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International magazine for lifestyle and business • www.superior-magazine.com

JANUARY 2017


IF YOU

DO IT RIGHT 17 – 19 January 2017 Berlin Postbahnhof

IT WILL LAST FOREVER


IT WILL

LAST FOR EVER IF YOU DO IT RIGHT

17 – 19 January 2017 Berlin Postbahnhof


„Für Menschen, die sonst nicht zu stoppen sind...“

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Superior is an international magazine for lifestyle and business from the most thrilling cities around the globe. Superior Magazine stands for high-quality content that is a source of new insights and inspiration. In the five sections Fashion & Style, Art & Design, Culture & Entertainment, Food & Travel and Business & Politics you find interviews with fascinating people, exclusive photos and videos, reports on high-class events, the hottest places in the city and a lot more. Superior Magazine’s sophisticated design provides an artistic showcase for all kinds of vanguard visual expression and imagery. Superior Magazine is published across all media channels – mobile, digital, print and web - with a strong link between the channels.


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CONTENT CULTURE ■ ENTERTAINMENT

BUSINESS ■ POLITICS ART ■ DESIGN

FOOD ■ TRAVEL FASHION ■ STYLE

14 16 22 26 40 98 108 122 128 138 144

EDITORIAL

CONTRIBUTORS CHRISTIAN ROTHENHAGEN

I try to ‘freeze’ some city moments in my drawings

YOUR LIFE IS A JOKE

Fashion editorial by Maria Ritsch

SUSTAINABLE FASHION

Greenshowroom & Ethical Fashion Show Berlin AW 17

HER KIND OF SOUL

Fashion editorial by Christina Hasenauer

BETTER IN TIME

Fashion editorial by Simone Rudloff

HOPE

Articles from the Superior Magazine App

GO ALONG WITH A.

Fashion editorial by Verena Knemeyer

NUMBER 38

Fashion editorial by Tom Porter & Holly Chapman

IMPRINT


EDITORIAL

DEAR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE READERS, W

e are living in a time with lots of changes - some of them are good, some are bad. Unfortunately, sometimes the ‘bad news’ are louder and more in the foreground which gives us the feeling that the ‘bad news’ are in the majority. But that’s not true. There are so many examples of a positive engagement by people and institutions that give hope. Having this in mind we decided last year to start the year 2017 with a special Hope issue. We like to present people and projects that give on an ecological, ethical or social field some hope to the world. Some of them are big things, but we also like to present small initiatives that show with how much enthusiasm many of us try to make our world a little bit better. Even the process, meeting these people and talking to them was exciting for us. The more people and initiatives we saw, the more we found. It was like a snowball rolling down the hill and becoming bigger and bigger. Therefore we decided to continue with

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Tom

this process. Starting with our Hope issue for the whole year 2017 it is our aim to present you as much as possible content with a positive impact. And, if you think we should present people and initiatives you know that fit, just contact us. The success of sustainable fashion is definitely something that gives hope. Therefore we present you on more than thirty pages sustainable designers and the sustainable fashion trade fairs Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Fair Berlin which are part of Berlin Fashion Week. Of course we have also fashion editorials for your. In this issue they come from Christina Hasenauer, Holly Chapman, Maria Ritsch, Simone Rudloff and Verena Knemeyer. For our covers we continue with a tradition we already have - illustrated covers. We are very happy that Christian Rothenhagen, who lives in Berlin and works worldwide as illustrator and art director, turned our covers into pieces of art.

Tom and the whole Superior Magazine team

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Nerys

Itamar

Yannic

Thain

Yule

Jana

Milena

LĂŠa

Sarah


CONTRIBUTORS JANUARY 2017

HOLLY CHAPMAN

© Tom Porter

ORIGIN PROFESSION

England, Kent, based in Camden Stylist

CREATIVE APPROACH

Holly considers herself to be feminist, which influences her photography and the style of representing strong women dynamically, whilst creating characters and stories through fashion.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Inspiration can be found in all the places and people she comes across daily. The city with all its creatives is inspiring as well as the huge collection of old and current fashion magazines she collected.

ABOUT HER FASHION EDITORIAL NUMBER 38 FOR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE

This editorial was shot in Holly´s shared flat in Camden. This makes the shoot very personal. She wanted it to have a ‘coming of age’ feel to it and embrace the different emotions that they have experienced whilst living in the space.

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CHRISTINA HASENAUER

© Dominic Packulat

ORIGIN PROFESSION

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Austria, based in Berlin, Germany Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

She is always in search of that precious moment where emotions are released, unique moods are created and stories are to be told.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Light chasing shadows, the interplay of fabrics and bare skin, hidden details that secretly uncover, contrasts that blend together, emotions expressed by one-of-a-kind characters, all these things inspire Christina.

ABOUT HER FASHION EDITORIAL HER KIND OF SOUL FOR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE

The combination of illustration and photography directly on set build a scenery that surrounds and extends the main character of the story. This mood is supported by unique garments that vary in shape and texture and enhance the aura that seems to be present.


CONTRIBUTORS JANUARY 2017

VERENA KNEMEYER

© Verena Knemeyer

ORIGIN PROFESSION

Germany, Hamburg Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

Urban backgrounds are her favourite. Structured and clean frames that are almost graphical in contrast to a dynamic and moving model are fascinating her.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

New american color photogrpahy is her greatest inspiration. Back in the days when she was photography student Verena discovered this group of photographers that since then have a huge impact on her own style. Especially “Uncommon Places” by Stephen Shore is a great influence to her.

ABOUT HER FASHION EDITORIAL GO ALONG WITH A. FOR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE

When she first met the model Alexander he said “I’m just a kiwi lost in Europe”. Verena picked up that idea of a total stranger wandering around in the unknown city. She took him to Hammerbrook, a part of Hamburg that is neither nice to look at nor known for tourists who come and visit. That’s how she ended up following him with the camera while he explored the neighbourhood, looking for uncommon places.

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MARIA RITSCH

© Anna Ritsch

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ORIGIN

Austria, Vienna

PROFESSION

Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

Maria´s style of photography is mostly natural, minimalistic and calm. It is an attempt to capture the interaction between human bodies and spaces.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Maria gets inspired by people, spaces, forms, motions and emotions that surround her.

ABOUT HER FASHION EDITORIAL YOUR LIFE IS A JOKE FOR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE

It is combining strong geometry in public space with bold black and white garments.


CONTRIBUTORS JANUARY 2017

SIMONE RUDLOFF

© David Birshan

ORIGIN PROFESSION

Australia, Byron Bay Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

Simone herself doesn´t have a specific style, when it comes to her photography. It is more about what people choose to perceive. She isn´t following a certain process or making plans. Each series turns out differently due to the teamwork, the models spontaneous inspiration during the shoot.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

There is a number of things that inspire Simone: frustration, long walks through London, too much wine, personal essays from various authors etc. And whilst traveling she follows Grace Coddington´s advice: “always keep your eyes open. Never fall asleep in the car or anything like that. Keep watching, because whatever you see out the window, or where ever, it can inspire you”.

ABOUT HER FASHION EDITORIAL BETTER IN TIME FOR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE

For this shoot, she collaborated with old friends from her hometown. They incorporated feelings of lethargy, being bored and stuck in a small town and the feeling of wanting to get out but being tied down by friends, responsibilities and/or fear. It is an homage to their hometown, because since growing up and going overseas they can appreciate it much more.

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BERLIN

CHRISTIAN ROTHENHAGEN I try to ‘freeze’ some city moments in my drawings Interview ■ Tom Felber Photos ■ Christian Rothenhagen The illustrator and art director Christian Rothenhagen lives in Berlin and loves cities. That’s something we immediately discovered when we visited him in his studio. Tom from Superior Magazine talked with the artist about his various passions. Christian, you are a successful illustrator and art director. Was that already your desire since ever? As a kid, when I was asked what I wanted to be once I’m grown up – I always said ‘designer’. I didn’t know, what exactly that was, but what I knew was – it had to do with drawing. And I always loved drawing. Still, due to a bunch of political circumstances (I grew up in East Berlin) and some self-confidence struggles I first did an apprenticeship as a carpenter, followed by going back to school to get my A levels … and

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then studied Social Education … Finished it all – just to realize I always wanted to do art as first priority! Well, I never stopped drawing aside. A lot of your illustrations show city- or streetmotifs. How does that come? I am a city kid. I grew up in Berlin. Played in rough backyards and on East Berlin attics. Always loved all the history of this city, the stories the city could tell at any given corner or cobble stone here… And I learned to see the beauty in all this. Maybe that is why I try to hold on time, ‘freeze’ some moments in my drawings. You grew up and still live in Berlin. How does this city inspire you? Just answered a little bit of that above. This city is special on so many levels. It breezes history, cries and laughs out billions of (personal) stories. It survived two world wars and always stood up with grace. I love travelling and exploring the world, but I could never

JANUARY 2017

imagine leaving Berlin for good. Never. I am bound to this old lady and I love her. Which advantages and disadvantages living and working in Berlin do you see compared with other cities? So many and not so many left… Berlin is an international melting pot and my home. Quite easy to get everywhere from here and many people still come here. No dull moment. I am lucky, that I grew up here and I know the city quite well. The city has changed so much, and not for the better. Once again, I try to keep / “freeze” some moments in my drawings, keeping ‘My Berlin’ alive without sounding too nostalgic. I know – change is normal and somehow needed. But change and respect for the city and the citizens should go hand in hand… You are a skate boarder since many years. How did that come? Did that inspire your art as well? I owe skateboarding. I started in 1984 with a make-

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shift board – made from an old roller skate and a found piece of wood… quite classic. There was a tiny little East Berlin skate scene which I joined a few years after. This changed my life, the way I looked on architecture, friendship even, culture, self-confidence and life itself. Skateboarding definitely changed my look on architecture for ever. And – yes, architecture is the core of my work.

You already achieved a lot. But what would you love to do in the future what you did not do so far?

Are you still skate boarding? And if yes, where do you do it in Berlin?

As somebody who really knows Berlin. Which places, stores, restaurants, bars or anything else would you recommend if friends would visit Berlin for the first time?

Kind of. It’s not that I skate daily or even weekly. I am an old guy – in skateboarding terms! Streetskating for me is definitely over since a bunch of years, but I still love mini-ramps. I got a little piece of land a few years back – an hour outside Berlin – just to built my own mini-ramp. Having sessions there with my buddies, with barbeques and all. Childhood dream / check! What is deerBLN? A moniker, a tag, a label, …, a studio: deerBLNstudio. Kind of like a declaration of love to this city. All in once.

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Oh, that is a tough one! My life is good, I am healthy, I have good friends and live in an amazing city. So, I’m grateful and hope to keep that all. Maybe use my art even more to do good, to ‘unfuck’ the world a bit.

Well, there’s bunch of great places – for different reasons. Try to see the ‘Spiegelsaal’ at Clärchens Ballhaus, have a pancake at Strandbad Mitte, a beer at Eschschloraque Rümschrümp, some good Whiskey at Griffin. See the sunset by the Spree, bike the city in the summer, walk through the Tiergarten on a summer day, see the green backyards at Potsdamer Strasse … breathe the history of this city …. Thank you for the interview!


DECEMBER 2016

Turtleneck â– WOOD WOOD 26


YOUR LIFE IS A JOKE

Photography ■ Maria Ritsch Art Direction ■ Magdalena Jurisic Model ■ Maximilian Mauracher

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Jacket ■ SECOND HAND Turtleneck ■ WEEKDAY

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Turtleneck ■ WOOD WOOD Pants ■ ÉTUDES

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Turtleneck ■ WOOD WOOD Pants ■ ÉTUDES Socks ■ ADER ERROR Slipper ■ BIRKENSTOCK

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Sweater ■ ÉTUDES

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T-shirt ■ ÉTUDES Pants ■ ÉTUDES

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T-shirt ■ ÉTUDES Pants ■ ÉTUDES

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION GREENSHOWROOM & ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN AUTUMN/WINTER 2017

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OLAF SCHMIDT & MAGDALENA SCHAFFRIN ALINASCHUERFELD BLEED COSSAC DEBORAH CAMPBELL ATELIER JUNGLE FOLK LANGBRETT

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LANGERCHEN LANIUS MASKA REET AUS RHUMAA ROYAL BLUSH ZURITA


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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

GREENSHOWROOM & ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN INTERVIEW WITH OLAF SCHMIDT & MAGDALENA SCHAFFRIN

selected labels that appeal because of their first-rate design produced on a fair and environmentally-friendly basis. We’re pleased that we have been able to welcome more and more labels to our trade fairs every season. And we’re also making progress in terms of quality: the overall quality of the collections has tangibly improved over the past few years.

Interview ■ Tom Felber Photos ■ MESSE FRANKFURT

Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies of Messe Frankfurt, which organises Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin, and Magdalena Schaffrin, Creative Director of both exhibitions, talked to Tom from Superior Magazine about the highlights this season. Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin are again increasing their exhibition space. Is a permanent growth important for you?

Olaf Schmidt: Further growth is of course very close to our hearts. However, it’s not necessarily about growing as quickly as possible. Rather, we want to develop the trade fair duo in a sustainable and strategic manner. Both trade fairs follow a clear plan anpresent

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Some exhibitors present their collections for the first time at one of the two fairs. Would you like to mention some?

Magdalena Schaffrin: We’re pleased that we will once again see some new labels again at the trade fairs this season. At the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin, Hoodlamb will be presenting for the first time, a company that manufactures urban and completely vegan parkas from hemp fibre. We will also welcome Amov, a Danish label that convinces with its sporty Scandinavian design style. Naturaline by Remei AG will be coming to the trade fair for the first time with its completely transparent supply chain. And in Kunert, we will have a conventional label presenting a new, green line. At Greenshowroom, we look forward to seeing one of its founders, Jana Keller, present her new women’s outerwear line under her brand Royal Blush. Also new are Rhumaa from the Netherlands, bySigne


from Denmark and Liisa Soolepp from Estonia and they will be inspiring with contemporary styles. Which themes and trends are very important from your point of view at this season’s Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin?

Magdalena Schaffrin: In terms of trends, the upcoming season is dominated by contrasts: decorative patterns meet sporty minimalism, wide silhouettes meet slim cuts and smoky tones meet bright colours. The fashion is becoming more colourful and varied. This fashionable eclecticism is breaking up conventional styles and we are seeing new style breakthroughs come to the fore. In a nutshell: glamour and sportiness are entering into an exciting interplay. Last season Eymeric François improved the staging of the fashion shows at Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin and the audience really liked it. Do you continue with that?

Olaf Schmidt: In our experience, the two fashion shows are the highlight of the three trade fair days and will be taking place in a new location in January: the Energieforum by the River Spree, just three minutes’ walk away from the Postbahnhof. In collaboration with Eymeric François, we enjoyed two wonderful shows last season. He will once again support Magdalena with the styling, choreography and selection of models this time round. Beside the presentation of fashion and the catwalk shows, talks, panel discussions and showcases are important elements of the fair. What are the main themes you cover there?

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Olaf Schmidt: Our focal point this time is called “ActiveSlow”. To us, this means progressive design and performance in combination with resource efficiency and recyclability. In a showcase entitled “Active Wear +”, Manufactum and ESMOD Berlin International University of Art for Fashion present a selection of prototypical functional clothing. Selected exhibitors from both trade fairs will also present design innovations that are characterised by their particular focus on resource efficiency, slowness and recyclability. And the panel discussion will cover this in more depth. With the title “Save the sea: the issue of textile shedding into water bodies”, we will be focusing on the challenges relating to pollution of the sea by the textile industry. Is there anything else visitors definitely should not miss at Greenshowroom and Ethical Fashion Show Berlin this time?

Magdalena Schaffrin: Langbrett will present the GuppyBag at the trade fair for the first time, a wash bag that catches microfibres so that they cannot enter the water supply and will answer questions about it during the panel discussion. Lanius x Kunert will present tights made from a new recycled material at the trade fair: ECONYL®, which is made from old fishing nets that float around in the sea as litter, and Ackermann and Werner Schuhe will once again be there with products made from Cradle2Cradle “Gold” certified olive leather which is produced in such a pollution-free manner that you could even eat it.

Thank you for the interview!

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ALINASCHUERFELD Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ ALINASCHUERFELD

Respect and responsibility are two of the core values of Alina Schürfeld and two of the reasons why she initially founded her label ALINASCHUERFELD. For the Hamburg based designer it´s all about creating change, inspiring and sensitising. She originally comes from an interior design background, but couldn´t stand the massive exploitation that takes place every single day and is part of the high street fashion business. Alina Schürfeld conceptualizes fashion as a tool of communication to create consciousness for a sustainable lifestyle and ecological, fair traded fashion. Sustainability means more to her than saving the resources and balance that is left, because making improvements for generations to come is what really matters and is the aim. Even the designs themselves cross the bridge between zeitgeist and timelessness, as conscious actions for preserving our natural environment do.

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The production of the unique ALINASCHUERFELD pieces take place in Spain and Italy, where masters of craftsmanship bring the designs to life, using only vegetable or chrome-free tanned leather and bio-certified salmon skin. Back in the early days of her label it was quite difficult to find suppliers that committed to sustainable production methods and realized how important it was. Nowadays the society and therefore the customers and suppliers become more and more aware of the necessity of leaving the smallest footprint possible. Alina Schürfeld sticks to her values and only works with manufactures that do the same, because – as simple as it sounds - good business comes from good practise. For her Autumn/Winter 2017 collection she works with contrasts, metallic finishes and an edgy attitude – and the designs are always elegant.

www.alinaschuerfeld.com

Visit ALINASCHUERFELD at Greenshowroom

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BLEED Text â– Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos â–  BLEED

When the nature is your friend sustainability becomes a matter of course. Michael Spitzbarth is a nature loving athlete who surfs, skates, snowboards and has a strong connection to his environment. In 2008 Bleed was born and the label itself, the name, designs and philosophy are results of his connection with nature and observations. For years and years, the nature and our environment were exploited and had to suffer for our own enrichment, but for the team around Michael nature is the most beautiful playground that has to be nourished and treated like the mother it is to everything and all of us. In their new A/W 2017 collection The cold lake they celebrate nature as refugium from the hectic of our lives and present clothes that can be worn for work or during outdoor trips.

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During the production of their functional sportswear three standards have to be met: “It has to be fair, produced under sustainable conditions, and of course animal friendly (vegan)�, says Michael himself. Additionally, clothes from Bleed not only meet their own standards but their whole supply-chain is certified with the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). The philosophy for his own label is, as simple as it may sound, that to live in harmony with each other and the nature nothing and no one should have to suffer and from the production to working conditions and retailing everything aligns with this point of view. In the very heart of Upper Franconia in Germany Michael and his team work enthusiastically, keep on learning about and experimenting with new sustainable materials to make sure, that the nature has to Bleed no more.

www.bleed-clothing.com

Visit Bleed at Ethical Fashion Show Berlin

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

COSSAC Text â– Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos â–  COSSAC

When she moved to London six years ago, fashion designer Agata Natalia Kosak started to discover the value of sustainability. In 2014 then, she founded her green fashion label Cossac as the natural outcome of her personal journey, as she says herself. For her, living sustainably means to live consciously and to think about the impact you have on the planet, the environment and its future. By designing clothes, that are fresh and sassy, yet minimal, Agata wants to give the customer a really good reason to buy more sustainable clothes and think about their choices of consume. From the garments to the marketing she collaborates and works with factories, that apply ethical and sustainable standards for production and labour. As many other smaller labels, Cossac sometimes struggles with placing small orders in an industry that mainly thinks big and with finding factories that are willing to work on their ecological footprint and meet certain standards.


But with passion and commitment Agata is learning, improving and having fun with fashion. She doesn´t want to compromise but design stylish pieces that are fun to wear whilst they can give you 100% peace of mind. The inspiration to create and design clothes, that are timeless and fashionable, comes from a lot of traveling. The theme for her A/W 2017 collection is ‘Retro Simplicity’ and the result of many influences merged together. Voluminous shapes with clean details make the retro inspired pieces interesting and give them a modern touch.

www.cossac.co.uk

Visit Cossac at Ethical Fashion Show Berlin

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DEBORAH CAMPBELL ATELIER Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ DEBORAH CAMPBELL ATELIER

When Deborah Campbell started her own green fashion label, she was fed up with high street fashion which’s only value is money after working for them in manufacturing and consulting for 15 years. The idea for Deborah Campbell Atelier was born and is a fusion of its founder’s love of modern art and fashion. Prints and patterns that are either inspired by art and nature or the result of collaborations with artists are the signature look of Deborah Campbell’s designs. There is no printed dress or shirt like the other and fashion becomes a unique piece of art that can be worn throughout many seasons. For the A/W 2017 collection there will be organic jacquard denim in different styles, chunky cable knits and a continuation of the Tabitha Wilson collaboration.

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Of course, a long life-span for her clothes is one of the keynotes of a green label and accordingly it is important to her, that the whole supply chain does not do any harm to the planet at all in order to preserve it for future generations. Therefore, Deborah and her team only work with upcycled or recycled materials and organic fabrics such as cotton, wool, denim or viscose from fair trade producers who empower their workers to build sustainable futures for them and their families. For an independent fashion brand, that is working against the ever faster flow of the globalized market it can be hard to find suitable suppliers in terms of minimum order standards and prices for small orders. Improving and working on making the fashion business a little less exploitive is Deborah Campbell’s mission and sustainability her lifestyle.

www.deborahcampbellatelier.com

Visit Deborah Campbell Atelier at Greenshowroom

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JUNGLE FOLK Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ JUNGLE FOLK

When the Jungle Folk founder Pauline Treis came back from a trip to Latin America she was very much inspired by the traditional crafts and natures beauty and brought out her first collection in 2013. Her approach to fashion was very clear from the start: if she becomes part of this overproducing and overconsuming fashion industry it has to be with a focus on sustainability. Designing and producing clothes that can be worn regardless of trends and won’t fall apart after one season of wearing is crucial for Pauline and definitely is a matter of course. In the end it is also a matter of quality and from the materials to the finished pieces this is what Jungle Folk stands for – a high-grade, sustainable wardrobe. But because sustainability also has a social factor, building long-lasting business relationships and not just helping but collaborating is the fundament for initiating change and practised by Jungle Folk and their suppliers.

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These collaborations first started in Medellin, Colombia but today manufactures with fair labour conditions in Peru and Bosnia are working together with Jungle Folk as well, which creates multicultural exchange and inspiration. Of course the fabrics are certified by Fair Trade and GOTS and make high-quality staple pieces for women, that are inspired by the needs and small wonders of the daily life. The A/W 2017 collection consists of softly coloured blouses, dresses and knitwear for the sophisticated woman. Pauline Treis built up a fashion brand, that is part of an upcoming movement towards more sustainability and a smaller ecological footprint. In business and in private she is setting a good example for that.

www.junglefolk.com

Visit Jungle Folk at Greenshowroom

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LANGBRETT Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ LANGBRETT

The wilderness of oceans is a surfer´s playground and the nature is their friend. For Alexander Nolte and Oliver Spies, surfers themselves, it wasn´t a matter of choice but their desire to consume responsibly and protect nature by all means. By sharing this idea and approach to consume with friends over time the LANGBRETT club came into life. Some years ago they decided to establish a label, quit their jobs and produce surf, skate and outdoor clothing under socially and ecologically fair conditions. By now you can find stores in Berlin, Hamburg, Düsseldorf and Frankfurt, where you will find womenswear, menswear and kids clothes. The LANGBRETT style is a combination of the functional aspect of sportswear for the oceans or the streets and a timeless design,

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that can be worn throughout the seasons and years – it simply represents a lifestyle. A lifestyle, that requires living in harmony and balance with your environment and fellow men whilst appreciating nature and having fun. Therefore, they relinquish mass production and work with GOTS certified materials from European manufactures that apply fair labour standards as well. To build close relationships to the people and factories they´re working with is important to be able to make improvements on the production methods and for not having to compromise when it comes to

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sustainability. Recycling is something LANGBRETT is working with a lot, mostly for their shoe collection. For example, 97% of the material they use for their sneakers is recycled. Thinking far-sighted also means not to think in collections, but to gather, often in beer gardens, and come up with ideas, that are still exciting the morning after and can carry on the philosophy of LANGBRETT: loving nature and coexisting with it in the best possible way.

www.langbrett.com

Visit LANGBRETT at Ethical Fashion Show Berlin 69


LANGERCHEN Text â– Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos â–  LANGERCHEN

ARTICLE S GREEN ART LINE GREE SUBHEAD L LINE GR E

In 2009 Miranda Chen and Philipp Langer, who both have been working in the fashion industry for a long time, decided to bring their own label for eco-fashion to life and LangerChen was founded. And the reason why is, that they had established an innovative fabric, that was too expensive for high street fashion retailers, so they used it for their first ever jacket collection. In their own factory LangerChen is still manufacturing unique and innovative fabrics, that match the typical LangerChen urban outdoor style. For their upcoming A/W 2017 collection there will be newly established velvet with a membrane and many more practical but fashionable pieces like woollen parkas, rainwear and extra-long coats.

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SUBHEAD LINE TICLES SUBHEAD EN ARTICLES LINE SUBHEAD ELINE

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Located in Jiaxing, China, it is their mission to improve the implementation of fair labour standards and be a role model in terms of sustainable production methods. But without conscious customers there would be no market for eco-fashion and therefore it is necessary to change our consume behaviour. By offering clothes, that are beautiful and sustainable at the same time they are contributing to making that change. Sustainability is showing respect to each other, to mother nature and our everyday environment. When it comes to designing and producing clothes

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sustainability has mostly to do with fair production conditions, conscious resourcing and a high-quality end product. In their own GOTS certified factory they are following all these norms and the outcome are clothes, that have a classic and timeless look but never miss that certain something for people, that don´t want to compromise between a good style and a clear conscience.

www.langerchen.com

Visit LangerChen at Ethical Fashion Show Berlin

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LANIUS Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ LANIUS

It was a long kept dream of Claudia Lanius to become a fashion designer. When she was a child her grandmother was the first one to teach her how to cut and sew. In her twenties she then started her own label ‘The Hanf Company’ working with the natural resource hemp as a fabric meeting the high quality standards of the dispatcher Hess Natur. Her motivation to establish a sustainable fashion label for modern women finally led her to founding LANIUS in 1999. From the seeds to the final products Claudia and her team work on the improvement of production methods to make them more sustainable and accordingly protect natural resources. Following their slogan love fashion - think organic - be responsible as an ambassador for green fashion it is their mission to make it something unexceptional, that every woman can wear, wants to wear and should wear. The minimalistic LANIUS style suits sophisticated and feminine women through the ages and provides them with manifold designs, fabrics and different price ranges.

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Only cooperating with GOTS, and some PETA certified suppliers is part of their sustainable philosophy and goes hand in hand with monitoring the chain from harvesting the resources to distribution. Sticking to a hundred percent sustainable material isn´t always easy – from the thread to the buttons and zippers everything has to be produced fairly, otherwise the finished pieces won’t be certified. Once or twice a year Claudia travels the world to get an impression of the local conditions in the manufactures and comes back with a knowledge about the origin of her fabrics and a lot of inspiration for the upcoming collections. The A/W 2017 collection consists of four key themes named ‘Metropolis’, ‘Eternity’, ‘Passion’ and ‘Rustic Purism’. LANIUS used athleisure, bohemian and romantic inspired elements to create key-looks, which are comforting, elegant and cosy and meet exactly the needs of women who live a big city live.

www.lanius.com

Visit LANIUS at Ethical Fashion Show Berlin

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MASKA Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ MASKA

When Maria Svensson founded her fashion label Maska back in 2009 there was no doubt for her that it had to be fashion with a focus on sustainability. This is not a matter of choice for her but the justification to even produce anything at all. As Maria herself said: „I feel like it is the only way you have the ‘right’ to produce something new”. Producing responsibly mainly is a matter of quality – the quality of every material and every production step. The results are cloth that show their beauty through the interplay of design and garment and therefore are timeless, practical and elegant at the same time, and of course have a long life span.

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The story behind Maria Svensson’s dream of building her own fashion business began way back when she was a child. She grew up playing with fabrics and ribbons, buttons and thread in her grandmother’s sewing business, who taught her that clothes should be defined by how well they are made, not by the amount of work that goes into them. Hence, it didn’t come as a surprise, that she quit her job as a buyer and founded Maska. For her A/W 2017 collection she mainly used fabrics like mohair, silk and cashmere as well as ultrafine wool, cotton and tencel in bold colours. Since capitalism and sustainability are not known to be the perfect match it doesn’t come easy to establish a brand, that works against the consumer society disregarding the fact of minimum purchases for organic cotton, that increase the risk for small labels immensely. But nevertheless Maska is very successful by now and available in 14 countries and an online shop, maybe because Scandinavian design plus sustainability just can’t be wrong.

www.maska.se

Visit Maska at Greenshowroom

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REET AUS Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ REET AUS

Estonia might not be a country that people think of, when it comes to fashion, but Reet Aus proofs them wrong. Since 1997 its founder is working as a fashion designer and soon started working with upcycling methods to reduce wastage of materials in 2002. During her studies of fashion design, she started her research on upcycling methods and how the use of resources like water can be reduced whilst producing clothes and hasn’t stopped yet. The latest collection is inspired by the design limitations of upcycling. Most of the fabrics are small in size, though sometimes bigger parts come from roll-ends. Considering the characteristics of leftover material in design, abstract geometric entity is created.

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After writing her PhD about the possibilities of upcycling in mass productions the implementation of the developed strategies on an industrial-scale level was her aim and in 2012 she brought out her first collection that was produced in collaboration with Beximco and UPMADE® certified in 2014. Reet Aus with UPMADE® is this year one of the finalist in ‘Ecolab Award of Circular Economy Digital Disruptor’. The winner will be announced at the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos in January. Beximco is one of the biggest apparel manufactures in Bangladesh working with ILO standards (International Labour Organisation). Here she was working on realizing upcycling methods in the early stages of production and stinted 75% water, 88% energy and 80% CO2 during the process of production. The results are clothes, that are long-lasting and real staple pieces in anyone’s wardrobe. It is very important, to understand, that every company and fashion label has the possibility to work like this and to pay its tribute to making the world a little less messy and become sustainable in terms of having a positive impact on people, planet and profit. As the designer of Reet Aus says herself: “Any business, regardless of the industry, has to thrive towards getting a positive result in all of these three bottom lines – otherwise it is hard to justify its existence.”

www.reetaus.com

Visit Reet Aus at Ethical Fashion Show Berlin

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RHUMAA Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ RHUMAA

Rhumaa was founded in 2014 after co-owner Daniel Beernink came back from an inspirational trip to South Africa. Another trip to India, where he was looking for suppliers, was the determining factor for the decision to become a fair and sustainable fashion brand. But Rhumaa is more than just a sustainable fashion brand – Rhumaa makes a difference in terms of sharing the values of cultural acceptance and diversity. Every Rhumaa collection is created in collaboration with an up & coming creative talent from a developing country such as South Africa. For example, their A/W 2017 collection is mainly made out of organic fabrics like tencel, cotton, raw silk and cupro and influenced by the artist Holmes Jansen from Sedgefield.

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Through their fashion Daniel and his partner Ton want to inspire people and share the cultural stories behind every single piece. To become even more involved in the local occurrences, five percent of every purchased item go directly to the Rhumaa Foundation that supports talent developing programs in the townships of South Africa. The functional yet fashionable clothes are mainly produced in Portuguese and Turkish manufactures that meet the standards of the Fair Wear Foundation. A few other places of production are e.g. located in India. All their suppliers are visited regularly to ensure the improvement of labour and production standards. Starting the process of improving sustainable and fair production standards can be hard, but isn’t impossible. For Daniel and Ton, it really is about taking the chance to make a change and to do the best they personally can with telling stories and reaching people with something so beautiful and meaningful as their collections.

www.rhumaa.com

Visit Rhumaa at Greenshowroom

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ROYAL BLUSH Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ ROYAL BLUSH

With a diploma from ESMOD BERLIN International University of Art for Fashion in her pocket Jana Keller had her first ever stand at Bread & Butter and wasn´t sure if she could fill the space with her diploma collection. Out of necessity she then bought some vegetable tanned leather, sewed some handbags and presented them at Bread & Butter Berlin. The feedback was great and this was the hour of birth of her eco-friendly accessory label Royal Blush. There have been bags, purses, jewellery, espadrilles and belts before Jana decided to go back to her roots and bring out an additional womenswear collection this year for the tenth jubilee of Royal Blush.

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All these beautiful things are created whilst considering the sustainability of every single production step but also in the daily life. It starts with the sourcing of materials and ends with the way of traveling to exhibitions. Keeping the balance between good designs and a small ecological footprint it is the same motto with her accessory collection as with her womenswear pieces: “create with love and passion for fashion, always in sustainable, fair and ethical ways”, says Jana. For her accessories vegetable tanned leather was, what inspired her, for her new womenswear collection, that will be presented during this Berlin Fashion Week for the first time, it was alpaca wool. All the practical aspects of it don´t subtract the beauty of it and the collaborating farmers in the Andes of course are certified by the fair trade organisation. Never stopping, always thinking forward, Jana Keller further developed her sustainable fashion label in the past few years and is working with several projects all over the globe to improve production methods and creating something with beauty and value.

www.royalblushbyjk.com

Visit Royal Blush at Greenshowroom

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ZURITA Text ■ Milena Hoedt, Tom Felber Photos ■ Esteban Vargas Roa

The sustainable fashion label Zurita came to live in 2010 as a result of Gabriela Farias Zurita´s want to overcome conventional ways of producing clothes and actually have a positive influence on our environment whilst producing. After 10 years of working in the fashion industry she realized, that sustainability and caring about the environment means more to her than just nourishing nature – it is about having respect for culture, traditions and to look at the big picture.

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Therefore, the implementation of sustainability already begins during the process of designing her clothes which is why design and sustained yield always go hand in hand. The designs of Zurita are mostly inspired by the fusion of Andean pre-Columbian culture and heritage as well as modern occidental tailoring. This combination of styles results in timeless clothes for elegant yet independent women, that can be worn not only for one trend-season but for a whole lifetime. It is important, says Gabriela, that people stop buying cheap clothes, that are not meant to last for more than 4 months until the next collection comes in the stores. This approach is the very heart of green fashion, but also the biggest struggle for a label like Zurita. The buyer´s and boutique´s schedules are adjusted to the productions of the big and global players in fashion business, which makes it hard to actually get a foot in the door. Nevertheless, Gabriela´s effort and passion for an intact environment mirror in her daily life as well as in her business.

www.zurita.co

Visit Zurita at Greenshowroom

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Her kind of soul Photography ■ Christina Hasenauer Illustration & Calligraphy ■ Duralitaet Hair & Make up ■ Ana Buvinic Model ■ Tanya C @ ICONIC MANAGEMENT

Dress ■ AC BY Collar ■ AC BY Earring ■ MO JEWELLERY 99


Dress â– FRIEDERIKE HALLER

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Body ■ FRIEDERIKE HALLER Leather Garment ■ FRIEDERIKE HALLER Pants ■ FRIEDERIKE HALLER

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Dress ■ AC BY Coat ■ ANNA LUKASEK Ring ■ MO JEWELLERY


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Jumpsuit ■ AC BY Socks ■ AC BY Necklace ■ MO JEWELLERY

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Top ■ ANNA LUKASEK Skirt ■ ANNA LUKASEK Pumps ■ PURA LOPEZ

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Better in time Photography ■ Simone Rudloff Assistant ■ Michi Schunck Hair & Make up ■ Georgia Gaillard Styling ■ Shakirra Mae Models ■ Michelle @ QUE MODELS & Rachel @ BUSY MODELS

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Jumper ■ LOUISE ALSOP Shoes ■ ADIDAS X RAF SIMONS

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Rachel [left] Shirt ■ J.W.ANDERSON Pants ■ KEEPSAKE THE LABEL Shoes ■ STYLISTS OWN Michelle [right] Dress ■ THE FIFTH Shoes ■ MARC BY MARC JACOBS

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Shirt ■ COMME DES GARÇONS SHIRT X SUPREME Pants ■ STYLISTS OWN Shoes ■ ZARA

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Shirt Pants Socks Shoes

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GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY STYLISTS OWN GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY NIKE

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Michelle [left] Shirt ■ LOUISE ALSOP Rachel [right] Shirt ■ GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY

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Michelle [right] Dress ■ MM6 MAISON MARGIELA Shoes ■ Y-3 Rachel [left] Shirt ■ COMME DES GARÇONS PLAY Skirt ■ UNIQLO X INEZ DE LA FRESSANGE Shoes ■ ADIDAS DECEMBER 2016

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Jacket ■ VINTAGE AZZEDINE ALAÏA Shirt ■ SAINT LAURENT PARIS Pants ■ UNIQLO Shoes ■ DIOR HOMME

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Hoodie ■ VETEMENTS Shirt ■ YEEZY SEASON 1 Belt ■ GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY Shoes ■ ADIDAS X RAF SIMONS

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Michelle [left] Shirt ■ LOUISE ALSOP Shoes ■ ADIDAS X RICK OWENS Rachel [right] Shirt ■ GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY 117


Rachel [left] Turtleneck ■ H&M Shirt ■ A-COLD-WALL* Pants ■ STYLISTS OWN Shoes ■ GUCCI Michelle [right] Glasses ■ RAF SIMONS X LINDA FARROW/ STYLISTS OWN Shirt ■ RAF SIMONS Belt ■ GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY Shoes ■ MM6 MAISON MARGIELA DECEMBER 2016

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Turtleneck ■ RAF SIMONS Dress ■ ZARA Shoes ■ MARC BY MARC JACOBS

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SUPERIOR MAGAZINE APP The Superior Magazine iOS & Android App for Tablet and Smartphone presents Lifestyle and Business in the most thrilling cities around the globe in an exclusive design The Superior Magazine iOS & Android App for Tablet and Smartphone presents Lifestyle and Business in the most thrilling cities around the globe in an exclusive design. In the five sections Fashion & Style, Art & Design, Culture & Entertainment, Food & Travel and Business & Politics you find interviews with fascinating people, exclusive photos and videos, reports on high-class events, the hottest places in the city and a lot more. With its sophisticated design Superior Magazine provides an artistic showcase for all kinds of vanguard visual expression and imagery. The Superior Magazine App is available in the App Store & Google Play Store.


THE HOPE ISSUE ILLUSTRATIONS

CHRISTIAN ROTHENHAGEN

These are the covers Christian illustrated for our Hope issues.

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Text ■ Nerys d’Esclercs Illustrations ■ Christian Rothenhagen

HOPE

Who are we to see the worst in people? As technological advancements keep on breaking the boundaries of our world and challenge preconceived ideas, we decided to take a moment to reflect upon the future. What it should and perhaps will be. Indeed, we have hope. Hope for a better, innovative, conscious future. Why see the worst in people when we can, in fact, believe in the best? Hope is a concept that has been explored and debated for centuries. Hope is actually what holds us together and keeps us going. Historians, such as Yuval Noah Harari, author of the book Sapiens, have evoked such a concept as one of the founders of the society we know today. In fact, it was this common, unifying belief in what they call ‘imagined realities’ that enabled us to build nations and achieve a feeling of belonging. A belonging not only to a particular nationality but to humanity as a whole. Religions where one hopes for life after death or hopes that a better ‘world’ awaits us somewhere, were a means by which people were united by believing in the same fate, beyond the boundaries of countries and language. Although said to be a disguise for our fears and how to deal with them, having hope is what

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differentiates us from being mere individuals. These ideologies that human beings created years and years ago help us experience life as communities. If religion is too complex a subject to be explored here, it is this idea of sticking together and reassuring ourselves that is interesting. In a world where – almost – nothing seems to go right, imagining a better future is what we have to rely on to move forward. In such times, thinking that we collectively don’t do everything wrong is perhaps a way to progress. And yes, this way of thinking is what sets us apart from other species, as instead of surviving in a decaying world, some of us try to act upon it and find solutions together to live and enjoy our time on this earth. Although some might argue that we are the reason for the state of decay, human beings are the ones that built this society and created some of the wonderful elements of our time. Technology, for instance, although daunting as portrayed so well in the popular TV Show Black Mirror, can indeed be considered a wonder. It brought many of us all closer, allowing for connections and relationships to grow in a way no one would have imagined before. Video calls across oceans and continents enable families to reinforce links; the Web and blogs enable lost people to find friends or a voice for themselves; and now the amazing virtual reality enables people to explore places they would never have imagined exploring. Interestingly, hope is a concept that we all know but everyone experiences differently. It is subjective. And yet, although different and unique to everyone, it makes us all understand each other. If Thomas Moore’s Utopia never actually happened it is probably because of all the rules and characteristics it had to have to exist. A utopian world could not be created by human kind as it resides in something far greater than the physical world. Hope lives in our minds and 123

Hope holds us together and keeps us going


SUPERIOR APP JANUARY 2017

Every single individual has something to say towards our common hope

links between people it has created. And one man, even as great as Thomas Moore, cannot dictate what the ideal world could be. It is something that is built from the power of the people, and every single individual has something to say towards our common hope. This is an idea that our new columnist, Léa Dang, brought to us from Paris with her column Become a drop. She wants to show you that each and every one of you can be a ‘drop’ and change the order of things. The people she will bring in are already proof that a small change from one person can make the difference. If not in the immediate present, it will at least show other people that things can indeed be done.

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Our other columnist, Sarah Weyers, speaks her mind about people initiating change with focus on sustainability with her column Let’s talk about Green. From opinion pieces to analysis of significant ethical issues and solutions, Sarah also presents some of the people that matter today, as a way of showing our readers who to have hope in. The protagonists we present you in this Superior Magazine App issue are in fact proof that hope exists. We talked to visionaries from the cities of Berlin, Cologne, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich and London. A short list of cities where people actually try to change the world around them, and a sign that some are not just waiting around for things to change. When we went to the London Design Festival, we met Daan Roosegaarde, a Dutch designer who decided to use the technology he developed with his studio to clean the polluted air he experienced in China. Purifying the atmosphere is an initiative that was started by the Chinese government but that will not be noticed straight away as it will take decades for clean energy to start showing results. As Daan told us in the interview, he found a way to act in the now and clean the air with his Tower, while waiting for the new energies to make their wonders. In Hamburg, Beatrace Oola founded APYA Productions in 2013, which is now the first creative agency that specialises in African fashion and trade. Beatrace became a voice for African designers and a way for them to showcase their work to greater audience. Mark Ankerstein, marketing expert from Cologne, as CEO of Opportunity International Deutschland now helps to create jobs and income for poor but motivated people in developing countries.

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In Frankfurt, Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies at Messe Frankfurt, is responsible for organizing Germany’s leading trade fairs for sustainable fashion, which grow in numbers of exhibitors and visitors every year. By expanding the level of awareness about sustainable labels, Messe Frankfurt’s organizers allow for a better, conscious shopping and support designers that try to take a stand in ethical fashion. Sustainable designers such as Wilson See, who we interviewed in Berlin about his wooden watch label, Wils Fabrik, which he labels ‘social fashion’. Indeed, more than just using sustainable wood, Wilson’s team donates books to children in Africa with every watch sold – a social and human act that proves how fashion is not as superficial as it may seem. These are only a few of the people we present you with this issue and the magazine. People who have a purpose with projects that we believe will bring you hope. If it seemed doomed, maybe these stories will enlighten your day and encourage you into becoming a drop.


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BERLIN

WILSON SEE

Life is not about what you’ve gained but what you’ve done Wilson See is the living proof that business and equality can work hand in hand and inequality must not be a given in a capitalistic society.

LONDON

DAAN ROOSEGAARDE Hope for the smart cities of tomorrow

Ever since founding his studio Daan Roosegaarde has been pushing the boundaries of design and innovation mixing clever technology to concrete projects and creating what he calls the Landscapes of the Future.

HAMBURG

BEATRACE OOLA

We want to provide a space for the contemporary creative industry in Africa Beatrace Oola created a platform for the African creative industry. Our globalized world needs people like her who are brave enough to play against the odds and are changing the point of view.

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FRANKFURT

OLAF SCHMIDT

Sustainability means responsible business For Olaf Schmidt sustainable fashion is not only a trend but a necessity. He and his international team at Messe Frankfurt organize some of the leading green fashion trade fairs worldwide.

MUNICH

SEBASTIAN VOGEL

Good art is when I can’t get enough of it For Sebastian Vogel art had always a leading role in his life. He realized his dream in form of a highquality web shop for limited art editions, curated by himself.

COLOGNE

MARK ANKERSTEIN

The biggest difference is not “what I’m doing” it is more “why I’m doing it” Looking for the sense in the things we do is the nature of our self-reflective entity. Mark Ankerstein found his way of not looking for sense but adding value to what he does by changing his profession.

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GO ALONG WITH A. Photography ■ Verena Knemeyer Assistant ■ Susanne Baumann Hair & Make up ■ Steffanie Kroll @ LIGANORD Styling ■ Janina Cüpper @ OPTIX AGENCY Model ■ Alexander Weber @ ICONIC MANAGEMENT

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T-Shirt ■ YOU KNOW YOU WANT IT BY REBEKKA RUÉTZ Shirt ■ NUDIE JEANS Scarf ■ NUDIE JEANS Pants ■ BRACHMANN Shoes ■ DR.MARTENS Watch ■ CHRONOSWISS

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Jacket ■ TIGER OF SWEDEN Shirt ■ NUDIE JEANS Pants ■ ONLY & SONS

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Jacket ■ ASOS T-Shirt ■ GARCIA JEANS Pants ■ CROSS JEANS

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Jacket ■ HIKIDS Hoodie ■ HIKIDS Pants ■ CROSS JEANS Shoes ■ DR.MARTENS Bracelet ■ NUDIE JEANS JANUARY 2017 DECEMBER 2016

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Coat ■ UNIQLO Pants ■ LEVIS 505 Shoes ■ DR.MARTENS

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Shirt ■ TRINITAS Pants ■ NIKE SPORTSWEAR Shoes ■ CLARKS Beanie ■ NUDIE JEANS

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Photography ■ Tom Porter Styling ■ Holly Chapman Hair & Make up ■ Ana Fry Model ■ Lauren Borgers @ ELITE

Dress ■ ALICE BEAVIS Bra ■ URBAN OUTFITTERS Pants ■ URBAN OUTFITTERS


Bra ■ TOPSHOP Trousers ■ LEANNE CROSHAW

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Dress ■ ALICE BEAVIS Bra ■ URBAN OUTFITTERS Pants ■ URBAN OUTFITTERS

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Dress â– ZARA

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Top ■ LEANNE CROSHAW Bodysuit ■ TOPSHOP Pants ■ ALICE BEAVIS


Top ■ JONATHON KIDD Boots ■ TOPSHOP UNIQUE

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IMPRINT

Founders Tom Felber & Marc Huth

Team Tom Felber ■ Co-Founder & Chief Editor Nerys d’Esclercs ■ Chief Editor UK & France Itamar Inbar ■ Art Director & Project Manager Yannic Poepperling ■ Creative Director Photography & Video Milena Hoedt ■ Editor & Project Manager Jana Wilms ■ Senior Editor Sarah Weyers ■ Senior Editor Thain Nguyen Phuong ■ Graphic Designer Yule Franke ■ Graphic Designer Léa Dang ■ Guest Author

Publisher SUPERIOR Publishing UG (haftungsbeschränkt) Lychener Strasse 76 10437 Berlin Registered at Local Court Charlottenburg HRB 143585 B Managing Director Thomas Felber VAT-ID DE284291789 contact@superior-magazine.com


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International magazine for lifestyle and business • www.superior-magazine.com

coming out on FEBRUARY 6th 2017

February 2017

SUPERIOR MAGAZINE January 2017  

In this issue a lot of SUSTAINABLE FASHION, exclusive FASHION EDITORIALS from across the world and content from our SUPERIOR APP | SUPERIOR...

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