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International magazine for lifestyle and business • www.superior-magazine.com

#68 | 2019


WWW.MY-FASHIONARY.COM

#68 | 2019

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DECEMBER 2016

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DECEMBER 2016

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WELCOME

Superior is an international magazine for lifestyle and business Superior Magazine stands for high-quality content that is a source of new insights and inspiration. In the four sections Art + Design, Business + Society, Culture + Travel and Fashion + Beauty you find interviews with fascinating people, exclusive photos and videos, reports on high-class events, the hottest places in the city and a lot more. Superior Magazine’s sophisticated design provides an artistic showcase for all kinds of vanguard visual expression and imagery. Superior Magazine is published across all media channels – mobile, digital, print and web - with a strong link between the channels.


DECEMBER 2016

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EDITORIAL

DEAR SUPERIOR MAGAZINE READERS, W

elcome to our Superior Magazine # 68 issue.

Again, we got so many submissions of great Fashion Editorials that it was hard for us to find the best selection. We hope you like what we present you this time. The exclusive fashion editorials have been contributed by photographers and stylists from all over the world. It’s Agnieszka Potoczna and Anna Zyskowska both from Poland, Bea v. Winterfeldt-Heuser from Germany, Christina ValÊrie Henningstad from Norway, Inmakko Marakasso from Morocco, Pascale Weber from Switzerland and Riccardo Torri from Itali. The cover story comes from Chicago, USA based photographer Adam Mayer and his team. They tell us the story of a luxurious thief - from her creative disguises, to her getaway car, and her ultimate arrest. For the category Art + Design we interviewed the artist and designer Simon Freund who lives and works currently in Gotha, Germany. In Business + Society we present a young fashion startup, KINTANA. We met the founder Marijan Divkovic at a tech startup conference. Enjoy our Superior Magazine # 68 issue... Tom & Bea and the whole Superior Magazine team

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GET YOUR PRINTED ISSUE 


CONTENT

14 EDITORIAL 16 CONTRIBUTORS 24 SWEET VINTAGE 38 BEAUTY BANDIT 52 SIMON FREUND 58 FRENZY 70 SCRIBBLE WIGGLE 82 ISLAND GIRL 100 KINTANA 102 UPHILL 114 ROSE 122 ONE DAY IN MILAN 130 IMPRINT

Fashion Editorial by Pascale Weber Fashion Editorial by Adam Meyer

Interview with artist Simon Freund

Fashion Editorial by Riccardo Torri

BUSINESS + SOCIETY

Fashion Editorial by Anna Zyskowska

Interview with designer Marijan Divkovic

Fashion Editorial by Bea v. Winterfeldt-Heuser

Fashion Editorial by Inmakko Marakasso

ART + DESIGN

FASHION + BEAUTY

CULTURE + TRAVEL

Fashion Editorial by Agnieszka Potoczna

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Fashion Editorial by Christina Valérie Henningstad

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CONTRIBUTORS #68 | 2019

CHRISTINA VALÉRIE HENNINGSTAD ORIGIN PROFESSION

Norway Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

I’m truly passionate about taking portraits, especially on location. For me, portrait photography is something very special. I love making models feel comfortable in front of my camera. I enjoy capturing people’s personalities in photographs. Whether it is a commercial or private photo session, I try to capture the true personality of the person and to create a little story line around the model.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

My fantastic team and my beautiful models is always the endless source of my inspiration.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

This editorial was taken during the Fashion Week in Milan. After being inspired from Italian style and fashion we wanted to share our positive emotions and Italian warmth with the readers of Superior Magazine. The model of the project true fashionista - Fariba Rahimi.

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MILA - INMAKKO MARAKASSO ORIGIN PROFESSION CREATIVE APPROACH

Marrakesh, Morocco Photographer “The real phototography is a story of one animated moment. It always feels like a song like breathing. Such a picture talks to you without words and immerses you in other reality.. What is a good photo? - This is a photo that you want to read like a book, it’s a photo that you want to listen to as music..” - Inmakko Marakasso. Mila loves to create different color combinations in the image and realize her creative ideas in the photo.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

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The universe This is a story about a woman, about the disclosure of her freedom, its curbing and flourishing. This is an editorial about the symbolism of contrasts and their manifestation. And about the beautiful flower that is in every woman.


CONTRIBUTORS #68 | 2019

ADAM MAYER ORIGIN PROFESSION

Chicago, USA Photographer & Model Agent @ MP Management

CREATIVE APPROACH

My creative approach is all about collaboration and telling stories. I love digging deeper than just superficial appeal.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Being a model agent, I am constantly viewing inspiration from watching shows at fashion week, reading magazines, going through portfolio shoots, and connecting with artists on social media.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

For this editorial, my team wanted to tell the story of a luxurious thief -- from her creative disguises, to her getaway car, and her ultimate arrest.

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AGNIESZKA POTOCZNA ORIGIN PROFESSION

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Wrocław, Poland Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

I’m a color addict, a story seeker and a weirdness fan. Someone who loves to create a new look at something seemingly normal. I don’t like boredom and schematics, which is why I’m focused on an unconventional approach to photography.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

I’m mostly inspired by pop culture and its influence on people. Movies, music, streets and even commercials are an endless source of inspiration that stimulates creativity. Contrasts and diversity are something that I love to focus on. As a photographer, I strive to mix what we really see and what we would like to see and create my own visual language.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

Our editorial is about a couple of people communicate through color. Or maybe it’s not a couple? Maybe they’re unity? The scenes are mysterious and open to interpretation. The shots are chosen in a such way that everyone can create their own story. What is the editorial about? You tell me.


CONTRIBUTORS #68 | 2019

RICCARDO TORRI ORIGIN PROFESSION

Milan, Italy Creative director, Photographer, Teacher

CREATIVE APPROACH

I’m always looking for something different. My style is about framing, thinking a picture as a single or a cover or a double page. Sometimes as a movie frame. But outside composition I’m always searching for the unexpected and creative side of photography.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Everything. Old fashion magazines, vynil records covers, comics, movie, paintings. I’m a visual thinker, in every sense.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

For this shoot I experimented with the use of a single light, a big moving bank able to light the subject in an easy and simple way. The rest was the inspiration that came from a classic fashion point of view, inspired by Avedon, Testino, Michel Comte and able to give life to the colours of the amazing styling I had to tell.

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PASCALE WEBER ORIGIN PROFESSION

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Zurich, Switzerland Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

I am a Swiss photographer based in ZĂźrich. I discovered my passion in still life photography. I especially enjoy the exact work in the arrangement and determining the perfect moment myself. I like presenting products playful and in unusual ways, which consequently, allows the viewer to see the objects in a new light.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

I like to be enchanted by fairy tales and utopian worlds that constantly inspire me for new things.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

The editorial is inspired from the 60s to 90s. Where we created a dreamy retro atmosphere with different small scenarios and lovely Celine with her dreamy expression gave to the whole story the perfect mood.


CONTRIBUTORS #68 | 2019

BEA V. WINTERFELDT-HEUSER ORIGIN PROFESSION

Frankfurt, Germany Photographer

CREATIVE APPROACH

Her photographic approach is somewhere between minimalistic and expressive. She tries to play with contrasts in order to focus on the point of interest within her photo stories.

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Bea gets a lot of inspiration from famous fashion photographers a s Tim Walker or Patrick Demarchelier. Also current social issues inspire her to interpret those in a creative way.

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

In our editorial we used one of the first warm days of the year to capture those moments between the last signs of winter and the first signs of spring.

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ANNA ZYSKOWSKA ORIGIN PROFESSION CREATIVE APPROACH

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Poland Photographer & Retoucher Don’t stop until you’re proud of the solution

SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

Travelling giving me the biggest inspiration, seeing new places and people are bringing new idea to my head

ABOUT THE FASHION EDITORIAL

The editorial was made during my journey to Cape verde. The view of restless ocean, a long, deserted beach was an ideal location for creating photos with an inspirational model, living and loving the island.


SWEET VINTAGE Photography ■ Pascale Weber Model ■ Celine L. @Scout Model Hair & Make-Up ■ Sophia Singh Styling ■ Victoria Steiner

Dishes ■ Depot & Ikea

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Bag â– TOPSHOP #68 | 2019

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Outfit â–

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FOMME (D)


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Swimsuit â– SOLID & STRIPED


Outfit ■ NAMILIA (D)

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Shoes ■ LOST INK WIDE FIT30


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Bag ■ TOPSHOP Glasses ■ EVEN&ODD


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Jewelery â– VINTAGE #68 | 2019

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Coat ■ VICTORIA’S SECRET

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Flowers â– IKEA


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BEAUTY BANDIT Photography ■ Adam Mayer Model ■ Mari @MP Management Chicago Hair & Make-Up / Creative Director ■ Karess Emme Dee @Distinct Artists Wardrobe Stylist ■ Kimmi Ade @Distinct Artists Retoucher ■ Ana-Maria Nedelea

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Coat ■ APPARIS ■ ALEXIS BITTAR

Pin |&2019 Earring #68

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Necklace ■ ALEXIS BITTAR Gloves ■ ELMA

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Mask ■ GUCCI Coat ■ U.C.C. Necklace ■ TFJ Lip Ring ■ IRIS TRENDS #68 | 2019

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Blazer & Pants ■ JEAN PAUL GAULTIER Top ■ BROOKS BROTHERS Shoes ■ MARC FISHER Bag ■ BALMAIN Glasses ■ CHLOÉ

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Scarf & ALEXANDER MCQUEEN Jacket ■ ALEXANDER WANG Earrings ■ IRIS TRENDS #68 | 2019

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Top ■ EVAN PICONE Blazer ■ LOLITA LEMPICKA Hat ■ VBIGER Rings ■ IRIS TRENDS & ALEXIS BITTAR Earrings ■ ALEXIS BITTAR

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SUBMISSION

SUBMIT YOUR WORKS

APP / DIGITAL / ONLINE / PRINT

SUBMIT NOW! DECEMBER 2016

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We are happy to receive contributions and submissions by photographers, filmmakers, stylists, make-up artists, hair stylists, models, illustrators, artists and authors.

SHOW US Your best ideas, your creativity and your excellence and become published in Superior Magazine

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GOTHA

SIMON FREUND

I’m a human most of all

Interview ■ Tom Felber Photos ■ Simon Freund

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Simon, how would you call yourself? I call myself an artist, a conceptual artist to be precise. However, the title of what I do does not really matter to me that much. At first, I didn’t really feel very comfortable calling myself an artist, now I don’t really care – I’m a human most of all. When did you find out that you like to become a creative?

When I look back I was already most certain that I would like to work as a creative when I was in school and I decided against doing my a-levels, although I would have easily had the grades to do so. I was just convinced that I would never want to study law, medicines or any of those things. In fact, I didn’t really want to study at all and started my own fashion brand “SIMON&ME” directly after school. Please tell us a bit about the steps of your art career so far.

After founding my own fashion brand at the age of 18 and running it for roughly 8 years, I basically spent most of the time of my professional life working in the fashion and design industry. It was only after those eight years, that I finally decided to stop all of my commercial work to make art. In a way that’s what I always wanted to do, but I never really dared to consider myself an artist. The last collection me and my assistant created for my brand was so conceptual however, that it clearly stepped over the

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line in terms of being a commercial brand, while still being within the fashion context. When we showed this concept in Copenhagen there was only one – highly conceptual – store, which decided to stock our items and as this clearly was too little to make a living and there is only a very small handful of these kind of stores in general – I sort of brought myself in the uncomfortable position needing to close the brand, while in the comfortable position as well being ready to make the step into the art world. After making this decision I worked a full-time job, to finance my art for about one and a half years and after also quitting the job I started to study fine arts at the Academy of Fine Arts Munich.


What inspires you?

I’m very inspired by films and videos. I love watching videos on Vimeo for example and always include my favorite at the of my “newsletter”. It sounds cheesy but in general I’m mostly inspired by life itself, which is also the topic of the films and videos I enjoy, like documentaries for example. As I’m not into decorative art I don’t need visual inspiration that much. I’m mostly looking for topics and thoughts, which I find interesting to work with. You made various design objects. Can you tell us about one or two? Some of my artworks from 2015 are the remains of the transitional period from my brand towards art and therefore are probably as much design object as they are artworks. One of my favorites from that time is the “wooden ladder“, which was handmade by a local crafts smith in Berlin from a local walnut tree and another one, also made from wood but painted white, which was the base for my installation from 2018, called “onwards & upwards“. The funny part about those ladders is that they are so carefully crafted with such high-quality materials, that they were so expensive, that even if you would be able to afford it, you might not dare to use it anyway. When I was still living in Munich I had the walnut version of the ladder in my living room and when a handyman stopped by to fix something on the ceiling he simply took the ladder and stepped on it, with his dirty boots. That was a strange moment as I wasn’t really comfortable about him doing this, but at the same time I could not tell him that he could not use the ladder because it’s too expensive to be used. Since then I’m treating the ladder as any other ladder. Another object from that time which I really like is the piece “glass & tumbler“, which follows the same concept as the ladder of being so expensive already in its production and due to the materials that you wouldn’t dare to use it for its original purpose #68 | 2019

anymore. So, the glass was handmade / mouth blown and the silver tumbler as well according to the measurements of the glass. From six glasses only one fit into the tumbler though, as being handmade they were all slightly different in their size – so not only was it expensive to produce it, 90% could not be used for the final product. And although this piece is always in perfect reach in flat, I never drank from it once. This might sound a little bit stupid, but the idea behind those pieces is to question the general value of the things we buy.

While it’s easy to argue why those two objects are so expensive, I would argue that they represent a rather normal price if we take everything that goes into producing such a product into account. However, it’s difficult to say how much a tree should cost for example and so companies just take advantage of everything they can (the environment, their employees, laws, etc.) to produce products which seem to be sold to us at a fair price. However most of the times the costs for the environment, fair loans and the fact that we might need to buy it again soon, due to poor quality are not part of this price… and that’s roughly what I want to express in those pieces. 54


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How would you describe your art?

Calling myself a conceptual artist, I also make conceptual art. This basically means that I don’t make art, with the intention that it looks nice or stunning, but art which has a concept behind it. While the idea might be complex sometime, I always try to execute that idea as simple as possible. This mostly results in a rather minimalistic aesthetic. Not because I’m a minimalist (I’m not), but because I like to leave everything out that’s unnecessary. Once I have an idea or a concept I would like to explore I see which materials or which medium I can use to express it. The results range from installations to performances and lately also websites, which serve as the medium. Can you give us some examples? The topics of my latest exhibition “+49 173 37 42 908” in Munich for example were our current addiction with social media and internet. So, I exhibited my mobile phone and three websites, which deal with #68 | 2019

those topics. And, “allipossess.com”, where I photograph everything I own; “countless.info” where you can see my current financial status and “fiverooms. cam” which shows 24 hour video recordings of every room of my flat. Last year, to show my disgust towards Black Friday, I created an installation with trash bags with the Nike logo on them, called “Black Friday”. Another piece I really liked doing is the photo series “Selbstportrait” For this series I photographed 100 people wearing my signature outfit and vice versa. The result is quite stunning and I really enjoyed the process of meeting and photographing all those people and wearing so many different outfits. You are currently living in Gotha. How does it come? Before moving to Gotha, which is basically located in the middle of Germany, right where it says Germany on the map, I was living in Munich. Before Munich I was living in London, before that in Berlin and before that in Amsterdam.

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So, in a sense you could say that I lived in a fair amount of really cool cities already and after not being able to afford a flat in Munich anymore I thought I start looking for alternatives. I literally simply took it to Immoscout to show me all flats in Germany for 250€ cold rent with wooden floor located in an old building (Altbau). From the 20 something results at that time, my current flat in Gotha was the most beautiful. In Munich I would pay around 600€ for a small room in a flat-share, so I decided to move to Gotha. The decision most definitely has not been easy though and I must say it’s really tough to live in such a small town where you don’t know anyone in comparison to living in a cool city where all of your friends are. Gotha allows me to fully concentrate on my next steps within my career as an artist though so for now I’m happy about the decision. I’m traveling between Berlin, Munich and other cities most of the time, anyway.

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What are your plans for the next time? Is there any project which you really would love to realize in the future? There are plenty of projects in my drawers which I would love to realize, however I’m currently struggling to finance myself, even with my cheap flat in Gotha, so most of them have to wait for a more fruitful time of my career. For now, I try to stick with what I already have. I love to reuse my own work for example, like I’m doing with it with the “letter boards” or the “metal chair”, which I used for several different pieces so far. Also, I’m planning my next exhibition in Munich in September at the CoMa (Container of Modern Art) and I’m hoping to be able to show my work outside of Germany for the first time as well this year, however that’s still to be decided and I’m afraid I’m not making the decision. Thank you for the interview!


Cape, shorts and bag ■ SIMON CRACKER Beret ■ DIANA SOROKINA Collar ■ MAJULA HANDMEADE Sunglasses ■ LIO OCCHIALI #68 | 2019

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Photography ■ Riccardo Torri Models ■ Mariana & Olga @Wonderwall Management Stylist ■ Dace Aleksandravica Eyewear Stylist ■ Franca Bochicchio Make-Up ■ Veronica Rotolo Hair ■ Francesca Giancotti Photography Assistant ■ Paolo Defila

FRENZY

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Cape ■ SIMON CRACKER Dress ■ DACE BAHMANN Collar ■ MAJULA HANDMEADE Sunglasses ■ LIO OCCHIALI

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Top ■ MASSIMO CRIVELLI Pants ■ YLENIA MANGANO Headband ■ MAJULA HANDMEADE Sunglasses ■ LAMARCA EYEWEAR #68 | 2019

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Top ■ MASSIMO CRIVELLI Pants ■ YLENIA MANGANO Headband ■ MAJULA HANDMEADE Sunglasses ■ LAMARCA EYEWEAR

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Top ■ SIMON CRACKER Skrit ■ YLENIA MANGANO Collar ■ MAJULA HANDMEADE Sunglasses ■ LIO OCCHIALI

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Dress ■ FOLGOSA Scarf ■ SIN ON THE BEACH Jacket ■ SIMON CRACKER Sunglasses ■ LIO OCCHIALI

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Blouse ■ DACE BAHMANN Pants ■ FOLGOSA Jacket ■ SIMON CRACKER Sunglasses ■ LAMARCA EYEWEAR #68 | 2019

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Coat ■ DERETA Shoes ■ sourced by Vintage Bee By Beth Caterer

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Creative Director/Photographer ■ Agnieszka Potoczna Male Model ■ Kacper Przybylak @Magnes Models Female Model ■ Sara Tarnicka Makeup Artist ■ Agata Rzepa Fashion Designer ■ Katarzyna Dworecka Mindless

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Island Girl Photography ■ Anna Zyskowska Model ■ Rehyan Rachel Fashion ■ Madnezz

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Top ■ JULIA SEEMANN (CH) Skirt ■ RUDOLF (A)


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STARTUP

KINTANA Interview with Marijan Divkovic Interview ■ Tom Felber Photos ■ Marijan Divkovic

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are located. Against the common perception, white sandy beaches and turquoise water is not everything Mexico has to offer. Therefore, our mission is to share the real beauty of Mexico by creating products that tell a unique story. Beside the design the ethical aspect is also important for you?

Marijan, we met at the Skinnovation conference. What is your background, tech or fashion? As a business and software engineering students, I can clearly say that I have a tech background. How did it come that you founded Kintana?

It all started when my best university friend was on exchange in Mexico. On one of his travels through the country, he discovered their fascinating textile culture. Indigenous artisans, mainly Mayan descendants, work for weeks or sometimes for months on precious embroideries and dresses. Every piece tells a unique story about their history and the place where it comes from. Hooked by the idea to bring the Latin-Style to Europe, I joined the German-Mexican team of designers and there, I am now responsible for business development and building our online infrastructure. Please tell us a bit about the fashion label Kintana.

What makes us truly special that we blend traditional artisan design with the latest fashion trends to create exceptional pieces of fashion. In our team, we have talented designers from both worlds who are either experts in indigenous textile art and work together with artisans, or have experience in the luxury runway fashion. If you have asked yourself, what does Kintana stand for: our brand name was inspired by the word Quintana Roo, the Caribbean state in which CancĂşn and Tulum, popular holiday destinations,

Producing sustainable fashion under ethical and fair conditions should be a must in the fashion industry. In contrast to Zara & Co., we just have started with a limited collection of only two jackets and therefore we know our producers and suppliers by name. Our aspiration in the future is to continue to build lasting relationships with our manufacturers, suppliers and artisans. We believe that doing business is not about win-or-lose decisions, but about creating mutual value. What are your plans for Kintana?

At Kintana, we want to create more social impact in indigenous communities in Mexico. In times of low market prices for coffee or other commodities, life is difficult for many people in this communities. At Kintana, we plan to open our sales channels and distribution channels to provide indigenous people with more options to secure a constant income. In our team are sheer endless ideas and I can´t wait to bring them to life. And your plans for your other profession, the tech business?

Bring forward Kintana. Is there any project which you really would love to realize in the future?

There are always ideas lying dormant. I guess making impact and helping people as in the project above, is something I would like to continue to realize. Thank you for the interview! â–

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Jacket ■ DEHA Dress ■ INCENTIVE!CASHMERE Belt ■ SABINE DICKLBERGER Shoes ■ ALDO #68 | 2019

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UPHILL Photography ■ Bea v. Winterfeldt-Heuser Model ■ Lucija Joksimovic Hair & Make-Up ■ Edita Poturak

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Shirt ■ INCENTIVE!CASHMERE Jacket ■ SABINE DICKLBERGER Choker ■ TRANLOEV Right: Top ■ TOPSHOP Choker ■ CHOKER:QUIETShirt STUDIO VIA ARCANE & Jacket ■ INCENTIVE!CASHMERE Shirt ■ ANNA ADAM Blazer ■ ALEKSANDRA SEWERYNIAK Short ■ MINT&BERRY Pants ■ ZARA Bag ■ JIMMY CHOO Necklaces ■ TOPSHOP Choker ■ TRANLOEV ■ MODEL’S Socks, Shoes, Rings Boots ■ STYLIST’S OWN OWN #68 | 2019

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Jacket ■ HUNTER Pullover ■ MANGO Top ■ VANS Skirt ■ VANS Stockings ■ WOLFORD Boots ■ VAGABOND


Dessous ■ INGA INTIMATES Dressing gown ■ STYLIST’S OWN

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Bomber Jacket ■ CANADA GOOSE Shirt ■ JACK & JONES Sewat-Cargo Pants ■ URBAN OUTFITTERS Sneakers ■ VANS Hat ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK

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Top ■ POSTYR Cardigan & Leggin ■ INCENTIVE!CASHMERE Shoes ■ ALDO

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Shirt ■ ANNA ADAM Jumpsuit ■ TOPSHOP Earrings ■ NA-KD ACCESSORIES #68 | 2019

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Jacket ■ NEW LOOK Skrit ■ SABINE DICKLBERGER Handbag ■ ZARA 109


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Shirt ■ POSTYR Coat & Leggin ■ INCENTIVE!CASHMERE 111

Left: Coat ■ BOHO QUEEN Dress ■ LACE & BEADS


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Body ■ TIGER MIST Short ■ MINT&BERRY Earrings ■ NA-KD ACCESSORIES Boots ■ MODEL’S OWN

Pullover ■ VERO MODA

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Dress ■ TOPSHOP Top ■ TOPSHOP Sweatshirt ■ MOOSE KNUCKLES Pants ■ ANTONY MORATOCoat ■ ZARA Socks ■ SANTA CRUZ Sneakers ■ VANS Hat ■ BAERBEL SANDROCK 113


Dress ■ SARAH MAJ Baclava ■ MAISON NOMADE #68 | 2019

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ROSE Photography ■ Inmakko Marakasso Model ■ Julie Muzyka Make-Up ■ Inmakko Marakasso

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Dress & Gloves ■ SARAH MAJ Baclava ■ MAISON NOMADE 117


Dress ■ ZADIG & VOLTAIRE Turtleneck ■ UNIQLO Balaclava ■ MAISON NOMADE Pants ■ PIKEUR Boots ■ LA MARTINA #68 | 2019

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Shirt ■ FRANCESCO EMOLTO Cape ■ ALEXANDER WANG Balaclava ■ MAISON NOMADE Pants ■ PIKEUR Boots ■ LA MARTINA

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Dress ■ ZADIG & VOLTAIRE Turtleneck ■ UNIQLO Balaclava ■ MAISON NOMADE Pants ■ PIKEUR Boots ■ LA MARTINA

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ONE DAY IN MILAN Photography ■ Christina V Henningstad Model ■ Fariba Rahimi Make-Up ■ Serguei Chatel Hair ■ Paulina Reynolds

Jacket ■ MOTIVI Watch ■ VERSACE Jewellery ■ VERSACE 123


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Overall ■ DENIM COPINK Hat ■ H&M Shoes ■ VERSACE Watch ■ VERSACE

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Sport Set ■ GAVELO Watch ■ VERSACE

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Jacket ■ LEVI’S Watch ■ VERSACE Jewellery ■ VERSACE #68 | 2019

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Dress ■ JISELE Watch ■ VERSACE

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Dress ■ TIGER MIST Watch ■ VERSACE Jewellery ■ VERSACE

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Jacket ■ LEVI’S Jewellery ■ VERSACE 129


IMPRINT

Team Tom Felber ■ Co-Founder & Chief Editor Bea v. Winterfeldt-Heuser ■ Creative Director & Photographer Sarah Weyers ■ Senior Editor Jana Wilms ■ Senior Editor Guest Authors And special thanks to Co-Founder Marc Huth, former Creative Director Itamar Inbar and all the great team members that worked with us during the last years.

Publisher SUPERIOR Publishing UG (haftungsbeschränkt) Lychener Strasse 76 10437 Berlin Registered at Local Court Charlottenburg HRB 143585 B Managing Director Thomas Felber VAT-ID DE284291789 contact@superior-magazine.com


Liability & Copyright Superior Magazine may contain links to the websites of third parties (“external links”).We do not have any influence over the content of linked websites and we are unable to monitor these on a permanent basis. We cannot assume any liability for suchexternal content nor does this data protection declaration apply to such websites. In all cases, the provider of information of the linked websites is liable for the content and accuracy of the information provided. At the point in time when the links were placed, no infringe-ments of the law were recognizable to us. As soon as an infringe-ment of the law becomes known to us, we will remove the link in question.

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Superior Magazine accepts no liability forany unsolicited material whatsoever. Opinions contained in the editorial content are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the publisher of Superior Magazine. While we strive for utmost precision in every detail, we cannot be held responsible for any inaccuracies, nor for any subsequent loss or damage arising.

Picture and text rights reserved for all countries. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever. All rights reserved.

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International magazine for lifestyle and business • www.superior-magazine.com

coming out May 2019

#69 | 2019

Profile for Superior Magazine

Superior Magazine # 68  

In this issue: Exclusive fashion editorials from around the world and interviews with artists and designers | Superior Magazine stands for h...

Superior Magazine # 68  

In this issue: Exclusive fashion editorials from around the world and interviews with artists and designers | Superior Magazine stands for h...

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