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Supplementaire ISSUE #11

UK ÂŁ15

Steven Chevrin Sebastian Troncoso Steven Bindernagel Guilhem Eustache Fobe House Vincent Khouni Jorgen Axelvall A

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Supplementaire Issue #11

Contents P04_Fobe House P12_Citizen Francais P22_Big, Young Woman P32_Steven Bindernagel P40_The Fading Flesh... P49_Pool of Life P58_Youri P67_Vincent Khouni Editor-in-Chief: Ian Cole Content Editor: April-Lea Hutchinson Design/Art Direction: Ian Cole Copy Editor: Catherine-Porter Brown Cover Model: Steven Chevrin at UNO Photographer: Sebastian Troncoso Fashion Editor: Marc Pina wwws.supplementaire.org www.supplementaire.tumblr.com Twitter: @supplementaire Published by Art and Smoke (2013) All Rights Reserved www.artandsmoke.com

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Fobe House

Perhaps the best way to fill a space – is to not fill it at all.

natural surroundings.

On a largely desolate 25,000m² plot, in the village of Tassoultante, some 9.2km from central Marrakech, French architect Guilhem Eustache has perfectly demonstrated minimalistic living.

The individual buildings cover less than 250m² and consist of a main house, containing two bedrooms and bathrooms, a pool and pool-house, a garage and a guard’s house, with four beaconlike columns intricately weaving them all together.

The Fobe House (designed for and with top Belgian film director and producer Dimitri de Clercq) is split in to four separate groundlevel buildings and has been sparsely scattered across the terrain, a decision Eustache has said allows the house to form an intimate dialogue with the

In this interview, Eustache discusses how this project was born, his design influences, the links between architecture, the house and cinematography, as well as the process of designing and building the Fobe House, which he states, strangely chose its own destiny.


Interview: Guilhem Eustache Interview by Dean Stephen Davies Editor: Ian Cole


How did this project come about?  How were you introduced to the client? A client introduced me to a Belgian film producer and director.   He asked me to draw up plans for several houses on a plot of land he had purchased in Marrakech, Morocco.   The adventure could begin.   How involved was the client in the overall design of the house? The main difficulty was to define the project with the client.   Originally, we had planned to build three houses on this site.  The project was gradually reigned in to the smallest of those three houses, in order to preserve the field.  My client then informed me that he had purchased a second, larger plot of land (5 hectares) that was similar in nature but closer to the Atlas, which could accommodate the other two houses.   Where there any other requests from the client that impacted upon how we now view the house upon its completion? The house was constructed in various stages.

We first designed and built the principal dwelling at the center of the property.    Some of its most important details only revealed themselves over time.   A few years later, at the client´s request, I designed additional spaces that were built rapidly the caretaker's house (two attached cubes), a double garage (a long tube peppered with square openings), the "totem" fireplace that stands between those two structures, the three vertical walls that mark the entrance to the property and the "technical  local" at the back of the pool (the cube behind the concrete bleachers/stairs). Then we added a few details to the main house that were missing - the laminated stairs rising from the small pool and mounting all the way up to the roof terrace, all the paths and outdoor terraces that "float" fifty centimeters above the natural ground level, and finally the stairs/bleachers at the foot of the swimming pool.  When the main house was first designed, we had no idea what the final result would be.  We moved toward it unconsciously. The evolution of the project triggered our architectural choices. I could list all of our intentions for each

structure, each architectural choice, each detail.  But that seems a bit daunting. Each square meter was intensely discussed and debated, thought through and constantly reworked, so as to meet the client´s expectations.   When the plans became clearer, evolving over time, the "right" (sharp and precise) choice became increasingly rare.   Our possibilities were narrowing.  By that point, we had the strange feeling that the house was choosing its own destiny.  The project eventually nourished itself by keeping to its own logic.   Where there any architectural works or pieces of art and/or sculptor that inspired your design of the house? The work of the principal architects, painters, sculptors, conceptual artists or filmmakers of all periods and all schools have had varying influences on my work. A detail of a Giorgio de Chirico painting, stumbling upon the Fez dye baths one early morning, a tracking shot in an Orson Welles´ film, discovering the Jantar Mantar


site in Jaipur might all be conscious or unconscious sources of inspiration for me.  All of the impressions we carry around with us - some of them for a very long time - eventually slip into our work.  It's a very mysterious process.  It´s very difficult for me to pinpoint my precise architectural or artistic influences, where this project is concerned, so I'm always surprised when a journalist makes those very astute connections between my work and the work of one of those artists.

Extensive analysis of the site is always essential.  Its orientation to the sun, its size, shape, access, the best points of view (toward the horizon or neighboring homes) and any potential problems all necessarily impact upon one´s architectural choices. The property is located about ten kilometers south of Marrakech.  It is flat, often lying under a veil of heat that conceals the horizon.  It is only between the months of October and May that the snow-capped Atlas Mountains appear clearly.  

Had you been to Morocco before you started this project?  What was it about Morocco and your experiences in Morocco, if at all, that influenced the design of the house? I have visited Morocco on many occasions over the years.  The country immediately bewitched me.  And the three Moroccan projects I´ve worked on to date are certainly fed, to varying degrees, by all the images and impressions I´ve accumulated during my stays there.   How did the plot and the plot location inform the design?

Observing the site  convinced us to limit any built-up areas, in order to preserve the wildness of the land.  The over-all design of the project grew out of the topology of the terrain.   The main building was positioned in the center of the plot and the keeper's house and garage, on the edge closest to the road leading to Marrakesh.   The orientation of each section of the house was determined according to several criteria directly induced by the site itself - the best views on the Atlas Mountains, the best orientations  to protect the inhabitants from the sun or the wind.   The negative aspects of the site also had an influence

on the architecture. Two parallel concrete "sails" create a noise and visual barrier to the west. Views of the snow-covered Atlas Mountain range emerge on clear days, from October to May. The final orientation of the main house stems from that desire to see the Atlas, which has always haunted the client.   He chose this land, near Marrakech, primarily for its stunning views of the mountains.  We all worked together for the ideal positioning of the main dwelling on the property.   But it was the client alone who finally decided on the exact positioning of the house, to the precise degree.  The end result is a compromise between climate considerations and the desire to have the most beautiful views of the Atlas from the living areas. For this first project, I wanted to establish a close dialogue with the terrain, the vegetation and the Atlas Mountains on the horizon.  As we planned to build a small house, measuring 170 square meters, on a 2.5-hectare plot, we had to create a dynamic equilibrium, despite this difference in


scale.

The "totemic fireplace" which lies between the garage and the keeper's house plays the role of a signal visible from the access road leading to the property.

For me they could be a metaphor, a call to a state of dreaming. I work with symbols but they are also functional.   In terms of practicality - How does the design of the house work to be inhabited all year-round? To combat the heat, we created rooms with very high ceilings and doubled the  walls, leaving an air pocket between them.  Air currents were created by increasing the openings to the outside.  We designed a winter living space and a summer lounge.   We positioned concrete sun breezes in front of most of the openings, which work best when the sun is at its highest position in the sky, during the hottest hours of the day and the warmest season of the year...   Using light colors, placing a small pool of water by the entrance, and building a large swimming pool also afford the house a breath of coolness.

The stands (stairs) at the end of the pool lead the eye toward the Atlas Mountains in the distance, but they could lead further...

The most pleasant period of the year is between October and April.  Winters are very mild.  Temperatures are, on average, between 20° and 23° Celsius

What was the thought process regarding the distance between each of the 4 separate buildings?  Was this to create a relationship with the surrounding lands? Can you explain the stairs at the base of the pool and how the placement works to encompass the view of the Atlas Mountains? Architecture is a also a game that plays with the 'full' and the 'empty'. The land visually links the four buildings to one another.   The surrounding nature is an integral element of the Fobe House.

at mid-day, allowing for outdoor lunches.  However, as in all desert climates, the nights are quite cold and temperatures can drop to 4° to 5° Celsius. Summer temperatures hover around 40° Celsius in the shade, at the warmest hours of the day.  But they can even go up to 44° to 45° Celsius on occasion.  The hottest months are between June and September. The two bedrooms are the only rooms that are air-conditioned.  It is a reversible system, which also allows for heating during the coldest winter nights. Heating is used only in the two bedrooms at night, approximately 10 days per year and principally during the month of January.  In addition, there is a fireplace in the master bedroom, as well as in the keeper's house. Air conditioning is used between 10 and 15 days per year, in the summer months.   What has triggered your fascination with light?  From every angle the house is beautifully lit. How was the physical location of the house utilized in terms of visually and practically lighting the house?


FOBE home workers with Atlas Mountains


This search is at the heart of the discipline. We played with light and shadow to enhance and strengthen the volumes.   The perception varies according to the intensity of the resulting contrasts.   The architecture reveals itself differently pending the time of day and according to the seasons. There is a simplicity and obviously intentionally minimalistic aesthetic to the design of the project, which could, to some people, come across as incomplete.  Would you agree with this statement? Could you explain the ‘maze-like’ design and positioning of the walls within the house and surrounding lands.  Was this a deliberate design feature?   Do you want to take the viewer on a journey? In the late 1920s, Le Corbusier drew the plans of the Villa Savoye  dedicated to the auto industry; symbol of modernity.  The Fobe House attempts, on the contrary, to preserve the wilderness.   It is likely that this choice, fully assumed by the client, is at the origin of this sensation of incompleteness. Minimalism often induces an element of mystery...

Circulations between buildings are created without any predetermined directional paths and often in direct contact with the earth itself. The idea to propose an architectural journey of initiation is very appealing to me. Everyone must freely decide to experience it according to his or her own sensibility or mood. It is quite exciting to captivate the visitor, to suggest a vertiginous rise of steps, a plunging view into space.  Or a pan across the landscape may eventually dissolve into a zoom towards the infinite, as you slowly move forward.   The way the house is designed and has been photographed since its completion, seems almost like it was destined to be a Photographer’s subject or perhaps even a film setting.  Could we be seeing this house in any of the client’s films in the near future? There is a fine link between architecture and cinema.  I remind you that my client for this project is a Belgian film producer and director.  Architec-

ture is primarily perceived through movement. The eye moves, when the perspective opens, gradually revealing the various elements that constitute the house.  In the distance, we see a white square.  As we move closer, it becomes a cube, a white wall, a tube.  Then we discover openings...   But another white rectangle turns out to be a flat wall and a small triangle, a pyramid. It would be fantastic to use the space as a film setting as the Villa Malaparte was in its time…  We often evoke this with the client. According to him, when you walk through the Fobe House, "There is something very cinematographic about it.  There are no dead ends, and everything is very much always in movement.  You experience a sort of permanent tracking shot, running through the house from one space to another.” Special thanks to: Dimitri de Clercq & Guilhem Eustache www.guilhemeustache.com


All images copyright Jean-Marie Monthiers


Citizen Francais

photography: SEBASTIAN TRONCOSO stylist: MARC PIÑA makeup: SAMANTA FALCONE hair: SAMANTA FALCONE using REDKEN model: STEVEN CHEVRIN at UNO BARCELONA

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Photography by Sebastian Troncoso Photographer’s assistant Vivian Bellido Styling by Marc Piùa Make-up by Samanta Falcone Hair by Samanta Falcone using Redken Model: Steven Chevrin at UNO Barcelona


The Fading Flesh of Life and Blood photography CULLY WRIGHT styling JULIA PLATT-HEPWORTH hair & makeup KYLIE SALLEE Models TALISA DURAN and GUS DRAKE at SMG, SEATTLE

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Big, Young Woman

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The Fading Flesh of Life and Blood photography CULLY WRIGHT styling JULIA PLATT-HEPWORTH hair & makeup KYLIE SALLEE Models TALISA DURAN and GUS DRAKE at SMG, SEATTLE

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The Fading Flesh of Life and Blood photography CULLY WRIGHT styling JULIA PLATT-HEPWORTH hair & makeup KYLIE SALLEE Models TALISA DURAN and GUS DRAKE at SMG, SEATTLE above Lanvin per H&M Vintage T-shirt Elizaveta Novikova Decorative Arm Piece ASOS Trousers

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Steven Bindernagel Artist In Conversation Interview: Jade Fitton

Born in Ohio in 1978, Steven Bindernagel has been working hard at his craft for years. Now, after a series of successful exhibitions (and years dedication), Bindernagel is enjoying some well deserved recognition. Here he enlightens us on everything from how his adopted home of New York influences him everyday to whether doing what you love is necessarily synonymous with being happy ‌..


You have a very intense work ethic working up to 15 hours a day 6 days a week – doesn’t sound like there’s all that much down time. How do you remain inspired? I do spend a lot of time in my studio, however not all of that time is spent painting or drawing. When I arrive at the studio, I often start off the morning by reading or spending time online. I also play around with paint in the studio without much intent on creating anything specific. By the afternoon I am usually more focused and can spend several hours in a row focused on one painting. This all varies of course, depending on what I have on the calendar. Now that my solo show has just passed at CRG, I have a little more down time to read, write and explore. You’ve been quoted as saying “It was at CCAD that I realized I love making art and I was willing to do everything possible to do it for the rest of my life,” what have you had to do so far? CCAD (Columbus College of Art and Design) is where I attended undergraduate school in Ohio. That quote

was taken from an interview I did with the school’s alumni magazine. I was trying impress upon students who might be reading the interview that a career in the arts is a lot of work. It's a daunting profession to take on in many ways, particularly as you start to get a bit older and worry more about money, financial security, family life etc. But as irresponsible and crazy as it is to be an artist, it’s also wildly rewarding. For me, I just had to stick my neck out and try to make a run for it. When I moved to New York for grad school, I knew next to nobody in the art world. After school, I got a job in Chelsea at an art gallery so I could start networking. Long hours became the normworking 9–5 and then heading to the studio until after midnight. Eventually it started to pay off though, and now the majority of my time is spent painting. Do you feel like you’ve had to sacrifice anything? Despite the common perception of artists living a bohemian, carefree lifestyle, most of the successful artists I know are extremely hard working and

dedicated people. I think most artists, myself included, realize early on that they really don’t ever expect to make much money from their art. So you have to go into this career with that mindset. So yes, I have sacrificed a lot early on in my career—steady income, financial stability, benefits that one would get with a salary job. That being said, I wouldn’t change anything for the world. And lately things have been going well, so hopefully the gambit is paying off. If for whatever reason, art had not been an option, what would you have done if you hadn’t followed your heart? And do you think you could have been happy? I would have done something in a creative field. Design or architecture. Or possibly some sort of carpentry. My first love has always been painting, so I find it hard to imagine my life without painting in it. But I think we all have a way in life of finding things that make us happy, even if its not through our primary profession. Following you heart does not guarantee happiness in much the same way that not following your heart doesn’t ensure misery.


It has often been noted with your work that “soft and gentle must be juxtaposed with harsh and aggressive”, why do you feel it is important to have that juxtaposition? I often will have several conceptual and technical juxtapositions in my paintings and drawings. Soft/hard, gentle/aggressive, intuition/logic, making a mess/imposing an order, gravity/weightlessness, fast/slow, flat/textured—I want all of these dichotomous elements to be playing with and against each other in my work because it creates a tension and unrest in the art. In the case of sensitivity vs. aggression, I want the elements in the work to feel like they are gently floating off into the atmosphere or slowly fading away. However, to the other extreme, I want areas of the painting to be active and explosive. It all relates to the circle of life in a way. You can’t have life without death. If you could pick one from art, one from literature, one from music and one from film, who/what would your

influences be? This list would probably change every month if I had to answer it that often, but here are some influences that have been on my mind lately. I am still recovering from the de Kooning retrospective at the MoMA in late 2011. I have always liked de Kooning, but that retrospective was epic. I love Flatland by Edwin Abbott Abbott. It’s a full of satire, humor, math, abstraction. One of my favorite books of all time. I have been listening to a lot of Neil Young. I don’t know how it influences me directly… but his first couple albums are almost perfect. Smart, full of heart, beautifully executed but still rough around the edges. I’m admittedly not much of a film buff – I don’t know if any film has drastically influenced me in a prominent way. The last movie I saw that truly blew me away though was The Departed. You’ve said that you have to see

being an artist as a lifestyle rather than a career and have, in the past, had to have a strong support network around you in order to support you, why do you think creative careers are, for the most part, the ones that are underpaid/undervalued? I kind of touched on this before, but I don’t think you can go into the arts expecting to make a lot of money from it. Not that it can’t happen, because it can, but you have to be a painter or photographer or musician because you love it more than anything else. So once you decide that your art is the most important thing to you, then you have to go about figuring out a way to make it happen. Particularly here in the U.S., there is not a lot of funding for the arts. Grants are available, but they are hard to get and there is a lot of competition. So for most artists I know, it’s a grind. You work to pay the rent, you create when you can. You skip dinner with your friends or going to the movies because you have to get in the studio and make art. And instead


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of dropping $20 at the movies, you can buy a tube of paint instead. As far as artists being underpaid or art being undervalued, I’m not really sure what to say. I think it comes down to an issue of practicality for the average person. Most people in the world don’t have money for capital A “Art”. But when we talk about that type of art, we are only talking about such a small portion of the art in the world. The treasured art that I own is not expensive. They are pieces that I have randomly found or traded with another artist for. I think we have to be careful never to equate monetary value with appreciation or sentimental value when we talk about art. They are not the same. You paintings have a very natural element to them, from crystal formations to flowers and leaves – living in New York, where these influences are somewhat limited, have you been tempted by the lure of man-

made formations? It’s funny, before I moved to New York my paintings were actually quite structured and rigid. They were much more wedded to the grid with very few natural elements at all. Once I got to New York, the imagery in my paintings slowly took on more organic and natural characteristics over the years. It’s almost as if I were always wishing for surroundings different from my current situation—like, the grass is always greener. But now, with images so readily available on the Internet on sites like Tumblr, I can pull imagery from anywhere and everywhere. But the urban grid of NYC does influence me a lot. Much like Cleveland where I grew up, I love the industrial, beaten down areas of the city. The ability to link the emotional content of a painting as well as the technical insights of creating is important to you – could you explain how you feel the two are linked?

For me, the act of creating is directly linked to the emotional or conceptual content of the painting. I have no interest in painting something that exists already – rather my process of painting and drawing is much more intuitive. I make a mark, sometimes wipe it away, sometimes I leave it. And then I make another mark in relation to that last stroke. So the works slowly accumulate piece by piece, layer by layer. Its not that I want the viewer to be able to see or focus on my process, rather I just couldn’t produce the paintings that I do without my particular process. So therefore, the two are inseparable. What was the moment in your career you have been most proud of yourself? And did you feel this was the same moment as, say, your family? Well, I just had my first solo show in New York, which has always been my top career goal up to this point in my


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life. So that was incredibly fulfilling and I was very excited and pleased with the exhibition. My family was all there for the opening and they have always be very supportive. Now it’s time to set some new goals and get back at it in the studio. What can we hope to see from you next? I have a solo show of small paintings this summer at a great gallery in Birmingham, Alabama called Beta Pictoris Gallery. I’ll have some works at art fairs this year with my NYC gallery, CRG Gallery, and hopefully a limited edition print coming in 2013 as well. I’m also hoping to start lining up some shows on the West Coast and in Europe, so you can keep track of my latest news at: www.stevenbindernagel.com.


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The Fading Flesh of Life and Blood photography CULLY WRIGHT styling JULIA PLATT-HEPWORTH hair & makeup KYLIE SALLEE Models TALISA DURAN and GUS DRAKE at SMG, SEATTLE

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The Fading Flesh of Life and Blood photography CULLY WRIGHT styling JULIA PLATT-HEPWORTH hair & makeup KYLIE SALLEE Models TALISA DURAN and GUS DRAKE at SMG, SEATTLE

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Talisa wears Studded Jeans by Daang Goodman Tripp NYC Tank Top by Vintage Portland trailblazers Gus wears Models own Jeans Vintage Belt Denim vest by Levis


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The Fading Flesh of Life and Blood photography CULLY WRIGHT styling JULIA PLATT-HEPWORTH hair & makeup KYLIE SALLEE Models TALISA DURAN and GUS DRAKE at SMG, SEATTLE

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Pool of Life

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Youri

Photography & Styling: Jeremy Louis Jolie Model: Youri Dedeurwaerder at Hakim Model Management


Montages by Vincent Khouni

The Fading Flesh of Life and Blood photography CULLY WRIGHT styling JULIA PLATT-HEPWORTH hair & makeup KYLIE SALLEE Models TALISA DURAN and GUS DRAKE at SMG, SEATTLE

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SUPPLEMENTAIRE #11