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International magazine for lifestyle and business • www.superior-magazine.com

#66 | 2019


#LISTEN!

GET INSPIRED BY KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS FROM LEADING EXPERTS ON STAGE.

GARRY WASSNER CEO & CO-FOUNDER

SEBASTIAN KLAUKE

ANA ANDJELIC

CDO

CHIEF BRAND OFFICER

THE OTTO GROUP IS ONE OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST E-COMMERCE COMPANIES

SELECTED BY FORBES AS ONE OF THE TOP 50 CMOS IN 2018

REZA MOUSSAVIAN

SOFIA WINGREN

MARKUS FUCHSHOFEN

PROMOTES THE DIGITALIZATION OF HR WHILE SUPPORTING THE DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF ALL BUSINESS UNITS AT TELEKOM

HYPER ISLAND WAS ONCE REFERRED TO AS “THE DIGITAL HARVARD”

FUCHSHOFEN HAS DRIVEN BONPRIX’S ONLINE TRANSFORMATION TO BECOME A SUCCESSFUL FASHION BRAND WITH WEB SHOPS IN 29 COUNTRIES

LOUISE TROEN

CHRISTOPH MAGNUSSEN

ALFREDO OROBIO

BUMBLE IS AVAILABLE IN 160 COUNTRIES WITH A COMMUNITY OF OVER 41 MILLION USERS

MAGNUSSEN RE–THINKS WORK STRUCTURES FOR SOME OF THE MAJOR PLAYERS LIKE ABOUT YOU, VOLKSWAGEN AND MYMUESLI

AWAYTOMARS WAS NAMED THE „GAME-CHANGING, INDUSTRY-DISRUPTING ONLINE FASHION RETAILER“ BY ELLE

HE ENSURES HIS CLIENTS GROW THEIR BUSINESSES THROUGH DIGITAL STRATEGIES, CRM AND CRO

SVP DIGITAL & INNOVATION (HR)

VP INTERN. MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

DECEMBER 2016

CEO

FOUNDER & CEO

...AND MANY MORE.

 

MANAGING DIRECTOR

FOUNDER & CEO

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THE CONFERENCE ON THE FUTURE OF FASHION

15 JANUARY 2019 10 AM–6 PM KRAFTWERK BERLIN HOW TO TRANSFORM YOUR ORGANISATION

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WWW.FASHIONTECH.BERLIN


WWW.MY-FASHIONARY.COM

#66 | 2019

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With our business experience, openness for something new and a strong hands-on mentality, CREATIVE FACE is the ideal partner for entrepreneurs.

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Regardless of your company’s phase, we offer customized solutions for your company’s success in the fields of consulting and media with our wide professional network & partners.

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WELCOME

Superior is an international magazine for lifestyle and business Superior Magazine stands for high-quality content that is a source of new insights and inspiration. In the four sections Art + Design, Business + Society, Culture + Travel and Fashion + Beauty you find interviews with fascinating people, exclusive photos and videos, reports on high-class events, the hottest places in the city and a lot more. Superior Magazine’s sophisticated design provides an artistic showcase for all kinds of vanguard visual expression and imagery. Superior Magazine is published across all media channels – mobile, digital, print and web - with a strong link between the channels.


THE INTERNATIONAL B

DECEMBER 2016

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BUSINESS MAGAZINE

WWW.SUPERIOR-BUSINESS.COM 13


EDITORIAL

DEAR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE READERS, W

e wish all of you a wonderful, healthy, successful and exciting year 2019 !!!

It is a Superior Magazine tradition that our January issue includes some Berlin Fashion Week content. This time our focus is on the #FASHIONTECH BERLIN conference and we present some great sustainable fashion labels you find at the NEONYT trade fair. For the fashion shows have a look at our website and social media channels. The fashion editorials have been contributed by the photographers Arno Ende, Christina Sandrock, Patrick Schwalb and stylist Vanessa Danisch (photography by Alexander Scholle), all from Germany and Vincent Binant from Paris. As cover story we have chosen THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWN by Arno Ende. It’s a story about boys’ friendship. Growing up together in a small neighbourhood and hanging out probably the last time at their places as they did so many times… before living the grown-up life and leaving their hood into all directions. For the category Art + Design we interviewed the UK based artist Richard young. In Culture + Travel read about Sarah Weyers’ trip to Iceland. Enjoy our first 2019 Superior Magazine issue ... Tom and the whole Superior Magazine team

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GET YOUR PRINTED ISSUE 


CONTENT

14 EDITORIAL 18 CONTRIBUTORS 22 AIRY 36 #FASHIONTECH BERLIN 40 THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWN 60 SUSTAINABLE FASHION 84 SALWA RAJAA 100 RICHARD YOUNG 106 VEIL OF OBLIVION 122 ICELAND IN NOVEMBER 128 IMPRINT

Fashion Editorial by Christina Sandrock

Interview with Michael Stracke

Fashion Editorial by Arno Ende

Label presentation @NEONYT

CULTURE + TRAVEL

BUSINESS + SOCIETY

FASHION + BEAUTY

ART + DESIGN

Fashion Editorial by Vincent Binant

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Interview with artist Richard Young

Fashion Editorial by Patrick Schwalb

Travel report by Sarah Weyers

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CONTRIBUTORS #66 | 2019

VINCENT BINANT ORIGIN PROFESSION CREATIVE APPROACH

Paris, France Photographer The liberty of women.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Vincent is inspired by women, stories and nature in general.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

Salwa Rajaa is the story about the model at her home in Paris.

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ARNO ENDE ORIGIN

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Cologne, Germany

PROFESSION

Menswear designer (FPPO - for peaceful people only), Photographer, Stylist

CREATIVE APPROACH

Natural and authentic. Telling Stories with a sense of humour and unexpected twists. No poses just being and trying to capture the character and soul of the people. Picturing true moments.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Arno is inspired by nature, music, movies, art from all over the world and different cultures. Life is an overall inspiration.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

It’s a story about boys’ friendship. Growing up together in a small neighbourhood and hanging out probably the last time at their places as they did so many times… before living the grown-up life and leaving their hood into all directions…


CONTRIBUTORS #66 | 2019

CHRISTINA SANDROCK

Š ANNA THOMA

ORIGIN PROFESSION

Berlin, Germany Photographer & Retoucher

CREATIVE APPROACH

Christina loves to show the moments in between that only a camera can capture. Herefore she uses dynamics of her subjects to get moments no one else can see except the camera. She loves what happens when a powerful movement transforms into a poetic shot in asingle frame.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Her Inspiration is like for everybody who creates things just everything what surrounds her. Especially in summer Christina sees much more colours and interesting colour mixtures to use in her work. Also she loves visual Illusions in every kind of art like paintings, illustrations, etc.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

AIRY is a project sh had in mind for a quite long time. It was kind of a team project with her mum who did the Baclavas for this shoot. The models were put up in the air or to places it seems not possible to stay. She loves that confusion in pictures and wanted to create a fresh and unusual fashion editorial outdoors with some eye-catching moments.

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PATRICK SCHWALB ORIGIN PROFESSION

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Hamburg, Germany Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

Patrick works not by staging pictures, but by making them come to life. His sparkling personality helps setting an atmosphere in which his team captures the pure and genuine emotions of the moment.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

As long as he has been a photographer he has always been driven by a passion for editorials. Working with editorial teams provides him with the freedom to experiment and the pleasure of having his work shared with the world of fashion.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

Patrick was on Tenerife Island when he saw an empty field of tomatoes. Within seconds he pictured the whole photo story in his mind. The wind blowing in the veils, the girl in this lost place and a distinctive feeling of emptiness.


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AIRY Photography ■ Christina Sandrock Model ■ Gloria @megamodels, Eric @mcfitmodels Stylist ■ Julia Weller Make-Up/Hair ■ Nicola Kurdziel

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Shirt ■ STRENESSE Skirt ■ MANGO Leggins ■ HANRO Shoes ■ PREMIATA Glasses ■ ETNIA BARCELONA


DECEMBER 2016

Bomber Jacket ■ CANADA GOOSE Shirt ■ JACK & JONES Sewat-Cargo Pants ■ URBAN OUTFITTERS Sneakers ■ VANS Hat ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK

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Choker ■ CHOKER:QUIET STUDIO VIA ARCANE Blazer ■ ALEKSANDRA SEWERYNIAK Bag ■ JIMMY CHOO #66 | 2019

Shirt ■ SANTA CRUZ Hat ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK 26


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Jacket ■ HUNTER Pullover ■ MANGO Top ■ VANS Skirt ■ VANS Stockings ■ WOLFORD Boots ■ VAGABOND


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Top ■ CAR I 2IE Jacket ■ ALEKSANDRA SEWERYNIAK Trousers ■ SIMONE SMITH Sunglasses ■ CELINE Shoes ■ JIMMY CHOO

Vest ■ CANADA GOOSE Sweatshirt ■ URBAN OUTFITTERS Jeans ■ WRANGLER Shawl ■ MOOSE KNUCKLES Watsch ■ G-SHOCK Shoes ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK


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Pullover â– VERO MODA

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Sweatshirt ■ MOOSE KNUCKLES Pants ■ ANTONY MORATO Socks ■ SANTA CRUZ Sneakers ■ VANS Hat ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK 31


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Jacket ■ ONLY Jeans ■ WRANGLER Blouse ■ CAR I 2IE Bra-Shirt Blazer ■ GUESS■ MATILDA ABERG Boots ■ VAGABOND Jumpsuit ■ SIMONE SMITH Earphones ■Earrings SKULLCANDY ■ CAR I 2IE

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He Pullover ■ ANTONY MORATO Pants ■ SUPERDRY Sneakers ■ ARTIST OWN Hat ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK SHE Jumpsuit ■ MARINA HOERMANSEDER Turtleneck ■ MANGO Boots ■ PREMIATA Bottle Bag ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK

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Top ■ SIMONE SMITH Body ■ ELLESSE Pants ■ KCA-LABCorset ■ ALEKSANDRA SEWERYNIAK Skirt ■ ALEKSANDRA SEWERYNIAK Stockings ■ WOLFORD Earrings ■ FEIHEFEIHEFEIHE Boots ■ RANI BAGERIA Shoes ■ JIMMY CHOO Glasses ■ MANGO


BERLIN

#FASHIONTECH BERLIN The C-Level Business Platform Interview ■ Tom Felber Photos ■ Offenblende

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We all recognize that digitalization and the fast technological development has an impact on all of us. Therefore, it’s no wonder that this also affects the fashion industry. Visitors to Berlin Fashion Week will find the answers at the #FASHIONTECH BERLIN conference, taking place at KRAFTWERK, Köpenicker Straße 70, 10179 Berlin, which brings together fashion companies, the tech industry and the start-up community, with the aim of discussing topics surrounding the digital transformation, change management, innovation and disruptive technologies. Read the interview with Michael Stracke, Chief Business Development Officer #FASHIONTECH BERLIN. Michael, what is #FASHIONTECH BERLIN?

The #FASHIONTECH BERLIN conference, which was founded in January 2015 by the PREMIUM GROUP, is the leading C-level tech conference for the fashion industry in respect to digitalisation. We will talk about topics like ‘How to transform the organisation’, which we will be breaking down into the aspects of companies’ culture, leadership and the whole future of work, technical innovation and of course the customers# journey. Who are the addressees of #FASHIONTECH BERLIN?

Our visitors are C-level executives from fashion, retail, tech, politics, the economy and the media. In July representatives from 38 countries attended, includ-

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ing the USA, Germany, Italy, France, the UK, Austria, Switzerland, Canada, India, China, Thailand and Vietnam, not forgetting Russia and Israel too. We are also particularly appealing to start-ups though — which is very important in view of an interdisciplinary dialogue on the subject of innovation and corporate culture. As one of the events organised by the PREMIUM GROUP and part of Berlin Fashion Week we connect the players in the fashion industry with other relevant industries. We create a mix of different ecosystems with the aim of attracting a broad and varied composition of visitors. #FASHIONTECH BERLIN is part of Berlin Fashion Week. How is it integrated into the fashion week program?

Through the collaboration between the PREMIUM GROUP, which hosts #FASHIONTECH BERLIN on 15 January 2019, and Messe Frankfurt, which hosts FASHIONSUSTAIN on 16 January 2019, visitors can access a wide-ranging program of content relevant to the industry.


Does #FASHIONTECH BERLIN only cover fashion topics?

Twice a year, during Berlin Fashion Week, #FASHIONTECH BERLIN connects fashion with the tech industry and the start-up community, with the aim of discussing topics surrounding the digital transformation, innovations, change management and disruptive technologies. The conference creates the stage for interdisciplinary exchange between the different industries. The networking areas give visitors the opportunity to network with the speakers, industry insiders and entrepreneurs, as well as to seek out new business partners and generate business leads. #FASHIONTECH BERLIN has evolved to become a leading European content hub for technology, digitalisation, sustainability and innovation. Beside the business element the #FASHIONTECH BERLIN program contains the sections Listen, Learn and Experience. What does that mean?

The #FASHIONTECH BERLIN conference is set up to the needs of the fashion industry. To achieve this, the conference is structured in three core areas: #LISTEN! featuring keynote presentations from leading international experts on the stage; #LEARN! with its interactive masterclasses for passing on detailed specialist knowledge; and #EXPERIENCE! in the Exhibition Area, which is where the latest developments, products and innovations in the market are introduced. Is there a focus of #FASHIONTECH BERLIN?

There are a lot of important questions around digitalization to answer. The ‘Future of Work’ is one of them. It will play a major role as a new central theme, focussing on the following questions: what do the working models of the future look like? What job profile will companies and employees need in the future? Artificial intelligence is another important topic – not just in connection with CRM programs, but also when it comes to further developing the processes along

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© Dominik Tryba

the supply chain. Analysing huge quantities of data from social media, e-commerce and smartphone feeds enables preferences, interests and consumers’ buying habits to be analysed. These can then be adapted to create a buying experience tailored to that customer’s personal requirements. Exciting examples of course include those from pioneers like Zalando and Amazon, along with Hugo Boss, Uniqlo and Nordstrom. Is there any side-program at #FASHIONTECH BERLIN?

There is no special side-program especially for #FASHIONTECH BERLIN. It is part of Berlin Fashion Week which means that there are so many things anyway going around. Last but not least, what have people to do to visit #FASHIONTECH BERLIN?

It’s easy. You can get your ticket at https://fashiontech.premium-group.com/en/ which gives you access to Conference and Stage Programme for EUR 240.00 (+19% VAT). The Exhibition, the Masterclasses and the Networking Area are free of charge for PREMIUM GROUP badge holders. Media and Press can pre-register at press@fashiontech.berlin.

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© Dominik Tryba

Thank you for the interview. See you at #FASHIONTECH BERLIN


Clément Shirt ■ WEEKDAY Jeans shirt ■ ZARA Hoodie ■ H&M Jeans ■ LEVI’S Shoes ■ ADIDAS #66 | 2019

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THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWN

Photography ■ Arno Ende Stylists ■ Petra Kratzheller & Vanessa Lovino Hair & Make-Up ■ Christina Konnertz Models ■ Clément & Fabio & Jude @ Dopamin Production ■ Carsten Dopamin

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Fabio Pullover & Shoes ■ ADIDAS College jacket ■ WEEKDAY Jeans ■ H&M Cap ■ STYLIST’S OWN

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Jude Shirt & Vest ■ ZARA Jeans ■ H&M Shoes ■ ADIDAS 42 Cap ■ STYLIST’S OWN


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Pullover ■ COS Belt ■ STYLIST’S OWN Shoes ■ INTO|INTO


Pullover ■ BERSHKA Hoodie ■ VOLCOM Jacket ■ LEVI’S #66 | 2019

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Pullover ■ ZARA Belt ■ STYLIST’S OWN Pants ■ FPPO

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GIRL Dress ■ COS BOY Shirt ■ TIGER OF SWEDEN #66 | 2019

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Jude Pullover ■ BERSHKA Jacket & Jeans ■ LEVI’S Fabio Shirt ■ FPPO Jacket ■ BERSHKA Jeans ■ LEVI’S Clément Polo ■ LEVI’S Coat ■ WEEKDAYS Jeans ■ LEVI’S Glasses ■ ZARA

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Cardigan & Scarf ■ WEEKDAY Jacket ■ LEVI’S Glasses ■ ZARA 49


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Shirt & Vest ■ FPPO Jumper & Pants ■ ZARA Belt ■ STYLIST’S OWN Socks ■ WEEKDAY Shoes ■ DEICHMANN

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Turtleneck Pullover ■ JULES Jumper ■ VINTAGE Trenchcoat ■ ZARA Pants ■ FPPO 51


Fabio: Pullover ■ COS Jacket ■ WEEKDAY Belt ■ FPPO Pants ■ FPPO

Clément: Shirt ■ H&M Sakko ■ ZARA Pants ■ FPPO #66 | 2019

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Shirt, Blazer, Pants ■ FPPO Pullover ■ ZARA


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Dress & Headpiece ■ DEADLOTUSCOUTURE · NANGEMAGRO

Shirt ■ H&M Pant ■ ZARA Socks ■ WEEKDAY Shoes ■ DEICHMANN 55


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Shirt ■ H&M Scarf ■ STYLIST’S OWN

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SUBMISSION

SUBMIT YOUR WORKS

APP / DIGITAL / ONLINE / PRINT

SUBMIT NOW! DECEMBER 2016

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We are happy to receive contributions and submissions by photographers, filmmakers, stylists, make-up artists, hair stylists, models, illustrators, artists and authors.

SHOW US Your best ideas, your creativity and your excellence and become published in Superior Magazine

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION NEONYT TRADE FAIR AT BERLIN FASHION WEEK A/W 2019

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BLEED

READ THE INTERVIEW

JUNGLE FOLK

WITH NEONYT SHOW

LANGBRETT

DIRECTOR THIMO

LANGERCHEN

SCHWENZFEIER IN

LANIUS

SUPERIOR MAGAZINE # 65

RHUMAA

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

BLEED When the nature is your friend, sustainability becomes a matter of course. Michael Spitzbarth is a nature loving athlete who surfs, skates, snowboards and has a strong connection to his environment. In 2008, bleed was born and the label itself, the name, designs and philosophy are results of his connection with nature and observations. For years and years, the nature and our environment were exploited and had to suffer for our own enrichment, but for the team around Michael nature is the most beautiful playground that has to be nourished and treated like the mother it is to everything and all of us. For the upcoming Autumn/Winter 2019 “Stormchaser” collection bleed found inspiration in northern Germany’s rough gale and restless sea. Sympatex® coats and jackets are in the centre of attention, as providing fully recycled and recyclable materials and being climate compensated throughout the whole production process. By that, bleed goes a big step ahead when it comes to combining performance and sustainability. The “Stormchaser” collection is topped off by a fine selection of recycled and warming Primaloft® products and an entire TENCEL® line, consisting of outstandingly functional hoodies, sweaters, tees and socks. The whole collection will be presented during Neonyt Berlin. During the production of their functional sportswear three standards have to be met: “It has to be fair, produced under sustainable conditions, and of 63


course animal friendly (vegan)�, says Michael himself. Additionally, clothes from bleed not only meet their own standards but their whole supply-chain is certified with the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). The philosophy for his own label is, as simple as it may sound, that to live in harmony with each other and the nature nothing and no one should have to suffer and from the production to working conditions and retailing everything aligns with this point of view. In the very heart of Upper Franconia in Germany Michael and his team work enthusiastically, keep on learning about and experimenting with new sustainable materials to make sure, that the nature has to bleed no more. www.bleed-clothing.com Visit bleed at Neonyt Text: Tom Felber Images: bleed

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JUNGLE FOLK When the Jungle Folk founder Pauline Treis came back from a trip to Latin America she was very much inspired by the traditional crafts and natures beauty and brought out her first collection in 2013. Her approach to fashion was very clear from the start: if she becomes part of this overproducing and overconsuming fashion industry it has to be with a focus on sustainability. Designing and producing clothes that can be worn regardless of trends and won’t fall apart after one season of wearing is crucial for Pauline and definitely is a matter of course. In the end it also is a matter of quality and from the materials to the finished pieces

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this is what Jungle Folk stands for – a high-grade, sustainable wardrobe. But because sustainability also has a social factor, building long-lasting business relationships and not just helping but collaborating is the fundament for initiating change and practised by Jungle Folk and their suppliers. These collaborations first started in Medellin, Colombia but today manufactures with fair labour conditions in Peru, Portugal and India are working together with Jungle Folk as well, which creates multicultural exchange and inspiration. Of course, the fabrics are certified by Fair Trade and GOTS and make high-quality staple pieces for women,

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

who are inspired by the needs and small wonders of the daily life. Jungle Folk’s Autumn/Winter 2019 collection all stands for the celebration of original, natural materials and crafts. Handknitted sweaters made out of undyed Baby-Alpaca wool next to handwoven silk-cotton fabrics for beautiful dresses and flowy jumpsuits are the heart of the collection. The ‘Essentials Line’ of Jungle Folk is further developed with pieces in which there has been months of development, versatile cuts and pure aesthetics.

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Pauline built up a fashion brand, that is part of an upcoming movement towards more sustainability and a smaller ecological footprint. In business and in private she is setting a good example for that. www.junglefolk.com Visit Junglefolk at Neonyt Text: Tom Felber Images: Jungle Folk


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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

LANGBRETT Interview with the LANGBRETT founders Alexander Nolte and Oliver Spies. Alexander and Oliver, you founded LANGBRETT. What is the story behind your brand?

LANGBRETT is grown from a group of surfers who shared experiences in nature and shared the strong desire to consume responsibly. We strived for protecting the environment in which we experience the best time of the year. That group grew over time and evolved into the LANGBRETT club. Building a brand was the last thing on our minds. Five years ago, we got rid of our other jobs and focused on LANGBRETT – with the same idealism than years ago: Surf, skate and outdoor clothing and eco-innovations produced under socially and ecologically fair conditions. LANGBRETT stores are located in Hamburg, Berlin, Düsseldorf and Frankfurt. Why did you establish your brand with a sustainable fashion focus?

Who needs another fashion brand that is profit oriented, uses the same materials and that harms nature and humans alike? We deliberately create alternatives to current mass production and the corresponding consumer culture with its negative consequences: we develop products that are timeless, functional and durable made of natural and recycled materials. That’s how we define sustainability.

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Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards?

All fabrics we use have GOTS certificates. Our manufacturers are based in Germany, Portugal, Spain and are meeting the highest ethical production standards in the industry. We e.g. partner with a dying company that returns the used water at a better water quality than they have taken it out of the river. However, we only collaborate if we find a working environment, in which we could image to work, too. We know how much each production operator earns and how much vacation they have. We are on site regularly to jointly work on the next product. Which barriers do you have to face in the production of sustainable fashion?

It’s a matter of finding the right production partners and of sticking to your values. We always try to avoid ‘eco-compromises’. That’s what makes us different. What is your inspiration?

Design follows beer garden. That’s where we come up with most of our ideas. If they are still good the next day, we discuss it with our club members and eventually create the first prototypes.


What is the typical LANGBRETT style? Who is your target group?

The lifestyle of our customers is defined by surfing, skating, traveling and outdoor activities. Our clothes are modern, but not trendy. We aim to offer your favorite sweater or shoe that is long lasting, recyclable, recycled and affordable. Such as our closed-loop shoes from recycled material or our made in Germany Troyer that lasts a lifetime.

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How developed your brand during the last years?

We developed the ‘Guppyfriend Washing Bag’ a bag for household washing designed to reduce microfiber shedding and prevent microplastics ending up in nature. We also established the nonprofit organization STOP! MICRO WASTE. Our goal is to raise awareness and to initiate new pragmatic solutions addressing the microplastic problem. We also founded the STOP! Plastic Academy, an education program informing school children on how to avoid, replace and re-use plastics.

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

Any new products we will see at Neonyt?

We’ll show the production process of our closed loop shoe line, will introduce new filter solutions to reduce microplastic pollution and will explain our upcoming crowdfunding campaign for a new shoe concept. www.langbrett.com Visit Langbrett at Neonyt Text: Tom Felber Images: Langbrett

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

LANIUS It was a long kept dream of Claudia Lanius to become a fashion designer. When she was a child her grandmother was the first one to teach her how to cut and sew. In her twenties she then started her own label ‘The Hanf Company’ working with the natural resource hemp as a fabric meeting the high quality standards of the dispatcher Hess Natur. Her motivation to establish a sustainable fashion label for modern women finally led her to founding Lanius in 1999.

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From the seeds to the final products Claudia and her team work on the improvement of production methods to make them more sustainable and accordingly protect natural resources. Following their slogan love fashion - think organic - be responsible as an ambassador for green fashion it is their mission to make it something unexceptional, that every woman can wear, wants to wear and should wear. The minimalistic Lanius style suits sophisticated and feminine women through the ages and provides them with manifold designs, fabrics and different price ranges. Lanius is GOTS-certified and provides a wide range of vegan styles – approved by PETA. Out of the love and respect for animals Lanius neither uses real fur nor down. And when it comes to wool, the label sticks to a strict “no-mulesing” policy. Sticking to a hundred percent sustainable material isn´t always easy – from the thread to the buttons and zippers everything has to be produced fairly, otherwise the finished pieces won’t be certified.

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION Once or twice a year Claudia travels the world to get an impression of the local conditions in the manufactures and comes back with a knowledge about the origin of her fabrics and a lot of inspiration for the upcoming collections. The Autumn/Winter 2019 collection of Lanius comprises the four themes “Nordic Noir”, “Down To Earth”, “Female Empowerment” and “Natural Awareness”. Multifaceted looks fulfil the needs of a woman, whose awareness of fashion goes hand in hand with her desire to manifest sustainability in her everyday life. The theme “Nordic Noir” is inspired by the new Scandinavian darkness. Casual and minimalistic colours are dominating. Classic patterns in black and white such as herringbone, glencheck and houndstooth prove their concentrated presence to the timelessness of fashion. Inspired by the colours of earth, the looks in the collection theme “Down To Earth” are inspired by a relaxed and adult casualness that is as uncomplicated as the name of the collection theme suggests! Blue shades do not only determine the colour palette in the collection theme - they are rather the dominant “tone generators” within the entire A/W season 2019/20. A strong statement dominates the collection theme “Female Empowerment: “Dress for yourself and no one else!” The looks celebrate the moment a present that “she” consciously enjoys with herself. Clear, reduced silhouettes accentuate the woman’s very personal charisma and are enhanced by tonal colours. Mindfulness and a natural, almost self-evident awareness of nature determine the looks in the theme “Natural Awareness”. The colour palette is characterised by bright warmth, led by caramel and

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off-white shades. As a sustainable fashion label, we feel a deep responsibility to take action against the immense volume of plastic waste. Under the slogan #NOPLASTIC Claudia Lanius founded an initiative and proactively joined forces with thirteen other sustainable fashion companies and organisations. Lanius pursues three important goals with #NOPLASTIC: developing sustainable packaging alternatives together, making an offense against marine pollution and preventing the formation of microplastics. www.lanius.com Visit Lanius at Neonyt Text: Tom Felber Images: Lanius


LANGERCHEN In 2009 Miranda Chen and Philipp Langer, who both have been working in the fashion industry for a long time, decided to bring their own label for eco-fashion to life and LangerChen was founded. And the reason why is, that they had established an innovative fabric, that was too expensive for high street fashion retailers, so they used it for their first ever jacket collection. In their own factory LangerChen is still manufacturing unique and innovative fabrics, that match the typical LangerChen urban outdoor style.

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The new LangerChen collection for fall 2019 combines urban outdoor with highest functionality and a modern look. Classical elements are mixed with streetstyle – the perfect fusion of contemporary and traditional components. For fall 2019 the brand focuses specifically on warm jackets made of the vegan eco cotton poplin Storm Pop and also offers several new styles made of their warm and water-resistant eco wool fabric Tecno Felt. Up to eleven different colours per fabric complete the wide range of colours. A special highlight: the extended unisex program offering three styles for women and men including a ve-

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gan eco down jacket. Located in Jiaxing, China, it is their mission to improve the implementation of fair labour standards and be a role model in terms of sustainable production methods. But without conscious customers there would be no market for eco-fashion and therefore it is necessary to change our consume behaviour. By offering clothes, that are beautiful and sustainable at the same time they are contributing to making that change.

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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

Sustainability is showing respect to each other, to mother nature and our everyday environment. When it comes to designing and producing clothes sustainability has mostly to do with fair production conditions, conscious resourcing and a high-quality end product. In their own GOTS certified factory they are following all these norms and the outcome are clothes, that have a classic and timeless look but never miss that certain something for people, that don’t want to compromise between a good style and a clear conscience. www.langerchen.com Visit LangerChen at Neonyt

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Text: Tom Felber Images: LangerChen


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SUSTAINABLE FASHION

RHUMAA Rhumaa was founded in 2014 after co-owner Daniel Beernink came back from an inspirational trip to South Africa. Another trip to India, where he was looking for suppliers, was the determining factor for the decision to become a fair and sustainable fashion brand. But Rhumaa is more than just a sustainable fashion brand – Rhumaa makes a difference in terms of sharing the values of cultural acceptance and diversity. Every Rhumaa collection is created in collaboration with an up & coming creative talent from a developing country such as South Africa. Made with much love and respect for our oceans Rhumaa’s A/W 2019 collection tackles sea trash in hope of fashioning change and raising awareness because global warming, polluted oceans, waste, melting ice caps and water scarcity are all very NOW issues. This collection aims to bring much needed attention to our polluted waters and delivers not just an impact story, but designer styles and fabrics made by suppliers who care as much about the environment and our future as we do.

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Rhumaa explored styles customers will love, flawless silhouettes, detailed tailoring to fit the body well and fabrics to adore. Worldly, modern customers will also love this season’s fabrics. These include lyocell, merino, cotton, cashmere, alpaca, cupro and viscose blends. This collection provides silhouettes ranging from tailored to a relaxed fit and has items for everyone.  


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SUSTAINABLE FASHION This A/W 2019 collection’s print is inspired by the original artwork of South African photographer, Fernando Badiali. It tells a story of plastic pollution and impact. “I spend so much time shooting South Africa’s beaches and harbour areas and I’m often standing in trash while shooting a beautiful scene. It’s a reflection of our time and people need to see what I see” says Fernando Badiali. Through their fashion Daniel and his partner Ton want to inspire people and share the cultural stories behind every single piece. To become even more involved in the local occurrences, five percent of every purchased item goes directly to the Rhumaa Foundation that supports talent developing programs in the townships of South Africa. The functional yet fashionable clothes are mainly produced in Portuguese and Turkish manufactures. All their suppliers are visited regularly to ensure the improvement of labour and production standards. Starting the process of improving sustainable and fair production standards can be hard but isn’t impossible. For Daniel and Ton, it really is about taking the chance to make a change and to do the best they personally can with telling stories and reaching people with something so beautiful and meaningful as their collections. www.rhumaa.com Visit Rhumaa at Neonyt Text: Tom Felber Images: Rhumaa

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Salwa Rajaa Photography ■ Vincent Binant Make Up & Hair ■ Elisa Verdon Model ■ Salwa Rajaa @mademoiselle paris

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Shirt ■ VINTAGE Earring ■ ARISTOCRAZY 85


Shirt ■ VINTAGE Earring ■ ARISTOCRAZY Socks ■ WOLFORD #66 | 2019

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Overall ■ LEVI’S Earring ■ ARISTOCRAZY Socks ■ WOLFORD 89


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Bra ■ VINTAGE Pants ■ BALENCIAGA

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Body ■ AMERICAN APPAREL Earring ■ ARISTOCRAZY


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Body ■ VINTAGE Earring ■ ARISTOCRAZY

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Panties ■ VINTAGE Earring ■ ARISTOCRAZY

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UK

RICHARD YOUNG

I got goose bumps watching Burlesque!

Interview ■ Tom Felber Photos ■ Richard Young

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and it took me a few years to get it right, though now I have so much control and the results are amazing. Study one of my paintings up close and the next time you butter toast, think of me! What inspires you for your art?

Richard, you have already a long career as artist. Was art already your desire since ever? What were the steps of your art career? I was a prolific artist as a child, but after leaving school and passing advanced level art qualifications, I studied engineering and worked in Saudi Arabia for a while. I commenced work as a semi-professional artist in 2003 and sold my first painting then. I have been a full-time professional artist since June 2018. You are using various techniques and materials like oil paintings, sketches, drawings and pastel. Why have you chosen especially these ones?

Sketches allow freedom of expression and deliver fast results. I absolutely love oil paint. It’s so buttery, rich and smells so good! I love the smell of oil paint in the morning! There are so many colours available and it’s so flexible, durable and forgiving, allowing re-work for many hours. Pastels have a great texture when done on pastel card. However, they are so delicate and unforgiving in the chiaroscuro format I use. For your oil paintings you use a very special technique. Could you explain it?

I paint with a knife. I found that brushes wore out too quickly and I would get through up to five in one painting. Also, cleaning between colours was so time consuming. I therefore experimented using a knife in 2005

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My partner Sarah is my source of motivation now. She has such a positive outlook, was there for me when times were really difficult a few years ago, keeps me going when things aren’t going well in art and life and she’s the only reason I am still painting today!


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You travelled a lot, including the Middle East. How did that influence your art?

I initially created several paintings of Arabia horses, falcons, desert scenes and belly-dancers… I enjoy passionate dance shows. I got goose bumps watching Burlesque! And a night at the Moulin Rouge is planned for 2019… Working in the Middle East gave me the time and space to practice, experiment with techniques and materials, establish myself, develop my own personal style and create many beautiful paintings. Also, being a senior manager in an engineering company exposed me to quality control and IT, hence I constantly strive to improve myself and the quality of my artwork, down to minute detail. I also do my own scanning and printing and have set up my office with the highest quality professional Epson equipment. I am extremely fortunate to have had this opportunity.

There are several. Horses – galloping, snorting, with dirt and dust everywhere. Both wild Arabians and ‘A day at the races’… Also Raptors. Up close and personal. Fierce, ferocious, attacking their prey – the viewer… After I complete my current project which is ‘Sax in the City’… Watch this space. Thank you for the interview!

Your 2019 calendar shows dance scenes. Can you tell us about that? My partner Sarah created it, focusing on complementary figures and available originals. She also created a musician calendar and there’s a common theme: Passion!!! Is there any project which you really would love to realize in the future?

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Veil of Oblivion Photography & Styling ■ Patrick Schwalb Make-Up ■ Josie Martens @ Bigoudi Model ■ Dana Rumphorst @munich-models Styling ■ Markus Galic Digital Assistent ■ Maik Denecke Production ■ Islasproducciones

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Blouse & Carmen Top ■ MES DEMOISELLES Skirt ■ KAREN BY SIMONSEN Boots ■ PUBLIC DESIRE Belt ■ TIGHA #66 | 2019

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Scarf â– TIGHA

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Dress â– ALEXANDRA FUKS

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Blouse â– SAND COPENHAGEN 113


Shirt ■ by CLARA PARIS O shaped pants ■ PHILOMENA ZANETTI BERLIN Belt ■ COSTUME NATIONAL Ankle boots■ SEVEN

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Pullover ■ OED LONDON Blouse ■ MAJE Pants ■ BRUUNS BAZAAR Ankle boots■ RANI BAGERIA Belt ■ TIGHA


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Blouse ■ TRAFFIC PEOPLE Pants ■ FRANZISKA MICHAEL 117


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Tie ■ HUGO Blouse ■ FRANZISKA MICHAEL Dress ■ DESIGNERREMIX CARLOTTE ESKLIDSEN Belt ■ 80`s VINTAGE-by RUDOLF BEAUFAYS Bag ■ JAROME DREYFUSS


Smoking ■ PINKO Blouse ■ PATRIZIA PEPE #66 | 2019

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COLUMN

ICELAND IN NOVEMBER Is traveling north in winter a good idea? Text ■ Sarah Weyers Photos ■ The Agency 23

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It’s 5.30am and pitch black dark outside. The wind is roaring around the brightly lit airport doors; yet the light shining from the neon light bulbs only lights up what is immediately around it and doesn’t illuminate its surroundings at all. The wind seems to be tearing on the roof, the cars, the doors - it is howling so loudly and violently, the rain on my face feels like it’s coming from every direction at once. And as I am standing outside the small yellow van, holding onto the backdoor tightly so it doesn’t fly out of its hinges while we cramp in our wet backpacks, all I am asking myself is: “Why did we think a trip to Iceland in November was a good idea?” We arrived in Keflavik, about an hour from Iceland’s capital Reykjavik at 4.30 am, after a delayed flight from Copenhagen, and slept on the floor - like the true backpackers we were aspiring to be on this trip - until we were able to get our rental camper van for the week. After fighting through what felt like all elements at once - the heat of the airport, the cold of the wind, and the wetness of the rain, hail and maybe even snow, we went on to get groceries for the week, as the import of all goods except a few selected vegetables which grow in greenhouses, makes Iceland incredibly expensive. This, as well as the fact that the busiest season for tourism so far up north was long gone which meant that many places were either closed, and the small ones mostly booked up. Additionally, we enjoyed the thought of making coffee on the way and living off of very minimalist, modest meals. Just like sleeping on the airport floor, we wanted to really feel the backpacking spirit. 123

Fortunately, I was not the one to drive through the storm that shook the van from left to right, with very, very limited sight due to the heavy rain, as we made our way to Costco to stock up on potatoes, oats, vegetables, wine (of course), coffee, and matches to then have breakfast at IKEA. Why IKEA? Because it was the only place that was opened in the area at 11am that offered food. As we were all exhausted, freezing, and doubting our travel decision, we ate in the canteen of the Swedish furniture giant, while our snow pants and jackets were draped over the seats in the hopes they would be dry be the time we got back to van which, of course, they were not. While we spent much of the five hours of daylight we were able to use in the car on our first day, Iceland’s landscape and wide nature was spreading beneath the windows. Condensation was slowly running down the yellow metal frames of our home for the week as we were heating the car up as much as we could; we stuffed our damp boots with newspaper, sorted out our clothes for the day, prepared the first snack, tea and even dinner, made our beds, arranged the few personal belongings we had brought and even used some of the drive to work. All, until one of the most beautiful waterfalls appeared on our left. In absolute awe, we all jumped back into wet snow pants, damp boots, put on gloves, heavy, wet woollen hats and wrapped our cameras in plastic covers. While we spent much of the five hours of daylight we were able to use in the car on our first day, Iceland’s landscape and wide nature was spreading beneath the windows. Condensation was slowly running down the yellow metal frames of our home for the week as we were heating the car up as much as we could; we stuffed our damp boots with newspaper, sorted out our clothes for the day, prepared the first snack, tea and even dinner, made our beds, arranged the few personal belongings we had brought and even used some of the drive to work. All, until one of the most beautiful waterfalls appeared on our left. In absolute awe, we all jumped back into wet snow pants, damp boots, put on gloves, heavy, wet woollen hats and wrapped our cameras in plastic covers.


Our team of four luckily had a tour guide - Kari, who had visited the country before, was well prepared and presented the itinerary for the next days. Besides ice cave tours, hikes, glaciers and more waterfalls, we were visiting black beaches and an artificial Viking village. So, after fighting our way back to the van, we -again, and as many more times to come - hung our jackets, hats, gloves, pants, caps, and camera pouches up in the very limited space the van offered in the hopes they would dry at least a little and made our way to our campground for the night. The day seemed incredibly short, and thinking back to it, really was - besides shopping, our strange brunch choice and seeing the waterfall, we had spent most of the Saturday’s daylight driving on what felt like abandoned streets. We came across maybe six or seven houses, all of which were surrounded by miles and miles of pure nothingness - hills, moss, some sheep here and there. Neither did we see a gas station, a sign on the side of the road, or even other cars; and we were not in the unexplored North of the island, but in the South West, which is among the most populated areas of the country. Fortunately, Stevie, who was our designated driver, had no problem driving in the pitch black dark - which was the case about 70% of the time, and brought us to our campground safely. It seemed to be a rather abandoned little spot in the middle of nowhere, which was again, surrounded by absolutely nothing. Yet, the showers were beautifully designed, sparkling clean and modern. As we learned from a local later that week, ‘Icelandic showers’ are at least 30 minutes long, since the water comes straight from the glaciers and is not heated by electricity or gas - but the very environmentally conscious selves that we were, we limited our shower time and made our way back through the storm and mud, to cook our first dinner, heat up the car one last time, and fall asleep yet lagged and happy at 8.30 pm. I woke up for the first time about 8 hours later; and it was still so incredibly #66 | 2019

dark in the car that I could not make out where I was. A little confused at first I gathered my thoughts, hit my head on the cold roof, laid back down to think about where I currently was and looked at my watch. It was 5.43 am and the wind was shaking the car so badly I couldn’t fall back asleep. That, and the fact that I hadn’t felt my toes since I went to bed the previous evening. I cautiously checked if anyone else was awake, and one after the other started to wake up - only to complain about the cold, too. So, we turned on a small light and got our little stove going. Our first breakfast was one of the most simple meals

I have ever eaten, and yet, the atmosphere in the van, wrapped in our sleeping bags, with the wind still whistling outside, we were excited for what the day had in store. Luckily, all of our clothes had dried during the night - so we put all of our gear on and made our way - you guessed it - through the darkness, to our first spot, which ended up being one of the many highlights of this trip.

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We arrived at the glacier at 7.20 am, and it was still raining heavily, as we were searching the parking lot for our tour guide. We had booked an ice cave tour to explore the insides of the large ice landscapes, but were told that due to the heavy rain, the first tours were cancelled and we would have to wait at least three hours to join a different one. We were incredibly lucky to have met Tony, a manager for one of the tour providers, who is from Spain but had been living in Iceland for many years, who invited us into his beautifully decorated bus, which had a fireplace, fresh coffee, wooden walls, benches and, most importantly, was full of kindness,

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hospitality and heat. So, we spent the morning with an incredibly interesting guy who told about spots to visit, showed us where to go next, made us coffee on the fireplace, and allowed us to dry our - again - wet jackets, before organizing a different tour for us to join. Around lunch time we then went on the tour - with spike strapped to our shoes we drove over large ice fields in a huge truck, none of us really knowing what to say, feel or think, until we arrived at a drop-off. We parked right next to a bus that had slipped into a glacier and was sticking out with its backside - a sight that made all of us incredibly uncomfortable and not ready for what was about to happen - and we got on a different truck with even larger tires that would bring us to the entrance of the glacier we were about to explore.


The next thing we knew, we were climbing down a steep ladder made out of ice (yes, you have read that correctly), into the ice cave, which, again, you have guessed that right, was completely out of ice. I suppose the name implies it, but it was still an incredible feeling to be literally surrounded by nothing but frozen water, and I had a slight hunch of feeling claustrophobic, but I didn’t really have the time to allow the feeling to wash over me and instead, carefully made my way further into the cave. We were able to explore the endless ice fields even more after being back out on solid ground and I had completely forgotten about how wet my shoes were, and my leggings, and my hat. And everything else I was wearing, too. Making our way back to Tony’s bus to show him our photos, which he had probably seen in 200 or more varieties by other people going on the same tour, we were over the moon. This experience was one for the books, and we are still so thankful for the chance to experience mother earth in this marvellous and wondrous way. We spent some more time with Tony, who, which again felt like some supernatural connection that had brought us together, teaches photography in his spare time and showed us how to best use our cameras to capture the Northern Lights. Next up we enjoyed the view of the glacier and its surrounding ice water, and even thought the view was limited, we were stunned by nature. The size of the ice blocks of which you can only see about 13%, the other 87% being under water, really put things into perspective - but so it seems, do almost all of nature’s wonders. Since we had spent much of the daylight in Tony’s gorgeous truck, we made our way to our next campground quickly after. This time, it was less of a campground and more of, well, the side of the road somewhere in the middle of nowhere. Happily, we made another simple dinner, hung up the wet clothes, brushed our teeth in the storm while holding onto the van’s bumper, and reminisced about the day that #66 | 2019

we had just experienced. The next morning, we were again woken up by full 9 hours of sleep, and the wind, but no rain for the first time in two days. Excitedly we started driving towards our destinations for the day and witnessed one of the most beautiful sunrises there ever was. Slowly, the sun was rising over the water in the distance, painting everything in a beautiful, bright orange - which was the most incredibly contrast to the green and grey mountains, and the black sand we were able to see in the distance.

Our first stop was the Viking village in Höfn, which was built for an Iceland film that never made its debut and is built in line with historic information of how Swedish Viking explorers had lived after discovering the island, back between 700-800, will finally be used for a film by Universal within the next few years. Even more impressive than the village was the black beach close by. The contrast between the almost white waves and the dark sand, with mountains and dunes all around, was one that could easily be made into posters and sold in art stores worldwide. The nature of this beautiful country is truly one of a 126


and deserves all the attention it has been getting in recent times. With flight deals between the US and Scandinavia, and Asian airlines jumping onto the popularity train of these deals, some of the more touristic places were relatively busy despite the late time of the year and the harsh weather, which indicates its incredible popularity during the tourism high seasons, too. After visiting the glacier again, which we had seen in completely different weather conditions the previous day, we were completely surprised by the sight of it: Neither of us had realized its enormous size, and the combination of the baby blue ice and the pastel coloured sky was again absolutely picture perfect. Enviously, we went back to Tony - he got to see this beauty every day - and all of us asked for a job as a tour guide straight away, just so we would get to see these miracles more than just once. This night was finally the night, too: We were going to see the Northern lights. As though we weren’t going to go to bed completely happy and content that day, we were preparing our cameras to see one of the most incredibly miracles of them all: The magnetosphere being disturbed by solar winds, which eventually emits light that is created by the ionization and the excitation of constituents of the atmosphere. This light varies in color, and we got to see the green shimmer of it across mountains, behind a few clouds and across the roofs of some lonely houses in the distance. Even though none of us felt either our fingers or our toes, we were in complete awe and seriously willing to sacrifice a body part or two, just to be able to gaze at this beautiful miracle a little longer. With a mixture of exhaustion, happiness, astonishment and wonder, we all went to bed freezing that night, but fortunately the wind wasn’t rocking the van as hard as it did the previous nights. After waking up, all of frantically looked at some of the photos we had taken - and they were absolutely beautiful; yet, the camera wasn’t able to fully capture the beautiful 127

atmosphere we had experienced when we finally, together as this amazing group of explorers that we felt like, finally saw the mildly green shimmer across the sky.

We spent the day hiking up to more gorgeous waterfalls and visited one of the most popular black beaches of the island. Reynisfjara embodies everything that the rough side of the country seems to offer: Gorgeous but incredibly dangerous waves, black sand, strong winds, mountains in the background, and a few lonely sheep that climb said mountains. We were standing by the ocean for some time, maybe an hour, maybe less, and just looked onto the waves that were forming artistically in the distance. Despite the wet feet, cold hands and modest meals, we had the most wonderful time, staring at these wonders that nature had to offer, marvelling at ice, walking through rain, feeling the cold water of waterfalls on harshly against our faces. I had the best sleep in the cold van, wrapped into my sleeping bag and covered in a few blankets, with the strong wind shaking our mobile home, some snoring from Stevie, with instant coffee and oatmeal awaiting me in the cold mornings. Iceland, you are always a great idea; weather in the summer and even more so in the winter.


IMPRINT

Team Tom Felber ■ Co-Founder & Chief Editor Bea v. Winterfeldt-Heuser ■ Creative Director & Photographer Sarah Weyers ■ Senior Editor Jana Wilms ■ Senior Editor Guest Authors And special thanks to Co-Founder Marc Huth, former Creative Director Itamar Inbar and all the great team members that worked with us during the last years.

Publisher SUPERIOR Publishing UG (haftungsbeschränkt) Lychener Strasse 76 10437 Berlin Registered at Local Court Charlottenburg HRB 143585 B Managing Director Thomas Felber VAT-ID DE284291789 contact@superior-magazine.com


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coming out MARCH 2019

#67 | 2019

Profile for Superior Magazine

Superior Magazine # 66  

In this issue: Exclusive fashion editorials from around the world, interviews with artists, fashion from Berlin Fashion Week and a journey t...

Superior Magazine # 66  

In this issue: Exclusive fashion editorials from around the world, interviews with artists, fashion from Berlin Fashion Week and a journey t...

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