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Magazine for fashion, design, music, art & culture • www.superior-magazine.com

# JANUARY 2016


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#  I m p r i n t

SUPERIOR MAGAZINE Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin www.superior-magazine.com connection@superior-magazine.com Publisher

SUPERIOR Publishing UG (haftungsbeschränkt) Lychener Strasse 76, 10437 Berlin

FOUNDERS & PARTNERS  Tom Felber, Marc Huth Chief Editor V.i.S.d.P.  Tom Felber  |  tom@superior-magazine.com CREATIVE Director  Franziska Raue   |  franziska@superior-magazine.com Senior Editor Fashion & Lifestyle Sarah Weyers  |  sarah@superior-magazine.com CORRESPONDENT ART & CULTURE Barbara Green |  art@superior-magazine.com fashion Consultant  Simon Heeger  | simon@superior-magazine.com Editorial Department  editors@superior-magazine.com Advertising  advertising@superior-magazine.com PR Management  press@superior-magazine.com

Superior Magazine accepts no liability for any unsolicited material whatsoever. Opinions contained in the editorial content are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the publisher of Superior Magazine. Despite careful control Superior Magazine accepts no liability for the content of external links. Any reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited

COVER: Photo by Javier Lopez


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Dear readers,

#  Editorial

HAPPY NEW YEAR !!! We hope you started well into the new year 2016 with a lot of power and wishes for the next twelve months and most of your expectations will come true. In a couple of days Berlin will turn into a fashion metropolis again. At BERLIN FASHION WEEK designers from across the world will present their Autumn/Winter 2016/17 collections at MERCEDES-BENZ FASHION WEEK BERLIN, at trade fairs like PREMIUM, SEEK, GREENSHOWROOM, ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN and many more as well as at plenty of other events. For this issue some of the opinion leaders told us about their events and highlights. In our # SELECTION we present on more than 40 pages some of our favourite SUSTAINABLE FASHION labels. Designers and representatives of eleven brands answered our questions and give you a lot of insights into sustainable fashion. If you are in Berlin and you like to see the wonderful collections of some of the brands, visit GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN. Read more about fashion in SARAH WEYER’s monthly column “Let’s talk about green” and in JUDITH BRACHEM’s article about the designer NADINE GOEPFERT. Art is a topic as well. BARBARA GREEN visited Shanghai and presents some insights from this exciting city. To get you in the right mood for 2016 we present you 5 different fashion editorials with perfect styles by photographers VANESSA ZICAN FENG, JAVIER LOPEZ (cover series), SHAHAF MARGALIT, ALVARO PEREÑA JIMÉNEZ, NORBERT HURRLE and the editorial voting winner MICHELLE GEORGE. Enjoy our first 2016 issue … Best, Tom, Marc and the whole SUPERIOR MAGAZINE team


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#

FASHION & STYLE

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Vanessa Zican Feng

»LINES« 

42 Shahaf Margalit

»COLOUR & TEXTURE« 

Javier Lopez

»CHEROKEE« 

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COLUMN: "LET'S TALK ABOUT GREEN" 

PORTRAIT: NADINE GOEPFERT 

126 146

Norbert Hurrle

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122 Alvaro Pereña Jiménez

»HUMANIZED NATURE« 

»TRAVEL TO YOURSELF« 


160 Michelle George

»CLEO'S MOOD« 

#

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SELECTION

60 #

EDITORIALS DECEMBER 

SUSTAINABLE FASHION AW 16/17 

ART & CULTURE

136

SHANGHAI: 5 HOTSPOTS FOR ART LOVERS

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INTERVIEW: MARIO WEINBERG


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coat Topshop dress Zara shoes Nike


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photography & styling by Vanessa Zican Feng make up by Nikki lighting assistant Justin Wang models Idiatou Thiam & Jonathan Abu

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coat Jones New York t-shirt h&m pants Levi's shoes Adidas


coat Topshop dress Zara shoes Nike

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coat Jones New York t-shirt h&m pants Levi's shoes Adidas


coat Jones New York t-shirt h&m pants Levi's shoes Adidas

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coat Topshop dress Zara shoes Nike


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total look ZARA

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pants Levi's t-shirt H&M shoes Adidas

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pants Levi's t-shirt H&M shoes Adidas

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total look ZARA


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pants Levi's sweater Topshop shoes Adidas hat J CREW

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jacket J crew skirt & top zara shoes Nike


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left: jacket J crew skirt & top zara shoes Nike

right: pants Levi's sweater Topshop shoes Adidas hat J CREW

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jacket J crew skirt & top zara shoes Nike

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pants Levi's sweater Topshop shoes Adidas hat J CREW


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Photo by Marc Huth

COVER OF THE YEAR 2015


2nd

Photo by OVERSOE Studio

For our Cover of the Year 2015 Voting we asked all our readers to vote for their favorite SUPERIOR MAGAZINE Cover from 2015. After a hot race the March Cover by Marc Huth won.

3rd

Illustration by IXIA

Thanks a lot to everybody who participated in the voting. And special thanks to our partner KEF who sponsored the wonderful prize, the MUO Bluetooth speaker.


make

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CHEROKEE photography by JAVIER LOPEZ photography assistant PAULA MENDEZ production by BARBARA BONASTRE styling by FRANX DE CRISTAL hair by XAVI GARCIA @ SALON44

e up by JOSE CARLOS GONZALEZ @ ANA PRADO FOR M.A.C. & SALON44 model DEIMANTE M. @ UNO MODELS

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total look Kokontazai


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total look Kokontazai

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jacket Marlota dress Davidelfin necklace & shoes Kokontozai

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necklace, top & skirt Kokontazai coat Jaime Mesa tights STYLIST'S OWN


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cap drkshdw BY Rick Owens blanket Marcelo Burlon -49-


sweatshirt Joe Chia necklaces Kokontozai & STYLIST'S OWN

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shirt & coat Jaime Mesa bagpack Khourian Beer


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dress 44 skirt Davidelfin shoes Kokontazai


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total look Kokontozai

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hat Vivienne Westwood necklace Kokontozai coat Marlota

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mask StyliST'S OWN dress Jaime Mesa

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cap & sweatshirt drkshdw BY Rick Owens jacket, pants & shoes Kokontazai

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SELECTION SUSTAINABLE FASHION AW 16/17 -60-


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INTERVIEW: MAGDALENA SCHAFFRIN & OLAF SCHMIDT ABURY ALL SISTERS - RESPONSIBLE SWIMWEAR BAACH Beaumont Organic BOXX FASHION LANGERCHEN LANIUS MUD JEANS PÄLÄÄ SUITE 13

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#fashion

Greenshowroom & Ethical Fashion Show Berlin

Photo: Š Thomas Lohnes/ Getty Images

INTERVIEW WITH MAGDALENA SCHAFFRIN & OLAF SCHMIDT

Magdalena Schaffrin, Creative Director of GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN, and Olaf Schmidt, Vice President Textiles & Textile Technologies of MESSE FRANKFURT, which organizes both exhibitions, talked to Tom Felber from SUPERIOR MAGAZINE about the highlights this season.

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | thomas lohnes/GETTY IMAGES & MESSE FRANKFURT


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# Sustainable and fair fashion has still an upward trend. Does the participation in GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN reflect that? OS: In recent times there have certainly been a number of indicators showing that eco-fashion is trending again. And these indicators include the registration figures for our two fairs. In January, more than 160 international labels will be making presentations in the ‘Postbahnhof’ event centre, a new record. We are particularly pleased with developments in the high-fashion segment where 41 labels have signed up. Thus, the Greenshowroom will be bigger than ever before and we are looking forward to an outstanding line-up with numerous important ecofashion brands and a broad spectrum of contemporary fashions.

# Some exhibitors present their collections for the first time at one of the two fairs. Would you like to mention some? MS: We are delighted with the large number of new exhibitors at both events – for example, the Alina Schuerfeld shoe label in the Greenshowroom. The Hamburger-based designer has created a luxurious feminine line with details from fish and rhubarb leather. Another new exhibitor, Switzerland’s Allsisters, offers fashionable swimwear made of recycled materials. Several brands from Mongolia, as well as Myak, an Italian textile manufacturer, will present high-grade knitted cashmere and yak fabrics. Taking part in the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin for the first time is the Knowledge Cotton Apparel label with a cool menswear collection while LangerChen will show ecological functional jackets for men and women.

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# Which themes are very important from your point of view at this season’s GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN? OS: This season, we have noticed a growing trend towards adaptations from the seventies and eighties whereby the styles at the Ethical Fashion Show Berlin will be either classic or sporting and mainly menswear. Thus, LangerChen will be showing longer coats or parkas while numerous streetwear labels, such as Recolution, will be making references to grunge or hip hop with hoodies or with striking prints, as in the case of Trevor’s Choice by Daily’s. Knitwear is and remains an evergreen at, for example, Mud Jeans or ‘recyclist workshop’, which will be presenting men’s pullovers made of recycled cotton fibres. Natural fibres, such as cashmere and yak, are also prominent at the Greenshowroom and can be seen, for example, at the stands of Sarazul Cashmere, Myak, Elementum, Austrian Design and Karin Fraidenraij. Based on the seventies and nineties, the atmosphere at Walkboxx/ Silkboxx, Jan’n June and Nine to Five is sure to be eclectic with warm colours, patterns and velvety fabrics.

# For the second time you present two fashion shows within one afternoon – the “Salonshow” and the “Ethical Fashion on Stage“. What is the difference between both shows? Are there any changes compared to last season? MS: Following the successful launch of ‘Ethical Fashion on Stage’, the two shows will once again be held in the ‘Club’ of the Postbahnhof event centre - the ‘Salonshow’ for the 13th time, ‘Ethical Fashion on Stage’ for the second time.


At the ‘Salonshow’, Greenshowroom exhibitors present their high-fashions and accessories against a background of live music. At ‘Ethical Fashion on Stage’, the spotlight is on looks from the collections of Ethical Fashion Show Berlin exhibitors in the casualwear and streetwear segments.

# Beside the presentation of fashion and the shows, talks and panel discussions seem to become more and more important. What are the themes you cover there? MS: This time, the superordinate theme will be on closed substance cycle waste management, an aspect of sustainability that is currently the topic of much discussion. Big companies, such as H&M and Adidas, are working on recycling concepts. However, we want to go a step further and focus on holistic solutions for the creation of closed product cycles. Accordingly, at our panel discussion during the ‘Create Green Breakfast’ at 11.00 hrs on 21 January, sustainability experts and representatives of trade and industry will discuss various facets of closed substance cycle waste management, recycling and the cradle-to-cradle principle.

# And you have two more topics which are new – an outdoor showcase and the cooperation with the international Frankfurt Style Award. Can you tell us a little bit more about both? OS: Together with our partners from Greenroomvoice, we are organising an Outdoor Showcase where well-known labels, such as Bleed, Ecoalf, Navarpluma, Paramo, Patagonia, Primaloft and Pyua, will present their concepts for ‘quality recycling’. Representatives of Patagonia and Pyua

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Magdalena Schaffrin

This time, the superordinate theme will be on closed substance cycle waste management.


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will also take part in the ‘Create Green Breakfast’. With the ‘Frankfurt Style Award’ initiative, we have gained a new Cooperation Partner committed to young, creative design. The aim is to help young, up-and-coming designers and provide a platform where they can present their ideas. You can look forward to 3 to 5 exciting projects.

Olaf Schmidt

# Is there anything else visitors definitely should not miss at GREENSHOWROOM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN this time? OS: As Europe’s biggest platform for eco-fashion during the Berlin Fashion Week, our two fairs provide the setting for numerous exciting labels and high-grade collections that are really worth discovering. The focus is very much on the designers and their fashions. Additionally, we have put together an interesting programme with a variety of information and networking events. Celebrities from politics, film and television are also expected. For example, actress Ursula Karven will take part in the opening ceremony and give us some insights into her green lifestyle and present the Yoga Collection of PeopleWearOrganic. As you can see, we are looking forward to three eventful days. # Thank you very much for the interview.

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ABURY Interview with Andrea Kolb www.abury.net | visit at GREENSHOWROOM

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | Suzana Holtgrave & Franziska Uhlmann


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# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? I am actually not a fashion designer but studied economics and was running a small boutique marketing agency in 2007 when I went to Marrakesh to renovate a riad (old house in the traditional centre of the city). On the site and while working with the craftsmen I was captivated by the immense handicraft heritage of the Moroccan people. These men and women passionately and skillfully carved, tinkered, blew, sewed and embroidered their way into, frankly, what can only be described as magic. Sadly though, some of these skills were vanishing as the price for „handmade“ was decreasing mainly because of cheap Chinese imports. With them, the beauty, wisdom, identity and stories were also at risk of being lost to the past. This is when the idea came up that these cultural gems could be revived if explored in a new way – by infusing the old world appeal of handicrafts with a spunky twenty first century spirit. Doing so would allow many to earn their sustenance practicing their heritage and thus allow for a more inclusive and harmonious world economy. The aim for this collaboration is to pave a way for tradition to find not just relevance, rather delicious appeal on an international stage.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair” mean to you, how would you describe that? To us „sustainable and fair“ means in the first place that the whole supply chain, from how the materials are made to the production and the sales team is integrated and respected in the process. To create 100% ecological sustainability is really difficult – where do you start and end? We ship things e.g. from Ecuador, is this sustainable? For us ecological sustainability means to always search for the natural alternative (e.g. in dyes, etc.) and the least harming option (e.g. for shipping – -67-

only ship bulks once or twice a year, not every month, etc.). And at the end – sustainability also means to sell and create a sustainable business and income for everybody in the supply chain.

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? In my opinion there is no other option in a long-term perspective than to produce and sell under sustainable and fair conditions. We started already 5 years ago and have been „pioneers“ at the time. But times are changing and people become more and more conscious and we definitely have seen a great rise in interest in sustainable brands already.

# Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? ABURY brings together the best of avantgarde design talent with traditional artisans of different countries. In using design to inspire change we want to foster intercultural exchange, preserve world crafts and promote education – this for us is authentic luxury. How does it work? Through the ABURY Design Experience – a global annual accessories designer contest – we select the best talent and provide them with a grant to go to an artisan community for 2 months. In this time, they can create a capsule collection that is unique, influenced by two different cultures and traditionally handmade. From the sales of the collections we give back the production time in education time in the respective communities. Like this and with the additional support of donations we already created


a school in Morocco for 70 women and children. Our target group are women who don’t want to compromise in style and quality but want to buy sustainable and fair. They live consciously in a positive and joyful way. They love traveling and exploring different cultures and people – our woman is independent, curious and adventurous.

# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? For us the personal contact is really crucial. So we know almost everybody in the supply chain that already makes a big difference on all levels! We see with our own eyes how and where things are produced. And as a customer you can follow the designer during her stay and learn where she sources the material, meet the artisans who produce the products, you can see how and where the products are made. The question „Who made my clothes?“ of Fashion Revolution Day we want and can answer.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? The winner of the ABURY Design Experience 2015, Pam Samasuwo-Nyawiri, spent two months in Ecuador creating an amazing handbag collection with local artisan communities. The collection, which is called “A Non Existent Tribe”, consists of six expressive handbags in a mix of leather, bast and alpaca wool. The collection draws inspiration from the Himba tribes of Namibia and the indigenous people of Ecuador by fusing the two together. The similarities between the two cultures are even more eminent as the collection is shaped by the way both cultures carry objects. The aim was to bring to life a visual identity from both cultures that celebrated their traditional -68-

craftsmanship with a modern twist. The collection highlights that beauty exists in that which is deemed different. Each design tells the story of the maker and has been named after the artisan who worked on it. The handbags pay homage to the arts, crafts and the people behind them. The Rosa bucket bag has already an emotional link to it as the artisan expressed ''I am always afraid to try new things. I did not understand what Pam wanted to do with just a weaved object but then I saw the fusion with the leather, my heart warmed up. I did this! – I shouted.”

# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? At home, we started an experiment about 6 months ago to live without using single use disposable plastic. This is a really eye-opening experience as you realize how many things are made of or wrapped into plastic. We are not 100% plastic free but got it down to only 1 bag of plastic garbage a month. Moreover I am vegetarian for over 20 years now. And then – it is the small things with which you can make a difference in your direct environment. Be nice and gentle, respectful, conscious on your thoughts and acts.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.


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Lookbook Photos: © SUZANA HOLTGRAVE Ecuador Photos: © FRANZISKA UHLMANN


ALL SISTERS Responsible Swimwear Interview with Alba Bisbal www.allsisters.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | Š ALL SISTERS


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# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? We do not see another way to create allSisters. Since the beginning our motivation has been to do things in a responsible and sustainable way. All our inspiration came from this base, from the design to all the materials we work with. Our philosophy is to create comfortable and fashionable swimsuits that respect the female body as well as the environment and its natural resources. Our idea was to create a fully sustainable brand that would match and compete with other major high fashion brands. We consider that fashion should be responsible and go hand-by-hand with sustainability.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair� mean to you, how would you describe that? We must protect the planet and the resources it offers. It is vital to have environmental awareness and social responsibility so we can ensure our future generations a healthy world in which to live.

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? Despite the difficulties that we have encountered along the way, there is nothing that can´t be done with effort and conscience. We have had some troubled in finding recycled materials that do not look like it and also not seem to be of high quality. Furthermore, in our desire to support the local economy, we produce everything in Barcelona and this sometimes means that delivery times are longer. However, satisfaction and the result is worth it.

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# Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? Our brand is a practical response to the necessities of the modern, eco-conscious woman who holds an active life and demands multifunctional swimsuits than can make her feel at ease with her body, and at the same time beautiful and sexy.

# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? All the materials we work with are certified to ensure its origin, recycled materials and manufacturing process. If we make an ethical and sustainable brand we believe this is a fundamental aspect to know and consider.


# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? Our next allSisters collection will continue to play with the combination of black and White and we will incorporate printings with geometric lines. We will add a “touch of art�. We can't advance much more! (laughs)

# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? We can do our bit in our day to day life too. I recycle both in my personal life and in the company's offices. On the other hand, I have acquired the habit and awareness of what I buy, especially its origin to support fair trade. Finally, I participate as a member of an organization that is responsible for cleaning the Mediterranean Sea.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.

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BAACH Interview with Michael Bach www.baachdk.wordpress.com | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | © BAACH


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# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? BAACH has been established in 2008 in Spain, together with local crafts people. We started upcycling and recycling leftover and discarded leather and canvas from the high-end leather goods industry. When we started it came natural to us to incorporate sustainable and fair production from day one with out thinking too much about it. Today we also work with new Eco certified leather from Portugal and Eco certified textile from Denmark. We try to make long lasting designs of high material quality that is easy to repair and recycle again if necessary.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair� mean to you, how would you describe that? Sustainable and fair is for me to make as little harm to the environment as possibly and to pay the people we work with a fair price for their service. Also it is to design and produce long lasting products that the consumer need. I think sustainable and fair designs come natural when you care about the products you design the people you work with and the client you sell too.

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? It is more expensive and time consuming to produce sustainable and fair fashion. You have to think more about what you do, which materials you select and what people you work with and trust. But hopefully if sustainable and fair fashion will be mainstream it will be more easy and cost effective to produce. So It is our target to -75-

get BAACH products out to the mainstream consumer so everybody one day is "sustainable and fair" with out thinking to much about it. # Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? As a lot of stories, it began with "boy meet girl". She had made the oven bag, he was a photographer who was in need of an income to make a living in the sun, so together they started to make a camera and computer bag, later wallets, belts and more bags. They sold them at local markets in Spain later to shops in their home countries Denmark and Belgium. Unfortunately the love didn't last as well as the goods. Today BAACH leather goods retails in Denmark, Germany, Belgium and Austria. We design and produce private labels that our clients retail all over the world.


# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We ask for as much certification and documentations as possibly and have worked with most of our suppliers and crafts people for years. The tanning process today and special the Eco leather tanning process in Europa is I think fairly sustainable and when a well maintained leather product can last up until 50-100 years I will not hesitate to continue to design and produce leather goods despite it has it critics.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? We don't work with the traditional fashion calendar but have a basic collection of 25 to 30 items that is always in production and then we ad 2-5 new items every year. It is not our goal to be in fashion but we don't want to be out of fashion either. # What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? I try to shop, live and consume as responsible as possibly and think it get more and more easy and affordable too!

# Thanks a lot for the interview.

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Lookbook Photos: © SUZANA HOLTGRAVE Ecuador Photos: © FRANZISKA UHLMANN


BEAUMONT ORGANIC Interview with Hannah Beaumont-Laurencia www.beaumontorganic.com | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | © BEAUMONT ORGANIC


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# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? Clothes have always been my passion. From a young age I would make my own outfits and experiment with all sorts of fabrics. In my late teens I knew I wanted to work in the industry, but it wasn't until I completed my work experience and got my first job that I understood the realities of the fashion world. I wanted to create my own role in the industry and the only way to do this for me, was to be completely transparent about sourcing, and to use only the most environmentally friendly fabrics. With Beaumont my mission is to create design-driven, contemporary 'conscious' clothing responsibly, whilst still using amazing, luxury fabrics.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair� mean to you, how would you describe that? Sustainable means something that can continue for ever at the rate we are using it. Fair is that every process is done in a way that is equitable for the people involved.

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# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? We really don't know any different - these have always been our principles and our way of sourcing.

# Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? Our mission is to design and create 'Contemporary Conscious Clothing' responsibly using luxury fabrics for the modern woman. Beaumont Organic is an international ethical ladieswear brand that combines signature styling with contemporary classics. Teaming contrasting fabrics and unique silhouettes with luxury organic, fair trade and eco fabrics to create a renowned style. The collection offers a wardrobe of transitional pieces - everything a woman needs to dress up or down, day or night. Beaumont Organic introduces two collections a year along with a collection of accessories that encompass the brands clean look and contemporary styling. The company’s vision is to be seen as a pioneering design driven, well-respected, established, international organic and ethical brand. A brand people are proud to be wearing and be associated with, producing clothing that people respect and care for, encapsulating an emotional bond with our customers and creating a loyal following around the world. We are inspired by making changes and paving a way for fashion to have a more sustainable future. We do this by asking questions, producing ethically, reducing wastage, using off-cuts where we can for sampling and keeping consumption low. Although we sell to other countries outside of the UK, we only averagely make two trips a year to visit them, travelling at key times and ensuring coverage of all topics during one visit.


# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We use only eco fabrics that are fairly produced. Our focus is on Organic cotton but we also use bamboo, tencel, linen. All our organic cotton is certified GOTS and fairly produced.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? We are back to nature for our AW16 theme with autumnal colours. We have focused on texture both with quilting and knitwear and have developed our best selling interlock fabric in the form of lots of lovely dresses! Also expect to see key denim shirts and dresses which have become Beaumont wardrobe staples.

# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? I love houses and am currently undertaking a big project to restore an old Victorian house. We are using all reclaimed wood, fireplaces, bricks to ensure the house is sustainable as well as beautiful. In my wardrobe i invest in key clothing that will last for years and that are timeless. We live in a small village and support the local shops every week buying produce. We also practise recycling in the house.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.

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BOXX FASHION (WALKBOXX & SILKBOXX) Interview with Cosima Wachs & Constanze Janusch www.walkboxx.com www.silkboxx.com | visit at GREENSHOWROOM

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | © BOXX FASHION


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# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? For over 20 years we create couture fashion, highest quality fabrics in pure natural area with demanding processing. When we decided in 2013 to create collections for retail, it was from the beginning, of course, to create with our awareness of nature and the environment, fashion, on a sustainable basis - fulled material (100% new wool) and pure silk, are in the center of our two collections WalkBoxx & SilkBoxx. The aim is to combine design and trends and to let both produce with a sense of responsibility and respect.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair� mean to you, how would you describe that? Sustainable and fair - the first and foremost, is for us to act and to produce in a socially acceptable and environmentally responsible manner. Likewise, clothing should be completely biodegradable. Quality rather than quantity is another keyword. From the starting material through to the finished product, all those involved in the process are expected to take responsibility accordingly.

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? Yes, it is. Both the procurement of certified materials according to our ideas as well as the complete certification of our production ways are obstacle rich and therefore cost-intensive. We frequently choose to work with small, flexible and very committed partner for whom however the cost of certification is prohibitively high. The stylish and modern you work, the more one has to rely -83-

on the conventional trade, which in turn is not yet on the necessary status of thought and development phase. # Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? We do not think in terms of categories and target groups and we shy away from pigeonholing people. We make premium fashion - design is paramount. Comfort and wellbeing accompany each of our collections. Not to be interchangeable is our objective. We are happy to create something special. As we come out of the couture range, we are driven by the search for value and quality. Nobody does it like we do.


# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We work very closely with all our suppliers, from the outer fabric down to the buttons. We know them all personally, know how they work and have built up good relationships over the years. The design and pattern work takes place in our own studio and workshop. The production process in Europe is also very close to our hearts and we make personal site visits several times a year. We also have the corresponding certification for most of our materials for supply chain transparency.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? Each collection is based on the inspiration of nature. This year we have the issue of FOREST in the narrowest and in the broadest sense "processed". The design is even more become the focus and the desire to build an extraordinary collection, dominates the look.

# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? For me and my partner Cosima Wachs even the small things count: not wasting water, not making unnecessary car journeys, recycling waste and choosing organic products where possible. “Made in Europe“ is also important for us, and we are likewise passionate about supporting conservation efforts. We live and work with nature and do our bit to protect and respect it wherever we can.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.

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JANUARY 2016

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LANGERCHEN Interview with Philipp Langer www.langerchen.com | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | © LANGERCHEN


JANUARY 2016

# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? LangerChen is not my first brand! Since I have enjoyed a craft mans education as a tailor, my focus has always been more on quality and style than on being trendy. In the 1990ties when I have started my first label, sustainability in textiles was far out of every mind. Nevertheless already from the beginning I have implemented principles as naturalness and a long life circle into my creations. Natural materials have always been more suited to become your most beloved long time companions. When I had sold my second very successful brand, it has been a logical consequence to me to integrate sustainability in my textile activities. In 2006, it was very hard to find good, high level and sustainable fabrics. So I decided to produce inspiring, organic fabrics. After several years of developing and producing sustainable fabrics, I realized that with some of my fabrics I could create a fantastic "green urban outdoor line“. Our LangerChen was then founded in 2013, embedded in the joint venture manufacturing factory of Philipp Langer and Miranda Chen. We create in our factory our own fabrics and design our own clothes - this is what is so special about LangerChen. # What do the terms “sustainable and fair” mean to you, how would you describe that? I love this definition: „Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs“. A sustainable lifestyle respects the resources, the waste and the energy related emissions. Sustainable means to me first of all to avoid unnecessary consumption. How much should I consume, what do I really need for satisfying my level of self expression? -87-

Creating sustainable garments means to me, apply the best practice! Don’t sacrifice the design for better sustainability score! When you become one with your garment, you will keep it for a long time. This is probably your biggest contribution to sustainability! However, the materials used should be produced as environmentally respectful as possible and feasible. Same as I respect the environmentally conditions, it matters to me, under which conditions things are made. People just as environment should not suffer from our wish of cheap mass consumption!

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? YES! Good pricing is an important factor when providing clothing for society. I call garment prices inflationary! During the past 15 years they were going down while all other products of daily needs were on the rise. Being forced to compete with the conventional mass market, I have decided to focus myself on the price-performance ratio. Combining design, fabric making and manufacturing under one roof, contributes to reducing costs and to achieve the requirements of sustainable manufacturing. # Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? LangerChen products are made of highly innovative fabrics, which I call Natural Softshells. Our fabric design combines natural fibres with state-of- the-art technology for outdoor garments: breathable membranes covered with 100% natural fabrics such as organic cotton or Eco-wool. These fabrics meet my standard for


quality jackets: naturalness and functionality. Adding contemporary styling plus good craftsmanship, the new line LangerChen was born! Our brand targets people who live a modern, urban lifestyle, who respect their environment, and who are aware of what they consume which means being conscious of what they eat and wear (organic), the so-called LOHAS. Today BAACH leather goods retails in Denmark, Germany, Belgium and Austria. We design and produce private labels that our clients retail all over the world.

# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? LangerChen products are made in-house, i.e. in our own certified factory. We have control over all production steps. We are a GOTS certified factory, so every year we have to prove our ethical and environmental claims to an independent certifying institute. Beside GOTS, we are also audited by BSCI and Fairwear for our working conditions.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? The story continues! You find single layer laminated woolen fabric, super lightweight, stretchable, wind- and weather-proof, laminated organic cotton padded with recycled materials. For the ladies strongly in focus are Unconstructed Shells, new Wrapping Volumes, Button-less, beside classical shaped Paletot and Parkas. For the men we have classical shapes, Parkas, Duffles, single layered, unlined, with cut edges. All styles worked out with an informal way, yet always sophisticated!

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Surprising details in neon colour plus shiny copper metal accessories enhance the deep and dark colours of this season.

# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? Energy saving is very important for me. We save a lot of energy by having invested in a good isolation of my house together with solar energy on my rooftop. Being aware of my desires and from where they originate, only then I decide what do I really need to consume or I repair equipment whenever possible instead of buying new. I also buy homegrown organic food from near-by providers in the villages. But I find my personal satisfaction also in other areas instead of only in material things - no compensation by consuming.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.


JANUARY 2016

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LANIUS Interview with Claudia Lanius www.lanius-koeln.de | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | © LANIUS


JANUARY 2016

# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? Due to Jack Herers publication “Die Wiederentdeckung der Nutzpflanze Hanf” I recognized the value of the fabric hemp as a textile. I established my first Company “THC - The Hanf Company” with my former husband at the age of 24. Our first collection has been a great success at the Colognes Fair ‘Interjeans’. I adapted the enormous and high quality standards of the dispatcher ‘Hess Natur’ to me. Driven by the idea of creating a modern-feminine and sustainable womenswear label, LANIUS was born. A collection made by high-end nature fabrics, like wool, cotton and silk.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair” mean to you, how would you describe that? Sustainability means to me, to protect our resources. A few simple questions help us, to improve the process, which always comes along in making a product or a fiber more sustainable. At LANIUS it starts with the seeds and ends with the product. With every step of the production we think about improvement. How can we optimize and exchange things? Always working in cooperation with our producers.

benefits of slow fashion. This begins in our communication with buyers at our stands on PREMIUM and ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN and ends in our retail stores in the communication with our customers. # Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? Our claim describes our vision in short terms: Love Fashion. Think Organic. Be Responsible. Twice a year new collections are developed in our studio in cologne – for women who share our love for fashion and who ask themselves: Where do my clothes come from? LANIUS focuses on sustainability. We always strive to close the textile chain, that means: the whole process from harvesting the fibres, processing them, giving them a finish, up to packaging and distribute them is sustainable and certified by GOTS. But sometimes - for example - it’s only one little button on a coat, which is not certified and this tiny button forbids us to declare the garment as GOTS. This is the reason, why we sometimes find us in between the decision of making admissions for fashionable pieces or not. It's obvious that behind every single sustainable garment there stands a lot more time and work for the whole process of doing research, having

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? It’s always a challenge! But as we never thought about doing something else than selling excellent fashion made under fair and sustainable conditions, we strive to de-trend the fascination of fast fashion and shift our target group to the Claudia Lanius -91-

Photo: © fabian stuertz


negotiations with the producer and of course doing the quality assurance, than behind a nonsustainable garment. What counts is our vision & mission: We don’t want green fashion to be an exception and we’re on a good way.

# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? We are fully certified, which means that we’re primarily working with GOTS-certified companies and as a label are GOTS-certified as well. We have one employee who is exclusively working on this theme. Furthermore I trust in long-term relationships. I know in person every single producer we’re working with.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? The major theme of the upcoming AW 16/17 collection, which we’re going to present at the ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN and at PREMIUM Berlin, is sophisticated minimalism. It combines raw materials with light layers and focuses on the power of off-colours in white, black, cream and grey. We always speak in our collections of reflected trends, as we not believe anymore in real trends. We do believe in well-thought-out silhouettes, comfortable but stylish appearances, and intelligent and durable fibres. For our vegan customers we also have many “PETA Approved Vegan” garments, for example our organic cotton, in the collection.

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# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? To protect the environment means to develop awareness for Sustainability. To integrate little things in your daily life and take it step by step: To use green electricity, to have a bank-account at a sustainable bank, to avoid unnecessary garbage – precisely in the office, to use ecological soap or go to the office by bike. We practice this “ecological awareness” together in our LANIUS team. And we believe, that when more people keep s.th. in mind, there are always new ideas to improve something. Our newest “purchase” is a ‘tap water filter system’.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.


JANUARY 2016

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Mud Jeans Interview with Bert van Son www.mudjeans.eu | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | © MUD JEANS


JANUARY 2016

# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? I think that it is after I lived in China that I realized the importance of sustainability and having a fair production. When you live there, you see the damage done to the earth. I have children that will have children, at the pace we are going right now, there will not be anything left for them, this is one of the reasons I decided to focus on fair and sustainable fashion. If we can reduce the damage, we should.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair” mean to you, how would you describe that? Sustainable and fair are one of the two terms I like to define MUD Jeans with. We are a sustainable fashion brand that produces in a fair way. By sustainable, I mean that we are trying our best to limit the damage that is why we lease our products and recycle them. Just by recycling cotton, we save up to 40% of water.

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? Well, overall, it is difficult to sell jeans. Because everyone is very picky when it comes to designs. But being a sustainable denim company is not really a handicap. Of course, there are always some people that think our denim is second hand, or others that directly assume that sustainable does not mean fashionable. Those are two of the stereotypes we are trying to erase.

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# Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? We dream of a world without waste. That’s why we recycle our old jeans into new ones. We stay owner of the raw materials and consumers can either buy or lease them. People increasingly want to know the story behind the products they buy too. They want to be part of a movement that does something good. And that’s exactly what we provide them, especially with the leasing program. To us it just doesn’t make sense to keep one pair of jeans for life. So our customers can keep them, until they’re ready to switch them. With the leasing program we’re creating a community of forward thinking people.


# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? In every aspect we try to minimize the effects we make on the environment. Fashion is the second largest consumer of water, so reducing water is one of the most important aspects in which we can make an impact. Together with BlueDot we have conducted a study in which we analysed our production process from cotton to jeans. The results are very encouraging: instead of standard industry of 7000 litres of water we only use 1554. These results are achieved through our mill partners at DNM who recycle 85% of their water and produce zero wastewater. Also our partner in garment manufacturing and laundering in Tunisia (Yousstex International) largely contributes by recycling up to 90% of the water consumed in combination with latest washing techniques such as laser, ozone and Jeanologia’s E-Flow. For example our denims in DAVEBLACKOD have not been touched by any chemicals at all; the worn in effect is achieved by a combination of laser, ozone and stonewash.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? The MUD Jeans ’Strong Black' collection consists of several dark coloured jeans. These new jeans add a touch of class to our collection of denim essentials. All pairs come with an innovative story. They are made with the newest techniques. The new and clean process applies laser and ozone methods that reduce the amount of water involved in production. A regular jeans takes up to 7.000 litres of water, the ’Strong Black’ jeans only 1554. While the jeans are sustainable they also

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come with the advantage of having a longer life. They live longer because they are stronger as no sandpaper is used at all. A win-win collection.

# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? There are a lot of small everyday gestures to protect the environment. For example, in our company we use recycled paper around the office. We have a very sustainable light system in the inventory and the office. Now, when it comes to my personal daily life. I turn off the water when I am brushing my teeth. I only wear MUD Jeans and I don’t buy a lot of other clothes. I recycle the clothes I don’t wear anymore. In the future I’m hoping to drive a Tesla.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.


JANUARY 2016

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Päälä Interview with Harm Jan Timmerarends www.paala.nl | visit at ETHICAL FASHION SHOW BERLIN

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | © PÄLÄÄ


JANUARY 2016

# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? Actually, it was never a decision. When we started to make clothing we used to make our own fabrics with silkscreen. We took the inks which we had at that moment. All stuff you can buy in the D.I.Y-shops. But also inks on water-base. People liked the surface and the way it was interacting with the material. Also they mentioned it was attractive because of its environmental impact. Honestly, we didn’t know anything of the impact the clothing industry had on the world. We were interested in the esthetics. But if you would ask us, it was the most logical thing to do, and this still is. So we started to source more consciously our materials.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair” mean to you, how would you describe that? Everyone who works in industries who are perversely trading should consider the downsides. All acts and trades shouldn’t have any impact on things or people who are not involved in this act or trade. Sustainable and Fair are words which stand for this awareness. They are meant to speak out this idea very fast.

# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? No, we don’t have experience in the conventional way, on the other hand Yes ecological materials are scarce and more expensive.

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# Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? We like to make clothes for smarter conscious girls because they are the most beautiful. The Nordic inspires us with its nature but also with its interesting urban cultures. These two aspects we try to combine in Päälä by the use of colors and materials. The designs often represent animals, like birds, rabbits or dears, very European animals. We combine this with graphical prints and photography. Anything to emphasize creativity. All cottons used are G.O.T.S certified and other materials like bamboo viscose and Tencel that are sustainable and innovative. All of our designs are made by us. Also we print everything ourselves in our workshop in Amsterdam. We consider this beneficial because it really helps us in the design. The print and design process merge together.

# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? By the use of standards which we can trust. Also we produce in the E.U. We are more and more sourcing in Europe. But also by visiting the plants.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? We work now with a new designer and she got a strong influence on our image. She came with the theme “Nordic Fairytale”. We combined it with a nice abstract play and use classical patterns. We are really happy with the collection, and I would say - check it out!


# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? We bike to work, we separate all of our garbage, we use Green Electricity, we eat biological food and we use low energy lamps. But the strongest impact I think we are making is that we became the first G.O.T.S printer in the Benelux. This forced others to reinvent themselves more towards a sustainable economy.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.

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SUITE 13 Interview with Maria Trepat www.suite13.es | visit at GREENSHOWROOM

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interview | TOM FELBER photos | Š SUITE 13


JANUARY 2016

# How did it come that you established a brand with a sustainable and fair fashion focus? Behind Suite 13 there is a story of 2 designers Maria Trepat and Aleixa Izu, who studied fashion design in Barcelona. We coincided in different retail companies and started a friendship. The last year before starting our project, we were working for a big Spanish company of fast fashion. The first years were exciting, many travels, fairs... we learned a lot about the fashion industry, but as the time went by, we were also discovering the black side of the fast fashion. And we realized we didn´t want to belong to this world anymore, we needed to reeducate our designer mind and look for a change.

# What do the terms “sustainable and fair” mean to you, how would you describe that? For us “sustainable and fair”, don’t misunderstand, should not be needed to be advertised, it is how things should be. We always say, we are not making anything special, we are making things how they have been made in the past. I grew up in a small Majorcan town, watching how they made my grandma’s clothes, her wardrobe, how she lives... She is the most sustainable person I know. Sustainable is to don’t leave footprint on the earth, to reduce the impact of our brand productions on the planet. Fair is to treat with respect all the people involved in our production. Pay fair salaries, working daily hours, health insurance....

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# For you as a fashion brand, as a company, is it more difficult to produce and sell excellent fashion design under sustainable and fair conditions? Sadly yes, starting to find the fabric, workshops where all the workers are legally hired. More than difficult is that you need to invest much more time, and control all the steps of the production. Of course this is reflected on your price that will be higher than in fast fashion. But it is the law of supply and demand, the more people consume sustainable fashion, the easier it will be.

# Coming to your brand. What is the story behind it? Who is your target group? Suite 13 was born at after work meetings with lots of dreams and hopes. In 2013 we quitted our jobs and start the new project. Creating a sustainable brand made 100% in Barcelona and designed around the world. With love and dedication we create two collections per year that are divided in two lines. “Suite 13” is our ceremonial line for especial occasions, or working days. We mainly use luxury fabrics as milk protein crepes, silk and wools. Our target group are women in mid age 30 - 50 looking for versatile and elegant pieces with our design touch. “Heaven Lab” is a comfy wear line, casual looks for an everyday comfort. In this line we only use 100% certified cotton. After a few months we opened our first eco-store in Palma de Majorca, sharing our space with other sustainable brands as Armedangels, People Tree, Komodo... Last summer we opened a new floor on the store where eco-leather brand Maravillas Bags has her work & shop.


made from local suppliers. For our shirting and linings we use 100% certified milk fiber fabric, and organic cotton satin. The 10% of our collection we use left overs of big productions, is the case of our silk.

# Can you tell us a little bit about your upcoming AW 16/17 collection? Under the name “Collection nº 8", it will be our biggest collection. Inspired by the island vibes and the effects of living surrounded by the sea. We’ve created clean cuts and minimal shapes with our personal hallmark. Is a collection full of textures.

# Sustainable fashion includes ecological and ethical aspects. How do you make sure that your fashion meets these standards? In terms of ethical aspects, in Suite 13 we work only with legally hired workers with all the rights of Spanish law, as health insurance and unemployment fee. All our collections are sewed by a woman’s cooperative in Barcelona. We would really like that a certification of fair trade workers conditions is made in Europe. Textile working exploitation not only happens in Asia or Africa, sadly in Spain and Italy it happens much more than we think. In terms of fabrics, we produce “Heaven Lab” in 100% organic cotton (G.O.T.S. certified). In “Suite 13” line all our wools and Tencels are 100% made in Spain, we try to buy 25% of our fabrics

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# What do you do in your daily life to protect the environment, to act sustainable and fair? Living on an island close to the nature is easier than when we lived in Barcelona. Palma has a great eco market where you buy straight from the farmer. For our store and houses we work with renewable energy by “Som energia” electric cooperative. In general I try to live as much as my grandma, slowly and consuming less but better quality. Buying local products in small stores and using the bicycle as my transport.

# Thanks a lot for the interview.


JANUARY 2016

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vest H&M skirt Topshop jacket & bracelet Zara rings Braska tights Zohara shoes MarC Jacobs


JANUARY 2016

&

Colour Texture photography & make up by Shahaf Margalit styling by Shirel Avrahami styling assistant Nofech Swisa hair by Hodaya Akrab

model Rony Papovian @ shahaf Margalit mODELS location Josephon

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shirt & pants zara necklace merry kikar hamdina hat golf shoes aldo


JANUARY 2016

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vest Mango jacket Zara dress & necklace H&M tights Zohara shoes Moschino


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JANUARY 2016

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dress & kimono Zara bag Aldo collar Neat Collar


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JANUARY 2016

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jacket & bracelet Zara rings Braska


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JANUARY 2016

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kimono Pull & Bear skirt & shirt Topshop tights Zohara bag H&M collar Neat Collar shoes Merry


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shirt & skirt Fam fash tights Zohara top & bag H&M socks Golf shoes Merry


JANUARY 2016

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#fashion

Let's talk about Green COLUMN: SUSTAINABLE FASHION

We spoke to Nixon Bui, founder of the fashion label NIXONBUI to find out more about the idea behind the brand, its story and its vision.

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interview & text | SARAH WEYERS photos | Š NIXONBUI


JANUARY 2016

Imagine mountains, the jungle, the burning of the sun on your skin, trees, grass, flowers, birds that are singing and the chirring of crickets. Imagine a world where the sun and the moon are the highest deities and living a life in balance with Mother Nature. Imagine 26 major tribes living in harmony with their distinct custom and traditions in the Northeastern tip of India, sharing borders with Bhutan, Tibet and Myanmar. And now imagine implying those values, lifestyles and looks into the modern world.

# Who started the brand and when was it founded? The idea of starting my own brand was born in 2012, but due to my studies and other restraints time-wise it was not until late 2014 that I was able to make something tangible out of it. I then created the brand as it is today. Starting the label was my idea and I am also the Chief Designer. Yet, there have been some amazing people involved in the process of creating the brand that have helped it grow into what it is today.

# What is your inspiration for your designs? I want to carry my heritage along with me throughout my life – and that is my biggest inspiration. I am very proud of our rich culture. The tribe that I come from values the simplicity of life – something we can learn so much from. The indigenous clothes and art are rich in color on the one hand, but simple in terms of design and cut. Being born on the countryside I was always close to nature; close to the colors and shapes that create life. And the people from those areas understand that life in its purest form is supposed to be simple. We value the forces of nature, the resources we gain from them and the importance of preserving them. We live consciously – we see beauty in all things. And even though my heritage will always be in my heart, I also enjoy the urban lifestyle very much. I love being exposed to and inspired by contemporary art in many forms. These two worlds combined – the urban and the indigenous – that is what inspires me and drives my creative process.

# What was the motivation to start the brand? I have always been interested in art. Even as a child, colors, patterns and shapes. My mother is a crafts teacher and I grew up being surrounded by amazing pieces of art that she had created. I also moved a lot and lived in different countries and cultures, which intensified the wish to start my own brand. NIXONBUI offered connecting my love for my heritage and my tribal roots with modern fashion.

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Founder Nixon Bui


# What kind of products do you use and where do you produce? At the moment we source and produce all of our designs in Europe. Still being in the process of learning we have found out that staying physically close to the production has had a very positive outcome for us. Still, we hope to be able to move a part of the production to my home area in order to give something back. I would like to draw attention to a part of India that usually gets less focused on. We use 100% Organic Cotton and aim to keep the products as sustainably and ethically responsible as possible, since that is a great part of our value system. Our pilot collection consists of a set of nine designs of T-Shirts in different colors, which makes a total of 17 different pieces. # How many people do you work with? Our in-house team consists of around five people, but we cooperate with a great team of freelancers, who assist us at need.

# Do you plan on expanding the team any time soon? Yes! Since we will be coming out with more designs, including sweatshirts, hoodies and more T-Shirts, we have a number of really incredible collaborations scheduled and some great partnerships with other creative. NIXONBUI believes in inclusiveness and not exclusiveness. Therefore, collaborations and partnerships are something we really enjoy.

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„

Founder Nixon Bui

We value the forces of nature, the resources we gain from them and the importance of preserving them.

“


JANUARY 2016

# Have you been to any fashion fairs or plan to visit any soon? Since the brand only just started we have not been to any fairs yet, but the most important ones for us will be the “Copenhagen International Fashion Fair” or the “Revolver”. But still, we are constantly looking for opportunities to showcase our designs. I have learned how beneficial these fairs can be for a brand so we are looking for those that match our philosophy – and when the timing is right, we will be visiting different ones in the near future.

# Thank you very much for your time. Thank you for the interview. It was a pleasure.

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Nadine Goepfert

#fashion

Material Girl

Photo: Š SANNA HELENA BERGER

Starting at the absolute beginning of a garment is what fascinates textile designer Nadine Goepfert. Her work ranges between clothing and art, aiming to reveal our relation to textiles. She studied at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and at the School of Art Berlin Weissensee. But she has never been interested in being a fashion designer; from the beginning it was all about materials.

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text | Judith Brachem photos | SANNA HELENA BERGER & ALINA ASMUS


JANUARY 2016

THE GARMENTS MAY VARY, her graduate collection from 2013, analyses the changing of the garment effected by wearing, sitting, moving, using. The pieces vary in form, structure, volume, motif or colour when used. A pullover out of more than three metres of memory foam that always remembers its original condition. A coat created out of transparent pockets filled with black liquid. A skirt covered in wax that cracks when moving. Goepfert looks at the relationship between wearer and clothing. Does a garment influence our identity? Or do we only influence the garment? A collection as abstract as it is wearable.

collection: THE GARMENTS MAY VARY

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photos | Š SANNA HELENA BERGER graphic design | HELLOME, TILL WIEDECK patterns (in collaboration with) | LISA HAAG hair & make up | MAIKE BOKMA models | ALMA REUTER & KRISTIN KEIL @ VIVA, LISA @ IZAIO


Two years later, in 2015, she continued the series with the collection MATTERS OF HABIT. Each piece is devoted to an ordinary interaction between people and textiles: habits, gestures, movements, storage, care. Wire becomes a sweater that remembers the movement. The cover of a jacket rips by washing it. The Inventory Jacket conserves the clothing beneath.

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By asking questions about the essence of a textile, whether or not it only exists because of the interrelation with the body, the Berlin based designer brings philosophy into clothing. Not visual inspiration, but research is her starting point for each work. She observes the behaviour of people in the street, reads the French philosopher Roland Barthes or studies the character of materials. Goepfert's clothes are exhibited in museums, she creates textile designs for fashion designers like Martin Niklas Wieser and even stages a play in collaboration with a dancer and a choreographer that shows the interaction between objects, clothes and bodies. With her conceptual approach to ideas like automatisms, unconscious habits and unapparent interrelations, she makes the abstract visible and transforms phenomena into textiles.


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collection: MATTERS OF HABIT

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photos | © ALINA ASMUS styling | STEFANIE KLOPF hair & make up | SUSANNA JONAS patterns (in collaboration with) | VIVIAN RONGE post production & typeface stretch dress | HELLOME, TILL WIEDECK models | LEA PLATOW @ IZAIO & LEA-SOPHIE BEHOLZ @ MODEL MANAGEMENT


HumAnIzeD NaturE photography, art direction by Alvaro Pereña Jiménez edit & 3D design by Alvaro Pereña Jiménez wardrobe by Luke Leandro Cano hair & make up by Paula G. Muah model Emma Anderson

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#art

High five – Shanghai!

FIVE HOTSPOTS FOR ART LOVERS

Photo: © LONG MUSEUM

Whilst being the biggest city by population in the world, Shanghai may not be the capital of China, but it’s undoubtedly the country’s busiest city. With its steady population growth comes a snowballing number of stunning art galleries, super sized young museums and cultural venues while nightlife options have exploded. The World Expo 2010 left an indelible mark on the city, which can still be seen today - especially in the arts scene.

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text | BARBARA GREEN


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#1 The Power Station of Art (PSA) The Power Station of Art is a innovative place for contemporary art and the first state-run museum dedicated to contemporary art in China. Right on the waterfront of Huangpu River, PSA occupies a big area of thousands of squaremeters - its 165-meter chimney, being an independent exhibition space, has also become a part of Shanghai’s legendary skyline. The Museum also host the Shanghai Biennale and was once the Pavilion of Future during the 2010 Shanghai World Expo. Have a coffee and relax at the huge roof terrace!

Cai Guo Qiang The Ninth Wave Exhibition view The Power Station of Art

Photos: Š PSA

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#2 50 Moganshan Road (M50) Once an old textile mill, the complex now houses a number of modern and contemporary art galleries, studios, restaurants and cafes. This place offers an interesting contrast between little galleries selling mass-produced commercial prints (that tourits often concentrate on) and internationally working art galleries like ShanghArt, as one of the most influential art institutions in the country or Antenna Space.

#3 LONG MUSEUM After opening it gates in December 2012 the LONG MUSEUM owns two huge places for exhibition and related functions: Long Museum Pudong and Long Museum West Bund. Founded by collector couple Liu Yiqian and Wang Wei, it is one of the largest domestic private collections presenting the who's who of Chinese contemporary art as well as ancient and traditional masterpieces, all showcased in rotating exhibitions.

Photos: Š LONG MUSEUM

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#4 The Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) & HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award The Rockbund Art Museum is one of the city’s best art museums with an exhibition focus on contemporary Chinese art. The Museum was originally built for the Royal Asiatic Society in 1932. The British architect David Chipperfield was in charge of restoration and design planning of the building in 2007- in 2010 the museem moved into the charming Art Deco Buliding near the Huangpu River. Rockbund and HUGO BOSS invited me to celebrate the opening of the second edition of the HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award. As one of my highlights in the Shanghai culture scene, the event was joined by several famous Asian actors such as Yao Chen, Chang Chen and Wang Luodan. The award returned with a focus on Greater China but also encompassing exciting artists from Southeast Asia, highlighting the rich possibilities for cultural exchange and dialogue across the regions included.

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Š HUGO BOSS ART ASIA Award 2015


The exhibition, curated by RAM, showcases artworks of the six nominated artists Guan Xiao (Mainland China), Huang Po-Chih (Taiwan), Moe Satt (Myanmar), Maria Taniguchi (Philippines), Vandy Rattana (Cambodia) and Yang Xinguang (Mainland China). Visitors will see a wide selection of artworks ranging from painting to video art, from sculpture to installation and performance. The organizers announced Maria Taniguchi (Philippines) as the winner of the second edition of the HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award for Emerging Asian Artists.

Moe Satt Like Umbrella, Like King

“The exhibition presents completely new productions and truly inspiring art projects. As such, it highlights the rich possibilities for cultural exchange and dialogue across the regions in Asia.” (Larys Frogier, RAM Director) Maria Taniguchi was born in 1981 in Dumaguete, Philippines, and lives and works in Manila, Philippines. Throughout her paintings, sculptures, and videos, her work involves a fetishism of form. Maria Taniguchi Untitled (ram dram sram)

Guan Xiao The Documentary Geocentric Puncture

Maria Taniguchi Photo: © Mark Nicdao

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#5 China Art Museum The China Art Museum, also called the China Art Palace, is one of the largest museums in the world located at the China Pavilion of the 2010 Shanghai World Expo. The Museum showcases Chinese modern art with an exhibition space divided into 27 halls and nearly a dozen sections that include sculptures, paintings, bronzes, jade and furniture of various dynasties. You should book a guided tour to visit the most interesting parts oft this huge exhibition place. One of the most popular art works is in Hall 5 — an electronic recreation of the mural "Riverside Scene at Qingming Festival".

China Art Museum

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#art

Mario Weinberg © Mario Weinberg

MEETING THE PAINTER IN SHANGHAI Mario Weinberg is a painter and has been living in Shanghai after receiving the Honor of a “Meisterschüler” at the Academy of Arts in Münster.

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interview | BARBARA GREEN photos & artworks | © Mario weinberg


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His work was shown at the exhibition “From Beckmann to Warholâ€? at the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin in 2013 alongside the biggest names in 20. and 21. century art, as well as at several different art institutions in Asia - for example at the renowned China Art Palace. Now he speaks to Barbara Green about China's influence in his art, the differences between the art market in Germany and Asia, painting between originality and ingenuity and lastly his take on Berlin as the ideal domain for young artists. # You left the rather laid-back MĂźnster in Westphalia in 2013 and moved to Shanghai on an artist-inresidence scholarship. What impressed you most upon your arrival in that megacity? The first impression of China was like a punch in the face when the doors of the airport opened and I literally walked into a wall. When I arrived in Shanghai in 2013, China was struggling with the hottest summer for over a century. Add to that the enormous humidity, high air pressure and pollution and every step becomes a challenge. The high pressure was to become rather symbolic for life in Shanghai for the rest of my stay.

# Chinese culture has appreciably influenced your art, what would you attribute that to? Even though I've been living in Shanghai for almost two years now, I'm wowed to this day by the extreme contrasts of both the city itself and its culture. It's not a rare sight to catch me standing in front of a brand new skyscraper marveling at its shiny facade. 60 floors of super modern architecture, swanky and futuristic. Once my gaze returns and I notice the family with a toddler setting up an improvised kitchen on the street, the difference is quite intense.

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You'll notice these stark contrasts all over Shanghai. The city has so many faces and they all clash mercilessly. The interesting and also inspiring thing about it is that these contrasts actually depend on each other.

# So how has your work changed compared to what it was like back in Germany? My entire approach has completely changed. Before I had tried to remove stylistic devices in painting from their original meaning in every single work. Now I'm not interested in a recognizable style, but rather in the tensions between the form of presentation, stylistic devices and the visual content. I use contradictions and let them crash to explore combinations, that draw their power out of conflict rather than what's actually depicted or its interpretation. Tension is generated through mutual reinforcement or mutual devaluation of the highlighted thesis on painting techniques. I subordinate the stylistic devices to this very purpose and use artistic means of expression from all eras.

# How do you chose what to combine? In order to not be trapped in subjectivity, in this exhibition series I've divided my painting into its constituents. Each painting deals with a single statement about painting. So a single stroke with a brush can be read as a potential sign or calligraphy, become figurative or refer only to itself. Patches of color are used as gradients, which serve as a simple way of displaying light, or then as monochromatic areas. These can be viewed as spaces of color or as shapes in color and geometry.An untreated canvas can also be used as


a stylistic device to question the idea of surface and its constitution. To put these fragment back together in an objective way and let them enter their discourse, the combination of the individual paintings is done randomly. The resulting pairs then constitute a coherent work.

# You have already shown these new works in four different places in China (an empty apartment building, a shopping mall, a gallery and a museum). How did your works fit into these diverse locations and does the above mentioned random combination of paintings not suggest their exchangeability? The question of originality and uniqueness is intended. I've addressed this explicitly by having double images of a “Transformer” robot in the four exhibitions you mention. In each exhibition one painting picks up on the given room. At the Vast Art Centre for example I showed a grey canvas, which had been roller painted with the color of the surrounding wall. This approach exemplifies how the entire interrelation between paintings and groups of them came into existence in a unique way for each exhibition. The constellation of painting and emerging groups of paintings are singular for each exhibition and thus become originally only temporarily.

Mario Weinberg interdependence, 2014 -144-

# So you're using this concept to illustrate that fact that the interpretation of works of art is always dependent on location, time and the recipient? Exactly. It's not up to the artist to interpret his work. I'm merely questioning painting as such and its correlation with originality, ingenuity and its place in society.

# You've visited Germany recently for an exhibition and sold very well. Do you think living and working in China has been beneficial for your recognition and ultimately your “market value”? I think that being exposed to such a different culture has opened up and enriched my work. And of course it makes me happy if other people see it the same way.

# What in particular do you like or dislike about China? Shanghai is one of the most vivid cities I've ever seen. Besides that China remains mostly alien to me, which is of course inspiring. And I love the challenge of simply mastering every day life. My Chinese is barely good enough to be able to communicate that I'd like my noodle soup semispicy or tell the cab driver where to go. But it's not like I've necessarily become a fan of China. This challenge could also be found somewhere else. But it is very interesting to be able to get a glimpse at the mentality of the Chinese people. Especially glimplse on Shanghai the pressure to succeed is incredibly strong. The need to save face is quite prominent, sometimes at very high costs.


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# So what is next for you? Apart from my own projects, I'm currently planning an exhibition in Shanghai for some painter colleagues of mine from Germany. I find the exchange between artists with such different backgrounds to be important and interesting, especially since the concept of art in China is really quite different. # You have mentioned that you're actually thinking about moving back to Germany and set up a studio in Berlin. You've never actually lived in Berlin, so what's the perception of Berlin from a Shanghai art scene point of view? What would you hope for or expect from Berlin? I'm having a great and inspiring time in China. It's exciting to experience how the Chinese interest in “western art” continues to grow. And while it's beneficial for me to have a different angle on my own art, I do miss the exchange with other artists who share a similar background. I like Berlin and from my perspective it's one of the most happening cities in the world. I love the fact that in Berlin you can go out on any given day and there will be several exhibitions to explore.

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Mario Weinberg This Summer will be most exciting Installation view, 2015

Especially glimplse on Shanghai the pressure to succeed is incredibly strong.

Mario Weinberg TAO, 2015 Oil on canvas, 230x160cm each


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dress & jewelry DIMITRI

Travel to yourself photography by Norbert Hurrle styling by Petra Wiebe hair & make up by Sigi Kumpfm端ller model Marli @ MODELWERK -147-


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dress Marciano BY Guess necklace Filini Collection headpiece Dimitri


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dress Max Mara stole Arisa / flipmunich earrings Filini collection

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dress & jewelry Dimitri sandals Kennel & Schemmer


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jewelry Dimitri dress Ana Alcazar scarf & mask Holy Ghost -151-


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dress Max Mara stole Arisa / flipmunich earrings Filini collection


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dress Holy Ghost necklace Filini Collection sandals Kennel & Schmenger


dress Ilsi Jakobsen blouse & jewelry Dimitri

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dress Ana Alcazar stole Arisa earrings Filini Collection sandals Kennel & Schemmer


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dress & belt DIMITRI


March 2014DIGITAL

SUBMIT

Y O U R EDITORIAL -158-73-


MAY 2015 DIGITAL

ONLINE

DIGITAL

PRINT

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Michelle George

»CLEO'S MOOD« 

Julia Keltsch

»SELFREFLECTION«  Danbo Choi

»SHADES OF NUDE«  Shahaf Margalit

»WEARABLE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIONS«  Marko Seifert

»COMPOSED« 

Click on the image to view full editorial


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Sharone Poole

»PROPULSION« 

Evgeniy Kuznetsov

»INTERNAL BREEZE« 

Norbert Hurrle

»KICKOFF« 

Valentina Melzi

»TWISTED CINDERELLA«  Pascale Weber

»DREAMY STRIKING« 


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photography by Michelle George hair by Sarah Monrose make up by Lindsey Poole model Charlotte Quita Jones @ Models 1

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Magazine for fashion, design, music, art & culture • www.superior-magazine.com

coming out on February 4th 2016

# FEBRUARY 2016

SUPERIOR MAGAZINE January 2016  

Exclusive FASHION, ART and DESIGN INTERVIEWS and FASHION EDITORIALS from across the world | SUPERIOR is an international MAGAZINE featuring...

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