 unique visits per month. • Our Members Portal now has 4,600 users. • Our official Facebook Page has 28,200 likes. • We have 6,300 Twitter followers. • We have 2,964 followers on our official Instagram Profile. • We have 893 subscribers to our YouTube Channel. Digital communications to members and stakeholders was managed entirely in-house including monthly Surfline e-newsletter to over 90,000 members. In September 2013, we launched a new monthly eDM, On Patrol with Graham Ford, SLSA President. Ensure your email details are current to receive these communications!

SLSA received over $2.5million worth of media exposure which was a 21% increase compared to the previous year.


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Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

037

Marketing & Brand Surf Life Saving is one of Australia’s most iconic and loved brands. It’s a name everyone knows. Trusted and respected for over 100 years. Known for the vital role we play on Australian beaches. But not everyone truly understands the breadth of what we do or that with the support from the Australian community we can do more. SLSA launched a truly national summer awareness/fundraising campaign to showcase the breadth of services we deliver to the community and that the Australian community can help us to save more lives by donating. This campaign was the first step in establishing a presence for Surf Life Saving on the community radar as a charity that needs help. SLSA received over $2.5million worth of media exposure which was a 21% increase compared to the previous year. The campaign was delivered through TV, radio, press, outdoor, digital, and social and all SLS owned communication channels. We saw an increase in website visitation of over 1200% and an increase in donations of 15%. Additional marketing support was delivered across a range of national SLSA programs, events and initiatives with the focus on confirming our position as the peak water safety organisation, promoting a full range of opportunities to members, enhancing and contemporising our sporting events and further maximising the integration of our peak body and fundraising messaging to engage new and existing supporters of Surf Life Saving.

Licensing and merchandise Our brand, or intellectual property as it was formally known, has been built over 100 years of our volunteers saving lives on and off the beach. It is a truly iconic Australian brand that is respected and loved across the country and the world. Our brand is represented formally by various logos, and properties such as the

Our digital and social media footprint as at 30 June 2014

30,000 unique visits to sls.com.au per month

4,600 Members Portal users

28,200 Facebook likes

6,300 Twitter followers

2,964 Instagram followers

893 YouTube Channel subscribers

90,000 Surfline e-newsletter subscribers

147,000 Beachsafe smartphone app downloads


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

Communications & Business Development

red and yellow patrol flags, patrol caps, patrol uniforms, and terms such as ‘Surf Rescue’, ‘Surf Patrol’ and ‘Nipper’ and it is our responsibility to ensure its use is protected. Surf Life Saving uses these images and marks in a number of places and in many important ways. This includes our patrol uniforms and equipment to designate official surf lifesavers and property, on licensed product such as our apparel range - to let consumers know that they have purchased official merchandise, and we allow our corporate partners to use these properties to show and leverage their association with Surf Life Saving. SLSA offers a member store which delivers a range of essential first aid and rescue equipment from our preferred suppliers/manufacturers to offer competitive pricing on equipment that meets our high standards. This service ensures our volunteer members can be confident they are using high quality,

durable and reliable equipment as they perform their essential rescue services and related activities across Australia’s beaches. We are pleased to donate discontinued stock to affiliated lifesaving organisations in third world countries to help them with building their respective services. Licensing activities have been reviewed in conjunction with our licensing partners Velocity Brand Management to ensure the brand is used to support Surf Life Saving’s position as a loved and trusted brand. The retail and licensing market has struggled in tight financial times however we continue to target this area for growth.

Melissa King General Manager, Communications and Business Development

038

We are pleased to donate discontinued stock to affiliated lifesaving organisations in third world countries to help them with building their respective services.


Section 2

Partnerships

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

039

Surf Life Saving Australia thanks our corporate and government partners who have supported us in 2013-14 Major Partners

Partners

Event Partners

Government Partners

Supporters


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Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

041

Corporate Services

Overview

Information Technology

The Corporate Services portfolio is responsible for governance, risk management, finance, human resources (HR) and Information Technology. In 2013/14 we achieved a number of milestones in our mission to develop our people. The introduction of a compliance register has provided a cross reference to the relevant legislation, the date when the requirement was last reviewed and the next review date, the person responsible for ensuring that SLSA remains compliant, as well as how we comply. This is then reviewed by the Finance, Audit and Compliance Committee (FACC) every three months. We also updated the Privacy Policy following legislative changes to the Privacy Act 2008 and realigned the general ledger and the annual budget to the three year business plan and SLS 2020. A separate finance report and the financial results are listed on pages 86-99.

SLSA’s Information Technology (IT) Team is responsible for the development, testing and maintenance of SLSA’s national website suite, applications and servers that impact every corner of the organisation. Public facing systems such as Beachsafe (available on desktop, mobile and iOS and Android apps) present our surf safety message and real time beach conditions to millions of beach-goers every year, while SLSA’s bespoke SurfGuard aims to assist every club, branch and state to administer most aspects of their organisation online. Surf Life Saving as a movement, is embracing technology and forging ahead with world firsts. In 2013/14 we continued to refine our Beachsafe app, a one-ofa-kind window to expert information on all of Australia’s 11,852 beaches. We re-launched our Beachsafe app (3.0) in November 2013. We also continued the development of our Patrol Ops smart device app which unites the latest smartphone technology with the demands of patrolling surf lifesavers, enabling patrol members to communicate, track and log all aspects of the beaches they are custodians of. We are

moving to a single log-in for all our systems, making life simpler for our thousands of volunteers. The IT Helpdesk is operated seven days a week, 365 days a year to ensure that volunteers and administrators can get IT assistance and support when required. In the last patrol year (July 2013/ June 2014), we successfully dealt with over 12,000 individual support emails from a cross section of SLS members. In 2014/15, we will continue our development of best practice and ways to enhance our systems. Key developments to be investigated are outlined below: • Patrol Ops smart device app – Patrolling members will be able to sign on, submit progressive information and sign off their service with Surfcom. This system is currently being piloted in selected states. • Patrol Swaps – Patrolling members will be able to submit a patrol of which they are unable to attend to their fellow members for substitution through the Members Portal. • Lifesaving Online – This will move to sit within the Members Portal so members can continue to use the self-service features within the Portal as a means of streamlining these services and reducing the number of logins required. • eLearning – This will have the ability to be more configurable by Surf Life Saving Clubs so that clubs can track their members learning progress in the system. • Sport’s Events Management – as at June 30, 2014, this system was under development to improve and replace the current carnival management system. This will be progressed in 2014/15.

Our Staff During 2013/14, SLSA’s team of paid staff continued to collectively demonstrate dedication and commitment to the national organisation. The majority of the staff work at SLSA HQ at Rosebery (Sydney), with a small number based in other states.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

042

Corporate Services

SLSA has placed significant prioritisation on developing and implementing people development strategies over the past year, ensuring we are enhancing our work environment and workplace practices for our staff. Through the creation of the SLSA “As One” Change Management Plan in 2013, SLSA committed to and successfully implemented all of the projects outlined in the first 12 months of the Workforce Transition (18 month) Plan. The overarching Workforce Transition Plan strategies are: • “As One” Workforce Integration – including structural effectiveness review. • Attracting and selecting the right people. • Implementing workforce management systems. • Developing, engaging and motivating the workforce. • Retaining or transitioning designated positions into the designated structure. The Workforce Transition Plan projects that have been implemented include: • Organisational structural effectiveness review and restructure conducted across SLSA and the Surf Life Saving Foundation. • The creation and implementation of SLSA Human Resources and Office Management reporting, which is submitted to the FACC on a monthly basis. • Whole organisation creation of our values and behaviours and determining our preferred organisation culture. The values and behaviours are now embedded within our recruitment process and personal performance development plan and review process. • Created and implemented employee satisfaction surveys across SLSA and the Foundation. The data gathered has now created a baseline for employee satisfaction and long term increase employee satisfaction targets have been

established within the business plan. • Staff and management personal enhancement program has been finalised and will be launched in July 2014. • New systems and processes have been created for recruitment, individual performance and development planning, annual performance review process and flexible work arrangements. • Internal communications have been enhanced through formalisation of matrix reporting requirements, a structured all staff meeting with both SLSA and the Foundation staff participating and regular senior management and executive meetings. Addressing the needs of our people within SLSA will in 2014/15, transition from the implementation of the Workforce Transition Plan to the implementation of the SLSA people requirements outlined within the SLSA three year business plan.

Remuneration We seek to remunerate our employees consistent with the not-for-profit sector and our formal research indicates that salaries offered are in line with those offered by similar organisations. Our remuneration includes fringe benefit packages which allows us, within Australian Taxation Office

guidelines (see page 97), to provide a proportion of an employee’s income as a tax-exempt fringe benefit.

Performance reviews and individual performance development plans All employees participated in formal annual performance reviews. These were complimented by regular progress meetings between staff and managers throughout the year. Each employee also had an individual performance development plan for the year which aligns to the business plan KPI’s. SLSA allocates an amount within the annual budget for professional development for staff.

Workplace relations In 2013/14, our staff operated, and will continue to operate under an enterprise agreement which covers general terms and conditions of employment and provides the flexibility to deal with non-standard work hours. The nature of Surf Life Saving activities requires significant amounts of weekend work and under the terms of the agreement, our employees are entitled to time-in-lieu for work undertaken on weekends. We have monthly staff


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Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

043

meetings where any employment related issues that affect all staff are discussed. 30% of SLSA staff access formal flexible working arrangements.

2013/14 Staff Statistics 2008/09

FTE’s

Staff turnover

% Male

There has been a 50% reduction in staff turnover in 2013/14. Almost half of this turnover was a result of the organisation effectiveness review and restructure. SLSA’s priority within the business plan is to focus on increasing employee satisfaction rates, and the development of and implementation of retention strategies.

% Female

Equal opportunity SLSA meets all legislative requirements in terms of equal opportunity and a biasfree workplace.

Work health and safety For the most part our employees work in normal business office conditions and are not exposed to any undue hazards. We have consistently promoted a healthy and safe work environment, which is ergonomically sound. There have been two Workcover claims during the year. SLSA provided all staff with work health and safety training in 2014 and completed all fire safety warden training requirements. SLSA provided peer support training for employees in 2014 resulting in 12 trained peer support officers within the SLSA team. SLSA provides an Employee Assistance Program for all employees.

Peter George AM General Manager, Corporate Services

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

# Executive Managers

Staff Departures

6

6

5

4

4

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

100.00%

50.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

50.00%

1

2

1

3

1

17%

33%

17%

60%

17%

13

16

14

13

13

12

% Male

76.92%

56.25%

50.00%

38.46%

33.40%

50.00%

% Female

23.08%

43.75%

50.00%

61.54%

66.60%

50.00%

2

3

4

3

5

7

18%

23%

25%

21%

35%

37%

Staff Turnover # Senior Managers & Managers FTE’s

Staff Departures Staff Turnover # Operational Staff FTE’s

25

23

24

29.6

24.3

25

% Male

36.00%

39.13%

41.67%

27.03%

18.20%

33.60%

% Female

56.00%

52.17%

58.33%

70.95%

81.80%

66.40%

Staff Departures Staff Turnover

10

9

9

7

12

2.8

40%

36%

39%

29%

40%

8%

38

45

44

47.6

40.3

41

Total FTE’s % Male

50.00%

53.33%

52.27%

39.92%

33.40%

40.00%

% Female

50.00%

46.67%

47.73%

60.92%

66.60%

60.00%

12

13

15

11

20

10.8

33%

34%

33%

25%

42%

21%

2.62

2.66

2.02

3.10

3.10

Staff Departures Staff Turnover

Average Length of Service - (yrs) 1.61

Staff departures = 5.8 resignations and 5 redundancies.


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

Strategic Development

045

Overview The Strategic Development Portfolio is responsible for International Development projects and Research at Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA). The aim of SLSA’s international activities is to reduce drowning in developing nations in the Asia Pacific region, by utilising SLSA skills and resources and adapting SLSA programs, methods and systems to suit local conditions and needs. Research at SLSA is focused on exploring statistical and analytical data to support development of education, technology, communications and operations to reduce coastal drowning deaths in Australia.

International Development

The aim of SLSA’s international activities is to reduce drowning in developing nations in the Asia Pacific region.

The International Development program continued to expand this past year. During the year SLSA completed a number of drowning prevention developmental projects, including the following: • Brunei – In December 2013, SLSA volunteer Chris Jacobson (TAS) presented on surf safety at a conference organised by Brunei’s Beach Bunch. As a follow-up in mid-2014, Stuart Massey (NSW) conducted a detailed risk assessment on Brunei’s 15 beaches. The outcome is likely to see Brunei’s first lifeguards within 12 months. • Cambodia –In 2013, SLSA assisted two Australian and South African expats form the Sihanoukville Surf Life Saving Club. • China – Development work with the ShenZhen Surfing Association included the introduction of surf safety and lifesaving into ShenZhen through the production of surf safety vignettes by Anthony Bradstreet (SLSA) and the training of 34 lifeguards by David Guest (TAS), made possible through the Australia-China Council. • Colombia – With the support of SLSNSW, SLS Central Coast and the Toowoon Bay SLSC provided an

opportunity to a youth group from Colombia to experience Surf Life Saving in Australia for a day. • Cook Islands – SLSA provided support to Harvie Allison (QLD) and the new Cook Islands Water Safety and Surf Lifesaving Inc. through the donation of lifesaving equipment. • Fiji – Collaboration with the Fiji Surfing Association continued in an effort to establish a sustainable surf lifesaving education and training presence in Fiji. The work of AVID volunteer Andy Eames (NSW) was invaluable. Furthermore, SLSA continued to support the new Water Safety Council of Fiji which during the year saw a visit from Shane Daw (SA) and administration by AVID volunteer Bronwyn Soko (VIC and Fiji). • India – SLSA continued to assist the Rashtriya Life Saving Society India – RLSS (I) through the Australian Sports Outreach Program (ASOP India). • Indonesia – In late 2013, AVID volunteer Emma Larssen (NSW) completed her second assignment in Bali with outcomes including lifesaving sport coaching and consolidation of the Balawista Nippers on a number of beaches of Bali.


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046

Strategic Development

• Israel – SLSA assisted a group of Australians and the fledgling Surf Life Saving Israel to develop plans to introduce volunteer surf lifesaving into Israel. • Kenya – To further assist the development of surf lifesaving in Kenya, SLSA AVID volunteer Lachlan Butcher (NSW) commenced a 12 month assignment in Nairobi and Mombasa. • Malaysia – SLSA continued to support the Life Saving Society of Malaysia following completion of Surf Sports coaching and officiating training completed late in 2012/2013 by SLSA trainer Jeff Mowbray (NSW). • Malta – SLSA provided a range of Surf Life Saving promotional items in support of the Australian High Commission promotion of Australia and also beach safety to schools in Malta. • Mauritius – Ongoing support and advice was provided to the Surf Life Saving Association of Mauritius and its President, Mr Viraj Ramharai. • Middle East – SLSA CPR, First Aid and Bronze Medallion training continued to be delivered in Dubai through SLSA licensed provider Australia International Sports Services (AISS). • Nauru – Partnered with the Nauru Surf Club, SLSA introduced surf safety and lifesaving into Nauru. Until February 2014, the partnership saw the delivery of a high quality lifeguard service in Nauru for the local residents and in particular the refugees in transition on Nauru. Unfortunately this service ceased for a variety of reasons beyond our control. Thank you to SLSA and SLSNSW employee Steve Allan who was invaluable in providing training and support to the Nauru Surf Club. • Philippines – SLSA continued to provide support to the Philippine Lifesaving Society (PLS). During the year SLSA provided resources to PLS following typhoon Haiyan. In early

Cronulla surf lifesaver Emma Larsen (left) is instrumental in the delivery of the Balawista Badung Nippers program (Bali).

2014 AVID volunteer Jess Murnane (VIC) commenced an assignment in the Philippines to further develop surf safety practices. • Samoa – SLS Tasmania continued to provide surf lifesaving training assistance through AVID volunteers • Sri Lanka – SLSA continued to assist the Life Saving Association of Sri Lanka (LSASL) to improve its lifesaving training and organisational development. • Thailand – Ongoing support to the Phuket Lifeguard Club and the Safer Phuket group enabled the continual improvement of beach safety in Phuket. In late 2013, NSW lifeguard and surf lifesaver Tom Allen provided training to lifeguards on five beaches in Phuket. • Vanuatu – SLSA AVID volunteer Martin Wilke (WA) completed his assignment in Vanuatu in early 2014 during which he guided the creation of the Vanuatu Surf Life Saving Association. • Vietnam – SLSA continued to support the development of surf lifesaving in Vietnam with training in Da Nang, Nha Trang and Ho Tram. In November 2013, SLSA was registered as an International NGO in Vietnam (PACCOM Registered No. 267).

SLSA CPR, First Aid and Bronze medallion training continued to be delivered in Dubai through SLSA licensed provider Australia International Sports Services (AISS)


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047

Successful SLSA Grants Funding body

Recipient Program

Amount

Australia China Council (EOI Stage Successful) - Full App Due 14/6/13

SLSA

Partnership with ShenZhen Surfing Association (EOI)

$19,817

Australia India Council

SLSA

Nipper Program

$49,500

International Life Saving Federation – ILS The International Life Saving Federation is the world authority for drowning prevention and lifesaving sport. SLSA is a founding and full member of ILS with significant contributions through members of the ILS Board of Directors, Commissions and Committees. Following elections at Rescue 2012 in November 2012, SLSA has the following representation.

Australian Volunteers for International Development (AVID) SLSA continued its work with the Australian Volunteers for International Development (AVID) funded by AusAID with volunteers in the following countries. • Fiji Andrew Eames (Wauchope Bonny Hills SLSC, NSW) and Bronwyn Soko (VIC and Fiji) • Indonesia Emma Larssen (Cronulla SLSC, NSW)

ILS Board of Directors • ILS World President – Graham Ford • ILS Business Commission Chair – Norman Farmer ESM • ILS Sport Commission Chair – Dave Thompson • Legal Adviser to ILS – Ian Fullagar

ILS Commission and Committee members • ILS Rescue Commission and Committees – Peter George AM (Secretary Commission), Dr Natalie Hood MD, Pamela Simon (Chair, Education Committee), Adam Weir, Peter Agnew and Matthew Thompson (Chair, RipSafe Committee) • ILS Business Commission and Committees – Norman Farmer ESM (Chair) and Peter George AM • ILS Sport Commission and Committees – Dave Thompson (Chair), Ian Fullagar, Kristy Munroe, Rick Wright OAM and Greg Allum OAM • ILS Drowning Prevention and Public Education Commission – Anthony Bradstreet

CPR training in Bali

• Kenya Lachlan Butcher (Cronulla SLSC, NSW) • Philippines Jess Murnane (Apollo Bay SLSC, VIC) • Samoa David Guest (Ulverstone SLSC TAS) and 2014: Mattias Baenziger (Brighton LSC and Point Lonsdale SLSC, VIC) • Vanuatu Martin Wilke (Mullaloo SLSC, WA) • Vietnam Stephanie McGuiness (Helensburgh Stanwell Park SLSC, NSW) and 2014: David Field (Cudgen Headland SLSC, NSW)


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

Strategic Development

Research SLSA’s research activities continued to expand over the past 12 months. Research activities were, and continue to be promoted via the SLS website, biannual Research Newsletter, and peer reviewed presentations and publications. The Research Advisory Committee continued to meet and provide valuable guidance, including critical review of grant proposals, draft publications and feedback to improve the presentation of the annual 2013 National Coastal Safety Report. We would like to thank John Fitzgerald OAM for his role of Chair, Research

Advisory Committee and we now welcome Norman Farmer ESM who will be taking his place. We would also like to acknowledge Dr Shauna Sherker’s contributions to SLSA Research over the last four and a half years. Dr Sherker departed SLSA in early June 2014. During this past year, SLSA has forged strong partnerships with a number of research institutions, including the University of New South Wales, University of Technology Sydney, Griffith University, Monash University, University of Ballarat, University of Melbourne, University of Wollongong, Bond University, and the Australian Institute of Sport. Emerging partnerships will continue to be explored both in Australia and internationally in 2014/15. In 2013/14 we were successful in attracting competitive research grants, including the following continuing grant: Dr. David Kennedy, Prof. Colin Woodroffe, Dr. Shauna Sherker. Rocky Coasts: A Framework for risk assessment in order to reduce drowning. Australian Research Council Linkage Project 2013-2016 in partnership with University of Melbourne and University of Wollongong (LP130100204). Newly funded projects this past year also included: SLSA and RLSS(I). Impact Evaluation of Swim N Survive, India: An international study to determine the effectiveness of Swim N Survive on reducing drowning risk in India. Australian Sports Outreach ProgramAustralian Sports Commission. We continued promoting our research activity at national and international conferences as well as through journal publications. In total, 23 abstracts were presented at scientific meetings or accepted for presentation, including 18 international conference abstracts and five national conference abstracts. In addition, six peer-reviewed journal articles were published or submitted for publication:

048

1. Shaw WS. J. Goff, R. Brander, T. Walton, A. Roberts, S. Sherker. Surviving the Surf Zone: Towards an integrative approach to rip current safety. Annals Of The Association Of American Geographers [submitted April 2014] 2. M. Edwards, Onyx J., H. Maxwell, P. Bullen, S. Sherker. A conceptual model of social impact as active citizenship. Voluntas [accepted July 2014] 3. Drozdzewski D., A. Roberts, D. Dominey-Howes and R. Brander, R. The experiences of weak and nonswimmers caught in rip currents at Australian beaches. Australian Geographer [in press June 2014] 4. Darcy S., J. Onyx, M. Edwards, H. Maxwell, S. Sherker. More than a sport and volunteer organisation: Investigating social capital in an Australian sporting organisation. Sport Management Review [in press March 2014] 5. McCarroll R. J., R. Brander, J. MacMahan, I. Turner, A. Reniers, J. Brown, A. Bradstreet, S. Sherker. Evaluation of swimmer-based rip current escape strategies. Natural Hazards 71:1821-1846, 2014 6. Matthews, B., R. Andronaco, A. Adams. Warning signs at beaches: Do they work? Safety Science 62:312-318, 2014 Valuable investigative reports completed by SLSA and our collaborative partners in 2013/14 include ‘SLSA National Coastal Safety Report 2013’, ‘Attributing the Social Contribution of Surf Life Saving Australia: Valuing the Social Capital of an Iconic Institution’ and ‘Engaging Diverse Communities in Surf Lifesaving’.

Norman Farmer ESM General Manager, Strategic Development


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

Case study: Valuing the Social Capital of SLSA

During 2013/14, we completed our work with researchers at the University of Technology Sydney’s Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Centre, evaluating the social impacts of Surf Life Saving on the Australian community. The project has, for the first time, provided evidence to support a non-profit organisation’s long term and multilayered contributions to the wider community. The Ripple Model was developed by UTS researchers as the primary tool used to measure the meaningful impact of SLSA as it creates, builds, and maintains flourishing civil societies.

The Ripple Model makes visible the contributions made by the organisation, rippling from the individual member and club, to wider networks of people and organisations and society itself. This research was funded by the Australian Research Council. The Ripple Model helped SLSA better understand its wider social contribution within the community and be able to develop ways to more effectively put a value on this social capital.

049


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

Surf Life Saving Foundation

These Guardians delivered over $6.4M in revenue which represents a 3.7% increase in the number of Guardians and an increase in revenues of 2.8%.

T

he Surf Life Saving Foundation (SLSF), is a wholly owned subsidiary of SLSA and is managed through SLSA’s Communications & Business Development Portfolio. SLSF is responsible for the creation and delivery of programs to raise much needed funds for the movement. SLSF concentrates on the following activities which delivered a positive contribution of over $11.5M given directly back to the movement for essential community programs and services through Surf Life Saving Australia and SLS Entities in New South Wales, Queensland, Northern Territory, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria.

Philanthropic Activities Donors of SLSF are collectively known as ‘Guardians of the Surf’. Our Guardians help to fund vital programs and services and allow us to confidently plan ahead and invest in our volunteer surf lifesavers so they can continue their vital community service now, and in the years to come.

051

2013/14 was a challenging year for the philanthropic sector with factors such as a new Federal Government, changes within some State Governments and an unstable economy all playing a role. Our loyal donors however continued to give and provide their support with funds raised through our regular Appeals being slightly up on previous years. In the 2013/14 financial year, we recorded 20,089 active Guardians of the Surf located throughout Australia. These Guardians delivered over $6.4M in revenue which represents a 3.7% increase in the number of Guardians and an increase in revenue of 2.8%. SLSF introduced Workplace Giving into our Philanthropic Programs portfolio in 2011 and since then we have seen steady and consistent growth year on year, resulting in a total of 37 companies and 201 individuals actively participating in the Program. Approximately 45% of these companies also match their employee’s gifts dollar for dollar, thereby making a significant contribution to their employees’ charity of choice. We continue to develop our Workplace Giving Program and look forward to welcoming new employers and employees to the program. The 2013/14 financial year has also seen awareness of our Surf Life Saving ‘Circle of Friends’ Bequest Program increase, and we welcomed 187 new Bequest Program participants who advised us of their intention to leave a gift to SLS. That brings the total number of known Bequest Program members nationally to 434. Of interest this year was the increase in the number of Will makers who were much more specific with the wording in their Wills, with many requesting their gift be used for specific programs and/or specific SLS clubs or geographic locations. This certainly demonstrates that our supporters are showing a much greater interest in where and what they want their Bequest to help.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

Surf Life Saving Foundation

The Foundation’s Grant Seeking Unit again achieved outstanding results for the SLS movement having successfully assisted 59 SLS entities secure $1,474,486 in funding.

We also managed the National Boardies Day Event during the year. This event enabled local clubs to participate in a national campaign with funds raised going to the clubs directly. Once again Grill’d Restaurants provided valuable support, donating more than $37,000 to SLS clubs through their ‘Local Matters’ program. In addition, more than 350 schools, retailers and workplaces participated in the popular fundraising activity , which contributed in excess of $104,000 towards SLS entities around Australia.

Commercial Activities Surf Life Saving Lotteries SLSF operates one of Australia’s largest ‘House and Land’ Lottery programs. The entire Lottery program includes six House Lotteries, six exclusive regular buyer Lotteries and a number of smaller ‘limited’ lotteries, all of which have

052

performed well over the year. A highlight in 2013-14 saw two first prize properties being valued at over $1M each. This saw supporter prizes given away last year total over $7.5M. Our focus continues to be improving our data quality. This has helped us gain a better understanding of our customer’s motivations and behaviours, leading to an increase in response rates and average ticket order across all channels. We also commenced a face to face Lottery membership acquisition trial in April 2014 with early indicators showing that this is an effective method to acquire new supporters.

Trade Promotions - Pin and Win 2 A second national Trade Promotion was launched in April 2013, using a promotion formula of $10 and $25 collectible pins together with a ‘Scratch card’ to reveal


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053

Highlights 2013-14 Financial Year*

$6.47M raised for SLS from National fundraising activities for distribution to SLS States

$0.58M distributed to SLSA from our revenue surplus

$1.46M raised for State Entities from specific State based fundraising and revenue activities cash prizes. The new program featured a Pin replicating an Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB). The promotion was enthusiastically received by our supporters who also received the chance to win instant cash prizes and $60,000 in the second chance major prize draw which was drawn on 11 April, 2014. The next Trade Promotion, Pin and Win 3 will commence in August 2014 and will feature a replica Rescue Board collectible pin.

thanks to all supporters. No matter how big or small the contribution, each supporter really does make a difference.

raised for SLS Clubs from specific Club based fundraising events Geoffrey Martin Walsh Foundation Chair

Grant Seeking Activities The Foundation’s Grant Seeking Unit (GSU) again achieved outstanding results for the SLS movement having successfully assisted 59 SLS entities secure $1,474,486 in funding in the 2013/14 Financial Year. With over 200 grants lodged, the GSU continues to provide essential support for our movement allowing our members to focus on the task of what they do best - saving lives and building better communities. The Foundation sincerely offers our

$1.48M

Melissa King General Manager, Communications and Business Development

$1.47M raised for State Entities and Clubs through direct funding requests for SLS Entities by the Foundation Grants Seeking Unit.

* Final distributions subject to audit

Steve Francia Chief Executive Officer


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

055

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter Service

Northern Region The Northern Region Helicopter Rescue Service (NRHRS) provides residents of and visitors to Northern New South Wales, an emergency aero-medical helicopter rescue service, available at all times, free of charge. The Service is an independent subsidiary of and is wholly owned by Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA). In 2013/14, our objective was heavily focused on responding to the NSW Health Reform Plan announcements and repositioning ourselves for the new reality of consolidation of aero-medical providers in NSW. The primary response was recognising that the financial scale of the new Northern NSW area was outside the financial capacity of an organisation our size to tender for the contract. This also recognised the effect of our financial decisions on the consolidated finances of our parent organisation, SLSA.

In the past 12 months, we continued to demonstrate the worth of the service that we provide to our local community. To date, we have performed over 7,600 missions, including 547 in 2013/14 with 717 hours flown (see Snapshot below).

Fundraising The nature of our fundraising has required us to continually reinvent ourselves. The strongest expression of this has been our migration from raffles, which are still of great value to us as a substantial percentage of our fundraising, to the fundraising we now generate through our Op Shops. In 2008 we had one Op Shop in Lismore – we now have six throughout our flight area – all performing well. As importantly, it has led to an amazing engagement with our volunteers throughout the region with over 450 volunteers now part of ‘the team’.

NRHRS Snapshot 2013/14 Number of available helicopters

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

1

2

2

2

Primary Response - Number of missions

156

153

171

152

Primary Response - Number of hours flown

165

183

176

205

Secondary Response - Number of missions

142

152

191

188

Secondary Response - Number of hours flown

223

245

270

291

Search and rescue - Number of missions

21

24

20

18

Search and rescue - Number of hours flown

34

41

29

26

Training - Number of missions

101

114

159

135

Training - Number of hours flown

106

122

185

161

Other - Number of missions

54

55

89

54

Other - Number of hours flown

18

32

43

35

Total - Number of missions

473

498

630

547

Total - Number of hours flown

546

623

703

717


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

056

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter Service

maintaining local staff onsite to ensure as little disruption to the service as possible. Our pilots know the area incredibly well making them the best for any retrieval and our on-ground team is vital to our ongoing service delivery. Against this background we continue to engage with and remain relevant to our community – our most important achievement as we are a Service that came from the community, for the community.

Farewell During the year, our Director Noel Doyle retired from the Board. Noel served his community through the Board since 2002. Noel remains a strong supporter of the community through other efforts and we thank him for the service to Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd.

Northern Region Board of Directors Member

Developments Our major development was the completion of the installation of Night Vision Technology in our second aircraft. This means that we have the capacity to accept more night time missions, with safer operating margins than we could previously. This ensures improved safety for our crews but also better coverage for our community. We initiated a national trial of Fatigue Risk Management with the introduction of CAO48.1 regulations. Our Engineering department was incredibly busy with the commissioning of Night Vision Technology in our second aircraft, new stretchers, improved distress beacon search homers, go-pro and enhanced radio technology for communications with Ambulance services. At a company level, we responded to the Reform Plan by engaging with the

Hunter-based Westpac Rescue Helicopter to address the tender. If successful, this would see our Service becoming part of the Hunter based Service under one contract servicing all of Northern NSW. We have been the custodians of the community’s helicopter service for over 30 years which meant our Board went to great lengths in considering the options that were available as part of this careful decision that was made. Importantly, the agreement reached was also seen as the best way to keep the community’s helicopter in community hands. One of the biggest reassurances under this new proposed merger is that despite the region expansion, funding and donations made here in our region will stay in our region to support the ongoing operation of the rescue helicopters in Lismore. Our agreement also includes

Meetings

Warren Tozer - Chairman

10/10

Paul Muldoon

9/10

Noel Doyle (retired)

2/3

Kevin Gosling

9/10

John Griffin

7/10

Peter George

8/10

Geoff King

6/10

Peter Fahey

7/10

Kris Beavis - Company Secretary

10/10

Kris Beavis Chief Executive Officer


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

Case study: Two Fishermen and an esky

On Saturday 21 December, 2013 work colleagues Ray and Paul were rescued by the Lismore based Northern Region Service after being spotted floating in the ocean clinging to a large white esky off the coast between Evans Head and Iluka just after sunrise. Just days before Christmas, the two work mates had finished their last working day for the year and made the quick decision to shoot off in their boat from Ballina for a fishing trip. After several hours, the pair turned their small boat for home and with land in sight they soon discovered that the loud cracking noise they’d heard while landing on some rough waves was actually more serious than first perceived. The helicopter crew was alerted to the fishermen in trouble and embarked on two searches; the second in fading light, with the aid of Night Vision Goggles, but was unsuccessful in locating the patients. Early the following morning, using new

Without the amazing work and personal sacrifice you are all committed to making, our outcome, would surely have been dire to say the least!

057

coordinates from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority overnight , the night crew embarked on a third search. With the pair now missing for 12 hours, urgency was rapidly increasing as the wind began gaining momentum on the water. Once the aircraft had reached the starting point for its search pattern, it quickly located Ray and Paul’s overturned boat and then the pair clinging to an esky to stay afloat. The helicopter winched them to safety and provided medical assistance before the pair were reunited with family and friends in time for Christmas. Ray and Paul later extended their gratitude and appreciation. “Without the amazing work and personal sacrifice you are all committed to making, our outcome would surely have been dire to say the least!” An amazing testimonial to the great value and importance of our vital community service.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

058

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter Service

Southern Region The last 12 months have seen the Southern Region Helicopter Rescue Service (SRHRS) continue to cement our position with government and fellow emergency services. We have secured long term funding, resolved a number of outstanding issues and improved our financial position. Due to ocean and weather conditions, it has been a quiet year operationally.

SRHRS Snapshot 2013/14 2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2

2

2

2

Coastal Surveillance Flights - Number of missions

55

62

89

56

Coastal Surveillance Flights - Number of hours flown

60

61

87

62

Number of available helicopters

Search and rescue - Number of missions

145

252

337

188

Search and rescue - Number of hours flown

157

239.2

331

219

Training - Number of missions

57

92

75

137

Training - Number of hours flown

46

86

144

179

Other - Number of missions

22

27

22

30

Other - Number of hours flown

19

18

26

14.5

Maintenance - Number of missions

18

18

23

22

13

11

10

8.5

Total - Number of missions

Maintenance - Number of hours flown

297

451

546

433

Total - Number of hours flown

295

415

598

483

Picture: Paul Sadler


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

059

will generate some further income. Earlier this year, we entered into an arrangement with the Australian Federal Police to provide aviation search and rescue services to their organisation.

Staff Restructure The government funding did not reach the levels that we have previously received, and as a result, $400,000 of savings had to be made. A number of options were considered and reviewed and this saw the Sydney operation return to daylight hours and several staff were made redundant. This was achieved with minimal impact on the Company’s operations.

Emergency Management

Government Funding Following successful negotiations and lobbying, Southern Region signed a four year funding agreement with the NSW Ministry for Police and Emergency Services (MPES). This agreement allows us to be directly tasked by police for search and rescue operations as well as providing urgent (non-disaster relief) search and rescue work for the State Emergency Service. The negotiations allowed our participation in multi-agency search and rescue exercises and the surf patrols we perform for Surf Life Saving New South Wales (SLSNSW) to be covered by the funding. The funding secures the medium term future for our base in Sydney and on the NSW South Coast and extends the operations of the South Coast to a yearround operation.

Operations and Staffing Operations Over the last 12 months, a total of 433 hours have been flown by the Westpac Life Saver Rescue helicopters in support of search and rescue activities throughout NSW. This was a significant reduction compared to previous years for a number of reasons including that there was no major flood event in NSW, whereas in previous years the Service has provided substantial support to the State Emergency Service with flood rescue operations. The introduction of 406 EPIRBs and ELBs, meant that we saw a reduction in AusSAR tasking for activated distress beacons. We also continued to support SLSNSW by undertaking coastal surveillance patrols in the Sydney Basin and along the NSW South Coast during the Surf Life Saving season. We are well advanced with negotiations with Fire and Rescue NSW to extend our operational capability with them and this

We have worked hard to improve our relationship with our emergency services partners as this is what will drive our taskings. These relationships have been integral in helping to secure government support and MPES funding. We now have an Observer’s Seat on all Regional Emergency Management Committees, Regional Rescue Committees and Marine Rescue Committees in our normal area of operations. Our helicopters and crew participated in a number of multi-agency search and rescue exercises (SAREX’s). Not only does this hone our skills, response capabilities and overall service provision, but the professional and social networking with our colleagues from other agencies ensures that we all work well together at major events. Major SAREX’s were held on the Pittwater, Bermagui, Greenwell Point (Shoalhaven), Canberra and the Snowy Mountains. Participants in these exercises included the NSW Police Force (Local Area Commands and Marine Area Commands), the NSW State Emergency Service, SLSNSW, the Australian Federal Police, Marine Rescue NSW, Volunteer Rescue Association, Ambulance Service of NSW and the Royal Australian Navy.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter Service

Our Aircraft/Bases/Facilities Our last two annual reports mentioned the collapse of the retaining wall at the Sydney base. This saw a large portion of the building closed down, bedrooms created in offices and staff relocated to a large open space area. The subsequent repatriation of the building super-structure and the internal repairs has now been completed and the base is fully accessible to our staff once again. This process lasted 18 months. The UrbanGrowth (formerly Landcom) negotiations were long and protracted for several reasons and this required a sustained effort from the Board and the Management Team to ensure a successful outcome. The initial offers were rejected until a final offer was made at the end of the reporting period. This offer was accepted and repatriation of the building is now being prioritised with repairs beginning shortly. Both aircraft are performing well with significant maintenance undertaken in 2013/14. Both aircraft have now been retro-fitted for the introduction of Night Vision Goggles. Sydney’s VH-SLU has had an upgrade of its engines and the same upgrade will be required of South Coast’s VH-SLA in the next 12-15 months.

Business Development Fundraising has been one of our challenges in 2013/14. We are continuing to address this through a restructure of the staff and staffing functions. Our change in focus includes developing the Westpac relationship, looking at high income generating events and better back-room support. In the last 12 months, we have conducted a very popular anniversary ball and fundraising dinners in Sydney and at Batemans Bay. Our Golf Day and the annual Mortgage Brokers Ball were successful and we continue to receive substantial income from events such as the City2Surf run in Sydney.

Our Housie sessions have improved and there are a number of pioneering programs ready to be launched at several of our clubs in 2014/15. Along with the national Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter family, we were excited when Westpac announced that the partnership had been extended until 2017, the bank’s 200th birthday – and look forward to continuing our partnership in 2014/15. Looking forward, in 2014/15, we are introducing a more sophisticated and advanced Customer Relationship Database and using the data more effectively in order to maintain contact with our supporters. Tied in with this has been the redevelopment and repositioning of our website. Financial performance of our fundraising efforts has markedly improved. Our 40th anniversary was celebrated in style with several events including a Gala Ball, a Fly By along the coast and Sydney Harbour and a staff reunion. Significant media coverage was generated as a result of these activities. A feature article on our 40th anniversary and our current operations was featured in the April edition of Australian Aviation. Our social media is extensively used to stay in touch with our supporters and it is constantly monitored by media agencies for rescue mission information. Nearly 5,000 individuals or organisations follow both our Facebook page and Twitter feeds.

Conclusion At our 40th Anniversary Ball, I said “It was 40 years ago that a group of ambitious, enthusiastic dare-devil surf lifesavers undertook their training at Wanda Beach, under the very watchful and sceptical eye of the Civil Aviation Authority. A week later, on the October long weekend, the Wales helicopter commenced their inaugural surf patrols along Sydney’s beaches. From this infancy we have grown

060

into a mature service that continues to provide free aviation search and rescue services to the community.” Many things have changed over the last 40 years, since the beginnings of our service – our crews, bases, the helicopters we have flown in, the rescue techniques and equipment we utilise. There are only two things that haven’t changed. The first thing is the reason we exist – to serve our community and to save lives. Secondly, the other constant that remains is our key supporter – Westpac – and that support is something we cherish. We recognise and thank Jon Donohoe AM who retired as our Chairman early in 2014. His leadership and guidance has ensured a strong future for the Service. We acknowledge the great support we receive from our Corporate Partners, particularly Westpac and Thales; and, of course, we are very grateful to the NSW


Section 2

Surf Life Saving Australia Operations

061

State Government through the Ministry for Police and Emergency Services for their backing. Finally, my sincere gratitude is extended to our wonderful staff. Their passion, their loyalty and their real desire to make a difference is admired. This is the team that ensures the longevity of Southern Region!

Stephen Leahy Chief Executive Officer

Southern Region Board of Directors Director

Directorship

Meetings

Jon Donohoe AM

Chairman to 27th February 2014

4/4

David Owens APM

Director; Chairman from 27th February 2014

5/7

Peter George AM

Member’s Representative

5/7

Gordon Lang

Director

7/7

Daniel Dwyer

Director

5/7

Les Tree AM

NSW Government Representative

4/4

Graham Ford

Director

1/1

Stephen Leahy JP

Company Secretary, Chief Executive Officer

7/7


Section 03 Governance & Oversight


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

064

Governance & Oversight

Overview Since 1907, when a small number of Sydney Surf Life Saving (SLS) clubs formed the organisation now known as Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA), we have evolved into a highly federated and geographically disperse organisation, made up of 507 entities/groups including 311 separately incorporated Surf Life Saving Clubs, 17 regional branches (in NSW and Queensland), 101 support operations (regional rescue and response teams), 66 paid lifeguard services and seven State and Territory centres (page 128). However, as these various separate entities are not subsidiaries of SLSA Ltd and have a variety of legal and reporting structures, their financial results are not consolidated here. We are the peak policy and decision making body for the movement. Under our constitution, our members are: • State Centres, represented by their appointed directors have the right to be present, debate and vote at our general meetings. • Life Members of SLSA, have the right to be present and to debate at our general meetings, but with no voting rights. • All individual members of affiliated SLSC’s, and services have the right to be present at general meetings, but with no voting or debating rights. Each year, prior to the commencement of the season, individual members sign an application for joint membership of SLSA and their club. Where the members are less than 18 years of age, the membership form

is signed by a parent or legal guardian. This detailed membership form meets a number of legal requirements, including indemnification of SLSA in the event of any claim arising from surf lifesaving activity, as well as outlining a member’s individual liability in the unlikely event of a wind-up of SLSA. SLSA also operates two subsidiary companies to provide helicopter rescue services in NSW. Other helicopter rescue services operate in Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia through their respective state centres. The Surf Life Saving Foundation (SLSF) which is now also a wholly owned subsidiary, undertakes a national fundraising role on behalf of the movement.

Patrons of Surf Life Saving Australia Chief Patrons His Royal Highness Prince Philip KG KT OM GBE AC QSO PC Duke of Edinburgh Her Excellency Ms Quentin Bryce AC (until 28 March 2014) Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd) (from 28 March 2014) Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia

Patrons Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO Governor of New South Wales Her Excellency Ms Penelope Wensley AC Governor of Queensland His Excellency Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce AC CSC RANR Governor of South Australia His Excellency Malcolm McCusker AC CVO QC Governor of Western Australia His Excellency the Hon Peter Underwood AC Governor of Tasmania Her Excellency the Honourable Sally Thomas AM Administrator of the Northern Territory

Vice Patron The Hon. Tony Abbott MP Prime Minister of Australia

Life Governor Alan Whelpton AO Sir Adrian Curlewis CVO CBE* *Denotes deceased


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

Surf Life Saving Australia Board

Overview As one of the largest volunteer organisations in Australia and the world, we are dependent on the contribution of our volunteer members for everything from patrolling beaches, to providing input for the strategic direction for the organisation. Board and Committee members freely give up their time for the benefit of Surf Life Saving.

Surf Life Saving Australia Board The peak policy and decision body for Surf Life Saving in Australia (SLSA), made up of the President of SLSA, seven Appointed Directors from each state and the Northern Territory, four Independent Directors and the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of SLSA. The Board delegates the management of SLSA to the CEO who seeks support and advice from the Executive Management Group (EMG).

Name

Position

Graham Ford

President (Chair)

Greg Nance

Chief Executive Officer

Andrew McGuiness SLSNT (From 8 March, 2014) Bob Creek

SLSNT (Until 8 March, 2014)

John Baker

SLSSA

Mark Irwin

SLSWA

Ralph Devlin QC

SLSA Deputy President SLSQ

Stephen Godfrey

SLST

Tom Mollenkopf

LSV

Tony Haven

SLSNSW

Christine Hopton

Independent Director

Lyn Barratt

Independent Director

Martin Walsh

Independent Director

Michael Crismale

Independent Director (Until 30 June, 2014)

Surf Life Saving Australia Roles and Responsibilities The key roles and responsibilities of SLSA are: a. Responsible for international lifesaving activities, coordination and representation - member of the International Life Saving Federation (ILS). b. Responsible for relations with allied agencies (AUSTSWIM, RLSSA, Swimming Australia, Australian Coastal Alliance etc.) and other peak organisations (e.g. Australian Water Safety Council, National SeaChange Taskforce etc.). c. Provides a framework within which surf lifesaving in Australia may be conducted safely and fairly in Australia including national strategies and supporting plans. d. Primary SLS organisation relationship with the federal government. Responsible for the management and delivery of all representation to the federal government. e. Facilitation, coordination and delivery of agreed national administrative programs such as insurance, Information Technology and Communications (ITC) and disciplinary and grievance. f. Responsible for lifesaving rules, policies and standards underpinned by evidence (research) and the coordination of lifesaving nationally with the State Centres, including professional lifeguards. g. Conducts relevant research. Sets curriculum and standards. h. Responsible for the coordination of member training and education through curriculum and resource development with the State Centres

065

i. Management and delivery of all national sporting events, development of national sport policy and standards and delivery of the national high performance program. j. Responsible for supporting national programs in member development, club management, leadership, recognition youth and junior development and the national resources to support these programs. k. SLSA brand protection, reputation and development. l. Management and delivery of national marketing, sponsorship and business development programs. m. Management and delivery of national fund raising in accordance with agreed national and state business outcomes.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

066

Surf Life Saving Australia Board

Graham Ford – President Elected Director

Greg Nance CEO

Andrew McGuiness Appointed Director (from March 2014)

Graham was elected as President of SLSA in October, 2010. He brings to this role a wealth of Surf Life Saving knowledge and experience, coupled with a strong business background. Graham is a Life Member of Bronte SLSC and has held many senior roles in SLS. His professional experience includes over 30 years in the property industry, as well as numerous chairman and directorship roles. Graham was re-elected as SLSA President in October 2012. He was also elected as President of the ILS in November 2012. Graham is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Formerly SLSA CEO, from 1996-2006, Greg Nance was appointed as CEO in July 2013. Prior to and in-between his time with SLSA, Greg has held positions including Director, Sports Development at the Australian Sports Commission (ASC), leading the Commonwealth Government’s investment in sport. In his former life, Greg was an officer in the Australian Army, serving in the Royal Australian Commando and Special Air Service Regiments.

Andrew, a Senior Teacher in Darwin was elected as President of Surf Life Saving Northern Territory in March 2014. Andrew has a wide background in lifesaving, education, search & rescue operations and business management. He is a Life Member of the Darwin SLSC.

Anthony Michael Haven Appointed Director

John Baker Appointed Director

Mark Raymond Irwin Appointed Director

Tony, a former Senior Manager at the NSW State Transit Authority, has been involved with Surf Life Saving since 1965. He was reelected as SLSNSW President in May 2014 and his term is due to expire in May 2016.

John, a Company Director, has been President of Surf Life Saving SA since June 2011, and was appointed as a Director on the SLSA Board in January 2012. John is a member of Brighton SLSC in SA and has been involved with Surf Life Saving since 1977.

Mark, a Company Director, has been President of Surf Life Saving WA since September 2008. He has been involved with Surf Life Saving since 1982. Mark was named SLSA Volunteer of the Year in 2006. His current term as SLSWA President is due to expire in September 2014.


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

067

Ralph Devlin QC Appointed Director

Stephen Godfrey Appointed Director

Tom Mollenkopf Appointed Director

Ralph, a Senior Counsel, has been President of Surf Life Saving QLD since July 2011. Prior to this time, Ralph held the role of SLSQ Deputy President, and was appointed as a Director on the SLSA Board on 20 December 2010. Ralph is a Life Member of SLSA.

Stephen, Acting General Manager of Corporate Services at PSMA Australia Ltd, has been President of Surf Life Saving Tasmania since September 2011, and was appointed as a Director on the SLSA Board in October 2011. Stephen is a Life Member of Carlton Park SLSC and has been involved with Surf Life Saving since 1967.

Tom was the CEO of the Australian Water Association from 2007 until 2013. Prior to that he held executive roles internationally and in Australia in the utilities sector, following a law career in private practice and as corporate counsel. Tom is President of LSV and is a Director of Western Water and WaterAid Australia. He is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and of Chartered Secretaries Australia. Tom is a Life Member of Point Leo SLSC.

Christine Hopton Independent Director

Lyn Barratt Independent Director

Martin Walsh Independent Director

Christine has an extensive media background having worked in the newspaper and television industries, public relations, marketing and communications for more than 30 years. Christine has been involved in Surf Life Saving for over 15 years, joining as a Nipper parent and holding positions on the Avalon Beach SLSC junior committee before gaining her Bronze Medallion in 2000. Christine is currently in her eighth term as President of Avalon Beach SLSC.

Lyn has worked extensively in Occupational Health & Safety and Risk Management for over 20 years in Tasmania, Victoria and NSW. She currently holds the position as the National Safety, Health, Environment and Quality Manager for an international dredging company specializing in the marine environment. Lyn has been involved in Surf Life Saving since 1985 as co-founder of the Port Sorell SLSC in Tasmania where she filled several roles over 12 years. She remains active on several national committees.

Martin Walsh is a member of Lorne SLSC and Life Member of LSV. Professionally, Martin is a Registered Company Auditor, Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants and Graduate of the Institute of Company Directors. He is also the current chair of the Surf Life Saving Foundation and a previous Director of LSV.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

068

Surf Life Saving Australia Board

Michael Crismale Outgoing Director

Kevin Larkins Outgoing Director

Mark Fife OAM Outgoing Director

Michael, Chairman of the Australian Turf Club and Director and founding owner of Matrium Technologies Pty Ltd, was appointed as an Independent Director of SLSA in April, 2011. Michael is also a member of the Institute of Sports Management, Institute of Chartered Accountants, Australian Institute of Company Directors and Taxation Institute in Australia.

Kevin, a Company Director, has been SLSA’s Director of Development since 30 October, 2010. Kevin has been a member of the Development Standing Committee for nine years, and is a member of Torquay SLSC in Victoria. Kevin was named SLSA Volunteer of the Year in 2000.

Mark, an assistant property manager, has been SLSA’s Director of Lifesaving since November, 2010. Mark was previously the State Lifesaving Officer and Director of Lifesaving for SLSQ and has been a member of the Lifesaving Standing Committee since 2001.

Rick Wright OAM Outgoing Director

Robert William Creek Outgoing Director

Rick, a consultant, has been SLSA’s Director of Sport since May, 2010. Rick has been a member of the Sport Standing Committee since 2003 and was inducted into the SLSA Hall of Fame in 2010. He was previously a SLSA Director when he held the role of Director of Development between 1996 and 2002.

Bob, an IT Manager, has been President of SLSNT, since June 2003. He has been involved with Surf Life Saving since 1988. His term as SLSNT president expired in March 2014.


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

069

Governance Structure of SLS in Australia

SLS Organisational Structure

SLS Governance Structure

168,622 Members National Body Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) Surf Life Saving Australia Subsidiaries

Executive Management Group SLSA Board

Northern Region Helicopter Rescue Service

Southern Region Helicopter Rescue Service

Surf Life Saving Foundation

Surf Sports Australia

Life Saving Victoria (LSV)

Surf Life Saving Western Australia (SLSWA)

Surf Life Saving South Australia (SLSSA)

Surf Life Saving Tasmania (SLST)

Surf Life Saving Northern Territory (SLSNT)

59 Clubs

57 Clubs

29 Clubs

19 Clubs

14 Clubs

4 Clubs

35 Support Ops

12 Support Ops

20 Support Ops

20 Support Ops

5 Support Ops

8 Support Ops

1 Support Op

19 ALS

18 ALS

13 ALS

11 ALS

2 ALS

1 ALS

2 ALS

Surf Life Saving New South Wales (SLSNSW)

Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ)

11 Regional Branches

6 Regional Branches

129 Clubs


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

070

“As One”Change Management Plan

Following a review of SLSA and SLSF by Deloitte in late 2012, it was agreed by both boards to accept all the recommended changes in order to reposition us as one organisation with a single, vision of saving lives, creating great Australians and building better communities. SLSA is structured to enable true collaboration across the organisation which delivers enhancement of our governance to contemporary standards. Our efforts were focused in a more integrated manner to deliver to our key stakeholders - the states, members, sponsors and donors in the past 12 months. We have continued to deliver to the “As One” Change Management Plan - a Workforce Transition plan, and are pleased to provide an outline of that progress below. Our journey is not over and our aim is to maintain trust and transparency in SLSA with our key stakeholders.

Change Management Plan recommendations - Matrix Recommendation/Action Required

Status

Comment

1. SLSA Board & Advisory Committee Restructure

C

No further action

2. Communication of Governance Reforms

C

No further action

3. Appointment of External Company Secretary

C

No further action

4. Formation of Board Nominations Committee

C

No further action

5. Review of Board skills, nomination process and structure and constitution/regs amended

C

No further action

6. Institution of bi-annual governance training

P

Need to contract

7. Establishment of Business Development Advisory Committee and timeline determined

P

By July 2015.

8. Completion of EMG operation reform & SLSA CEO assigned full accountability & responsibility

C

No further action

9. Endorsement of Performance Management Framework

C

No further action

10. Sharing of EMG Annual Performance to State Presidents

P

Mid 2014

11. Development of SLSA Business Plan

C

No further action

12. CEO’s internal review of SLSA roles/functions

C

No further action


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

071

Change Management Plan Progress

Change Management Plan recommendations - Matrix Recommendation/Action Required

Status

Comment

13. Endorsement and implementation of “As One” Workforce Transition Plan

C

No further action

14. GM C&C & GM Corp Serv be endorsed and advertised

C

No further action

15. SLSF will become a wholly owned subsidiary. Review of SLSF operations and ‘Winding down’ of SLSF. Development of an Accountability matrix.

C

No further action

16. Review of SLSA brand and development of brand, marketing, sponsorship and fundraising strategies

U

Work commenced at August 13 EMG. Progressively being completed. Target for completion is September 2014. On track.

17. Initial GM-CBD review of SLSF Structure

C

No further action

18. Further external analysis/review of cost effectiveness and compliance of SLSF outsourcing

C

No further action

19. Review of revenue planning, funding allocation models, info mgmt and mgmt decision making to ensure optimal practices

C

No further action

20. SLSF business planning and budgeting cycle align with SLSA. Development of 3 year business plan.

C

No further action

21. Reassessment of the management arrangements of SRHRS

U

Helicopter Operations Review Committee established. Sale of SRHRS to SLSNSW being considered.

22. ICT Audit of SLSA and SLSF and the development of combined strategy for ITC for SLSA and the SLSF

P

Deferred to second half of 2014. Not finished - will not be achieved.

23. Review current & future use of properties and develop property plan linked to budget for the combined SLSA /SLSF/ helicopter Group

U

SLSA Property Strategy 2014-2024 to SLSA Board for endorsement August 2014.

24. Risk remediation strategies form part of the Change Management Plan

C

No further action

25. SLSA Board agrees in principle that costs be reflected in Financial Statements of SLSA/SLSF and/or the 2013/14 Budget and SLSA/SLSF Business Plans to be approved by the respective Boards and communicated to EMG

C

No further action

C

Complete

P

Pending

U

Underway


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

072

SLSA Board Governance Charter (Adopted May 2014)

Key aspects of the charter are detailed below.

The role of the Board and Committees As one of Australia’s largest volunteer movements, our Board and Committee structure is critical to ensuring volunteer representation in key decisions. The various committees outlined on pages 74-81 are advisory only, however can be empowered by the Board and meet as required. Their recommendations are considered by either the CEO, the Executive Management Group, or in some instances the Board. The Board, through the CEO, has ultimate supervision of the committees.

The role of the Directors and Management The day-to-day business of SLSA Ltd is managed by the CEO, under the direction of the Board. The Board may exercise all the powers of the company, except any power the Corporations Act or the constitution requires the company to exercise in a general meeting of members. The Board is responsible for the appointment of a CEO to manage and administer the organisation. The CEO is ultimately accountable to the Board however; the CEO is accountable to the President (as Chairman of the Board) on a day-to-day basis.

Board composition

Accountability

The Board comprises seven State Centre Appointed Directors, one from each state and the Northern Territory, (the ‘shareholders’ of SLSA Ltd) who represent our members; the President (Chairman), who is also elected by the Appointed Directors and the CEO (non-voting). Up to four additional Independent Directors may also be appointed to the Board. The current Board has four appointed Independent Directors.

The Board is accountable to the members of SLSA Ltd. Part III of the Constitution lists the following categories of membership: • State Centres – debating and voting rights at SLSA general meetings. • Affiliated Clubs – debating but not voting rights at SLSA general meetings. • Life Members – debating but not voting rights at SLSA general meetings. • All members of affiliated clubs – can be present, but no debating or voting rights at SLSA general meetings. The general membership category is divided into various other sub-categories set out in the regulations.

Board meetings and access to management The Board meets at least five times each year. The Appointed Directors are supported by their respective State or Territory CEOs.

Management of significant business risks 2013/14 has seen further refinement to our risk management processes. The Board considered the Risk Management Reporting and top ten risks and their mitigation strategies.

Code of conduct A code of conduct for Directors, setting out expectations and limitations is contained within the SLSA Board Governance Charter which was adopted in May 2014.

Independence At the commencement of each Board meeting, the Chair asks for Directors to declare conflicts of interest in any agenda items. Under the Board’s structure, seven Directors are appointed by their respective State or Territory Centre, and as with most other federated organisations, there is inevitably the perception of tension between State Directors’ responsibilities to their State Centres and their fiduciary duties to SLSA Ltd. These fiduciary duties are higher for a limited company such as SLSA Ltd than for incorporate associations such as State Centres. The Chair ensures that all State Appointed Directors fulfil their fiduciary duties first and foremost to SLSA.


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

073

Obtaining independent advice

Compliance issues

The Board is assisted in aspects of its operations with external advice. Lander and Rogers Lawyers were re-appointed to provide legal services at the Annual General Meeting in October 2013 for a period of 12 months. Our auditors, BDO (formerly known as PKF), conduct an annual internal audit, giving the Board independent assurance and advice on financial management matters. Jardine Lloyd Thompson Australia Pty Ltd (JLT) also provides insurance advice and services. Throughout the year, SLSA also sought advice from a range of other external consultants including, Astute Consulting which conducted Governance and Strategic Planning workshops.

SLSA is a company limited by guarantee under the Corporations Act 2001 (Commonwealth). SLSA is also a registered charitable institution under the NSW Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW). The advisors noted earlier, Lander and Rogers Lawyers, BDO and JLT also ensure compliance with relevant legislation and regulation.

Ethical standards The Board acknowledges the need for, and continued maintenance of, the highest standards of corporate governance practice, ethical conduct by all Board members and open and transparent processes. Declaring any conflict of interest and/or pecuniary interest in agenda items of Board meetings ensures that, where appropriate, Directors leave the meeting until discussion on the matter is concluded.

Compensation Directors receive no compensation for their services. Travel and accommodation costs associated with meetings are met by SLSA.

Training At times, presentations by outside experts on strategic matters are made to the Board. Directors have also been given the opportunity to attend workshops and other conferences relating to corporate governance at SLSA’s expense.

Subsidiary entities As noted elsewhere, SLSA Ltd wholly owns a number of subsidiary bodies. The Surf Life Saving Foundation (SLSF) raises funds nationally and in each State for SLSA. Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Services P/L and Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Services P/L provide helicopter rescue services in NSW. Surf Sports Australia P/L is another subsidiary of SLSA, primarily concerned with

professional sports events. The financial results of the four subsidiaries are included as segment reporting in SLSA’s accounts.

Fiduciary duties Monthly financial statements for SLSA Ltd. and subsidiary companies are provided to the Board. These monthly statements together with monthly accounts are submitted to Directors for endorsement at the subsequent Board Meeting. All financial accounts and reports are overseen by the FACC and, on their recommendation, adopted or otherwise by the Board throughout the year.

Pathways to Board and Committee membership As one of the largest volunteer organisations in Australia, we are dependent on the contribution of our volunteer members for everything from patrolling beaches, to providing the overall management and operational delivery of frontline services and activities. Broadly speaking a person can become a member of the Board or committee by being appointed by either SLSA or by a state centre. The skills base required for these positions is set out in the SLSA Board Governance Charter and also in the SLSA Regulations.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

074

Boards & Committees

1. Executive Management Group (EMG)

Finance, Audit & Compliance Committee (FACC)

Management authority by the SLSA Board and is made up of the SLSA CEO, State CEO’s, SLSA General Managers and SLSA’s Legal Advisor.

Assists the SLSA Board in oversight of the reliability and integrity of accounting policies, financial reporting and disclosure practices. Finance, Audit & Compliance Committee

Executive Management Group

Name

Position

Name

Position

Michael Crismale (until May 2014)

Chair

Greg Nance

SLSA CEO (Chair)

Michael Martin AM (from May 2014)

Chair

Clare Harris (from April 2014)

CEO, SLSSA

Greg Nance

SLSA

Elaine Farmer OAM JP (until April 2014)

CEO, SLSSA

Lyn Barratt

NSW

John Brennan OAM

CEO, SLSQ

Neil Morarty OAM

VIC

Nigel Taylor ESM

CEO, LSV

Martin Walsh (from May 2014)

VIC

Paul Andrew

CEO, SLSWA

Phil Vanny AM

CEO, SLSNSW

Tony Snelling

CEO, SLSNT

Tony van den Enden

GM, SLST

Kitty Chiller

GM Capacity & Capability

Melissa King

GM Communications & Business Development

Norman Farmer ESM

GM Strategic Development

Peter George AM

GM Corporate Services

2. Governance Committees

Nominations Committee Proposes any and all candidates for election and appointment to the SLSA Board and is responsible for the appointment of the Board Appointed Chairs of SLSA’s Advisory Committees. Nominations Committee Name

Position

Christine Hopton

Chair

Sarina Bratton AM

Member

Kate Bell

Member

Appointments and Remuneration Committee Recommends the appointment of the CEO to the SLSA Board, reviews and reports proposed remuneration packages for the CEO and senior executives to the SLSA Board, and ensures adequate human resource levels within the organisation.

3. Development Management Committee (DMC) Responsible for discussing issues related to SLS member development.

Appointments and Remuneration Committee

Development Management Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Graham Ford

President, SLSA

Vanessa Brown

People & Development Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Michael Crismale

Director

Brenda Lofthouse

QLD

Kate Higginbotham

NSW

Joshua Drummond

WA

Julie Snelling

NT

Kate McLauchlan

VIC

Leanne Martlew

TAS

Stephen Cornish

SA


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

075

4. Lifesaving Education Committee

6. Lifesaving Management Committee (LMC)

Coordinates the operations of the Australian Lifesaving Academy and discusses issues relating to education.

The LMC is responsible for the implementation and continual improvement of lifesaving plans, programs and activities.

Lifesaving Education Committee

Lifesaving Management Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Amy Teale (until Jan 2014)

Training & Education Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Mark Fife OAM

SLSA Chair, Lifesaving (Chair)

Pamela Simon (from Jan 2014)

Education Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Anthony Bradstreet

Assisting Chair, Coastal Risk & Safety Manager (SLSA)

Ben Whibley

QLD

Andy Kent

NSW

Dean Hemburrow

VIC

Chris Peck

WA

Janelle Slattery

WA

George Hill

QLD

Joy Fisher

SA

Greg Scott

VIC

Julie Snelling

NT

Shane Daw

SA

Leanne Martlew

TAS

Tony Snelling

NT

Louise Fuller

NSW

Tony Van den Enden

TAS

5. Lifesaving Advisors

7. Lifesaving Member Advisory Committee (LMAC)

Responsible for providing technical advice on specific lifesaving matters to SLSA

Responsible for the development and implementation of the strategic lifesaving business of SLSA.

Lifesaving Advisors

Lifesaving Member Advisory Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Carolyn Wiseman

National Workplace Health & Safety Advisor 

Mark Fife OAM

SLSA Chair, Lifesaving (Chair)

Chris Stevens

Communications Advisor

Anthony Bradstreet

Coastal Risk & Safety Manager (SLSA)

Dr. Natalie Hood

Medical Advisor

Alan Cross

NT

Henry Scruton

Powercraft Advisor

Bruce Hosking

SA

Marcia Fife

Marine Stinger Advisor

Christopher Jacobson

TAS

Darren McLeod

VIC

John Restuccia

NSW

Mark Hills

WA

Peter Lucas

QLD


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

076

Boards & Committees

8. Sport Advisors

10. Special Purpose Committees

Responsible for providing advice on specific sport matters at SLSA

Athlete Selection Panel Sport Advisors Name

Position

Andrew Buhk

National Event Advisor

Bert Hunt

Surf Boat Advisor

Chris Gately

Selection Advisor

Danny Short

High Performance Advisor

Don van Keimpema

National Officiating Advisor

Gavin Hill

National Coaching Advisor

Greg Allum OAM

National Technical Advisor

Kristy Ellis

National Sport Integrity Advisor

Responsible for the selection of national teams in accordance with SLSA selection policy. Athlete Selection Panel Name

Position

Chris Gately

Chair

Anne-Maree Gardiner

QLD

Brett Dowker

NSW

Australian Lifeguard Service Management Committee Responsible for standardising the delivery of lifeguarding services around Australia and discussing issues surrounding lifeguarding.

9. Sport Directors and Management Committee

Australian Lifeguard Service Management Committee Name

Position

Sport Directors and Management Committee

Murray Copas

Lifesaving Operations Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Name

Position

Dale Richardson

VIC

Dick Bignold

SLSA Chair, Sport (Chair)

Greg Cahill

QLD

Alan Holmes

VIC

Matt du Plessis

WA

Charles Melloy

QLD

Brent Manieri

NSW

Chris Inglis

WA

Shane Daw

SA

Leanne Martlew

TAS

Tony van den Enden

TAS

Michael Bate

NSW

Trevor Radburn

NT

Michael Schetter

SA

Peter Zuill

SA

Sam Edwards

NT

Shane Knight

NSW

Stephen Carrick

WA

Stuart Hogben

QLD

Tom Mitchell

VIC


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

077

Hall of Fame Committee

Honours Committee

The Panel meets to discuss SLSA Hall of Fame nominations, and makes recommendations to the SLSA Board about inductions to the Hall of Fame.

Initiates nominations to the appropriate authorities on behalf of SLSA members considered eligible for civil, sporting, community and other awards.

Hall of Fame Committee

Honours Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Graham Ford

President , SLSA (Chair)

Kevin Larkins

SLSA Chair, Education and Development

Alan Whelpton AO

NSW

Andrew Barnes

VIC

John Fitzgerald AM

SA

Danny Hoyland OAM

QLD

Vanessa Brown

People & Development Manager (SLSA)

Jean Burling OAM

WA

Warren Rennie AM

NSW

Richard Lytham

NSW

Vanessa Brown

People & Development Manager (SLSA)

History Committee Advises, comments and submits recommendations on the collection, conservation, management and documentation of the history of surf lifesaving in Australia.

Information Technology and Telecommunications Committee This Committee makes recommendations to the EMG on IT&T strategy, architecture, standards and policy with Surf Life Saving.

History Committee Name

Position

Information Technology and Telecommunications Committee

Stan Vesper

Chair

Name

Position

Don Burchill OAM

QLD

Gary Daly

National IT Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Don Henderson

SA

Bob Creek

NT

Gary McKinnon

NT

Craig Williams

QLD

Ken Knight BEM

TAS

Emma Atkins

VIC

Prue Weber

VIC

Greg Bird

TAS

Ray Brennan

NSW

Jonathan Farrell

CEO Appointment

Tim Tucak

WA

Matt Hanks

NSW

Vanessa Brown

People & Development Manager (SLSA)

Ryan Greenaway

WA

Honorary Archivist

Shane Daw

SA

Peter Orlovich


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

078

Boards & Committees

Lifesaving Gear & Equipment Committee

Public Education Committee

Coordinates the trial and evaluation of new and/or modified lifesaving gear and equipment, and discusses issues relating to surf lifesaving gear and equipment.

Responsible for promoting and ensuring the highest standard of public education in line with best practices nationally and internationally.

Lifesaving Gear & Equipment Committee

Public Education Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

Anthony Bradstreet

Coastal Risk and Safety Manager, SLSA (Chair)

Sarah Anderson

Public Safety Project Coordinator, SLSA (Chair)

Adrian Petrie

TAS

Donna Walls

QLD

Andy Kent

NSW

Joshua Drummond

WA

Ashlee Biddle

SA

Julie Snelling

NT

Matt du Plessis

WA

Kate Simpson

VIC

Peta Lawlor

QLD

Kevin Spencer

SA

Scott Ivey

VIC

Stacey Pidgeon

NSW

Trevor Radburn

NT

Tony van den Enden

TAS

Meritorious Awards Selections Committee

Public Liability Claims Committee

Selects individuals, lifesavers, and/or groups for Meritorious Awards. Selects individual lifesavers and/or groups for the Lifesaver of the Year Award and other associate programs, awards and educational tours.

Manages part of the public liability risk for all of SLSA’s entities participating in and covered by SLSA’s public liability insurance, and to authorise public liability risk claims. Public Liability Claims Committee

Meritorious Awards Selections Committee

Name

Position

Name

Position

John Brennan OAM

QLD

Graham Ford

SLSA President (Chair)

Peter George AM

GM, Corporate Services (SLSA)

John Restuccia

NSW

Phil Vanny AM

NSW

Lyn Barratt

NSW

Mark Fife OAM

Chair, Lifesaving


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

079

Research Advisory Committee

Surf Boat Committee

Responsible for assisting SLSA in identifying, guiding, conducting and prioritising research relevant to SLS activities and operations including water safety, lifesaving, general injury prevention, education, training, sport, youth, volunteering and leadership.

Responsible for overseeing the regulation, development and management of surf boat rowing in Australia.

Research Advisory Committee

Surf Boat Committee Name

Position

Bert Hunt

Chair

Name

Position

Don Alexander

SA

Mr. Norman Farmer ESM

General Manager, Strategic Development, SLSA (Chair)

Don Cotterill

QLD

Geoff Matthews

VIC

Grant Wilkinson

NSW

James McLauglan

WA

Mick Lang

NSW

Rod Costa

VIC

Stephen Blewett

VIC

Dr. Bernadette Matthews

LSV

Dr. Dean Dudley

Macquarie University

Dr. Melissa Edwards

University of Technology Sydney

Dr. Shauna Sherker, PhD

National Research Manager, SLSA

Dr. Sophie Pointer

Flinders University

Mr Wade Sinclair

James Cook University

Professor Andrew Short OAM

University of Sydney

Professor Ann Williamson

University of New South Wales

Professor Caroline Finch

University of Ballarat

Youth Development Committee Responsible for discussing issues and implementing programs related to youth activities within surf lifesaving.

Sport Technical and Rules Committee

Youth Development Committee

Responsible for technical and editorial advice on rules and publications, and policy formation when directed.

Name

Position

Kevin Larkins

SLSA Chair, Education and Development (Chair)

Bridget Riggs

NT

Glenn Langley

NSW

Joshua Drummond

WA

Leanne Martlew

TAS

Nancy Joseph

VIC

Rob Campbell

QLD

Stephen Cornish

SA

Vanessa Brown

People & Development Manager (SLSA)

Sport Technical and Rules Committee Name

Position

Greg Allum OAM

Chair

Allan Inwood

QLD

Paul Schott

NSW

Ric Mitchell

VIC

Steve Strange

NSW


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

080

Boards & Committees

11. Australian Championships Committees These committees are responsible for the event and safety planning and organisation of the Australian Championships.

Competition Committee Competition Committee

Organising Committee Organising Committee Name

Position

Nathan Hight

Manager Surf Sport (Chair)

Rick Wright OAM

Surf Sport Advisor (Deputy Chair)

Adam Weir

Work Health and Safety Advisor

Andrew Buhk

Championship Referee

Anne-Marie Widermanski

Medical Coordinator

Catherine Pacholke

Event Coordinator

Cherie Kellett / Sophie Packer

Sponsorship Representative

Dan McAtamney

Event Assistant

Dani Potter

Event Manager

Name

Position

Mike Martin AM

Chair Competition Committee

John Brennan OAM

Deputy Chair - Championship Advisor

Adam Weir

Work Health and Safety Advisor

Andrew Buhk

Championship Referee

Dani Potter

Event Manager (Chair of Operations Committee)

Dick Bignold

Deputy Referee

David Thompson

Logistics Coordinator

Elise Irwin, President of Scarboro SLSC

Host Club Representative

Dick Bignold

Deputy Referee

Kate Breeze

Media Representative (observing role)

Don van Keimpema

Officials Appointments

Nathan Hight

Chief Executive Officer Delegate

Elise Irwin

Host Club Representative

Paul Chivers

External Risk Consultant (observing role)

Felicity Colbourne

Counselling Services Manager

John Brennan OAM

Championships Advisor

Stephen Leahy

Safety & Emergency Services Officer (Chair of S&E Committee)

Kate Breeze

Media Representative

Kate Hayes

Marketing Representative

Ken Bird OAM

Venue Manager

Mal Flew

Powercraft Coordinator

Rob Murphy

SLSWA Representative

Robyn Carr

Presentations Manager

Operations Committee Operations Committee

Ron Pears OAM

Event Administration Coordinator

Name

Position

Ross Wyeth

Gear and Equipment Coordinator

Dani Potter

Event Manager (Chair)

Stephen Leahy

Emergency Services Officer

David Thompson

Logistics Coordinator

Steve Strange

Results Manager

GBE - Christian Bucciarelli

Sports Presentation Contractor

Val Connell

On Beach Recorders Coordinator

Jean Burling OAM

Announcing Coordinator

Yvette Rutherford

IT Representative

Ken Bird

Site Manager

Robyn Carr

Functions and Presentations Coordinator

Ron Pears OAM

Event Adminstration Coordinator

Ross Wyeth

Gear and Equipment Coordinator

Sold Out - Peter Lang

Event Signage Contractor

Sophie Packer

Sponsorship Representative


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

081

Safety and Emergency Committee Safety and Emergency Committee

12. International Life Saving (ILS) Federation Committee ILS Board of Directors

Name

Position

Stephen Leahy

Emergency Services Officer (Chair)

Adam Weir

Work Health & Safety Advisor

Anne-Marie Widermanski

Medical Coordinator

Chris Stevens

Communications Coordinator

Dick Bignold

Deputy Referee

Felicity Colbourne

Counselling Services Manager (observing role)

Local Police Representative

Local Police Representative

ILS Board of Directors and Committees

Mal Flew

Powercraft Coordinator

Name

Position

Mark Hills

ARRO Coordinator

Graham Ford

ILS World President

Murray Copas

Emergency Services Assistant

Dave Thompson (Chair)

Phil Clayton & Alyce Bennet

Athlete Liaison X 2 (M+F)

ILS Sport Commission and Committees ILS Sport Commissioner

Norman Farmer ESM (Chair)

ILS Business Commission and Committees ILS Business Commissioner (Chair)

Adam Weir

ILS Rescue Commission and Committees

Anthony Bradstreet

ILS Drowning Prevention and Public Education Commission

Dr Natalie Hood MD

ILS Rescue Commission and Committees

Greg Allum OAM

ILS Sport Commission and Committees

Ian Fullagar

Legal Adviser to ILS ILS Sport Commission and Committees

John Fitzgerald OAM

ILS Sport Commission and Committees

Kristy Ellis

ILS Sport Commission and Committees

Pamela Simon

ILS Rescue Commission and Committees

Peter George AM (Secretary Commission)

ILS Rescue Commission and Committees ILS Business Commission and Committees

Rick Wright OAM

ILS Sport Commission and Committees

Matthew Thompson

ILS Rescue Commission RipSafe Committee

Peter Agnew

ILS Rescue Commission Education Committee

The ILS Board of Directors oversees the business of ILS between the General Assemblies. Board of Director’s meetings are held on a regular basis at various places in the world. The ILS Committees cover areas across the board of international lifesaving including Rescue Commission, Business Commission, Sport Commission and Drowning Prevention and Public Education Commission.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

082

Surf Life Saving Australia Organisational Chart (as at July 2014)

Chief Executive Officer

EA to CEO

GM Capacity and Capability

International Development Coordinator (contract Jan 2015)

Coastal Risk and Safety Manager

Portfolio Administration Coordinator

Education Manager

Sport Manager

Lifesaving Operations Manager

Resource Development Coordinator

Grants and Operations Analyst

Public Safety Project Coordinator

Resource Development Coordinator

High Performance Pathways Coordinator

Fixed term contract

Fixed term contract

Fixed term contract

Fixed term contract

Fixed term contract

Member Services Assistant Vacant

Development Operations Manager

Sport Development Coordinator

Research Coordinator

Event Manager

Event Coordinator

Venue Manager

Event Assistant

Executive Management

Senior Management

Management

Operational

Vacant Position

Matrix Reporting


Section 3

Governance & Oversight

083

GM Corporate Services Matrix reporting - SLSF

GM Communications and Business Development

Finance Manager

IT Manager

Human Resources Manager

Marketing Manager

Comms & PR Manager

Partnerships Manager

Head of SLSF

Assistant Accountant

ICT Coordinator

Receptionist

Marketing Executive

Comms & PR Executive (Digital)

Partnerships Executive

SLSF positions

Accounts Administrator

Technical & Business Support

P/T Casual

P/T

ICT Support Officer P/T

ICT Support Officer

ICT Support Officer P/T

Senior Graphic Designer


Section 04 Financial Report


Surf Life Saving Australia

Financial Report

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

086

Summarised financial report for the year ended 30 June 2014 The summarised financial report is an extract from the full financial report for the year ended 30 June 2014. The financial statements and specific disclosures included in the summarised financial report have been derived from the 2014 financial report of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries. The summarised financial report cannot be expected to provide as full an understanding of the financial performance, financial position and financing and investing activities of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries as the full financial report. The full financial report and the auditor’s report will be sent to SLSA’s voting members on request, free of charge.

Discussion and analysis of the summary financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2014 1. Statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income The 2014 consolidated surplus was $1,235,094 (2013: $317,158). This included an $874,719 surplus (2013: $129,586 surplus) in helicopter activities and a $397,017 surplus from The Surf Life Saving Foundation (SLSF) which became a wholly owned subsidiary of the parent entity on 1 July 2013. Consolidated revenue for 2014 was $69,599,325 (2013: $37,340,387). Sponsorship remained steady at $11,857,183 (2013: $11,826,577). Government Grants also remained steady at $7,537,578 (2013: $7,709,196). The SLSF lottery and trade promotion activities contributed $24,666,891 to group revenue. Expenditure on Lifesaving increased to $12,169,052 (2013: $11,091,217) due to an increase in sponsorship distributions to states. Expenditure on competitions decreased to $4,779,421 (2013: $6,281,521) as 2013 included the cost of the Rescue 2012 Lifesaving World Championships. Overall expenditure for helicopter administration and operations increased to $13,285,075 (2013: $12,055,877).

2. Statements of financial position The net assets of the consolidated group have increased to $33,426,574 (2013: $29,090,702). This was due in part to an increase of $3,100,778 being the net assets of The Foundation acquired for nil consideration. The current ratio (current assets : current liabilities) of the group 2.13 (2013: 1.95) continues to be well above the international benchmark of one. Property, plant and equipment decreased by $2,419,920 with no major capital purchases. Cash increased to $20,502,725. Over the 12 month period, total group assets increased by $9,411,635 while group liabilities increased by $5,075,763. The resulting increase in group equity was $4,335,872 representing the surplus for the year and the consolidation of the SLSF. The debt/equity ratio (total liabilities : total equity) of 0.41 (2013: 0.30) of the group continues to show a conservative approach to leveraging the business.

3. Statements of cash flows For the consolidated group, cash increased by $10,704,605 (2013: decrease by $1,738,867). Net cash inflow from operating activities was $6,531,573 (2013: 189,137 outflow). Net cash inflow from investment activities was $4,173,032 (2013: $1,549,730 outflow) which comprised payments of $550,212 (2013: $1,768,959) for property, plant and equipment. This was offset by proceeds of $168,210 (2013: $219,229) from the sale of property, plant and equipment, and $4,555,034 cash acquired on acquisition of the SLSF.


Section 4

Financial Report

087

Statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income For the year ended 30 June 2014 Note

Consolidated Entity 2014 ($)

2013 ($)

Parent Entity 2014 ($)

2013 ($)

Revenue

2

69,599,325

37,340,387

26,280,841

26,205,872

Expenses

3

(68,364,231)

(37,023,229)

(26,430,742)

(26,019,144)

1,235,094

317,158

(149,901)

186,728

Surplus / (deficit) before income tax expense Income tax expense Surplus / (deficit) after income tax expense for the year attributable to the members of Surf Life Saving Australia Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax Total comprehensive income for the year attributable to the members of Surf Life Saving Australia

-

-

-

-

1,235,094

317,158

(149,901)

186,728

-

-

-

-

1,235,094

317,158

(149,901)

186,728

The above statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

088

Financial Report

Statements of financial position For the year ended 30 June 2014 Note Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables

4

Inventories Other assets

Consolidated Entity 2014 ($)

5

Total current assets

2013 ($)

Parent Entity 2014 ($)

2013 ($)

20,502,725

9,798,120

4,315,187

1,862,839

2,313,527

4,982,804

2,650,485

3,508,048

782,279

749,609

257,787

274,077

3,958,490

308,320

109,608

15,810

27,557,021

15,838,853

7,333,067

5,660,774

-

-

3,300,882

200,104

Non current assets Other financial assets

6

Trade and other receivables

4

113,387

-

-

-

Property, plant and equipment

19,599,153

22,019,073

7,142,266

7,395,883

Total non current assets

19,712,540

22,019,073

10,443,148

7,595,987

Total assets

47,269,561

37,857,926

17,776,215

13,256,761

Current liabilities Trade and other payables

7

11,781,703

7,073,843

7,060,492

5,632,809

Employee benefits

8

1,158,090

1,047,297

338,234

410,302

12,939,793

8,121,140

7,398,726

6,043,111

766,025

547,820

768,194

555,240

Total current liabilities Non current liabilities Trade and other payables

7

Employee benefits

8

137,169

98,264

37,440

37,432

903,194

646,084

805,634

592,672

Total liabilities

13,842,987

8,767,224

8,204,360

6,635,783

NET ASSETS

33,426,574

29,090,702

9,571,855

6,620,978

Retained surpluses

28,621,673

27,024,758

4,766,954

4,555,034

Special funds

1,704,123

2,065,944

1,704,123

2,065,944

3,100,778

-

3,100,778

-

33,426,574

29,090,702

9,571,855

6,620,978

Total non current liabilities

Equity

Other reserves

TOTAL EQUITY

12

The above statements of financial position are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.


Section 4

Financial Report

089

Statements of changes in equity For the year ended 30 June 2014 Consolidated Entity

Parent Entity

Retained surpluses ($)

Special funds ($)

Other reserves ($)

Total equity ($)

Retained surpluses ($)

Special funds ($)

Other reserves ($)

Total equity ($)

Balance at 1 July 2012

26,447,592

2,325,952

-

28,773,544

4,108,298

2,325,952

-

6,434,250

Surplus after income tax expense for the year

317,158

-

-

317,158

186,728

-

-

186,728

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total comprehensive income for the year

317,158

-

-

317,158

186,728

-

-

186,728

Amounts transferred from special funds

260,008

(260,008)

-

-

260,008

(260,008)

-

-

Balance at 30 June 2013

27,024,758

2,065,944

-

29,090,702

4,555,034

2,065,944

-

6,620,978

Surplus / (deficit) after income tax expense for the year

1,235,094

-

-

1,235,094

(149,901)

-

-

(149,901)

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total comprehensive income for the year

1,235,094

-

-

1,235,094

(149,901)

-

-

(149,901)

-

-

3,100,778

3,100,778

-

-

3,100,778

3,100,778

Amounts transferred from special funds

361,821

(361,821)

-

-

361,821

(361,821)

-

-

Balance at 30 June 2014

28,621,673

1,704,123

3,100,778

33,426,574

4,766,954

1,704,123

3,100,778

9,571,855

Amounts Acquired

The above statements of changes in equity are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

090

Financial Report

Statements of cash flows For the year ended 30 June 2014 Consolidated Cash flows from operating activities

Parent Entity

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

78,309,024

35,956,668

29,271,648

25,897,576

(72,306,725)

(36,658,433)

(26,914,244)

(28,350,057)

529,274

512,628

120,175

145,133

6,531,573

(189,137)

2,477,579

(2,307,348)

Cash acquired on acquisition of subsidiary

4,555,034

-

-

-

Payments for property, plant and equipment

(550,212)

(1,768,959)

(36,980)

(91,216)

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment

168,210

219,229

17,000

154,209

4,173,032

(1,549,730)

(19,980)

62,993

-

-

(5,251)

(5,095)

Receipts from sponsors, donors and customers (inclusive of GST) Payments to suppliers and employees (inclusive of GST) Interest received Net cash from / (used in) operating activities Cash flows from investing activities

Net cash from / (used in) investing activities Cash flows from financing activities Loans to subsidiaries Net cash used in financing activities Net increase / (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

-

-

(5,251)

(5,095)

10,704,605

(1,738,867)

2,452,348

(2,249,450)

9,798,120

11,536,987

1,862,839

4,112,289

20,502,725

9,798,120

4,315,187

1,862,839

The above statements of cash flows are to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.


Section 4

Financial Report

091

Notes to and forming part of the summary financial statements For the year ended 30 June 2014 1. Basis of preparation The Summary Financial Statements have been prepared from the audited financial report for the year ended 30 June 2014. The audited financial report for the year ended 30 June 2014 is available to Surf Life Saving Australia Limited’s voting members on request from Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries. The financial statements are presented in Australian Dollars which is Surf Life Saving Australia Limited’s functional and presentation currency. The financial statements, specific disclosures and other information included in the summary financial statements are derived from and are consistent with the full financial statements of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries. The summary financial statements cannot be expected to provide a detailed understanding of the financial performance, financial position and financing and investing activities of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries as the full financial report. The accounting policies have been consistently applied to Surf Life Saving Australia Limited and its subsidiaries and are consistent with those of the financial year in their entirety.

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2. Revenue

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

Government grants

7,537,578

7,709,196

6,397,535

6,185,496

Sponsorships

11,857,183

11,826,577

10,269,212

10,597,731

Fundraising and donations*

16,854,785

9,566,245

6,394,034

5,526,654

Commercial revenue

24,666,891

-

-

-

Contract revenue

3,337,817

2,784,536

-

-

Other revenue

3,022,613

2,294,547

1,347,361

1,625,976

Interest

522,947

512,628

120,175

145,133

1,098,359

1,207,484

1,105,704

1,207,484

Hire of helicopter

54,332

521,776

-

-

Royalty and trademark revenue

125,484

227,937

125,484

227,937

Sale of goods

Competition entry fees

521,336

689,461

521,336

689,461

69,599,325

37,340,387

26,280,841

26,205,872

* Revenue from fundraising and donations is recognised when the amount of revenue can be measured reliably and it is received by the company. There is an inherent risk associated with a not-for-profit entity’s operating environment as it relates to revenue recognition from fundraising sources. This arises as a result of the internal control environment surrounding the recording of cash receipts from fundraising revenue.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

092

Financial Report

Notes to and forming part of the summary financial statements For the year ended 30 June 2014 Consolidated 3. Expenses

Parent Entity

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

Lifesaving

12,169,051

11,091,217

13,333,565

12,194,129

Competitions

4,779,421

6,281,521

4,777,407

6,286,521

Administration of lifesaving and competitions

3,881,806

3,161,622

3,388,854

3,157,454

Cost of sales Fundraising distribution to states Philanthropic expenses Expenses relating to commercial activities

881,351

1,060,714

887,451

1,060,714

9,476,248

3,316,561

4,046,899

3,316,561

2,155,333

-

-

-

20,084,052

-

-

-

Administration of Foundation activities

1,619,525

-

-

-

Helicopter administration and finance

3,168,635

2,006,899

-

-

Helicopter operations

7,969,612

8,188,853

-

-

Helicopter fundraising

2,146,828

1,860,125

-

-

Foreign exchange loss / (gain)

1,541

27,258

-

-

Net loss / (profit) on disposal of property, plant and equipment

30,828

28,459

(3,434)

3,765

68,364,231

37,023,229

26,430,742

26,019,144

Trade receivables

1,797,713

2,070,813

1,602,260

1,915,981

Other receivables

515,814

2,911,991

1,048,225

1,592,067

2,313,527

4,982,804

2,650,485

3,508,048

4. Trade and other receivables Current

Non Current Security deposit

113,387

-

-

-

113,387

-

-

-

5. Other Assets (current) Prepayments Fundraising prize bank

530,260

308,320

109,608

15,810

3,428,230

-

-

-

3,958,490

308,320

109,608

15,810

The Fundraising Prize Bank consists of property purchases, and other prizes to be offered in future lotteries. Other costs, that are not associated with prizes, which relate to future lotteries, are expensed when incurred. 6. Other financial assets (non current) Unlisted investments in subsidiaries at cost (Note 11)

-

-

3,300,882

200,104

-

-

3,300,882

200,104


Section 4

Financial Report

093

Notes to and forming part of the summary financial statements For the year ended 30 June 2014 Consolidated 7. Trade and other payables

Parent Entity

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

Trade payables

2,148,155

1,449,513

907,605

822,739

Other payables

2,638,312

2,652,799

2,203,392

2,312,545

Income in advance

6,220,650

2,049,577

3,174,909

1,575,571

774,586

921,954

774,586

921,954

11,781,703

7,073,843

7,060,492

5,632,809

Current

Public liability claims pool (see below)

Non current Other payables Public liability claims pool (see below)

-

-

2,169

7,420

766,025

547,820

766,025

547,820

766,025

547,820

768,194

555,240

The public liability claims pool is administered by the parent entity on behalf of the parent entity and all its State Centres to manage part of the public liability risk for all of Surf Life Saving Australia’s entities covered by the parent entity’s public liability insurance. Current estimates by insurance broker (Jardine Lloyd Thompson) calculated a potential liability of $774,586 (2013: $921,954). This amount makes up the current liability portion shown above. 8. Employee benefits Current Employee benefits

1,158,090

1,047,297

338,234

410,302

137,169

98,264

37,440

37,432

1,295,259

1,145,561

375,674

447,734

Non current Employee benefits Aggregate employee entitlements


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

094

Financial Report

9. Contingencies The parent entity manages a public liability claims pool on behalf of the parent entity and all Surf Life Saving Australia’s State Centres. A review has indicated that the funds held in the pool will be sufficient to cover the cost of all expected claims. The NSW Government announced on 17th July 2013 a Reform Plan in which NSW Health propose to restructure helicopter contracts. Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd (NRHRS) has entered into a Deed of Commitment and Undertaking to assist Hunter Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service to tender for the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) in the Northern Region. Based on the tender submitted, it is expected that NRHRS will cease providing HEMS services in May 2016. On 30th August 2014 the board of SLSA resolved that NRHRS be wound up following the expiration of the HEMS service. The constitution of NRHRS states that on winding up a portion of the net assets of the company be distributed to charitable organisations within the local flight path area. This will result in a reduction in the net assets of the consolidated entity as these funds are distributed upon winding up however the total amount is not yet quantifiable.

10. Members’ equity issued capital The parent entity is incorporated under the ACNC Act 2012, as a company limited by guarantee and as such does not have any issued capital. If the company is wound up, the Constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 each towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the company. As at 30 June 2014 the number of members was 168,622 (2013: 166,923).

Percent of shares held Country of Incorporation

2014 (%)

2013 (%)

Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd

11. Details of subsidiaries (1)

Australia

100

100

Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd

(1) (2)

Australia

100

100

SLSA Helicopters Pty Ltd

Australia

100

100

Surf Sports Australia Pty Ltd

Australia

100

100

Australia

0

0

The Surf Life Saving Foundation Limited

(2)(3)

(1). C  ompliance with the financial disclosure requirements of the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW) has been disclosed in the financial statements of these entities. (2). Not Audited by BDO East Coast Partnership. (3). The Surf Life Saving Foundation is a company limited by guarantee and therefore does not have issued capital. The parent entity acquired control over The Surf Life Saving Foundation Limited on 1 July 2013 by board resolution of The Surf Life Saving Foundation Limited.


Section 4

Financial Report

095

Notes to and forming part of the summary financial statements For the year ended 30 June 2014 Consolidated

Parent Entity

12. Other reserves

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

2014 ($)

2013 ($)

Acquisition / disposition reserve

3,100,778

-

3,100,778

-

3,100,778

-

3,100,778

-

The acquisition / disposition reserve represents the net assets of The Surf Life Saving Foundation acquired by the parent entity on 1 July 2013 for nil consideration. Refer to Note 14.

13. Financial risk management The consolidated entity is not exposed to any significant interest rate risk. The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as publicly traded derivatives and trading and available-for-sale securities) is based on quoted market prices at the end of the reporting period. The consolidated entity enters into foreign exchange contracts to manage the risk of currency movements on the purchase of new aircraft or substantial parts and components. Foreign exchange management is undertaken in order to minimise possible adverse effects for movements in exchange rates. The accounting for subsequent changes in fair value depends on whether the derivative is designated as a hedging instrument, and if so, the nature of the item being hedged.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

096

Financial Report

Notes to and forming part of the summary financial statements For the year ended 30 June 2014 14. Business combinations On 1st of July 2013 the parent entity acquired control of The Surf Life Saving Foundation Limited for nil consideration. The Surf Life Saving Foundation Limited is the national fundraising arm of Surf Life Saving in Australia Details of the acquisition are as follows:

Fair Value ($) Cash and cash equivalents

4,555,032

Trade and other receivables

397,317

Plant and equipment

199,791

Others assets

3,051,343

Trade and other payables

(3,727,267)

Employee benefits

(295,129)

Revenue in advance

(1,026,436)

Other liabilities Net assets acquired

(53,873) 3,100,778

Consideration transferred Net assets in excess of consideration transferred recognised within equity

3,100,778

15. Events occurring after the reporting period The board of SLSA resolved on the 30th of August 2014 to wind up Northern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd following the expiration of the HEMS contract which is expected in May 2016. Refer also to Note 9. The parent entity is currently in negotiations over the sale of Southern Region SLSA Helicopter Rescue Service Pty Ltd (‘SRHRS’). SRHRS is expected to continue with its operations as normal throughout and after the sale is completed. The sale is expected to occur within the next 12 months. As of the date of this report, no formal agreement on the sale had been reached.

16. Company details The registered office and principal place of business of the consolidated entity is 789 Botany Road, Rosebery, NSW 2018.


Section 4

Financial Report

Directors’ Declaration

097

The Directors of Surf Life Saving Australia Limited declare that: 1.

In the directors’ opinion, the financial statements and notes of the company and the consolidated entity are in accordance with the ACNC Act 2012, included that they: a. comply with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the ACNC Regulations 2013 and other mandatory professional reporting requirements; and b. give a true and fair view of the financial position of the company and the consolidated entity as at 30 June 2014 and of their performance for the financial year ended on that date; and 2. In the Directors’ opinion there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company and the consolidated entity will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. On behalf of the Directors by

Graham Ford Director Sydney, 29 September 2014

Ralph Devlin Director Sydney, 29 September 2014




   

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

        

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                                                   

     

  


                 


Section 05 Awards & Honours


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

102

SLSA Hall of Fame

2013/14 Inductees Naomi Flood, Manly LSC, NSW Naomi has won six Individual and 11 team Australian Surf Life Saving Championships (open) Gold medals. Naomi also won three Gold medals at Rescue 2012, World Lifesaving Championships. Naomi has proven to be a fantastic team member and ambassador for Surf Life Saving.

North Cottesloe Open Surf Boat – J Crew, North Cottesloe SLSC, WA North Cottesloe SLSC’s Open Surf Boat Crew, J Crew, has won four consecutive Australian Surf Life Saving Championship Open Men’s Surf Boat Gold Medals with the same four team members, Peter Charles, Kim Greville, Derek Knox and David Porzig.

Lenore Grice, Noosa Heads SLSC, QLD As at 2013, Lenore Grice had coached 30 Gold, 18 Silver and five Bronze Medals in First Aid at Australian Surf Life Saving Championships over a 27 year career, for Noosa Heads and Maroochydore Surf Life Saving clubs.

SLSA Hall of Fame Surf Lifesaving

Administration

Sport

Sport

Major John Bond

Gregory Arthur Allum OAM

John Bliss

Robert (Bob) Mayo AM

Harold John Brown OAM

Cornelius Kennedy Asmussen MBE

Don Morrison OAM

Michael Burke BEM

Sir Adrian Curlewis CVO CBE

Ballina Lighthouse & Lismore Open Boat crew

Professor Tess Cramond OBE AO

Roy Doyle

Bondi R&R team

Ken Murray

Currumbin Patrol Competition team

Theo Haywood

Bundaberg March Past team

Bob Newbiggin

Cliff Marsh OAM

Graham Carlisle OAM

Harry Nightingale

Jack Dearlove MBE

Donald D McIntyre

Jon Donohoe AM

Clint Robinson OAM

Bob Gear AM

John West (Jack) McMaster AM DFC

Harold C Evans

Barry Rodgers

Alan Kennedy MBE

Tom Meagher OBE

Karla Gilbert

Noel P Ryan

Dr Ian Mackie AM

Lyster Ormsby

Kristy Harris

Peter Douglas Tibbitts

Graham McKenzie OAM

Charles Davidson Paterson

Trevor Hendy AM

Ken Vidler

Hector McDonald OAM

Ronald E Rankin AM

Dennis Heussner

Wanda Six Man R&R team

Warren Allen Rennie AM

Paul Smith OAM

John Robert Holt

Stephen Warren

Earle Smith AM

Barry Bede (Gus) Staunton MBE

Ky Hurst

Graham Ross White OAM

Ainslie W “Sprint” Walker OBE

Ron Tallon OAM

Brian Hutchings

Steve Wilkes

Peter George AM

F O (Frank) Venning MBE

Grant Kenny OAM

Shannon Eckstein

Ken W C Watson MBE

Bruce Kolkka

Michael Jones

Alan Brian Whelpton AO

Peter Lacey

Naomi Flood

Dan White OAM

Killcare Open Mens Beach Relay Team

North Cottesloe Open Surf Boat - J Crew

S W (Bill) Winders MBE

Maroubra SLSC Double Ski Team

Lenore Grice

Ian (Rick) Wright OAM

Northcliffe Open Patrol Competition Team

Jack Winders OBE

* Robert Brydon AM

Kristy Munroe


Section 5

Awards & Honours

103

New Life Members

Life Membership recognises distinguished service that is both sustained and conspicuous. In 2013/14, Alan Victor Doig OAM and Ian Goode received Life Membership of Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA). Together, Alan and Ian have contributed 100 years of service to the movement

Alan Victor Doig OAM Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC, QLD Alan joined Surf Life Saving over 60 years ago. He has served in several prominent roles including that of Club Secretary, Chief instructor, Branch Publicity Officer and on the Branch Board of Examiners. Furthermore Alan has acted as Chief Referee Steward at all levels of the organisation. Alan is recognised for his contribution to the area of Expired Air Resuscitation (EAR). He was instrumental in bringing expired air and cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques to SLSQ and SLSA. He was one of four participants anaesthetised, rendered unconscious and revived to demonstrate EAR.

Ian Goode Cronulla SLSC, NSW Ian Goode has been a member of his club for 51 years. Ian has served on both competition and Board of Junior Activities committees across all levels of the organisation and has held roles as Referee, Coach and Team Manager at club, branch, state and national levels. Ian is recognised for his contribution to the promotion and development of both women and juniors in Surf Life Saving. As Chair of SLSA’s ‘Women in Sport 10 Years on Committee,’ Ian identified the limited opportunities existing for women in sport at that time, promoted the growth of women in the movement, and advocated for equal competition events for women as we see it today.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

104

SLSA Life Members

Recognising Distinguished Service Life Membership of SLSA is awarded to members who have contributed distinguished voluntary service to SLSA for more than 20 years. To be considered as distinguished service, the service must be both sustained and provide an evident contribution. SLSA currently has 270 recorded Life Members. * Denotes deceased

* Doyle, RD

* Hayton MBE, N

* McGrath, HF

*Riley MBE, HK

* Rathborne, H

* Webb, GR

* Castleman MBE, AW

*Asmussen MBE, CK

* Burke BEM, MJ

* Figtree, AS

* Prior BEM, AE

* Molyneux, D

* McIntyre, DD

* Thompson, DH

* Haywood MBE, FST

* Crain MBE, WAT

* Windon, SJ

* Hodge, JN

* Frizzell OBE OAM, AB

* Bennett, PI

* McRorie, JS

* Small, HA

* McCarthy, JG

*Smith AM, EJ

* Canning, JT

* Emms, FG

* Spender OBE, JR

* Clark OAM, HH

* Goold, WJ

* Mack, C

*Bullpitt MBE, NF

* Grant OAM, GF

* Cohen, GS

* Heath, EA

* Brydon, RC

Hatchett, JG

* Holmes, Capt A

* Gadsdon Kt, Sir LP

* Shanahan, RP

*Howells OAM, RM

* Dart, GW

* Costa, SV

* Williams MBE, VJ

* Mcdonald OAM, HN

* Moran, TF

* Williams, AM

* Walker OBE, AW

* Peacock, RJ

* Taylor, CE

* Kennedy MBE, AER

* Meagher OBE, TW

Tallon OAM, RC

* Dargan, FH

* Winders OBE, JR

* Wilson OAM, NB

* O’Reilly BEM, JE

* Whitehead, CW

* White OAM, DG

* Olson, AO

* Switzer OAM, JR

* Dellitt, GS

* Jaggard OAM, EFK

* Lucas OBE, DC

* Vaughan OAM, JK

* Gordon, JL

* Johnson, GH

* Avery, EC

* Claybourn OAM, MC

* Englert, CG

* Moroney, DRB

* Ovens OAM, EJ

* Klingner OAM, MJ

* Gray, JE

* Woodroffe, NS

* Payne, FT

Staunton MBE, GB

* Winders MBE, SW

* Becher OAM, MH

* Wilson, GJ

* Field OAM, RC

* Cohen, M

* Betts, JJ

* Stewart, JJ

* Slaven, P

* Cronin, VS

* Stephens, PR

* Nicklin KCMG, Sir Francis

*Rosewell OAM, JWA

* Watson MBE, KW

* Donaldson, AR

* Johnson MBE, SA

* Weimer, HJ

* Curlewis CVO CBE, Sir Adrian

* Daley, WJ

* Richards, FC

* Honey, C

* Dillon, JB

* Sloane, AD

* Williams, G

* Burrell OAM, RA

* Cameron, JR

* Besomo, VA

* Dempster, JW

* Wilkes, BF

* Turner, LD

* Foerster, WH

* Saunders, RA

*Rector AM, CE

* Sutherland, AC

* Loton, AR

* Flanagan BEM, NJ

* Sellars, JPW

* Cahill, J

* McDonald OAM, LS

* Tier, FB

* Fitzgerald MBE, AE

* Marshall BEM, ER

* Paterson, A

*Newman, P

Singleton OAM, WJ

* Hanley, GR

* Denison, AG

Dearlove MBE, JB

Brown OAM, GM

* Millar, G

* Lindsay, GA

*McMaster AM DFC, JW

*Morrison OAM, DP


Section 5

Awards & Honours

105

Whelpton AO, AB

Watson AM, RJ

*Fielder OAM, CD

Owen, GB

Moseley OAM, A

Reeves OAM, JA

Halliday, WE

Grant OAM, IJ

*Pittard, HA

*Marshall OAM, WG

Harding OAM, RJ

*Goetz, AW

*Parkyn OAM, AB

Scott OAM, ID

Menico OAM, JA

Kennedy, KA

Brown OAM, HJ

Byrnes OAM, MJ

*Somers, JF

*O’Rorke OAM, PJ

* Dann, GL

*Dixon, NA

*Wilcox OAM, ST

Fitzgerald OAM, JB

* Bowman, BH

McNaughton OAM, G

Wright OAM, IJ

Stanford OAM, KH

Worrell, JG

*Donnell OAM, BF

Rankin AM, RE

*Barlow, JR

*Martin, WE

*Trigg OBE, RJ

*Conrick, C

Green OAM, BEM, DA

Heywood OBE, NJ

Jones OAM, JM

*Jackson OAM, RA

Smith OAM, RA

*Hofmaster, EV

Dewey, JC

Devlin SC, RP

Godbee OAM, NM

Knight BEM, KC

King OAM, BC

Purcell OAM, NR

Bartlett, ME

McGee, EJ

*Henshaw OAM, NJ

Worth OAM, WJ

Boulton OAM, DJ

Trethowan, J

Little OAM, RA

* Collins, KJ

Fraser OAM, JS

* Windmill, HC

*Brown OAM, RM

Lyons MP, GR

Martin AM, MJ

* Webb OAM, MA

Burchill OAM, DS

Allum OAM, GA

Mitchell, RA

* Rodgers OAM, DG

Stephens OAM, EB

Jaggard OAM, EK

*Singleton, M

Critcher, GT

Butler OAM, RJ

Gaynor OAM, WE

*Sargeant, RJ

Conlin OAM, DR

*McGrory OAM, FH

Clark, DE

Howard OAM, R

Bruce OAM, BD

Hoskins OAM, KF

Griffiths, JA

Strange, SR

Blackley, DT

*Taylor OAM, CJ

McGibbon, PJ

*Roberts OAM, R

*Sabien, M

*Millett MBE, RC

Morarty OAM, NW

Thompson, D

Chesher OAM, RC

* Mackie AM, IJ

*Bond, KJH

Burling OAM, J

Morrison, KA

Davidson OAM, RJ

Edstein OAM, JT

Lytham OAM, R

Paton OAM, LS

Cramond AO OBE, TR

Finch AM, The Hon. FA

White, C

Smith OAM, RA

*Smith OAM, PW

Meehan OAM, JV

Brennan, R

Gear AM, RJ

*Taylor OAM, PF

George AM, PB

Welch OAM, R

*Buist, RV

Davis OAM, E

Wood ESM, RS

Jamieson OAM AFSM, W

Marsh OAM, CW

Whitmore OAM, RT

Lyne AM, CR

Haven, A

*Johnson, DL

Pears OAM, RE

Mayo AM, RJ

Farmer OAM, E

Stapleton AM, PR

Murray, K

Young, IJ

Bruce, G

Wilson BEM, HB

Priest, KC

Bird OAM, KC

Blake OAM, R

Thorburn, AJ

Beasley OAM, JB

Inwood, AJ

Doig OAM, A

Rennie AM, WA

Smith OAM, BJ

Kelk, NT

Goode, I

*McKenzie OAM, GD

Waters OAM, M

Weldon AM, KE

McNeilly MBE, MD

*Bermingham OAM, PJ

Donohoe AM, JT


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

SLSA Awards of Excellence

106

2012/13 Award Recipients

DHL Club of the Year Noosa Heads SLSC, QLD

DHL Surf Lifesaver of the Year Ryan Rosenbaum Tacking Point SLSC, NSW

DHL Lifeguard of the Year Tim Daymond Australian Lifeguard Service, NSW

Ryan, the Patrol Captain at Tacking Point SLSC for the past six years, has mentored two junior lifesavers who also became Patrol Captains. Ryan also held the position of Deputy Director of Lifesaving for the branch and is the first on-call duty officer in the region. Ryan has played an integral role in testing and coordinating the radio network within the branch including introducing external lifeguards to the network.

Tim, a senior lifeguard with the ALS since 2008/9 season has trained and mentored many lifeguards and lifesavers. In 2012/13, he was involved in four major spinal cases where a quick and professional response dramatically improved the outcome. Tim has a very professional attitude towards his work. He takes his training in his lifeguard work seriously and this was seen to be beneficial in the major incidents he was involved this season.

DHL Volunteer of the Year Sam Edwards Mindil Beach SLSC, NT

Assessor of the Year Adrienne Lowe Dee Why SLSC, NSW

Community Education Program of the Year Be Active Program, Brighton, SA

Sam Edwards is a great ambassador for Surf Life Saving in the Northern Territory. He capably lead the Mindil Beach Surf Life Saving Club as President for over two years, increasing the Club’s membership by 200% through innovative programs. Sam was also named by the NT Government and Awards Australia as one of the Territory’s ‘Young Achievers of the Year’ – winning the Community & Wellbeing category.

Adrienne demonstrated ongoing commitment to conducting assessments at a club and branch level. Adrienne designed and developed new assessment tools and processes for the Sydney Northern Beaches Bronze Central Venue and implemented mentor programs and guidelines for assessors.

The Be Active Program offers free ocean swimming and surf safety lessons to members of the community who may already know how to swim, but are not confident in swimming in the ocean. This group includes a high number of international students. The program also provides a ‘Come and try Surf Sports Day’ introducing program participants to club activities and club members, facilitating an easy transition into the Surf Life Saving movement.

Noosa Heads SLSC recorded significant improvement in all areas of operation in 2012/13 including increasing active membership by 25%. The Club initiated a Club Support Program in conjunction with the Sunshine Coast Branch, to address lifesaving service deficiencies in neighbouring clubs. The highly successful Seahorse Nippers Program was also introduced for children with disabilities or special needs.


Section 5

Awards & Honours

107

Surf Sports Athlete of the Year Naomi Flood Manly LSC, NSW

Surf Sports Coach of the Year Wade Sinclair Townsville Picnic Bay SLSC, QLD

Surf Sports Official of the Year Don Van Keimpema Shelly Beach, NSW

Naomi has excelled in the surf ski discipline winning five gold medals at The Aussies including the Open Female Surf Ski, Surf Ski Relay, Mixed and Women’s Double Ski and the Rescue Tube. Naomi also won Gold in the Open Female Surf Ski at the World Lifesaving Championships, Rescue 2012. Naomi was also selected in the London 2012 Australian Sprint Kayak Olympic Team.

Wade was the Senior Coach of the QLD Country High Performance Squad, High Performance Coach for the SLSA National High Performance Program and was Sports Scientist for the Australian Life Saving Team at Rescue 2012. Wade is actively involved in the ongoing development of the Pool Rescue discipline, contributing to the most successful year for the QLD Country High Performance Program.

Don continues to officiate at club, branch, state, national and international events in various roles of authority. Don was involved in the development of the Junior Officials Accreditation Program and the development of the youth competition program for the National Pool Rescue Championships.

Trainer of the Year David Rylance Elwood LSC, VIC David, the Chief Instructor at Elwood LSC, delivered a broad range of courses for both his Club and surrounding clubs. David was dedicated to continually developing himself and others by attending and completing many training events, awards and workshops in all areas of lifesaving.


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

108

National Rescue of the Month

The National Rescue of the Month is a program that recognises excellence in lifesaving and service delivery, measured against industry best practice and operating procedures. The Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) board endorsed the implementation of the National Rescue of the Month in December 2013. The National Rescue of the Month recipients listed below were awarded at quarterly ceremonies at Parliament House in Canberra, ACT.

December 2013 Surfers Paradise SLSC Emily Schofield On 16 December 2013, Surfers Paradise’s patrol performed 44 rescues, countless ‘assists’ and hundreds of preventative actions and was a great example of efforts in Surf Life Saving across Australia. During the rescue, off duty surf lifesaver Emily Schofield, 17 year old school student, assisted 25 individuals over four hours.

January 2014 Australian Lifeguard Service Yallingup Lifeguards Ben Sowter & Janek Ferrandi On 10 January 2014, lifeguards Ben Sowter and Janek Ferrandi rescued three surfers who had been dragged by a rip 500-600m off shore at Smith Beach.

February 2014 South Narrabeen SLSC Peter Madden (Patrol Captain), Angie Thorpe, Jacinta Paquay, Chris Gale, Sean Coutts and Rohan Fisher (Sydney Northern Beaches Duty Officer); Warringah Council - Brad Young Patrolling members Peter Madden (Patrol Captain), Angie Thorpe, Jacinta Paquay, Chris Gale and Sean Coutts saved the life of a woman who was severely allergic to, and stung by a blue bottle on 9 February, 2014.

March 2014 Surfers Paradise SLSC Scott Dineen

April 2014 Freshwater SLSC Tod Rowbotham

May 2014 Geraldton SLSC Blair Walkington

On 22 March, 2014 Patrol Vice-Captain, Scott Dineen saved the lives of two swimmers in difficulty at the same time.

On Saturday 12 April 2014, at Freshwater Beach, Tod Rowbotham pulled a surfer out of the surf. The patient had been washed up near rocks through the treacherous surf. Todd assisted the patient to duck dive and ride the rescue board to safety.

On Wednesday 7 May 2014, after witnessing a surfer knocked off his board at Back Beach WA with suspected spinal injuries, lifesaver Blair Walkington paddled over to the surfer to provide assistance. The surfer indicated head, neck and back pain and was visibly struggling to keep his head above water. Blair stabilised the patient’s head and neck, and swam 100 metres to shore.

NB. June 2014 nominations were not received at time of this report’s publication


Section 5

Awards & Honours

109

Meritorious Awards

Meritorious Awards are awarded to affiliated clubs and/or their members and/or the public for outstanding deeds of bravery performed in the sphere of Surf Life Saving operations. This includes lifesaving - both in and outside of designated patrol hours. In 2012/13, Certificates of Merit were awarded to the following:

Andrew Mizzi Broulee Surfers SLSC Individual Certificate of Merit w/ Bronze Insert Anika Morgan Woolgoolga SLSC Individual Certificate of Merit Avoca Beach SLSC Group Certificate of Merit Ballina Jet Boat Surf Rescue Service Group Certificate of Merit

Point Lonsdale SLSC Group Certificate of Merit Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) Bundaberg Region 24-Hour Emergency Response Crew Group Certificate of Merit w/ Bronze Insert SLSQ Westpac Life Saver Helicopter Rescue Service Group Certificate of Merit w/ Bronze Insert SLSQ Westpac Life Saver Helicopter Rescue Service Group Certificate of Merit

Bradley Heard, Gary Murphy and Mark Puglisi Ballina Jet Boat Surf Rescue Service Individual Certificate of Merit w/Silver Insert

Toby Adams North Wollongong SLSC Individual Certificate of Merit

Gary Barben Coolum SLSC Individual Certificate of Merit

Trent O’Shea Scamander SLSC Individual Certificate of Merit

Michael Banister Cronulla SLSC Individual Certificate of Merit w/ Bronze Insert


Section 06 Statistical Summaries


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

112

Membership

47,080 Patrolling Surf Lifesavers

61,946 Junior Activities (5-13) members

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT*

13/14

12/13

% Change

Male

1,860

840

Female

1,329

699

1,209

473

1,061

467

206

60

10

4,658

4,433

5.08%

202

48

13

3,819

3,623

-

-

-

5.41%

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

3,189

1,539

2,270

940

408

108

23

8,477

8,056

5.23%

Active (15-18)

Unknown Total

Active (18 or over) Male

9,034

3,352

2,091

1,842

1,170

325

72

17,886 17,432

2.60%

Female

4,190

1,600

1,393

1,110

699

218

58

9,268

9,142

1.38%

1

-

1

-

0.00%

1.65%

Unknown

Increase in long service membership

Active Reserve

Total

13,225 4,952

-

-

-

-

-

3,484

2,952

1,869

543

130

27,155 26,574

2.19%

Male

866

98

110

57

6

13

2

1,152

1,155

-0.26%

Female

291

25

40

29

0

7

1

393

385

2.08%

Unknown

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

1,157

123

150

86

6

20

3

1,545

1,540

0.32%

Male

1,675

663

875

552

200

67

8

4,040

3,901

3.56%

Female

1,649

612

914

570

199

69

14

4,027

3,824

5.31%

Total Cadet (13-15)

Unknown

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

3,324

1,275

1,789

1,122

399

136

22

8,067

7,725

4.43%

Male

245

445

127

155

25

8

4

1,009

901

11.99%

Female

223

377

64

128

25

7

3

827

780

6.03%

Total Award

Unknown Total

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

468

822

191

283

50

15

7

1,836

1,681

9.22%

Patrolling Lifesavers Male

13,680

5,398

4,412

3,079

1,607

473

96

28,745 27,822

3.32%

Female

7,682

3,313

3,472

2,304

1,125

349

89

18,334 17,754

3.27%

Unknown Total

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

21,363

8,711

7,884

5,383

2,732

822

185

1

-

100.00%

47,080 45,576

3.30%

Junior Activity (5-13) Male

15,308

5,138

5,248

3,969

1,500

460

106

31,729 32,244

-1.60%

Female

14,300

4,905

5,316

3,673

1,492

427

104

30,217 30,622

-1.32%

-

-

-

Unknown Total

29,608 10,043 10,564

-

-

-

-

7,642

2,992

887

210

-

-

0.00%

61,946 62,866

-1.46%

Long Service Male Female Unknown Total

3,224

1,051

123

460

65

2

0

4,925

4,910

0.31%

311

189

21

132

22

0

0

675

599

12.69%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

3,535

1,240

144

592

87

2

0

5,600

5,509

1.65%


Section 6

Statistical Summaries

113

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT*

13/14

12/13

% Change

Male

5,980

3,624

3,854

1,275

739

215

20

15,707 16,240

-3.28%

Female

4,950

4,711

4,400

1,034

815

272

48

16,230 16,613

-2.31%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10,930

8,335

8,254

2,309

1,554

487

68

Associate

Unknown Total

-

-

31,937 32,853

0.00% -2.79%

Male

3,258

75

872

1,942

422

16

342

6,927

5,984

15.76%

Female

2,959

82

992

2,083

469

21

327

6,933

5,736

20.87%

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

6,218

157

1,864

4,025

891

37

669

Male

281

190

31

55

22

-

1

580

589

-1.53%

Female

155

107

20

33

7

1

-

323

359

-10.03%

Total

13,861 11,720

18.27%

Honorary

Unknown Total

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

436

297

51

88

29

1

1

903

948

-4.75%

1,496

880

544

248

322

82

22

3,594

3,499

2.72%

130

95

171

48

67

14

10

535

497

7.65%

Life Member Male Female Unknown

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

1,626

975

715

296

389

96

32

4,129

3,996

3.33%

Male

417

420

511

111

21

19

15

1,514

1,667

-9.18%

Female

262

281

523

77

22

10

8

1,183

1,330

-11.05%

Total Probationary

Unknown

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

679

701

1,034

188

43

29

23

2,697

2,997

-10.01%

Male

88

132

93

1

1

3

-

318

294

8.16%

Female

34

72

43

1

-

1

-

151

164

-7.93%

Total Past Active

Unknown Total

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

122

204

136

2

1

4

0

469

458

2.40%

Total Male

43,732 16,908 15,688 11,140

4,699

1,270

602

94,039 93,249

0.85%

Total Female

30,783 13,755 14,958 9,385

4,019

1,095

586

74,581 73,674

1.23%

Total Unknown Grand Total

Life Members

903 Honorary Members

General

Unknown

4,129

2

0

0

0

74,517 30,663 30,646 20,525

0

0

8,718

2,365

0

2

0

1,188 168,622 166,923

0.00% 1.02%

3.30% Increase in patrolling surf lifesavers


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

114

Actions

7,327

SLS Actions (Clubs) NSW

QLD

VIC*

WA

SA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

786

192

16

150

15

2

3

1,164

305,486

Rescue Tube

1,147

560

69

104

7

4

34

1,925

Board

1,389

551

83

207

23

17

89

2,395

Preventative Actions performed by SLSC’s

690

342

146

209

36

21

-

1,444

Surfboard

5

-

-

1

1

-

-

7

Other

161

151

12

98

2

4

-

428

Total

4,178

1,796

326

769

84

48

126

7,327

912

18

156

Surf Life Saving club (SLSC) rescues

Rescues

13,851 First Aid treatments administered by surf lifesavers

No Gear

IRB

Preventative Actions Lost Children Preventions

149,060 108,064 28,462

54

89

12

-

1,241

13,008

4,209

739

106

303,648 330

Searches

171

14

89

20

28

8

-

Evacuation Alarm

137

58

19

19

28

6

-

267

13,101

4,354

765

106

305,486

Total

150,280 108,154 28,726

First Aid Fractures/Dislocation

90

98

20

42

6

1

-

257

Marine Stings

2,231

1,818

136

1,293

508

31

15

6,032

Major Wounds

150

57

35

22

10

4

1

279

2,550

1,096

631

551

226

53

2

5,109

Other

808

331

193

388

126

20

2

1,868

Resuscitation

21

-

3

-

9

-

-

33

Minor Cuts/Abrasions

Spinal

138

71

16

36

11

1

-

273

Total

5,988

3,471

1,034

2,332

896

110

20

13,851

160,446 113,421 30,086

16,202

5,334

923

252

326,664

17,416

2,672

1,227,746

Grand Total Patrol Hours Total

537,854 354,247 152,169 104,578 58,812

* Support operations for Victoria are delivered through the lifeguard or club operations, and actions are recorded in club and lifeguard actions


Section 6

Statistical Summaries

115

SLS Actions (Lifeguards) ALS NSW

ALS QLD

ALS Victoria*

ALS SA

ALS WA

ALS TAS

ALS NT

Total

75

296

3

1

40

-

158

573

Rescues No Gear Rescue Tube

84

95

34

1

167

-

35

416

Board

636

667

106

7

169

-

32

1,617

IRB

11

6

31

-

-

-

-

48

RWC

56

305

13

-

46

-

-

420

JRB/ORB/RIB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Helicopter

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Surfboard

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

Other

28

30

-

-

3

-

1

62

Total

893

1,399

187

9

425

-

226

3,139

Preventative Actions Lost Children

2

41

8

1

2

-

2

56

Preventions

224,313

375,853

61,724

2,852

24,465

22

4,784

694,013

Searches

4

36

-

1

-

-

-

41

Evacuation Alarm

47

30

8

2

2

-

-

89

61,740

2,856

24,469

22

4,786

694,199

Total

224,366 375,960

First Aid Fractures/Dislocation

38

124

7

-

35

-

16

220

Marine Stings

1,777

3,760

-

120

1,052

5

15

6,729

Major Wounds

42

116

32

-

25

1

9

225

2,256

5,434

472

193

733

2

682

9,772

248

491

2

2

159

-

15

917

Minor Cuts/Abrasions Other Resuscitation

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

Spinal

14

50

6

1

10

-

1

82

Total

4,375

9,975

520

316

2,014

8

738

17,946

229,634

387,334

62,447

3,181

26,908

30

5,750

715,284

79,679

227,750

24,900

910

27,015

889

13,057

374,199

Grand Total Patrol Hours Lifeguard Hours

* Support operations for Victoria are delivered through the lifeguard or club operations, and actions are recorded in club and lifeguard actions

3,139 Australian Lifeguard Service (ALS) rescues

694,199 Preventative Actions performed by ALS Lifeguards

17,946 First Aid treatments administered by ALS Lifeguards


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

116

Actions

1,245

SLS Actions (Support Operations) NSW

QLD

VIC*

SA

WA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

1

1

170

-

-

1,032 97

Rescues performed by Support Operations

Rescues

16,352

-

-

-

-

RWC

233

563

9

57

Preventative Actions performed by Support Operations

39,480 Patrol Hours

No Gear IRB

JRB/ORB/RIB

10

73

-

11

-

-

3

Helicopter

3

1

-

3

-

-

-

7

Other

6

85

-

14

-

-

-

105

Total

255

722

9

85

170

0

4

1,245

Preventative Actions Lost Children

1

5

-

20

-

-

-

26

Preventions

600

9,851

-

5,162

301

31

36

15,981

Searches

29

67

-

58

73

1

1

229

Evacuation Alarm

11

10

-

95

-

-

-

116

641

9,933

0

5,335

374

32

37

16,352

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

3

Total First Aid Fractures/Dislocation Marine Stings

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

Major Wounds

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

Minor Cuts/Abrasions

-

72

-

2

-

1

-

75

Other

3

5

-

2

-

-

-

10

Resuscitation

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

3

Spinal

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

Total

7

83

0

5

0

1

0

96

903

10,738

9

5,425

544

33

41

17,693

12,132

19,786

439

4,455

1,684

133

853

39,480

Grand Total Patrol Hours Total

* Support operations for Victoria are delivered through the lifeguard or club operations, and actions are recorded in club and lifeguard actions


Section 6

Statistical Summaries

117

Equipment

SLS Equipment (Clubs) NSW

QLD

VIC*

SA

WA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

96

22

55

20

30

6

1

230

Land-based Beach Vehicle (ATV) Buildings and Structures

74

71

71

-

34

14

5

269

Defibrillator

275

101

124

74

37

14

1

626

First Aid Equipment

663

154

108

69

49

17

2

1,062

Oxygen Resuscitator

3,073 Rescue Boards

626 Defibrillators

379

102

210

70

53

17

2

833

1,025

269

885

237

87

45

12

2,560

Spinal Equipment

347

94

212

32

70

28

2

785

854

Suction Equipment

82

36

96

53

8

14

2

291

Inflatable Rescue Boats

Radio

Vehicle

23

21

15

15

12

2

3

91

2,964

870

1,776

570

380

157

30

6,747

Rescue Board

1,438

388

726

231

245

42

3

3,073

Rescue Tube

1,717

255

868

323

249

46

6

3,464

Total Aquatic

IRB Hull

353

73

259

61

70

32

6

854

IRB Motor

452

114

388

88

70

35

6

1,153

RWC

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

3,960

830

2,241

703

634

155

21

8,544

Grand total

6,924

1,700

4,017

1,273

1,014

312

51

15,291

SLS Equipment (Support Operations) NSW

QLD

VIC*

WA

SA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

2

5

-

-

4

-

2

13

Land-based 4WD Beach Vehicle

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

Buildings and Structures

2

2

-

-

-

6

-

10

Defibrillator

3

5

-

14

2

-

1

25

First Aid Equipment

5

10

-

14

5

-

1

35

Oxygen Resuscitator

5

10

-

14

4

-

1

34

Radio

95

25

-

48

26

17

10

221

Spinal Equipment

9

3

-

14

-

-

1

27

Suction Equipment

2

10

-

14

1

-

1

28

Total

123

72

-

118

42

23

17

395

* Support operations for Victoria are delivered through the lifeguard or club operations, and actions are recorded in club and lifeguard actions


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

118

Equipment

11

SLS Equipment (Support Operations) continued NSW

QLD

VIC*

WA

SA

TAS

NT

TOTAL

4

4

-

2

-

-

-

10

Helicopters (SLS Support Operations)

Aquatic

298

Rescue Tube

23

17

-

30

11

4

3

88

JRB

2

2

-

-

2

2

-

8

ALS Rescue Boards

260 ALS Rescue Tubes

Rescue Board

RWC

35

25

11

24

7

4

3

109

ORB

2

2

5

-

-

11

1

21

RIB

-

-

7

-

-

1

1

9

Total

66

50

23

56

20

22

8

245

Aviation Helicopter

4

2

2

2

1

-

-

11

Other

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

4

2

2

2

1

-

-

11

Grand Total

193

40

21

176

63

45

25

651

SLS Equipment (Lifeguards) ALS NSW

ALS QLD

ALS Victoria*

ALS SA

ALS WA

ALS TAS

ALS NT

TOTAL

9

51

3

1

4

-

1

69

Land-based Beach Vehicle Buildings and Structures Defibrillator

-

68

-

3

-

-

-

71

37

90

3

-

7

1

2

140

First Aid Equipment

47

90

7

2

9

4

4

163

Oxygen Resuscitator

53

90

4

1

8

4

4

164

Radio

111

130

10

6

6

2

8

273

Spinal Equipment

36

90

3

-

7

2

3

141

Suction Equipment

24

90

4

-

9

-

3

131

Vehicle Total

7

-

-

-

5

-

-

12

324

699

34

13

55

13

25

1,164

Aquatic IRB Hull

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

5

IRB Motor

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

5

Rescue Board

78

180

6

-

21

10

3

298

Rescue Tube

89

120

8

-

24

13

6

260

RWC

7

26

6

-

2

-

-

41

Total

174

326

30

-

47

23

9

609

Grand Total

498

1,025

64

13

102

37

34

1,773

* Support operations for Victoria are delivered through the lifeguard or club operations, and actions are recorded in club and lifeguard actions


Section 6

Statistical Summaries

119

Coaches & Officials

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

28

TAS

NT

13/14 Total

12/13 Total

% Change

New Surf Official New - Surf Official Level 1

135

102

22

30

New - Surf Official Level 2

19

2

1

1

New - Surf Official Level 3

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

320

347

-7.78%

2

-

25

21

19.05%

-

-

-

-

0.00%

New - Surf Sports - Junior Official

93

26

49

-

3

10

-

181

225

-19.56%

Total

247

130

72

31

31

13

2

526

600

-12.33%

New - Surf Coach Level 1

80

56

17

9

17

1

10

190

257

-26.07%

New - Surf Coach Level 2

9

2

1

-

2

-

1

15

30

-50.00%

New - Surf Coach Level 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0.00%

New - Surf Sports - Junior Coach

32

23

12

17

10

-

-

94

107

-12.15%

Total

121

81

30

26

29

1

11

299

394

-24.11%

Surf Official Level 1

997

507

160

190

213

23

27

2,117

2,952

-28.29%

Surf Official Level 2

140

89

25

15

33

5

1

308

458

-32.75%

Surf Official Level 3

31

16

4

5

8

1

-

65

94

-30.85%

New Surf Coach

Surf Official

Surf Sports - Junior Official

278

26

105

-

3

9

-

421

257

63.81%

1,446

638

294

210

257

38

28

2,911

3,761

-22.60%

Surf Coach Level 1

823

446

152

128

130

35

21

1,735

2,312

-24.96%

Surf Coach Level 2

89

52

15

18

11

5

1

191

242

-21.07%

Total Surf Coach

Surf Coach Level 3

12

12

2

1

1

-

-

28

38

-26.32%

Surf Sports - Junior Coach

112

40

36

10

25

-

3

226

225

0.44%

1,036

550

205

157

167

40

25

Total Grand Total

2,180

2,817

-22.61%

5,091

6,578

-22.01%


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

120

Awards & Qualifications

NSW Member Comm.

QLD Member Comm.

VIC Member Comm.

WA Member Comm.

Patrolling Lifesaver Awards Bronze Medallion

3,202

37

1,529

-

1,729

-

830

-

Certificate II in Public Safety (Aquatic Rescue) (PUA21012)

3,273

37

2,459

124

1,728

-

-

-

Gold Medallion (Advanced Lifesaving)

39

18

53

-

42

-

13

-

Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue

78

3

45

-

100

-

1

-

Maintain Safety at an Incident Scene (PUAOHS002B)

78

3

45

149

100

-

-

-

Search as a Member of an Aquatic Search Team (PUASAR011C)

78

3

45

148

100

-

-

-

Silver Medallion Basic Beach Management

611

14

285

-

184

-

42

-

Undertake beach safety management activities (PUAOPE027A)

594

14

338

-

40

-

-

-

Work Autonomously (PUATEA002B)

591

14

338

-

40

-

-

-

599

9

338

-

40

-

-

-

1,858

72

920

-

972

-

793

-

Contribute to team effectiveness (BSBFLM312C) Surf Rescue Certificate (CPR Endorsed) Radio Awards Radio Operator Certificate

323

-

2,126

-

96

-

6

-

3,533

37

2,549

124

1,771

-

-

-

Certificate III in Public Safety (Aquatic Search and Rescue)

3

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

Certificate IV in Public Safety (Aquatic Search and Rescue Management)

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

22

-

-

55

-

20

-

Operate Communications Systems and Equipment (PUAOPE013A)

Powercraft Awards ATV Operator Certificate Drive Vehicles Under Operational Conditions (PUAVEH001B)

-

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

ATV Operator Induction

248

-

521

-

11

-

-

-

IRB Crew Certificate

927

-

556

-

427

-

155

-

Crew small powercraft in a rescue operation (PUASAR015A)

927

-

1,578

2

427

-

-

-

ORB Crew Certificate

3

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

ORB Driver Certificate

1

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

ORB Skipper Certificate

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

Rescue Water Craft Operator Certificate

51

-

146

-

14

-

7

-

Operate and maintain a personal water craft for rescue operations (PUASAR016A)

52

-

192

-

13

-

-

-

Prepare Maintain and Test Response Equipment (PUAEQU001B)

355

-

11

-

160

-

-

-

Silver Medallion IRB Driver

322

-

216

-

166

-

57

-

Operate and maintain a small powercraft and motor for rescue operations (PUASAR014A)

326

-

230

-

159

-

-

-

Prepare Maintain and Test Response Equipment (PUAEQU001B)

355

-

-

-

160

-

-

-

Advanced Resuscitation Techniques Certificate (and refresher)

979

-

661

-

414

-

211

277

Apply Advanced Resuscitation Techniques (HLTFA404A)

12

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

Emergency Care Awards

Apply advanced resuscitation techniques (HLTFA404B)

12

-

-

-

11

-

-

-

Apply advanced resuscitation techniques (HLTFA404C)

979

334

718

116

407

-

2

277

Apply (Senior) First Aid

188

11,789

955

-

429

4,708

25

4,249

Apply First Aid (HLTFA301B)

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Apply first aid (HLTFA301C)

10

-

-

-

1

3

-

34


Section 6

Statistical Summaries

121

SA Member

Comm.

TAS Member Comm.

NT Member

Comm.

Total Member

Total Commercial

Grand Total

7,933 Bronze Medallions Awarded

354

87

95

2

15

53

7,754

179

7,933

356

-

98

-

7

-

7,921

161

8,082

-

-

-

-

-

-

147

18

165

-

-

-

-

-

2

224

5

229

-

-

-

-

-

-

223

152

375

-

-

-

-

-

-

223

151

374

10

-

-

-

6

-

1,138

14

1,152

16

-

-

-

6

-

994

14

1,008

16

-

-

-

6

-

991

14

1,005

16

-

-

-

6

-

999

9

1,008

339

-

74

-

9

23

4,965

95

5,060

14

-

-

-

-

-

2,565

-

2,565

374

19

98

-

16

-

8,341

180

8,521

5

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

191

-

-

-

-

-

285

22

307

82

-

-

-

-

-

82

22

104

-

-

-

-

-

-

780

-

780

131

-

46

-

2

-

2,244

-

2,244

134

-

44

-

2

-

3,112

2

3,114

-

-

-

-

1

-

8

-

8

-

-

-

-

2

-

7

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

3

218

3

221

-

-

-

-

-

-

257

-

257

27

-

13

-

1

-

567

-

567

27

-

13

-

1

-

802

-

802

27

-

13

-

1

-

756

-

756

27

-

13

-

1

-

556

-

556

106

37

40

-

2

30

2,413

344

2,757

-

-

7

-

-

-

21

-

21

-

6

1

-

-

-

24

6

30

106

-

62

4

2

-

2,276

731

3,007

179

311

86

8

8

118

1,870

21,183

23,053

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

-

5

-

-

-

-

11

42

53

8,082 Certificate II in Public Safety Awarded

5,277 Powercraft Awards


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

122

Awards & Qualifications

NSW Member Comm.

QLD Member Comm.

VIC Member Comm.

WA Member Comm.

Emergency Care Awards (continued) Apply First Aid (HLTFA311A) Provide First Aid (HLTAID003) Basic Emergency Care

177

11,789

1,344

1,848

346

4,705

18

3,714

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

435 1,614

57

3,597

-

-

-

-

1

Provide basic emergency life support (HLTFA201B)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

Provide basic emergency life support (HLTFA211A)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,557

Provide basic emergency life support (HLTAID002)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

57

Marine Stinger Management

-

-

49

-

-

-

-

-

Pain Management Certificate (Methoxyflurane)

52

13

82

-

25

-

60

-

Provide pain management (PUAEME005A)

49

13

37

21

-

-

-

-

Resuscitation Certificate

271

-

2,604

-

309

-

-

3,263

Perform CPR (HLTCPR201B)

254

-

-

-

120

-

-

-

Perform CPR (HLTCPR211A)

3,614

17,832

3,030

3,263

4,618

-

-

3,109

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

154

Silver Medallion Advanced First Aid

34

-

17

-

-

-

-

96

Apply advanced first aid (HLTFA402C)

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Apply advanced first aid (HLTFA412A)

29

8

68

63

-

-

-

96

Provide CPR (HLTAID001)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Spinal Management

Provide advanced first aid (HLTAID006)

776

-

585

-

316

-

103

-

Provide emergency care for suspected spinal injury (PUAEME004A)

771

213

584

12

309

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

Aerial/Helicopter Awards Helicopter Crew Certificate Training and Assessing Certificate IV in Training and Assessment

2

-

11

-

11

-

6

-

Provide work skill Instruction (TAEDEL301A)

159

-

192

-

93

-

1

-

Make a Presentation (BSBCMM401A)

159

-

216

-

88

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

Participate in Assessment Validation (TAEASS403A) Participate in assessment Validation (TAEASS403B)

121

-

206

-

56

-

-

-

Plan assessment activities and processes (TAEASS401B)

122

-

206

-

61

-

-

-

Assess Competence (TAEASS402A)

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

Assess Competence (TAEASS402B)

122

-

206

-

56

-

-

-

Surf Aware One

4,237

-

1,142

-

911

-

1,014

-

Surf Aware Two

3,534

-

1,203

-

986

-

959

-

Surf Play One

3,691

-

860

-

356

-

602

-

Surf Play Two

3,794

-

1,060

-

530

-

885

-

Surf Safe One

2,966

-

1,033

-

953

-

877

-

Surf Safe Two

2,672

-

1,023

-

946

-

755

-

Surf Smart One

2,147

-

855

-

800

-

661

-

Surf Smart Two

1,855

-

769

-

714

-

576

-

24,896

0

7,945

0

6,196

0

6,329

0

Junior Activities Awards

Total


Section 6

Statistical Summaries

123

SA Member

Comm.

TAS Member Comm.

NT Member

Comm.

Total Member

Total Commercial

Grand Total

85,519 Emergency Care Awards

212

1,028

107

1,185

13

-

2,217

24,269

26,486

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

435

435

22

-

-

-

6

-

86

5,211

5,297

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

26

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,557

1,557

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

57

57

-

-

-

-

-

-

49

-

49

36

-

-

-

-

11

255

24

279

106

-

-

-

15

-

207

34

241

223

895

-

-

6

9

3,413

4,167

7,580

36

-

-

-

-

-

410

-

410

1,081

2,199

-

594

21

-

12,364

26,997

39,361

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

154

154

20

-

25

-

-

-

96

96

192

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

44

-

-

-

-

-

141

71

212

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

96

96

100

-

-

-

-

2

1,880

2

1,882

155

-

-

-

-

-

1,819

225

2,044

2

-

-

-

-

-

7

0

7

21

-

15

-

-

-

66

-

66

31

-

-

-

-

-

476

-

476 475

12

-

-

-

-

-

475

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

5

20

-

-

-

-

-

403

-

403

20

-

-

-

-

-

409

-

409

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

5

21

-

-

-

-

-

405

-

405

174

-

81

-

16

-

7,575

-

7,575

277

-

89

-

16

-

7,064

-

7,064

129

-

29

-

20

-

5,687

-

5,687

129

-

32

-

20

-

6,450

-

6,450

238

-

93

-

23

-

6,183

-

6,183

231

-

89

-

20

-

5,736

-

5,736 4,792

220

-

101

-

8

-

4,792

-

209

-

75

-

18

-

4,216

-

4,216

1,607

0

589

0

141

0

47,703

0

47,703

47,703 Junior Activities Awards

2,324 Training and Assessing Awards


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

124

Service Awards

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

13/14 Total

12/13 Total

% Change

508%

National Medal National Medal

70

5

-

2

2

-

-

79

13

National Medal - Clasp

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

Total

82

5

0

2

2

0

0

91

13

600%

5 Year National Patrol Service Award

97

33

82

-

16

10

-

238

233

2%

10 Year National Patrol Service Award

114

48

27

5

10

3

5

212

201

5%

15 Year National Patrol Service Award

43

7

8

1

5

-

-

64

99

-35% 18%

Patrol Service Awards

20 Year National Patrol Service Award

25

2

10

1

9

-

-

47

40

25 Year National Patrol Service Award

9

-

4

-

4

-

-

17

18

-6%

30 Year National Patrol Service Award

2

3

-

-

3

1

-

9

10

-10%

35 Year National Patrol Service Award

5

-

1

-

1

-

-

7

8

-13%

40 Year National Patrol Service Award

-

1

-

-

1

-

-

2

7

-71%

45 Year National Patrol Service Award

1

-

1

1

2

-

-

5

1

400%

50 Year National Patrol Service Award

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

4

-50%

297

94

133

8

52

14

5

603

621

-3%

81

21

13

3

-

-

-

118

87

36%

Total Long Service Awards (Membership) 25 Year Long Service Award 30 Year Long Service Award

21

16

4

1

-

-

-

42

53

-21%

40 Year Long Service Award

35

19

3

3

1

-

-

61

43

42%

50 Year Long Service Award

72

17

6

3

1

-

-

99

107

-7%

60 Year Long Service Award

39

3

6

-

-

-

-

48

48

0%

70 Year Long Service Award

1

-

-

2

-

-

-

3

7

-57%

75 Year Long Service Award

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

0%

80 Year Long Service Award

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

252

76

32

12

2

0

0

374

348

7%

15

1

1

-

-

-

-

17

-

0%

Total Officiating Service Awards 5 Year Officiating Service Certificate 10 Year Officiating Service Certificate

2

7

-

-

-

-

-

9

2

350%

15 Year Officiating Service Certificate

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

0% 700%

20 Year Officiating Service Certificate

3

5

-

-

-

-

-

8

1

25 Year Officiating Service Certificate

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

0%

30 Year Officiating Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

35 Year Officiating Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

40 Year Officiating Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

50 Year Officiating Service Certificate Total

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-100%

22

17

1

0

0

0

0

40

5

700%


Section 6

Statistical Summaries

125

NSW

QLD

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

13/14 Total

12/13 Total

% Change

Coaching Service Awards 5 Year Coaching Service Certificate

3

2

3

-

-

-

-

8

4

100%

10 Year Coaching Service Certificate

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

100%

15 Year Coaching Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-100%

20 Year Coaching Service Certificate

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

0%

25 Year Coaching Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

30 Year Coaching Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

35 Year Coaching Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

40 Year Coaching Service Certificate

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

0%

45 Year Coaching Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

50 Year Coaching Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

Total

5

4

3

0

0

0

0

12

7

71%

188%

Assessing Service Awards 5 Year Assessing Service Certificate

11

4

2

-

6

-

-

23

8

10 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

2

1

-

2

-

-

5

5

0%

15 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

3

-

-

1

-

-

4

4

0%

20 Year Assessing Service Certificate

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

3

3

0%

25 Year Assessing Service Certificate

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

3

1

200%

30 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

0%

35 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

40 Year Assessing Service Certificate

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

-

0%

45 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

50 Year Assessing Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

14

12

6

0

9

0

0

41

21

95%

967%

Total Age Manager Service Awards 5 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

1

16

-

-

-

-

-

17

3

10 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

0%

15 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

20 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

25 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

30 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

35 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

40 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

45 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

50 Year National Age Manager Service Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0%

Total Grand Total

1

17

0

0

0

0

0

18

3

500%

673

225

175

22

65

14

5

1,179

1,018

16%


Section 07 SLS Entities


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

128

SLS Entities

National 12 national, State and Territory Centres, SLSA subsidiaries, Foundation 311 clubs 17 branches 101 support operations groups 66 Australian Lifeguard Service operations 507 SLS entities/groups

New South Wales 129 Clubs, 11 Branches, 35 Support Operations Groups, 19 Australian Lifeguards Services 129 Clubs

Coogee SLSC

Maroubra SLSC

Austinmer SLSC

Cooks Hill SLSC

Merewether SLSC

Avalon Beach SLSC

Copacabana SLSC

Minnie Water - Wooli SLSC

Avoca Beach SLSC

Corrimal SLSC

Mollymook SLSC

Ballina Lighthouse and Lismore SLSC

Cronulla SLSC

Mona Vale SLSC

Batemans Bay SLSC

Crowdy Head SLSC

Moruya SLSC

Bellambi SLSC

Cudgen Headland SLSC

Nambucca Heads SLSC

Bellinger Valley - North Beach SLSC

Dee Why SLSC

Narooma SLSC

Bermagui SLSC

Dixon Park SLSC

Narrabeen SLSC

Bilgola Beach SLSC

Elouera SLSC

Newcastle SLSC

Birubi Point SLSC

Era SLSC

Newport SLSC

Blackhead SLSC

Evans Head-Casino SLSC

Nobbys SLSC

Bondi SBLSC

Fairy Meadow SLSC

North Avoca SLSC

Bronte SLSC

Fingal Beach SLSC

North Bondi SLSC

Broulee Surfers SLSC

Fingal Rovers SLSC

North Cronulla SLSC

Brunswick SLSC

Forster SLSC

North Curl Curl SLSC

Bulli SLSC

Freshwater SLSC

North Entrance SLSC

Bungan Beach SLSC

Garie SLSC

North Narrabeen SLSC

Burning Palms SLSC

Gerringong SLSC

North Palm Beach SLSC

Byron Bay SLSC

Hat Head SLSC

North Steyne SLSC

Cabarita Beach SLSC

Helensburgh Stanwell Park SLSC

North Wollongong SLSC

Camden Haven SLSC

Kempsey - Crescent Head SLSC

Nowra Culburra SLSC

Cape Hawke SLSC

Kiama SLSC

Ocean Beach SLSC

Catherine Hill Bay SLSC

Kiama Downs SLSC

Pacific Palms SLSC

Caves Beach SLSC

Killcare SLSC

Palm Beach SLSC

Clovelly SLSC

Lennox Head - Alstonville SLSC

Pambula SLSC

Coalcliff SLSC

Long Reef SLSC

Port Kembla SLSC

Coffs Harbour SLSC

Macksville - Scotts Head SLSC

Port Macquarie SLSC

Coledale SLSC

MacMasters Beach SLSC

Queenscliff SLSC

Collaroy SLSC

Manly LSC

Red Rock-Corindi SLSC


Section 7

SLS Entities

129

New South Wales 129 Clubs, 11 Branches, 35 Support Operations Groups, 19 Australian Lifeguards Services Redhead SLSC

Woolgoolga SLSC

Surf Rescue 20

Salt SLSC

Woonona SLSC

Surf Rescue 30

Sandon Point SLSC

Yamba SLSC

Surf Rescue 40

Sawtell SLSC

11 Branches

Surf Rescue 50

Scarborough - Wombarra SLSC

Central Coast Branch

Sydney Branch - Duty Officers

Shellharbour SLSC

Far North Coast Branch

Sydney Branch - Night Operations

Shelly Beach SLSC

Far South Coast Branch

Sydney Branch - RWC service

Shoalhaven Heads SLSC

Hunter Branch

Sydney Branch - Surfcom

Soldiers Beach SLSC

Illawarra Branch

Sydney Metro SurfCom Team

South Curl Curl SLSC

Lower North Coast Branch

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch - CISM TIPS

South Maroubra SLSC

Mid North Coast Branch

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch - Duty Officers

South Narrabeen SLSC

North Coast Branch

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch - RWC Service

South West Rocks SLSC

South Coast Branch

Stockton SLSC

Sydney Branch

Westpac Lifesaver Helicopter Rescue Service Northern Region

Sussex Inlet SLSC

Sydney Northern Beaches Branch

Swansea Belmont SLSC

35 Support Operations

Tacking Point SLSC

Central Coast Branch - Duty Officers

19 Lifeguard Services

Tamarama SLSC

Central Coast Branch - RWC Group

Ballina Shire Council

Taree - Old Bar SLSC

Central Coast Branch - Surfcom

Bega Valley Shire Council

Tathra SLSC

Far North Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Bellingen Shire Council

Tea Gardens - Hawks Nest SLSC

Far North Coast Branch - RWC

Byron Shire Council

Terrigal SLSC

Far South Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Cape Byron Trust

The Entrance SLSC

Far South Coast Branch - RWC

Clarence Valley Council

The Lakes SLSC

Hunter - Support Operations Newcastle

Great Lakes Council

Thirroul SLSC

Hunter - Support Operations Port Stephens

Greater Taree City Council

Toowoon Bay SLSC

Hunter Branch Duty Officers

Kempsey Shire Council

Towradgi SLSC

Illawarra Branch Duty Officers

Magenta Lifeguard Service

Umina SLSC

Illawarra Branch RWC Team

Munmorah State Conservation Area

Urunga SLSC

Lower North Coast Branch Duty Officers

Nambucca Shire Council

Wamberal SLSC

Lower North Coast RWC

Pittwater Council

Wanda SLSC

Mid North Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Port Stephens Council

Warilla - Barrack Point SLSC

Mid North Coast Branch - RWC

Richmond Valley Council

Warriewood SLSC

North Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Royal National Park Sydney

Wauchope - Bonny Hills SLSC

North Coast Branch RWC

Salt Lifeguard Service

Whale Beach SLSC

South Coast Branch - Duty Officers

Shoalhaven City Council

Windang SLSC

South Coast Branch - RWC

Tweed Shire Council

Wollongong City SLSC

Surf Life Saving NSW State Duty Officers

Westpac Lifesaver Helicopter Rescue Service Southern Region


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

130

SLS Entities

Queensland 59 Clubs, 6 Branches, 12 Support Operations Groups, 18 Australian Lifeguard Services 59 Clubs

Mooloolaba SLSC

12 Support Operations

Agnes Water SLSC

Moore Park SLSC

Brisbane Lifesaving Service

Alexandra Headland SLSC

Mudjimba SLSC

Cairns Offshore Rescue Boat Service

Arcadian SLSC

Nobbys Beach SLSC

Gold Coast Duty Officers

Ayr SLSC

Noosa Heads SLSC

Gold Coast JRB Service

Bilinga SLSC

North Burleigh SLSC

Gold Coast Surfcom

Bowen SLSC

North Kirra SLSC

SLSQ RWC - Gold Coast

Bribie Island SLSC

Northcliffe SLSC

SLSQ RWC - Sunshine Coast

Broadbeach SLSC

Pacific SLSC

Sunshine Coast Duty Officers

Bundaberg SLSC

Palm Beach SLSC

Sunshine Coast JRB Service

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park SLSC

Peregian Beach SLSC

Sunshine Coast Surfcom

Cairns SLSC

Point Lookout SLSC

Coochiemudlo Island SLSC

Port Douglas SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Gold Coast

Coolangatta SLSC

Rainbow Bay SLSC

Coolum Beach SLSC

Rainbow Beach SLSC

Currumbin SLSC

Redcliffe Peninsula SLSC

18 Lifeguard Services

Dicky Beach SLSC

Sarina SLSC

Bundaberg Regional Council

Eimeo SLSC

Southport SLSC

Burdekin Shire Council

Elliott Heads SLSC

Sunshine Beach SLSC

Cairns Regional Council

Ellis Beach SLSC

Surfers Paradise SLSC

Cassowary Coast Regional Council

Emu Park SLSC

Tallebudgera SLSC

Fraser Coast Regional Council

Etty Bay SLSC

Tannum Sands SLSC

Gladstone Regional Council

Forrest Beach SLSC

Townsville Picnic Bay SLSC

Gold Coast City Council

Hervey Bay SLSC

Tugun SLSC

Gympie Regional Council

Kawana Waters SLSC

Tweed Heads Coolangatta SLSC

Hinchinbrook Shire Council

Kirra SLSC

Yeppoon SLSC

Livingstone Shire Council

Kurrawa SLSC

6 Branches

Mackay Regional Council

Mackay SLSC

North Barrier Branch

Morton Bay Regional Council

Marcoola SLSC

North Queensland Branch

Noosa Shire Council

Maroochydore SLSC

Point Danger Branch

Redland City Council

Mermaid Beach SLSC

South Coast Branch

Rockhampton Regional Council

Metropolitan Caloundra SLSC

Sunshine Coast Branch

Southbank Corporation

Miami Beach SLSC

Wide Bay Capricorn Branch

Sunshine Coast Regional Council

Mission Beach SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Sunshine Coast

Townsville City Council


Section 7

SLS Entities

131

Victoria 57 Clubs, 20 Support Operations Groups, 13 Australian Lifeguard Services 57 Clubs

Mount Martha LSC

Marine Rescue - Hastings

Altona LSC

Ocean Grove SLSC

Marine Rescue - Mallacoota

Anglesea SLSC

Point Leo SLSC

Marine Rescue - Mornington

Apollo Bay SLSC

Point Lonsdale SLSC

Marine Rescue - Port Campbell

Aspendale LSC

Port Campbell SLSC

Marine Rescue - Port Fairy

Bancoora SLSC

Port Fairy SLSC

Marine Rescue - Port Melbourne

Barwon Heads 13th Beach SLSC

Port Melbourne LSC

Marine Rescue - Portland

Beaumaris LSC

Portland SLSC

Marine Rescue - Waratah

Black Rock LSC

Portsea SLSC

Marine Rescue - Woodside

Bonbeach LSC

Rosebud & McCrae LSC

Mt Martha RWC Service

Brighton LSC

Sandridge LSC

Northern Port Phillip RWC Service

Cape Paterson SLSC

Sandringham LSC

Seaspray RWC Service

Carrum SLSC

Seaford LSC

Southern Peninsula Rescue Squad

Chelsea Longbeach SLSC

Seaspray SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter - Geelong

Dromana Bay LSC

Sorrento SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter - Melbourne

Edithvale LSC

South Melbourne LSC

13 Lifeguard Services

Elwood LSC

St Kilda LSC

Bass Coast Shire Council

Fairhaven SLSC

Torquay SLSC

Borough of Queenscliffe

Frankston LSC

Venus Bay SLSC

City of Greater Geelong

Gunnamatta SLSC

Waratah Beach SLSC

City of Warrnambool

Half Moon Bay SLSC

Warrnambool SLSC

Colac Otway Shire Council

Hampton LSC

Williamstown Swimming and LSC

East Gippsland Shire Council

Inverloch SLSC

Wonthaggi LSC

Glenelg Shire Council

Jan Juc SLSC

Woodside Beach SLSC

Mornington Peninsula Shire Council

Kennett River SLSC

Woolamai Beach SLSC

Moyne Shire Council

SLS Lakes Entrance

Wye River SLSC

Parks Victoria

Lorne SLSC

20 Support Operations

South Gippsland Shire Council

Mallacoota SLSC

Bass RWC Service

Surf Coast Shire Council

Mentone LSC

Bellarine RWC Service

Wellington Shire Council

Mildura LSC

Central Port Phillip RWC Service

Mordialloc LSC

Frankston RWC Service

Mornington LSC

LSV Comms


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

132

SLS Entities

Western Australia 29 Clubs, 20 Support Operations Groups, 11 Australian Lifeguard Services 29 Clubs

Port Bouvard SLSC

North Cottesloe Support Operations

Albany SLSC

Quinns Mindarie SLSC

Port Bouvard Support Operations

Binningup SLSC

Scarboro SLSC

Scarborough Support Operations

Broome SLSC

Secret Harbour SLSC

Secret Harbour Support Operations

Busselton SLSC

Smiths Beach SLSC

SLSWA Emergency Response Beacons

Champion Bay SLSC

Sorrento SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service

City of Bunbury SLSC

Swanbourne Nedlands SLSC

SLSWA Surfcom

City of Perth SLSC

Trigg Island SLSC

Yallingup Support Operations

Coogee Beach SLSC

Yanchep SLSC

11 Lifeguard Services

Cottesloe SLSC

20 Support Operations

City of Albany

Dalyellup Beach SLSC

Albany Support Operations

City of Greater Geraldton

Denmark SLSC

Broome Support Operations

City of Joondalup

Dongara-Denison SLSC

Bunbury Support Operations

City of Rockingham

Esperance-Goldfields SLSC

Busselton Support Operations

City of Wanneroo

Floreat SLSC

Denmark Support Operations

Rottnest Island Authority

Fremantle SLSC

Dongara Support Operations

Shire of Augusta Margaret River Lifeguard Service

Geraldton SLSC

Esperance-Goldfields Support Operations

Shire of Busselton

Mandurah SLSC

Fremantle Support Operations

Shire of Denmark Lifeguard Service

Margaret River SLSC

Geraldton Support Operations

Town of Cambridge

Mullaloo SLSC

Margaret River Support Operations

Town of Cottesloe

North Cottesloe SLSC

Metro North Support Operations

Northern Territory 4 Clubs, 1 Support Operations Group, 2 Australian Lifeguard Services 4 Clubs

1 Support Operation

2 Lifeguard Services

Darwin SLSC

Westpac Offshore Rescue Boat Service

Darwin City Council

Gove Peninsula SLSC Mindil Beach SLSC Walngawu Djakamirri SLSC

Darwin Waterfront Corporation


Section 7

SLS Entities

133

South Australia 19 Clubs, 5 Support Operations Groups, 2 Australian Lifeguard Services 19 Clubs

Normanville SLSC

5 Support Operations

Aldinga Bay SLSC

North Haven SLSC

SLSSA JRB Service

Brighton SLSC

Port Elliot SLSC

SLSSA RWC Service

Chiton Rocks SLSC

Port Noarlunga SLSC

SLSSA State Duty Officers

Christies Beach SLSC

Robe SLSS

SLSSA Surfcom

Elizabeth LSC

Seacliff SLSC

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service

Glenelg SLSC

Semaphore SLSC

2 Lifeguard Services

Goolwa Surf Life Saving Service

Somerton SLSC

Alexandria Council

Grange SLSC

South Port SLSC

Holdfast Bay City

Henley SLSC

West Beach SLSC

Moana SLSC

Whyalla SLSC

Tasmania 14 Clubs, 8 Support Operations Groups, 1 Australian Lifeguard Service 14 Clubs

Launceston LSC

Kingborough Volunteer Marine Rescue

Bicheno SLSC

Penguin SLSC

Tamar Sea Rescue

Boat Harbour SLSC

Port Sorell SLSC

Surf Life Saving Tas JRB Service

Bridport SLSC

Scamander SLSC

Surf Life Saving Tas RWC Service

Burnie SLSC

Somerset SLSC

Southern Marine Rescue and Training

Carlton Park SLSC

Ulverstone SLSC

Ulverstone Volunteer Marine Rescue

Clifton Beach SLSC

8 Support Operations

1 Lifeguard Service

Devonport SLSC

Dodges Ferry Sea Rescue

Clarence City Council

Kingston Beach SLSC

Freycinet Volunteer Marine Rescue


Surf Life Saving Australia

Annual Report 2013 - 2014

134

Glossary of Terms

Lifesaving

Common Acronyms

Blackspot – An area with a high concentration of coastal/ocean incidents and a high probability/risk of ongoing reoccurrence.

Preventative action – Where intervention by a lifesaving resource averts a person/s from getting into a potentially life threatening situation.

Coastal death – A fatality arising from various circumstances (e.g. heart attack, boat collision, fall, shark attack) occurring where the location of the death is coastal.

Rescue – Where intervention by a lifesaving resource removes a person/s from a life threatening or potentially life threatening situation.

Coastal drowning death – Where the location of the drowning is on the coast, in the ocean up to two nautical miles offshore or inland up to five times the width of the inlet/river.

Resuscitation – Preservation or restoration of life by establishing and maintaining a person’s airway, breathing and circulation.

Drowning – The process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersion/ immersion in liquid. Drowning death – A fatality arising from respiratory impairment as a result of submersion/immersion in liquid. First aid – Immediate or emergency assistance given on the spot to people suffering from illness or injury. Lifeguard – Typically a paid employee at a beach or another aquatic environment whose role is to rescue people in danger of drowning or prevent them getting into that situation.

Rip current – A narrow seaward flowing current of water moving through a surf zone (Short, 2003). Rock fishing death – A fatality arising from various circumstances occurring (e.g. wave motion, loss of footing) where the victim was participating in fishing activities on a rocky coast immediately prior to or during the incident. Service gap – An area identified as having an inadequate level of resources to meet public safety demands. Support operations – Rapid response rescue units, not affiliated to any one Surf Life Saving club.

Lifesaving service – A service which exists to provide aquatic safety services to the public.

Surfcom – SLS radio communications centre which assists in managing the communications of lifesaving operations and data collection.

Patrolled location – A location supervised constantly or periodically by a lifesaving service.

Total service plan – An assessment of current and future lifesaving resources, national blackspots, hotspots and trends.

ACNC – Australian Charities and Not-ForProfit Commission ACPSG – SLSA Australian Coastal Public Safety Guidelines AEMI – Australian Emergency Management Institute AEMVF – Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum ALS – Australian Lifeguard Service ARC – Australian Resuscitation Council ASC – Australian Sports Commission CPR – Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation DSC – Development Standing Committee EMA – Emergency Management Australia EMG – Executive Management Group FACC – Finance, Audit & Compliance Committee HRS – Helicopter Rescue Service ILS – International Life Saving Federation IRB – Inflatable Rescue Boat JRB – Jet Rescue Boat LSC – Lifesaving Standing Committee (now Lifesaving Member Advisory Committee) NHP – National High Performance Program ORB – Offshore Rescue Boat PM&C – Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet RIB – Rigid Inflatable Boat RTO – Registered Training Organisation RWC – Rescue Water Craft, sometimes called a Personal Water Craft SLS – Surf Life Saving SLSA – Surf Life Saving Australia SLSF – Surf Life Saving Foundation SSC – Sports Standing Committee


Section 8

Glossary of Terms

135


Surf Life Saving Australia Ltd 789 Botany Road, Rosebery NSW 2018 Australia Locked Bag 1010, Rosebery NSW 2018 Ph: +61 (0) 2 9215 8000 | Fax: +61 (0) 2 9215 8180 Web: sls.com.au | Email: info@slsa.asn.au ABN: 67 449 738 159 | ACN: 003 147 180 Limited additional copies of this annual report are available upon request from SLSA. This report is also available online at sls.com.au Editor: Bessie Quansah Design: Tom Parsons Images: Rob Palmer, Brigid Arnott, Harvpix, Mark Watson