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T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

B E Y O N D , T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

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ISSUE 13


BALHARBOURSHOPS.COM 9700 Collins Ave, Bal Harbour, Florida


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B E AU T I F U L W O N ’ T B E TA M E D

a s t o n m a r t i n . c o m Official fuel consumption figures in litres/100km (mpg) for the 2019 MY Aston Martin Vantage V8: urban 14.2 (19.9); extra urban 8.0 (35.3); combined 10.3 (27.4). CO2 emissions 236g / km. The mpg /fuel economy figures quoted are sourced from official regulated test results obtained through laboatory testing. They are for comparability purposes only and may not reflect your real driving experience, which may vary depending on factors including road conditions, weather, vehicle load and driving style.


T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

Cover photographed by ROKAS DARULIS; styling by SOPHIE VAN DER WELLE; with thanks to MARIE-LAURE BLAISE, SEEMA SOOCHIT, and the entire team at THE ST. REGIS MAURITIUS RESORT

Editorial Editor: James Collard Design director: Sara Redhead Design: Luke Gould, Lesley Evans, Ewa Dykas Sub-editor: Damon Syson Picture editor: Emma Hammar Editorial director: Gill Morgan Publisher: Crispin Jameson Project director: Sarah Glyde

Creative and Publishing Brave New World Publishing Ltd, 6 Derby Street, London W1J 7AD T +44 (0)20 3819 7520

Advertising Advertising: Sarah Glyde Represented by: Couture Marketing (couturemarketing.com) in USA Luxx Media (chris@luxx-media.com) in EAME Nexus Ltd (tak.man@nexusmediaasia.com) in Asia Pacific

© Copyright 2019 Brave New World Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission from the publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for any errors it may contain

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Welcome to the latest edition of Beyond, the exclusive magazine of St. Regis Hotels & Resorts. We hope that Beyond inspires you with unique stories that reflect the varied interests and passions of our guests around the world. In this issue we meet world-renowned architect André Fu, who introduces his latest masterpiece: the new St. Regis hotel in his home city of Hong Kong. In our regular feature, “The Journey,” we drive from Toronto to Manhattan, passing Niagara Falls and following the Hudson River through Upstate New York’s picturesque landscapes and historic villages – a cultural odyssey that takes in some of America’s most notable locations. We also visit the Indian Ocean paradise of The St. Regis Mauritius Resort, which played host to our cover and fashion shoot. In “The Connoisseur,” art collector and patron Valeria Napoleone shares why she has been buying iconic works by women artists since the 1990s. We then look back at the extraordinary life of one of 20th-century art’s most influential figures, Peggy Guggenheim, whose former home on Venice’s Grand Canal is now the city’s most popular art gallery. Elsewhere, Beyond hails the restaurant revolution in Rome, where a new generation of chefs is taking time-honored cooking techniques and traditional ingredients and reinventing them in innovative ways – while in “A Little Place I Know,” tidiness guru Marie Kondo recalls the beautiful and inspiring spectacle of the cherry blossom tunnel at the Japan Mint in Osaka. Thank you for making St. Regis a part of your travels. With more than 40 hotels around the world, we hope that you will continue to find the time to join us on your journey.

LISA HOLLADAY Vice President & Global Brand Leader St. Regis Hotels & Resorts


CONTRIBUTORS Jade Beer As editor-in-chief of Condé Nast’s Brides, no one is better placed than Jade Beer to observe the latest global matrimonial trends. She is also the author of two romantic novels, What I Didn’t Say and The Almost Wife. Of her most treasured vacation memory, she says, “I’m someone whose job involves going on an annual honeymoon, despite having been married for 18 years, but I’ll always remember the white-knuckle flight on a very old private plane to Mustique. Sipping cocktails in the hotel bar with Bryan Adams just about made up for it.”

Sarah Crompton Sarah Crompton is an arts writer and broadcaster, whose work appears in The Times, The Guardian, British Vogue, The Art Newspaper and The Economist among others. In this issue of Beyond, she profiles iconic collector Peggy Guggenheim. A favorite travel memory? “Driving to Villasimius in southern Sardinia, singing Italian songs en route, ditties of bright sunny beaches and translucent seas full of fish. Then we’d arrive and the same scene would unfold in front of us. It felt somewhere close to paradise.”

Mark Ellwood After college, Mark Ellwood spent several years as an art tour director in Florence, Rome and Paris, before moving to Manhattan to specialize in travel and style journalism for the Financial Times, T: New York Times, and Wall Street Journal – just the person, then, to write about a road trip from Toronto to New York. His favorite travel memory? “Childhood trips to Versilia, near Pisa. As an only child, I had to pick up a few words of Italian to play with the other kids. I remember the ice-cream tasted better than seemed possible back home.”

Rokas Darulis “They swim past just a few feet away from you,” says Rokas Darulis, recalling an unforgettable early-morning encounter with dolphins in the Indian Ocean off Mauritius, where the Lithuanianborn photographer returned to work on the cover and fashion shoot in this issue, shot at The St. Regis Mauritius Resort. “It was really magical swimming next to these animals in the wild. I couldn’t believe how close to them we could get. It felt totally surreal. If you ever get the chance to try it – do!”

Katie Parla The New Jersey-born and Rome-based food writer Katie Parla – who writes in this issue of Beyond about the Eternal City’s vibrant contemporary food scene – could well have the world’s most mouthwatering Instagram account. And needless to say, her favorite travel memory is a foodie one. “My first trip to Bangkok was in peak mango season. Each day, when leaving or returning to the hotel, I would stop at the same stall on the street for mango sticky rice, which I would take to the back patio of the hotel and devour in record time.”

James Oses In this issue, illustrator James Oses depicts “A Little Place I Know” chosen by four well-traveled tastemakers – from an art gallery in Shanghai to some celebrated gardens in Rome – all destinations with St. Regis hotels. Oses worked on these illustrations from his home in London, but loves to travel – and loves to work on location. Asked to recollect his favorite travel memory, he opts, naturally, for a highly visual one: “I loved visiting the Paris Museum of Modern Art and seeing La Fée Electricité, a huge fresco created by the painter Raoul Dufy in the 1930s.”

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CONTENTS 16 Seven Wonders – The World in Seven Objects –

From velvet smoking jackets and Pop Art sunglasses to bespoke fragrances and artisanal small-batch gin, we present the stories behind seven fascinating objects from around the globe

30 Empire State – The Journey –

Mark Ellwood discovers old-school charm and natural wonders as he travels from Toronto to Manhattan through Upstate New York, taking in some notable historic locations along the way

38 The Alchemist

54 The G-Force

– Profile –

– Family –

Leading architect André Fu reveals the inspiration behind his latest creation: the new St. Regis hotel in his hometown of Hong Kong, which blends East and West in perfect harmony

As more of parents’ time is taken up by work, grandparents are stepping in to provide treats, trips and even vacations to their grandchildren. We celebrate this intergenerational bond

43 Hidden Treasures

58 Beauty and the Beach

– A Little Place I Know –

– Fashion –

Tastemakers share with us their address-book secrets, from designer Noé DuchaufourLawrance’s favorite Roman garden to a Shanghai art museum chosen by curator Pearl Lam

The clear turquoise waters and ivory-colored sands of The St. Regis Mauritius Resort provide the perfect backdrop for our curated pick of this season’s chicest beachwear styles

46 Smart Packing

68 The St. Regis Atlas

– Vacation Style –

– The Directory –

Whether you’re planning a Roman holiday, a cultural odyssey to Lhasa, a beach break in Puerto Rico or a family outing in San Francisco, these are the essentials you need to take

Our international network of hotels and resorts, from Aspen to Astana, Lhasa to Langkawi, plus our St. Regis Atlas Guide – to help you make the most of your stay

Cover: Paloma pleated-sleeve cotton blouse, $797, Cecilie Bahnsen, matchesfashion.com; leather belt bag, $1,435, Fendi, fendi.com; ivory cotton high-waisted briefs, $395, Altuzarra, altuzarra.com; Just A Friend pearl earring, $135, Wald Berlin, wald-berlin.de. Above: see page 65

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YORK LONDON HONG

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Contents

70 New Roman

84 A Bold Approach

– Food –

– The Connoisseur –

The traditional cuisine of Rome has remained unchanged for centuries. But now the Italian capital is witnessing a foodie revolution, as bold young chefs rewrite the culinary rule book

Italian-born art patron Valeria Napoleone has been collecting the work of female artists for more than 20 years. She shows us around her fascinating London studio

73 Kitchen Confidential

86 Maid to Measure

– Food –

– The Trend –

Sydney-born Christopher Miller has spent over 20 years mastering pan-Asian cuisine at a series of top restaurants. Now he brings his passion for all things Thai to The St. Regis Bangkok

Inspired by Meghan Markle’s royal wedding, the modern bride’s nuptial squad is likely to consist of flower girls, or even a professional bridesmaid, rather than members of her friendship circle

74 Queen of Venice

88 Up Close and Personal

– The Back Story –

– Art –

We celebrate the extraordinary life of Peggy Guggenheim, the collector who changed the face of 20th-century art, and whose former home is now Venice’s most popular art museum

Mexican-born artist Aliza Nisenbaum is famed for her intimate portraits of people living in marginalized communities. She explains why, for her, painting is both personal and political

80 Walk Like an Egyptian

94 Society

– Design –

– St. Regis Events –

The opening of a vast new museum near Cairo is inspiring a renewed wave of interest in all things Egyptian, witnessed everywhere from the catwalks of Chanel to the current Art Deco revival in interiors

Snapshots from our glamorous events around the globe, including the grand unveiling of The St. Regis Rome’s exquisite refurbishment, a Midnight Supper in Mexico City and the launch of the stunning new St. Regis Toronto

96 Sebastian Faulks – A Life in Seven Journeys –

The award-winning author reveals the seven journeys that have shaped his life, from a teenage sojourn in Paris and a cricket trip to Sri Lanka to the lengthy stay in rural France that inspired his bestselling novel, Charlotte Gray

Above: Las Taliveritas by Aliza Nisenbaum. The New York-based artist discusses her work on page 88

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W W W. C E R R U T I . C O M


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THE WORLD IN SEVEN OBJECTS Words by ALEX MOORE Photography by LOUISA PARRY

THESE UNIQUE , FINELY CR AFTED OBJECTS E ACH TELL A STORY OF OUR T IME , FROM A RTFUL CER AMICS TO PINK SAPPHIRES

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The velvet jacket “Men are starting to dress down for work and dress up for night-time,” says Oliver Spencer, the menswear designer of formalwear brand Favourbrook as well as his own eponymous tailoring house. “For many of us the workplace has become much more of a casual environment,” he explains, “and I think because of that, men are enjoying being more well-dressed in the evenings.” And just like many of London-based Spencer’s clients all over the world, the designer “couldn’t be more up for that”. What velvet brings to “smart dressing” is a feeling that’s luxe but also a little bit louche. “Velvet is, and always has been, associated with nighttime, with sumptuousness and dressing up,” says Spencer. “That’s why the velvet smoking jacket is such a wonderful thing. It’s also just about the most comfortable thing you could ever wear.” Of

course, the Favourbrook jacket pictured isn’t technically a smoking jacket – it lacks the velvet lapels, the frogging and (as worn by Hugh Hefner), a sash. A number of brands, from Tom Ford to Maison Margiela, are taking the velvety essence of the smoking jacket and injecting it into their dinner jackets, blazers and tuxedos. Where once the material was employed to absorb smoke and protect a gentleman’s clothing from falling ash, it’s now purely about razzle-dazzle and tactile enjoyment. But before you reach for your cravat or bow tie, these velvet showstoppers don’t necessarily demand an entirely formal ensemble. “The beauty of velvet is you can dress it up with black tie trousers or dress it down with jeans,” explains Spencer. “You could even wear it with your AC/DC t-shirt from when you were 22 – and really go wild.”

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The sea holly

The so-called “greenhouse aesthetic” was last year’s standout interiors trend. Fill your space with big plants, small plants, exotic plants and perennial plants, they said. Add botanical-inspired wallpaper, upholstery and curtains, to really bring the outdoors in – the greener the better. Wave goodbye to minimalism, they said. And they seem to be saying the same this year. Front and center of this trend are wild botanicals such as the magnificent sea holly. Found in coastal sand dunes around Europe and North America, this black sheep of the carrot family’s ruggedly handsome lines and purple flowers make it a wonderfully versatile visual. Used for decades to add texture and whimsy to wedding bouquets, we’re now employing it in our homes, juxtaposing its wild, foraged form against the shiny roundness of succulents, cheese and money plants. And its virtues don’t end there. The candied roots of sea holly (or “eringoe” as it was known) were once a popular delicacy and considered an aphrodisiac. Falstaff even mentions them in Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor: “Let the sky rain potatoes; let it thunder to the tune of Green Sleeves; hail kissing-comfits and snow eringoes; let there come a tempest of provocation.” The plant’s young shoots and tips can be blanched and eaten like asparagus, while the roots, which can grow to lengths of more than three feet, can be candied for use as a sweetmeat and restorative. Candied eringoes were particularly popular until the end of the 19th century, and they seem to be appearing again in one or two more forage-centric restaurants. Fancy candying your own? We’d recommend boiling the roots until tender, peeling them, then boiling them again, this time in a thick, rose water-flavored syrup – should you wish to adhere to writer and gardener John Evelyn’s (16201706) recipe. Finally, roast them over a log fire for best results.

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The gin The recent “craft spirit boom” has allowed small distilleries around the globe to really explore the world of flavor – with exceptional results. In a warehouse in Copenhagen, for example, Noma alumni Lars Williams and Mark Emil Hermansen, founders of cult favorite Empirical Spirits, have created an entirely original spirit base, fusing eastern and western techniques by using koji instead of yeast, into which they infuse an array of foraged seasonal ingredients – think mugwort, Douglas fir, quince kombucha or even smoked fish. The brand’s small batches of 300 have been known to sell out in half an hour. Portland, Oregon’s House Spirits also creates smallbatch limited-edition developmental spirits alongside its award-winning vodka, rum, whiskey and Aquavit, while micro-distilleries in Japan, India and Mauritius continue to make headlines by subverting traditional tastes and techniques. But for all the fancy new concoctions, it’s arguably gin that’s been experimented with the most in recent years. We can perhaps thank British brand Sipsmith for this. In 2009, it successfully lobbied for the UK’s first small-scale distilling license granted in nearly 200 years. Since then, the boutique gin scene has exploded – on both sides of the Atlantic. The St. Regis Deer Valley in Utah, meanwhile, has partnered with Park City’s award-winning Alpine Distilling to create a limited-edition run (two barrels) of gin, available exclusively at the hotel. “St. Regis Barrel Select Gin” has a bold, juniper-forward and intensely floral profile incorporating notes of coriander, cardamom, angelica root, orris root, lemon peel and licorice root. Before distillation, the mash is soaked with Brazilian and Nicaraguan coffee beans to add a touch of acidity, and it is aged in new American oak barrels. The results speak for themselves.

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The pink gem Perhaps people will never tire of the luster of white diamonds, shimmering as their facets catch the light, but we seem to be living through an era which calls for color – and for more than a decade now, the stones which tend to catch our eye increasingly come in vivid hues. It helps that people are starting to understand colored gemstones better. Where diamond rating has always been a relatively straightforward process using the “four Cs” – color, clarity, cut and carat – assessing gemstones used to be a more complicated and often controversial process. Now though, gemologists use an internationally recognized grading system that allows jewelers to match colors and reassure consumers about the quality of their stones. Thus the rich green of “old-mine” emeralds, the deep red of a spinel or a “pigeon’s blood” ruby, and colored diamonds in every shade from Yellowish-Green to Purplish Red have never been more fashionable. Pink is arguably the color of choice right now though – from Fancy Pink diamonds to pink tourmalines or garnets. And last but by no means least, the pink sapphire, like this cushion-cut beauty, set in a ring by Graff (sapphires 3.90cts, Diamonds 1.98cts), the international jewelry house synonymous with superb gemstones. A deep blue normally springs to mind when we think of a sapphire, but as Anne-Eva Geffroy, Design Director at Graff, explains, “Pink sapphires are exceptionally beautiful and interesting jewels because they come in myriad shades, and it takes a true expert to identify the deepest, most beautiful hues.” And of course by contrast the white diamonds in the twisted surround of the setting serve to make the color of this stunning pink sapphire all the more intense.

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The sunglasses

“Mr Kim doesn’t come from this world, which explains the out-of-this-world approach to everything he does.” Gary Bott of South Korean sunglasses brand Gentle Monster is explaining how the company’s founder, Hankook Kim, ran a summer camp in South Korea before becoming an eyewear demigod, seemingly overnight. Gentle Monster’s groundbreaking designs have reinvented sunglasses as a branch of Pop Art; in just seven years, Kim has created a $200m-plus company with a cult following, 41 stores worldwide and more in the pipeline. He has collaborated with the likes of Alexander Wang, Xander Zhou and Tilda Swinton, and is releasing an album produced by Kanye West and Pharrell Williams in January 2019. Yes, the brand was lucky enough to launch around the same time that K-Pop went global – and the fact that South Korean actress Jun Ji-hyun wore its glasses for the entire series of My Love From Another Star didn’t hurt. But take nothing away from Kim: his vision to make sunglasses an art form, and the brand’s boutiques into installations, is nothing short of genius. “Mr Kim saw the opportunity to experiment not just with product design but also with space,” explains Bott. “He was convinced that our stores shouldn’t look like stores.” Each Gentle Monster space is designed around a unique concept, from sand-covered cars or Kung Fu aliens to dreamy fieldscapes and robotic manufacturing arms. A carefully curated roster of artists, photographers and stylists is commissioned to dream up these intriguing installations, which have succeeded in attracting millions of visitors. Indeed, while shoppers around the globe are making the bulk of their purchases from home, less than 10 per cent of Gentle Monster’s business is online. If you can make the experience exciting and innovative enough, it seems people can still be persuaded to make the journey to a store.

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The stealth scent

In a world where individuality is all, luxury is changing – with consumers increasingly seeking out rare, one-off and under-the-radar brands. No surprise then that this trend is extending to perfume. After all, who wants to smell the same as everyone else? For some, nothing less than a fragrance made for them, and them alone, will do. Brands like Maison Francis Kurkdjian, Azzi Glasser, and Guerlain will create bespoke perfumes that reflect an individual’s personality and personal taste. And for anyone who enjoys small-scale, artisanal products, a number of excellent independent perfumeries are also coming to the fore. One of the most interesting is Joya Studio, Brooklyn’s first commercial perfumery. The company’s fine porcelain perfume bottles announce from the off that this is a very different kind of scent. “I look at independent perfume as a design challenge and an entrepreneurial endeavor,” says Frederick Bouchardy, the studio’s founder. Joya became the first perfume to be sold on Net-a-Porter, despite (or perhaps because of) some batches being limited to as few as 100 units; and it has collaborated with a range of high-profile names – “all best-in-class in the discipline they’re dedicated to,” says Bouchardy. “So if we developed a fragrance with a chef, it was Thomas Keller; if we developed a scented product with an architect, it was Zaha Hadid.” For the brand’s Foxglove Perfume (pictured), Joya spent two and a half years developing a porcelain bottle and a 22k golddipped wand with ceramic artist Sarah Cihat. “It’s the lengths we go to that make it a truly luxurious product,” says Bouchardy. “The modern consumer wants to know the story and the source of the product they’re investing in, big or small. We’re looking to make a connection with our customers, where our expression is something that they make their own.”

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The art ceramic The art ceramic is very much in vogue – as is clear both at big international art fairs such as PAD and in little boutiques selling high-end crafts the world over. Witness this charming piece by artist and interior designer Luke Edward Hall, recently described by Vogue as “the interior design world’s 26-year-old wunderkind.” But the idea of the plate as decoration, rather than merely something to put your food on, is ancient. Chinese blue-andwhite porcelain was widely admired and proudly displayed across the Islamic world and Europe, where local imitators produced the “willow pattern” chinoiserie that graced kitchen walls and dressers everywhere from English cottages to ranch houses in America’s West. Meanwhile the classical scenes on Wedgwood’s plates harked back yet further – to the decorative pottery traditions of ancient Rome. And the 20th century saw a burst of activity in two contrary directions. Mass-produced decorative plates sold in the thousands, celebrating everything from a king-emperor’s coronation to the Manhattan skyline in Rockwell Kent’s popular Our America series for Vernon Kilns. Unsurprisingly, leading artists have also felt the urge to do something very modern with this age-old form. Picasso produced 633 ceramic editions between the 1930s and the 1970s, many of them plates – bearing anything from bullfighting scenes to the face of his current muse – known as a “visage”, a tradition which Cocteau took up in the 1950s, and to which Luke Edward Hall gives an elegant nod in his graphic design for this plate.

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The Journey

EMPIRE STATE

BET W EEN THE T WO GRE AT CIT IES OF TORONTO AND NEW YORK LIE SOME OF AMERIC A’S MOST CELEBR ATED NAT UR AL WONDERS AND NOTA BLE HISTORIC AL TOW NS. FROM PICT URESQUE M AIN STREETS TO THE SPIRIT U AL HOME OF BASEBALL , A DRIV E THROUGH UPSTATE NEW YORK IS A JOURNEY THROUGH SOME OF THE KEY MOMENTS IN NORTH AMERIC AN HISTORY

Words by MARK ELLWOOD

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Toronto to New York

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The Journey varied that every time you drive it, you’ll notice something new – a general store converted into a new restaurant, perhaps, or an old Astor-era pile that’s home to an intriguing, if little-visited, museum. The axis of any drive should be the Hudson River, which acts as a dowsing rod from the center of the state towards New York City. Otherwise, look for the bodies of water – lakes, rivers, ponds – to act as handy signposts as you move across the state’s upper reaches, emerging unexpectedly to signal that a settlement is nearby. The most impressive water feature, of course, straddles the border itself. Niagara Falls is a one-and-a-half-hour drive from Toronto. Thronged with people year-round, pause to admire it from the Canadian side, which is much less overdeveloped. The site comprises three distinct cataracts: the American, Bridal Veil and Horseshoe Falls. The latter is the broadest and most impressive. Resist any urge to shun a trip to this site, cliché as it might seem: no image can replicate the immense noise and power that radiates from the waters. Even the squeamish should brave one of the boat tours that bring visitors up close to the water – to feel the sheer force as it thunders down. The Maid of the Mist is the best option. Wrap up warm, and don’t worry, the ticket price includes a disposable raincoat. Once you cross the border into America – with foot firmly on the gas through the seemingly mile-long stretches of souvenir shops you’ll encounter – follow the signs for scenic Lake Ontario State Parkway. It’s a worthwhile detour en route to Rochester, rather than taking the more

isiting Toronto for the first time can be startling: its location, on the edge of the vast Lake Ontario, suggests the city isn’t truly landlocked, with America in the far-off distance across the water. Toronto clings to the lake, low-slung and spread out, and, for an enormous city, it retains a small-town charm, in large part thanks to a quirk of recent history. Until the 1970s, it was a regional town, only morphing into Canada’s new metropolis after Québécois nationalists passed a law in the 1970s requiring all business taking place in Canada’s then-largest city, Montreal, to be bilingual. The associated costs caused most major companies to decamp to an English-speaking rival: Toronto. Since then, it’s become most famous outside Canada for its annual fall film festival. If you’re visiting, be sure to catch a movie or two at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, its gleaming new home, which screens movies all year round. Toronto is often nicknamed “New York North”, a nod to its cosmopolitan feel and energy (though these Canucks are arguably a gentler bunch than many veteran Manhattanites). The two cities are separated by just under 500 miles of road, but the route from southern Ontario to the mouth of the Hudson River features sites that are anchors of key moments in North American history: the origins of baseball, the mansions of the Gilded Age and even a tie-dyed love-in or two. These places sit in one of the lushest landscapes in the country, so often overlooked in Manhattan’s shadow. Were the charming towns dotting Upstate New York elsewhere in America, they’d prove more than compelling standalone draws. The journey is so

Full steam ahead

Previous pages: Getty Images. Left: Getty Images. Right, and overleaf: Alamy

Opening pages, left to right: Toronto’s CN Tower; the Empire State Building; the majestic Catskill mountains in Upstate New York. Below: a tourist boat gets up close to the action in Niagara Falls’ Horseshoe Falls

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Toronto to New York sport here when he tweaked the rules of what was known as “town ball”. The fact that its true origins are more likely a riff on the British game of rounders hasn’t stopped Cooperstown from milking the opportunity. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is here, and each summer, when a new roster of legendary players is inducted, the town throbs with visitors. For the rest of the year, though, it retains the genteel veneer of its earliest days, when it was founded by the father of James Fenimore Cooper, author of The Last of the Mohicans. Cooper dubbed the lake here Glimmerglass, and the state park nearby reflects that name: the trails are bracing and offer superb views out across the water from the top of the hill. Indoorsy types can instead head just south of town where the Belgian-style brewery Ommegang offers tours and tastings on its 136-acre site, an old hop farm. Cooperstown sits at the northern reaches of the Catskills. The name is instantly evocative, suffused with a nostalgic sense of Americana: think drive-in movies, summer camps, rollerskating waitresses and, of course, Dirty Dancing. Baby and her family were typical guests in the Catskills’ heyday. While hotels elsewhere might euphemistically have described their guest policy as “restricted”, there was no such anti-Semitism here. For Jewish New Yorkers in the wake of World War II, it was synonymous with summer, when Borscht Belt comedians would perform on a circuit through the various towns. Driving to New York, you can meander down through this region on twisty roadways that snake through the leafy countryside: there’s fine fly fishing in Sullivan County, along the Willowemoc Creek,

direct freeway, I-90. It might add an hour or so to your drive, but since the landscape here is unremarkable – mostly flat farmland – it’s more pleasant to cruise along the southern edge of Lake Ontario. Pitstop at one of the oft-deserted spits of sand in Hamlin Beach State Park, a 1,200-acre green space with water that’s warm enough to swim in during the summer. The sight of grand Victorian mansions heralds the outskirts of Rochester, an old industrial hub. This was famously the city where Xerox, Bausch & Lomb and Kodak were all founded. The copymaker and optician are now subsidiaries of other conglomerates, but the photo pioneer, once the city’s largest employer, battles on. Its founder, George Eastman, bequeathed an impressive haul of early photography to the local university on his death; it’s now showcased in a museum in his former home – look for the raw, arresting images from Civil War battlegrounds. Follow US Route 20 eastwards from here. The longest highway in the country, it shadows a Native American trail from Boston, MA, to coastal Oregon. The stretch within New York’s boundaries is particularly charming, and officially designated a Scenic Byway. Don’t hurry: the joy of this drive is chancing on small towns, often full of Colonial-era buildings, with a walkable main street and a throwbackish diner or two. The prettiest of them, by far, is Cooperstown, on the edge of the eightmile-long Lake Otsego. It’s best known today for a dubious claim to be the birthplace of baseball. A cadet from the famed military academy, West Point (located 100 miles away down the Hudson River), apparently invented the

American dream Below: Cooperstown, NY, is considered one of the prettiest of the historical towns along the Hudson, especially in winter. It is also the official home of baseball

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The Journey

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Toronto to New York

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The Journey

Kodak moment

Book for dinner at Fish & Game, run by another Manhattan transplant, chef Zak Pelaccio. Housed in an old blacksmith’s shop, it’s a nose-to-tail, farmto-table type place, with an emphasis on hearty food: expect rabbit saddle, smoked lamb shoulder and locally caught turbot. The next noteworthy settlement south along the river is Germantown, where the patriarch of what would become one of New York’s wealthiest families, the Rockefellers, was born. Today, it’s a quiet hamlet with a smattering of chic stores clustered around one intersection: look for Shakerinspired furniture designer Michael Robbins’ new showroom and Alder East, a concept store-style shop in the Rockefellers’ one-time stables. The four-year-old Gaskins is a bustling stopoff for lunch, run by a husbandand-wife team who previously worked at Manhattan’s Gramercy Tavern. Ritzy Germantown is a stark contrast with artsy, rather ramshackle Tivoli, the appealing town to its south. The anchor here is the 11-room Hotel Tivoli on the main drag, Broadway. Unarguably the best place to stay overnight in the Hudson Valley, it’s owned by artist Brice Marden and his wife Helen, longtime locals who took over the site recently when its former owners decided to close. Eclectically decorated with art picked by Marden himself, the red chairs on its patio are the perfect place for sundowners. Brice and Helen aren’t the only art world mainstays here, either – Ellsworth Kelly and Marina Abramović also have studios in the area while the upscale liberal arts college, Bard, sits just south of town and has an impressive contemporary arts space, CCS Bard, on campus.

or of course, Woodstock. That town, made famous by 1969’s psychedelic love-in in nearby Bethel, proudly retains its off-kilter, tie-dyed sensibility, full of psychic readers, organic restaurants and alternative bookstores. But it’s probably better to drive a little further past Cooperstown and cross the Hudson River before turning south. Head first for the town of Hudson, the anchor at the northern tip of the namesake valley, one of New York State’s most picturesque spots. Each of the necklace of towns strung along the river’s edge between here and Manhattan is distinct yet delightful, with its own personality. They’re popular destinations for second-homers from New York City and unlikely foodie hubs, too, thanks to the alumni of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY – one of the country’s top schools for chefs. Many graduates, enchanted by the area, opt to stay nearby and open their own restaurants rather than gravitating to highprofile kitchens in New York or San Francisco. Of these settlements, Hudson is the largest. Today its vibe is countrified, hipsterish Brooklyn, but back in New York’s Gilded Age it was a swanky, socialite-packed spot. See the extravagant Moorish villa designed by Central Park architect Calvert Vaux for Hudson River School painter Frederic Edwin Church nearby, for example. Olana, as he called it, has now been repurposed as a museum, its interiors untouched since Church’s death in 1900. Downtown Hudson today is renowned for its antique and furniture stores, whether midcentury meccas like Mark McDonald or Finch, which is owned by a former YSL exec who moved to the area with his partner.

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Above: Alamy. Right: Getty Images

Previous pages: Bear Mountain Bridge, NY. Above: George Eastman Museum in Rochester, NY. The world’s oldest museum dedicated to photography is housed in the former home of the Eastman Kodak founder


Toronto to New York

A river runs through it Above: the Vanderbilt Mansion in Hyde Park, one of the necklace of historic towns flanking the Hudson River, is an “architectural sugar rush” with exquisite formal gardens

Drive further south and you’ll come to Rhinebeck, the country retreat of the Astors. St. Regis founder John Jacob IV was born on their estate here, Ferncliff (now a nursing home, it’s not open to visitors, though its onetime sporting pavilion is an events venue where Chelsea Clinton married in 2010). Rhinebeck retains the regal air of the Astor era: downtown is easy to walk around and browse – the upscale children’s store, Land of Oz, is a standout. Market Street is the best restaurant downtown, but if you’re here at the weekend, drive a little further to a hidden gem in a nearby hamlet. The unassuming Schultzville General Store was just rebooted by two brothers who operate a gourmet café inside. On Friday nights they host a set menu supper (reservation required) that’s a steal at around $25 per person. There are two other noteworthy detours to make while meandering down the river towards Manhattan. Hyde Park is where New Deal-striker Franklin D Roosevelt was born, and it’s where he chose to build his Presidential Library. It’s an astonishing, rather moving tribute to the iconic president, and a reminder of his artfully concealed frailty: there’s a car on view which was adapted for him to use after he was paralyzed from the waist down by a bout of polio in 1921. Opt for the bracing walk along a three-mile clifftop park to the other major sight here, the Vanderbilt Mansion, an architectural sugar rush built for a member of yet another of New York’s grandest families, railroad baron Cornelius’ grandson Frederick. If the OTT beaux-arts interiors don’t appeal, linger longer in the extraordinary formal gardens which overlook the Hudson River.

Before barreling down to New York City, pause for a final stop in Beacon. Once a bustling industrial town, many of its former factories have been smartly repurposed, whether the textile mill by a waterfall which houses the Roundhouse, the best restaurant and bar in town, or the erstwhile Nabisco box-printing facility which was reborn 15 years ago as one of the country’s best contemporary art museums, Dia:Beacon. The permanent collection here focuses on monumental, large-scale pieces by the likes of Richard Serra, Dan Flavin and Michael Heizer. Then take the Taconic State Parkway, a freeway that’s gorgeously landscaped and a surprisingly pleasant drive. The suburbs of Westchester give way to the warehouses and tract homes of the Bronx, signaling that you’re finally in New York City. The monolithic Washington Bridge funnels traffic onto the island; its double-decker 14-lane set-up is always snarled with traffic – the first angry honk on a horn is a reassuring reminder you’ve reached the city that has helped define what cities can (or should) be for the past century or more. There’s no more fitting culmination of this great American road trip than the sight of the skyline here. Take the West Side Highway exit all the way down to the tip of the island for the ultimate final destination. Pull over in Battery Park City and look out onto the harbor here for a sunset view of America’s icon: the Statue of Liberty, who looks out across the water, open-armed and ready to welcome those in need. Your address: The St. Regis Toronto; The St. Regis New York

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Profile

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André Fu

THE ALCHEMIST Words by FIONA MCCARTHY

ARCHITECT ANDRÉ FU FUSES DESIGN INFLUENCES FROM BOTH EAST AND WEST AND CONJURES THEM INTO THRILLINGLY LAYERED, THOUGHTFUL SPACES. HERE HE REVEALS HIS LATEST CREATION: THE NEW ST. REGIS HOTEL IN HIS HOME CIT Y OF HONG KONG

Photo: Jonathan Wong/SCMP

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the outsider’s perspective of its metropolis feel, with its mix of skyscrapers, colonial history and junk boats on the harbor? Or could I go deeper into it because I was born and raised there?’” Ultimately, he decided to draw inspiration from the silhouettes of the city, marrying the old world with the new, “as I have seen it, living and growing up with it”, he explains. The Wan Chai area itself, where the hotel is located, proved the perfect starting point. A fascinatingly eclectic neighborhood – one of the first to be settled by the British – it still has old pawn shops and temples coexisting alongside the glass and steel futurism of buildings such as the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (where Art Basel is held every March). Even the old Hong Kong tram still passes through. But while Fu has taken visual cues from the surrounding area, he has reinvented them in unexpected ways. The patterning of old shop metal shutters inspired the bronze panels installed as headboards in some of the bedrooms; the indented grooves of colonial columns echo through the scooped detail of the hand grips for cabinet doors; and the traditional oilburning street lamps have been redesigned as chic bedside lanterns. “I didn’t want to go with the very superficial expression of Hong Kong,” he says, “just as I wouldn’t do a run of Union Jack cushions along a sofa if I was designing something in the UK. It needed to be much subtler than that.” Against the backdrop of the towering cityscape, its dazzling lights dancing across the water of Victoria Harbour, Fu has imbued the 129-room St. Regis Hong Kong with the warm and welcoming feel of an elegant home rather than a grand hotel. Although set within a contemporary skyscraper, Fu has created the same experience one might enjoy while walking through a private home – designing a sequence of spaces to be explored, and presenting something new or unexpected at every turn.

ndré Fu is an architect who likes to see rather than be seen. His work reflects the man who created it: gentle, pared back and highly considered – a luxurious hybrid, if you will, in which Eastern ideology and craftsmanship meet Western proportion and modernity (a blend that owes much to his Hong Kong roots but British education). Since founding his own practice, AFSO (afso.net), in 2000, fresh from graduating with a master’s degree in architecture from Cambridge University, he has mastered the art of navigating and merging both worlds seamlessly, developing a signature style he has dubbed “relaxed luxury”. We meet when Fu, 43, is on one of his frequent whistle-stop visits to London. The architect travels incessantly, his work taking him from designing Mayfair penthouses or sky-high bars in London, apartments in New York and a winery restaurant and spa in Provence, to hospitality, art gallery and retail projects as far and wide as Singapore and Seoul to Tokyo, Bangkok and Shanghai. Along the way, he has also managed to squeeze in a number of furniture designs: the Ribbon Dance double chair for Louis Vuitton’s Objets Nomades project, launched last year at Milan’s Salone del Mobile; rug designs for Tai Ping; taps for Cooper & Graham; art spaces for gallerists Emmanuel Perrotin and Ben Brown. Not to forget launching his own lifestyle collection, André Fu Living (AFL), in 2014. We hear he even designed a private residence for Crazy Rich Asians star Michelle Yeoh. Yet when it came to the task of designing The St. Regis Hong Kong – the only five-star hotel to be built in the area of Wan Chai in the past 10 years, opening this year – it not only brought Fu back to his hometown, but gave the in-demand architect much unexpected food for thought. “St. Regis always talks about creating a sense of place, so I asked myself the question: ‘What does Hong Kong quintessentially mean to me? Is it

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Profile

“It’s not enough to design a room that looks good… there needs to be an emotional connection” He has deliberately broken up the generously proportioned lobby, which has 30ft-high ceilings, with a series of bronze screens to create different areas for checking in and sitting down. A winding staircase up to Olivier Elzer’s L’Envol, the hotel’s French fine-dining restaurant, lends a residential feel. A wooden frame in Rùn, the hotel’s Cantonese restaurant, overseen by chef Hung Chi-Kwong, replicates the feeling of a secluded Chinese pavilion, the rippled marble of the floor imitating soothing pools of water. “Bringing the scale down in each space makes it feel more intimate,” says Fu. As with all of Fu’s projects, materiality here has been key. “I wanted to tap into the old world through traditional Chinese techniques like lacquering but express them through a contemporary palette. Mineral gray and dustycolored woods, with open-pored, grainy textures, and honed (rather than shiny) marble bring an understated quality to the design,” he says. Of course, there are moments of glamour too – a huge crystal pendant light hangs in the lobby (pictured, above), an evolution of Fu’s “Tac/Tile” design made in collaboration with Lasvit – and L’Envol is swathed in rock crystal, agate and hand-painted wall panels by Fromental. This intricate attention to the smallest of details has made Fu one of his generation’s leading lights in hotel design. “It’s simply not enough to design a room that looks good,” says Fu. “There needs to be an emotional connection with a space as well.” Today, luxury is about “creating exceptional, personal experiences that are meticulously considered at every level and detail’, says Fu, who still first sketches all his schemes or product designs by hand. “We focus on the comfort and tactility inherent in the experience itself.”

As a modern-day nomad, Fu admits his perception of travel is slightly distorted. “I pack a bag, I board a plane – I really don’t think about it so much. Traveling for me has become about going to a place, taking it all in and then starting to design a project as I see it through my eyes,” he muses. Yet what first piqued Fu’s interest in architecture as a child, traveling with his family to Japan, still holds true today. “I remember being in a very tiny building and as we went up in the elevator, I was amazed how one floor was a karaoke bar, another floor was a clinic, the next someone’s home. I was fascinated by how design within the same space could transform a place and make it feel completely different,” he remembers. For Fu, hotels still provide this magical gateway to worlds within a city. By appreciating how “a hotel is often someone’s first encounter and last memory of a city,” says Fu, he knows too well how much impact the “signature details” he and his 20-strong team spend considerable time developing will have on every project (as seen in the Grand Deluxe room, pictured, right). “What really touches a guest is when they are surprised by the thoughtfulness of something that’s very small,” he says. “At The St. Regis Hong Kong, it’s the fineness of the embroidery, the way the stitching detail on leather caps over the edge of a cabinet, or the little wooden joist below it, which is slightly oriental in its composition. It immerses you subconsciously into a cultural journey of Hong Kong and its evolution,” Fu enthuses, “while capturing the spirit, soul and tranquility of the city, past and present.” Your address: The St. Regis Hong Kong

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André Fu

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A Little Place I Know ADDRESS-BOOK SECRETS FROM LUMINARIES OF THE WORLDS OF ART, DESIGN AND CULTURE

An historic park in Rome by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance Villa Borghese Gardens, Piazzale Napoleone I, Rome

Villa Borghese is a landscape garden in the heart of Rome – a city of seductive decadence and shameless beauty where I spend a lot of time. The garden was commissioned in 1605 by Cardinal Scipione Borghese and is a place that I always revisit when I’m in the Italian capital. The change of seasons and with it the change of light, even the smell in the air, makes it a different place every time I go. I travel quite a bit for work, and I take a great deal of inspiration from these particular gardens and the various follies and villas. It’s a process that I nurture carefully, and one that makes me emotionally aware, and from this, creative. Nature has always been my main source of inspiration; it gives me the vocabulary to translate feelings into drawings and drawings into projects. In honor of Villa Borghese, for example, I designed Borghese, a sofa and table, for French furniture brand La Chance, where the metal structure reminded me of the intricate tree branches and the cushions served as the landscape. There’s something about the free-flowing forms, curves, textures, and even the smells of Villa Borghese that stay with me and move me emotionally. Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance is the designer of the Folia collection for luxury Parisian crystal house Saint-Louis, which has teamed up with St. Regis to produce the Midnight Supper glassware gift set Your address: The St. Regis Rome

A private museum in Shanghai by Pearl Lam Rockbund Art Museum, 20 Huqiu Rd, Huangpu Qu, Shanghai

I absolutely love the Rockbund Art Museum (RAM), which is not far from my gallery in Shanghai’s Bund district – a must-stop destination for anyone interested in contemporary art. This private museum opened in 2010 and is located in an historic building that housed the Royal Asiatic Society, one of China’s first modern exhibition spaces. The building was originally completed in 1932 with a beautiful Art Deco facade, but its interior was renovated in 2007 for a more contemporary look. I first visited the museum for its inaugural show – a fantastic Cai Guo-Qiangcurated exhibition featuring creative installations and inventions for better living by Chinese peasants. As well as going there for one of the rotating exhibitions, I would also recommend taking in the view from the museum and then exploring the neighborhood. There are other historic buildings and other opportunities to look at great art in the same area. Pearl Lam is the founder and owner of Pearl Lam Galleries, which exhibits contemporary art and design in Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong Your address: The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan

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A Little Place I Know

A floral landmark in Osaka by Marie Kondo Japan Mint, 1-1-79, Temma 1-chome, kita-ku, Osaka

After my first book was published in 2011, I started speaking at conferences and events around Japan, and visiting Osaka more frequently. One day, during a break, my husband and I were walking along the Okawa River and we found the cherry blossom tunnel at the Japan Mint. The blossoms were in full bloom and it was spectacular. I remember being deeply moved by the beauty of the blossoms, coupled with the riverside setting. I highly recommend visiting during the cherry blossom season (though at any time of year it’s still wonderful to walk along the river). The prime season in 2019 will be 11-17 April, when the area will be lit up with lanterns. The cherry blossom season is very short – the blossoms are gone so quickly that in Japan we attribute a great deal of virtue to their transience and grace. They also symbolize a life that has fulfilled its purpose. When I initially visited this area, my first book had just become a bestseller. While I was starting to receive kind words from people, I was also under enormous pressure to write my next book and decide what to do with my future. Seeing the cherry blossoms in full bloom motivated me to devote all my energy to my purpose, which is to help more people experience the life-changing magic of tidying up. The Okawa Cherry Blossom Cruise is also wonderful – the view of the blossoms from the boat is completely different to what you see at street level. Marie Kondo is an organizing consultant and the author of international bestseller, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up Your address: The St. Regis Osaka

A poetry library in New York by Alex Poots I first went to Poets House in late 2015, not long after I moved to New York. It has an amazing archive of poetry and I went there because I was researching American poets and was told the guys there were a fount of knowledge. Later, after my initial visit, I attended a beautiful event, a fundraiser they have every year where you start at Poets House with poetry readings, right there on the waterfront, and then you walk over the bridge to a dinner in Brooklyn. I’m really impressed and inspired by the people who run Poets House and the way they’ve created a successful organization at a time when poetry doesn’t have the mainstream recognition it should. When you think about the poems of Saadi from the 13th century, which then inspired Henry David Thoreau to write Civil Disobedience, which later inspired Martin Luther King Jr – that’s the real power of poetry. One of the things I notice with artists from different disciplines is how important poetry is to their practice even if they’re not in the literary arts. Poetry is a kind of creative wellspring, and this beautiful home for it is both admirable and precious. Alex Poots is the founding chief executive and artistic director of The Shed, the new cultural center in Manhattan’s Hudson Yards development Your address: The St. Regis New York

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Illustrations by James Oses

Poets House, 10 River Terrace, New York


A DVA N C E D P E R F O R M A N C E

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Smart Packing

Intrepid chic

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PRACTICALITY IS KEY WHEN YOU’RE EXPLORING THE WORLD’S MOST FASCINATING DESTINATIONS. MAKE SURE YOU FEEL ON TOP OF THE WORLD AS YOU STEP OUT IN THE TIBETAN CAPITAL

Your address: The St. Regis Lhasa Resort

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1. Bondi sweatshirt, $154, The Upside, theupsidesport.com 2. On My Level rucksack, $148, Lululemon, lululemon.com 3. Allerton gilet, $350, Belstaff, belstaff.com 4. RadarLock Path vented sunglasses, $233, Oakley, oakley.com 5. Overhead jacket, $1,035, Holland & Holland, hollandandholland.com 6. Solarboost, $160, Adidas, adidas.com 7. Activated Sun Protector Sunscreen for face and body, $30, Kiehl’s, kiehls.com 8. Salute stripe track pants, $230, P.E Nation, pe-nation.com

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Smart Packing

Eternal style

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1. Sports leather messenger bag, $2,937, James Purdey & Son, purdey.com 2. Cashmere crew neck sweater, $1,900,

Stefano Ricci, stefanoricci.com 3. GraffStar men’s timepiece in rose gold with black dial 43mm, $36,000, graff.com 4. Craftsmen leather Chelsea boots, $495,

R.M. Williams, intl.rmwilliams.com 5. Polka-dot linen pocket square, $85,

Drake’s, drakes.com

ROME IS A CITY WHERE LOOKING GOOD IS PART OF THE CULTURE. KEEP UP WITH THE LOCALS WITH OUR PERFECT PICK OF OFF-DUTY STYLE. WHEN IN ROME…

6. Blue cotton chinos, $320,

Canali, canali.com

Your address: The St. Regis Rome

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ORLEBARBROWN.COM


Smart Packing

Shore thing

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ROUND OFF A BLISSFUL DAY’S SUNBATHING AT THE ST. REGIS BAHIA BEACH RESORT WITH A GLAMOROUS DINNER. FOR EFFORTLESS APRÈS-BEACH CHIC, LOOK NO FURTHER…

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Your address: The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort

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1. Tess small leather bag, $1,850, Chloé, chloe.com 2. Striped silk midi dress, $900, Ganni, ganni.com 3. Forget-Me-Not diamond drop earrings, POA, Harry Winston, harrywinston.com 4. Cashmere silk mandarin jacket, $1,295, Eskandar, eskandar.com 5. Deedee metallic-leather wedge mules, $525, Jimmy Choo, jimmychoo.com 6. Rose-print silk-twill scarf, $277, Dolce & Gabbana, dolcegabbana.com

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Aaron Basha Boutique • 673 Madison Avenue • New York • 212.644.1970 • www.aaronbasha.com Dubai • Hong Kong • Kiev • London • Moscow • Qatar • Tokyo


Smart Packing

Child’s play

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1. Girls’ smocked-waist dress in velvet, $98, J.Crew, jcrew.com 2. Blue Star Gardenia bag, $142, Stella McCartney Kids, stellamccartney.com 3. Tartan tulle hem dress, $85, Polo Ralph Lauren, ralphlauren.com 4. Leather flats, $450, Dior, dior.com 5. Navy jersey blazer, $195, BOSS, hugoboss.com

GETTING READY FOR SOME FUN, EXCITING OUTINGS IN SAN FRANCISCO? YOUR LITTLE ONES WILL WANT TO BE AS ST YLISHLY DRESSED AS YOU

6. Kids’ cotton chinos, $210, Emporio Armani, armani.com 7. Herringbone sweater, $196, Burberry, burberry.com

Your address: The St. Regis San Francisco

8. Junior Gommino driving shoes in leather, $225, Tod’s, tods.com

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For a retailer near you visit alor.com Advertising copyright © 2019 ALOR International LTD. All designs copyright © ALOR International LTD.


BEAUTY AND THE BEACH Photography by ROKAS DARULIS Styling by SOPHIE VAN DER WELLE Art Direction by LYNDSEY PRICE

DUSK Y COR ALS AND EMER ALD GREENS MIX W ITH BOLD STRIPES FOR AN EFFORTLESSLY CHIC TAKE ON THIS SE ASON’S BE ACHSIDE ST Y LE – SHOWCASED TO PERFECTION AMID THE NAT UR AL GLORIES OF THE ST. REGIS M AURITIUS RESORT. JUST ADD SPARKLING T URQUOISE SE AS, SOFT W HITE SANDS AND ANCIENT BAN YAN TREES FOR YOUR FULL DOSE OF PAR ADISE


Above: micro light nylon Herringham jacket, $600, Belstaff, belstaff.co.uk; cashmere roll neck, $420, & Daughter, and-daughter.com; helmet from jans.com. Opposite: patent trench coat, $3,130, Victoria Beckham, victoriabeckham.com; wool cashmere ribbed roll neck, $520, & Daughter, and-daughter.com; Stella pleated pant in white, $700, Tibi, tibi.com; Grenson boots, as above


Previous spread: The Caroline bag by Armando Takeda, $500, available at The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort or St. Regis Boutique, stregisboutique.com; navy/cream Horizon swimsuit, $375, Odyssee, odysseecollection.com; silk skirt, $1,646, Zeus and Dione, zeusndione.com. Opposite: Solitaire swimsuit, $154, Hunza G, available at selfridges.com. Above: Demeter one-piece swimsuit, $235, Zeus and Dione, zeusndione.com; ear caps earrings, $189, Misho, luisaviaroma.com


Previous pages: Camille halterneck silk-habotai maxi dress, $1,096, Kalita, matchesfashion.com; Signature medium hoop earrings, $265, Dinny Hall, dinnyhall.com. Above: Sanremo striped open-back dress, $580, Isa Arfen, matchesfashion.com. Opposite: white classic one-piece, $306, Asceno, asceno.com; cream textured pants, $1,408, Rosetta Getty, net-a-porter.com; Harmony earrings, $62, Aeyde, aeyde.com; Infernal Storm necklace, $273, Alighieri, shop.alighieri.co.uk


Opposite: Nora jumpsuit in copper silk, $879, Three Graces, threegraceslondon.com; Mini Paniers DorĂŠs 18kt gold-plated earrings, $312, Anissa Kermiche, mytheresa.com. Above: Beach Party cotton-poplin top, $311, Isa Arfen, isaarfen.com; The Rachel bikini bottoms, $79, Solid and Striped, solidandstriped.com Hair and makeup: Carolyn Gallyer; video director: Juan Leon; producer: Sarah Glyde; model: Manon Leloup


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1. The St. Regis New York * 2. The St. Regis Beijing 3. The St. Regis Rome 4. The St. Regis Houston 5. The St. Regis Washington, D.C. 6. The St. Regis Aspen Resort * 7. The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort 8. The St. Regis San Francisco * 9. The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort 10. The St. Regis Singapore * 11. The St. Regis Bali Resort * 12. The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort 13. The St. Regis Atlanta * 14. The St. Regis Mexico City * 15. The St. Regis Deer Valley * 16. The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico 17. The St. Regis Osaka 18. The St. Regis Lhasa Resort

19. The St. Regis Bangkok * 20. The St. Regis Florence 21. The St. Regis Tianjin 22. The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort 23. The St. Regis Shenzhen 24. The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi 25. The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort * 26. The St. Regis Doha 27. The St. Regis Mauritius Resort 28. The St. Regis Abu Dhabi 29. The St. Regis Chengdu 30. The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya 31. The St. Regis Istanbul 32. The St. Regis Mumbai 33. The St. Regis Macao, Cotai Central 34. The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur * 35. The St. Regis Langkawi 36. The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort

37. The St. Regis Changsha 38. The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan 39. The St. Regis Astana * 40. The St. Regis Zhuhai 41. The St. Regis Toronto * COMING SOON 42. The St. Regis Amman 2019 * 43. The St. Regis Cairo 2019 44. The St. Regis Hong Kong 2019 45. The St. Regis Venice 2019 46. The St. Regis Kanai Resort, Riviera Maya 2020 *

* This property includes St. Regis Residences


Food

NEW ROMAN Words by KATIE PARLA

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he food of Rome – called “cucina romana” by locals – is defined by its ingredients, dishes and cooking techniques, and was shaped by the city’s geography, history and assimilation of immigrants. Indeed, while the name cucina romana implies a native Roman cooking tradition, the reality is that what Romans eat today is the product of centuries of glorious contamination of people coming from beyond the city on the Tiber. Jews fleeing the Inquisition in the 15th century brought artichokes and other produce from Spain and Sicily; nobles from Piedmont brought aperitifs and decadent sweets like chocolate in the late 19th century; and peasants fleeing rural poverty in the Apennines in the early 20th century expanded the city’s menu of pork and lamb dishes. Meanwhile, New World produce like tomatoes, zucchini and peperoncini (mild chili peppers) climbed up the Italian peninsula via their ports of arrival in southern Italy. These outside influences, which mingled with indigenous ingredients such as mint, fennel and Pecorino Romano (a salty sheep’s milk cheese), have shaped the cucina romana and are prepared in homes and trattorias (the classic Roman casual restaurant) across the city. The most recognizable dishes to outsiders are pasta specialties like amatriciana (pasta tossed with a spicy tomato sauce containing cured pork jowl and Pecorino Romano) and braised meats made from poor cuts, like coda alla vaccinara (oxtails simmered with tomato and celery). For Romans, the litany of local dishes wouldn’t be complete without earthy offal recipes like trippa alla romana (strips of tripe cooked in tomato sauce and seasoned with Pecorino Romano and mint), not to mention staples like pasta all gricia (pasta dressed with cured pork jowl, Pecorino Romano and black pepper) and rigatoni alla pajata (pasta with the intestines of suckling veal braised in tomato sauce). While Romans are fond of their traditional cucina, they aren’t averse to a bit of innovation, and across town the local cuisine is being advanced by creative young chefs. Among them, 30-year-old Sarah Cicolini stands out. The brightly painted walls of Santo Palato, her neo-trattoria in the residential San Giovanni neighborhood, are as bold as the flavors she packs into her Rome-inspired dishes. Cicolini leans on hearty local ingredients, then reimagines them for a contemporary crowd. Due to her background in fine dining – she worked at one-Michelin-starred Metamorfosi in Rome before opening Santo Palato

– she’s unconstrained by the rigid conventions of the time-honored cucina romana, and she’s well-versed in modern techniques. At Santo Palato, Rome’s classic braised oxtail is pulled from the bone, formed into meatballs, then fried. A frittata con rigaglie di pollo (omelet with chicken innards) combines two things Romans traditionally eat plenty of, just never before together. When Cicolini cooks the classics, like trippa alla romana, she brings a lighter touch than other local chefs, barely cooking their tomato condiment, leaving it bright and light, a departure from the viscous heaviness that defines it elsewhere.  Another chef building on the classics is Luciano Monosilio, who opened his eponymous ristorante-pizzeria in central Rome in September. The location, near Campo de’ Fiori, a large square that hosts a daily outdoor market, is not far from Pipero, the one-Michelin-starred restaurant where Monosilio was head chef for six years. Like Cicolini, his experience in fine dining prepared him to merge modern techniques with traditional flavors to great effect. The chef’s most popular dish, which has already achieved cult status, is spaghetti alla carbonara, which he makes over a double boiler, gently cooking the egg and Pecorino mixture until silky, rather than taking the classic approach of cooking it all in a pan over direct heat. The result is an incomparably smooth sauce, which is spiked with crispy bits of cured pork jowl and its rendered fat. The pasta at Luciano is made in-house – a rarity in Rome, where dried pasta reigns – and with organic flour milled in Piedmont, a region in northern Italy. The same flour is used in Luciano’s pizzas. It’s not just the flour that hails from beyond Rome. While most of the dishes on Luciano’s menu are distinctly and uniquely Rome-inspired, there are a handful that locals would immediately recognize as imports. The vitello tonnato, for example, is a classic starter from Piedmont that features thin slices of veal spread with a tuna mayonnaise. It dwells beside a creative twist on a classic – meatballs filled with mozzarella. The melted heart of the meatball is an addition that embraces tradition while changing it with a touch of creativity. This slow and natural evolution of the local cuisine advanced by creative chefs who love the food of their city is what the cucina romana of today is all about. Your address: The St. Regis Rome

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Alberto Blasetti

FAMED FOR ITS USE OF HUMBLE , RUST IC INGREDIENTS, THE TR A DIT IONAL CUISINE OF ROME H AS REM AINED UNCH ANGED FOR CENT URIES. BUT A NEW GENER AT ION OF CHEFS IS REINTERPRET ING THE T IME-HONORED CL ASSICS IN BOLD AND INNOVAT IV E WAYS


Bold flavors At Rome’s Santo Palato, chef Sarah Cicolini uses classic ingredients to create innovative dishes, like this oxtail terrine with pickled vegetables and salsa verde

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Kitchen Confidential CHRISTOPHER MILLER, THE EXECUTIVE CHEF AT THE ST. REGIS BANGKOK, ON HIS MOTHER’S ROAST CHICKEN, THE WONDERS OF THAI CUISINE, VEGEMITE ON TOAST AND WHY HE HATES 24-COURSE MEALS

Words by ALEX MOORE

What else do you love about Bangkok? The versatility of the cuisine. You can get the best Thai food in the world for 50 cents, fish flown in from Tokyo daily, modern German, Indian molecular… any style of cuisine, any budget, any time.

Born and raised in Sydney, Australia, Christopher Miller has spent more than 20 years mastering pan-Asian cuisine at a series of critically acclaimed restaurants – having cut his teeth under world-renowned chef Neil Perry at Sydney’s Wockpool and Rockpool. Last year, he was appointed Executive Chef at The St. Regis Bangkok, where he brings with him a wealth of experience as well as a deep-rooted appreciation for all things Thai.

What’s the most memorable dish you’ve eaten while traveling? Grilled whole baby lamb in Croatia – it was the best lamb I’ve ever eaten.

What’s the best meal you’ve ever eaten? Too hard! The white truffle degustation at Alain Ducasse? Lunch at Mugaritz? Dinner at Sepia in Sydney? My mother’s roast chicken would still be my last meal if I had to pick one. But those are all purely for the food. For the experience, anything next to the water in the sunshine makes me happy.

What’s the secret to running a restaurant? Benevolent dictatorship. When you were a child, what was your favorite food and do you still eat it now? Vegemite on toast. I think most Australians would agree on this – and most of us have no idea why.

Have you been inspired by any local ingredients or traditions? Thailand has some of the best produce in the world, whether it’s the tropical fruits, herbs or seafood. I try to use as much of it as I can.

Who taught you to cook? Phillip Searle, Kylie Kwong, Neil Perry, Amanda Gale and David Thompson.

Are there any Australian influences in your cooking? I think being comfortable with Asian cuisines and ingredients is perhaps slightly more instinctive in a lot of Aussie cooks.

Can you remember the first thing your mother taught you to cook? Probably spaghetti Bolognese. It’s still the recipe I cook for myself. Everyone thinks their mom’s recipe is the best but I’m pretty sure I’m right.

What’s been your proudest/most memorable career moment? When a guest comes up to you and says, “That’s the best thing I’ve eaten in ages,” – that’s the best part of the job.

Is there a culinary trend you detest? Twenty-four-course meals. All I want these days is a great meal. A pasta, curry, steak, stir-fry… something that tastes like a meal.

Are there any ingredients you think are underrated? Vegetables. So many meals these days are just small pieces of protein on a plate. More vegetables, please.

What’s the strangest request you’ve ever had? An out-of-the-blue request for frogs’ legs Provençale. I believe the kitchen rose to the challenge.

Are there any foods you think are overrated? Wagyu beef in everything.

What’s your guilty pleasure food? Life is far too short to let food make you feel guilty.

What’s the best thing to eat in Bangkok? Isaan food at 3am on the footpath with a beer.

Your address: The St. Regis Bangkok

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The Back Story

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Peggy Guggenheim

QUEEN OF VENICE Words by SARAH CROMPTON

PEGGY GUGGENHEIM WAS ONE OF 20TH CENTURY ART’S MOST INFLUENTIAL FIGURES. A FRIEND, PATRON AND AT TIMES SAVIOR TO THE LIKES OF PICASSO AND POLLOCK, HER OWN UNCONVENTIONAL LIFE WAS MARRED BY TRAGEDY. BUT IN HER ADOPTED HOME OF VENICE, GUGGENHEIM’S LEGACY REMAINS IN THE FORM OF HER MUCH-LOVED GALLERY ON THE GRAND CANAL

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The Back Story

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The artist Daphne Astor also visited Guggenheim as a child, and remembers yapping dogs, lots of drinking and cigarettes, as well as the astonishing art on the walls. “I wandered around alone a lot and looked at things and was very polite as Peggy didn’t seem to be interested in kids at all. She was not polished glam, but sad glam. I remember noticing that her feet looked odd, that her makeup was not beautifying to her face. She seemed to have courage, though her eyes were sad.” Both Vail and Astor were meeting Guggenheim towards the end of a long life, full of incident, and scarred by tragedy. She was born into a rich, New York Jewish family. Her father Benjamin was one of seven brothers who, with their father Meyer, made a fortune from mining and smelting. Her mother, Florette Seligman, was the scion of a banking family. Yet Peggy claimed later that her early life left her “with no pleasant memories of any kind”. Her mother was neurotic and eccentric and her father both squandered his capital and was an inveterate philanderer. Peggy’s father went down with the Titanic – like St. Regis founder John Jacob Astor IV – heroically giving up his place in a lifeboat. On hearing the news, his grieving widow moved with her children, including young Peggy, into The St. Regis hotel, where Benjamin’s brother had for some time kept a permanent suite. Judith Mackrell, author of The Unfinished Palazzo, a book about three dynamic women who lived in the Palazzo Venier, says of Benjamin’s untimely death: “From that point onwards he became a romantic ideal for Peggy – the template of the perfect man – and she would seek to replicate him over and over again in her choice of lovers and husbands.” At the time, however, his death reinforced her sense that she simply did not fit into the privileged, sheltered life into which she had been born. She sought excitement and intellectual liberation, working for a small, radical bookstore, and mixing with New York’s literary rebels. In 1921, with her first husband, the writer Laurence Vail, father to her two children Sindbad (father of Karole) and Pegeen, she traveled to Paris and flung herself into

t is one of the most familiar silhouettes on the Grand Canal: the low outline of Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, “il palazzo non finito”, once unloved and abandoned, now home to the second-most-visited museum in Venice, and Italy’s most popular contemporary art museum. In 1949 Peggy Guggenheim bought this flat-roofed unfinished palace and made it her home for the rest of her life. In 1951 she made it something else, opening its doors to the public and displaying her unrivaled collection of modern art, built up over a lifetime of discriminating purchase, full of Picassos, Pollocks and Picabias, paintings of such quality and distinction that they attracted visitors from all over the world. After her death in 1979, at the age of 81, the collection was taken over by the foundation set up by her uncle, Solomon R Guggenheim, and turned into a museum. Last year, a record 427,000 visitors came to marvel. But not all know the remarkable story of the woman who amassed those paintings, someone whose courage in setting herself at the forefront of promoting and collecting modern art has been occluded by the misogyny of the art world and her colorful, unconventional life. Only recently has her contribution become fully appreciated. Her granddaughter Karole Vail, now director of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, says: “Peggy has become a uniquely extraordinary icon on so many levels, as a woman who dared to do what she wanted, and as an unparalleled collector of modern art.” Vail first visited the collection as a child, when some of the paintings – particularly those by the Surrealists such as Max Ernst (Guggenheim’s second husband) used to scare her, although she always loved the early Cubist paintings by Picasso and Braque and felt inspired by the energy of the American Abstract Expressionists. “I used to use a toothbrush to flick paint onto paper in a poor attempt to imitate artists such as Jackson Pollock and Sam Francis,” she remembers. Her memories of her grandmother are of a “formidable woman who was really quite modest about her accomplishments as a collector and patron of the arts”.

Art addict Opening pages: Peggy Guggenheim with Calder’s “Arc of Petals” at the 1948 Venice Biennale; leaving her palazzo in 1968. Above: at home with Picasso’s “On the beach”. Opposite, clockwise from right: Guggenheim with art critic Alfred Frankfurter; at her New York residence with Jackson Pollock, in front of Pollock’s Mural (1943); and with the Surrealists, including Max Ernst (far left)

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Opening page: Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche, Cassa di Risparmio di Venezia, 2005 Š Solomon R Guggenheim Foundation, New York. Previous page/left: Getty Images

Peggy Guggenheim

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The Back Story

Top of the world

to whom she turned for expert help.” In 1938, then, when she opened an art gallery called Guggenheim Jeune in London, it was Duchamp who acted as her guide. “He taught me everything about the art I had to buy,” she said later. “He was a great, great, teacher.” Jean Cocteau was the subject of the gallery’s inaugural show; the second was the first one-man exhibition of works by Wassily Kandinsky in the UK. By 1939, Guggenheim was actively scouting for premises to open a museum of modern art in London with Herbert Read as director. He made her a famous list of artists to collect that reads like a roll call of fame for the early 20th century. While the onset of war disrupted their plans, it also provided Guggenheim with an opportunity. Many of her friends fled to America – in some cases she paid for their tickets – but she went instead to France, determined to buy “one picture a day”, saving art from the encroaching invasion at bargain basement prices. In this period, she accumulated around 150 works, including paintings by Dalí, Klee, Braque and Mondrian, and sculptures by Giacometti and Brâncuși. In 1940, she realized she had to leave and asked the Louvre to take care of her collection. When they turned her down, she found a way to ship the works out of Marseille and to fly to America with her family, via Lisbon. During this dangerous and difficult time, she helped many refugee artists escape to safety, contributing financially and putting herself in some danger as she completed paperwork on their behalf. Ernst, with whom she was passionately in love, flew with her to the US, leaving his estranged lover Leonora Carrington – with whom he was still in love – to follow by boat. Her return to New York marked another high point; the founding of an art center that would allow her to present her collection but also to organize exhibitions of new work. She wanted to create something playful and exciting and in Art of This Century, her gallery on West 57th Street, which

the heart of bohemian society, making lifelong friends of artists such as Constantin Brâncuși, Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp. But while her outlook expanded, laying the foundations for the “art addiction” that became her life, her relationship with Vail floundered. “Perhaps because I was awful with him about money, he always tried to make me feel inferior about my brains,” she said later. When they divorced, the children were divided: Sindbad went to his father while Pegeen stayed with Peggy, a decision that laid the foundations for her troubled relationships with both. In 1967, Pegeen, an artist, committed suicide; a room at the museum is still dedicated to her work. Terrible unexpected deaths stalked Peggy Guggenheim’s life. One sister died in childbirth; the children of the surviving sister fell to their deaths from a roof. One lover, the writer John Ferrar Holms, died during a routine operation, upstairs at their home. Unsuitable lovers also filled the picture. In Art Addict, Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s documentary about Peggy Guggenheim’s life, you hear her talk in interviews recorded over the last two summers of her life. “I was a nymphomaniac, probably,” she confesses, in her strange, rasping drawl. Her lovers included Samuel Beckett and Ernst, who never seemed to care for her much but whom she married to give him the protection of American citizenship. Although she was notoriously open about her sexual appetite – her brutal honesty about such matters was one of the factors that obscured her significance as a patron of art – her affairs were fueled and complicated by a lack of self-confidence. She didn’t like her appearance after plastic surgery on her nose went wrong; she was surprisingly timid and lacking in social poise. In any case, art quickly seems to have become her way of finding herself emotionally. As Mackrell points out, while “Peggy’s choice of husbands and lovers might have turned out poorly, she showed good instincts in the men

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Previous page: Photo Scala; Frank Scherschel; George Kargar, courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Archives, New York. Above: Alamy. Right: Matteo de Fina/Peggy Guggenheim Collection

Above: a still from Art Addict, Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s documentary about Peggy Guggenheim’s life, shows her sunbathing in a deckchair on the roof of her home, the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, with Venice’s Grand Canal in the background


Peggy Guggenheim was immediate. “Everyone’s eyes were opened and it was very influential,” says Vreeland. “Venice at that time was not considered important in the art world. She opened the doors to modern art.” Over the years, the Guggenheim Collection became a focus for art in Venice, a contrast to the historic art of the palaces, a window onto a wider world. Behind the scenes, it was the focus for an interesting crowd: Igor Stravinsky, Tennessee Williams, Truman Capote and a young Paul Newman all signed their names in the guest book. Guggenheim’s parties were famous for providing the worst food and the best art and conversation in Venice. Nevertheless, her later years were once again pitted with sadness – the death in a car accident of a young lover, the suicide of Pegeen – and she became a more isolated figure, traveling the city in her gondola, calling the paintings her “children”. She ensured their future by donating both her home and the collection to the foundation set up by her uncle Solomon. In 2019, to mark the 40th anniversary of her death, the museum is organizing a show called “Peggy Guggenheim: The Last Dogaressa”, which will focus on her collecting after she moved to Venice, including the Italian artists she supported enthusiastically and her little-known African art. “I want to go on ensuring that the collection is appreciated for its superlative quality,” says Vail. “And I am interested in finding new and fresh relationships between the works.” So it is that this unfinished palace and this magnificent collection continue to remind people of Peggy Guggenheim and her place in the history of art. “You can’t just think of her as a collector,” says Vreeland. “You have to think of her as an impresario of art, who was pivotal in all these countries at all those moments when modern art was just developing.”

opened in 1942, she did precisely that. Designed by Frederick Kiesler, it was radical in both appearance – one of its four galleries had a black ceiling and curving walls – and intent. It became the spark that lit the burgeoning American art movement, a place where ideas could be pollinated. Lisa Immordino Vreeland remarks: “Art of This Century was pivotal and lifechanging for many artists in the US. Not only was it a meeting place for exiled artists from Europe but all of a sudden it gave American artists a meeting place aesthetically, where they started to think about themselves in a collective way. This is the beginning of Abstract Expressionism.” By 1943, Guggenheim had begun to support Jackson Pollock, giving him an allowance that enabled him to give up work and concentrate on art full-time, while actively promoting his paintings. She also mounted the first exhibitions by Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko and Clyfford Still. Her exhibition “31 Women” was the first devoted solely to female artists; it was also, sadly for her, the exhibition that sealed the fate of her unhappy marriage to Ernst, since it was there that he met his new lover, Dorothea Tanner. “I should only have had 30 women,” Guggenheim later remarked. With similar wit, Guggenheim later referred to herself as the “midwife” of Abstract Expressionism. Yet by 1947 she had decided to escape from Manhattan and set about enacting her long-held fantasy of living in Venice, thus embarking on the latter stage of her career. Her decision was motivated partly by her love of the city, but as her friend, the artist Jean Hélion, remarked: “Peggy could be a queen in Venice. It suited her and her pictures very well… she could be the first person there to show modern art.” One of her most astute decisions – apart from the purchase of the palazzo – was to take a pavilion at the relaunched Venice Biennale, in the summer of 1948. “I felt as though I were a new European country,” she said, as she proudly put her collection on show in the Greek pavilion. Its impact

Your address: The St. Regis Venice

Unfinished symphony Above: Guggenheim purchased this flat-roofed unfinished palace in 1949 and two years later opened its doors to the public to display her unrivaled collection of modern art. Today, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection is Italy’s most popular contemporary art museum

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The Connoisseur: Valeria Napoleone

A BOLD APPROACH Words by JAMES COLLARD Photography by MATHILDE AGIUS

“A personal collection is interesting because it’s a personal journey,” says collector Valeria Napoleone. “I’m not a museum or institution; I don’t need to tick boxes. Life’s too short; you have to buy what you love and want to be surrounded by.” For Napoleone, this means contemporary art by women artists. “I’m a feminist,” she says, but this specialty began organically when she started collecting in the 1990s, “because I’m interested in artists that other people aren’t looking at, and back then women artists were overlooked.” At her home in London, the Milanese-born Napoleone is indeed surrounded by art. She talks me through some of it: a painting by Elaine Lustig Cohen, “known mostly for her graphic design, but a wonderful painter”; a cabinet by Nathalie du Pasquier, “an artist-designer who was one of the founders of the Memphis Group”; the Telephone Dress worn by Frances Stark. But elegant though this space is, it’s a staging point. For Napoleone and her husband Gregorio are building a new home nearby that will showcase her ever-expanding collection. The intention, she explains, is to “elevate a domestic space into an exhibition space for a private collection”. And although she has earmarked certain pieces for particular spaces, “We always re-hang two or three times and play with the spaces.” “I’m a patron,” she says, “and patronage isn’t just about signing checks, it’s about supporting artists.” It’s about buying art and putting it on her walls – and she recognizes that as her influence as a collector grows, what’s on her walls really counts. But it’s also about supporting artists with exhibitions, books and her “Valeria Napoleone XX” program, which sponsors shows in London and New York by women artists “in the middle of their careers”. That’s a moment, she says, that can be “problematic” even for artists who have proven themselves to be dedicated and talented: “They’re not the hot new thing that’s just been discovered, and they’re not old enough to be rediscovered.” Napoleone, then, clearly has a very particular approach to collecting. She has an art “wish-list” and, like all major collectors, the personal wealth to fund her art habit. But she sticks to a budget, tending not to spend more than “about $40,000” on any single piece, and she buys from artists and galleries, rather than auctions (“just one piece in 20 years of collecting”). She often finds the major art fairs “overwhelming”, likening them to shopping in a supermarket rather than “buying from growers”. She wants to know the artists whose work she buys – to respect the way they work “and the way their work is handled” – and to cultivate them. Du Pasquier, for example, is one of the artists with whom she has chosen to collaborate in her new London home – making what she describes as “permanent installations for functional spaces”. This approach was born out of Napoleone’s formative experience studying arts administration at New York’s FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology), before she embarked on her journey as a collector. “Those kind of courses have mushroomed,” she explains, “but back then it was more or less unique.” She learned a lot from leading curator and art advisor Josh Baer, who headed up the course – and also from meeting passionate collectors. “I remember this couple coming to talk to us and saying, ‘For us it means deciding between buying a dishwasher or buying an artwork. I can wait for a dishwasher, but I can’t wait to get this art on my walls.’ That really inspired me.”

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The Trend

MAID TO MEASURE Words by JADE BEER

FROM THE RISE OF THE PRO BRIDESMAID TO THE CURRENT ROYAL WEDDING-INSPIRED FASHION FOR CUTE “MINI-MAIDS”, MODERN BRIDES HAVE NEVER TAKEN THEIR NUPTIAL SQUAD MORE SERIOUSLY

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can’t help thinking that historically, being a bridesmaid was a much easier gig than it is today – if perhaps a little more dangerous. Skip back to Roman times when it was ten friends of the bride who acted as witnesses to the wedding. They all dressed alike, apparently to confuse any meddling evil spirits or real-life challengers to her hand in marriage. Then it was business as we might expect: an exchange of rings, a wedding reception, a kiss and a contract that would seal the legalities. In later years a matron of honor – a woman chosen for her fine moral backbone – was in charge of holding the dowry to give to the groom. Most of the bridesmaid duties were focused around styling the bride, but the job came with some unpleasant superstitions. In the 16th century, if you served as a bridesmaid three times without yourself getting married, it was said you were cursed. In order to reverse that misfortune, you needed to serve as a bridesmaid four more times, bringing your total to a lucky number seven. In more recent history, bridesmaids as we think of them today became more common, and the number attending a bride was a solid indication of the family’s social status and wealth. By Victorian times is was more likely that

maids would be small flower-girls and, as a nod to Queen Victoria’s color-free wedding gown, would typically all be dressed in white too, with a to-do list that amounted to little more than looking cute and scattering rose petals. Compare that to the dizzying array of tasks that can be thrown at a bridesmaid facing down wedding season in 2019. The perceived wisdom is that, beyond the wedding day itself, a bride today can reasonably ask for one Saturday night, one Sunday afternoon, one bachelorette party and six more hours of her bridesmaid’s time. But there’s a lot to cram into those hours, and prior to them, any bridesmaid is likely to have completed a staggering list of jobs with an extremely varied skill set. Before the wedding, for example, she might be found honing some previously non-existent crafting skills. She might sign up to a calligraphy course – because those 200 invitations aren’t going to write themselves. She could be responsible for designing and updating the wedding website, a key piece of modern-day kit to keep the guests fully up to speed with the detailed wedding itinerary and logistics. She will certainly have played a part in organizing a bachelorette party and – in the US – possibly a bridal shower, a rehearsal dinner and a wedding brunch the following day, too.

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Left: Mary Evans Picture Library. Right: Getty Images

Bridesmaids “For my wedding in April I had six mini-maids aged between two and seven,” says digital consultant Rosanna Falconer. “They were the daughters of cousins and friends, and they brought complete joy to the day, from the moment they pulled my train too hard up the aisle and nearly tripped me over. It was havoc, in the most adorable way, but that made it all the more memorable. It also meant I didn’t have to single out women from my friendship group as bridesmaids – that would have been impossible!” It may also explain why we’re starting to see the emergence of the professional bridesmaid, a trend I explore in my new novel What I Didn’t Say. My fictional pro maid finds herself negotiating discounts for the bride and calling guests who have failed to contribute to the wedding gift list fund to remind them of the bride’s account details. This is really happening; if you don’t believe me, Google Jen Glantz’s account of life on the professional bridesmaid circuit in the US. What started out with simply being a popular choice among engaged friends became an intense new career that she documents in her book, Always a Bridesmaid (for Hire). It’s not for everyone, obviously. But I can see the appeal. A secret pro bridesmaid can slip between family politics more easily than a planner, who everyone in the wedding party feels they have access to. Some women hire a professional for altruistic reasons: they want their friends to enjoy the wedding day without being tied to a long list of duties. For others it’s a chance to really dictate what they want, knowing they’re paying for the service. Perhaps the brides themselves don’t want to be responsible for managing a group of maids who don’t necessarily know each other and who may have strong views on how the wedding celebrations should pan out. As international wedding planner Bruce Russell concludes, “Some bridesmaids can actually be more high maintenance than the bride.”

On the day of the wedding, the bride may ask her to take control of her social media accounts (obviously they will have brainstormed a wedding hashtag in advance) and to update them at regular intervals with all the backstage glamour. Then she’ll be giving a speech. She will also be the bride’s timeline tracker (hair and makeup need to be kept in step with the photographer’s shot list); her gatekeeper (ensuring all unwanted faces are far from the bridal suite). She will feed her and dress her. I have just interviewed a bride who had nine outfit changes over her four-day wedding, so stamina and a cool head are key. The good news for bridesmaids is that their outfit choices are infinitely better these days. For more confident, style-savvy brides, there’s a move away from overly coordinated maids, who are now more usually given a color tone to stick to and allowed to choose their own dress – no horrible one-stylemust-suit-all trauma. And they may have been on the receiving end of their own lovely proposal from the bride. Brides are thinking of ever more creative ways to ask their maids to join them on this wedding planning ride. There could be a bespoke piece of jewelry, a personalized pack of beauty goodies or a commissioned illustration in the mail before the to-do list even gets written. And a bridesmaid’s work may not be done even once the big day is over. With the rise in weddings abroad, more and more couples are now opting for a buddymoon (a new style of honeymoon that extends to the immediate wedding party as well as a dozen or so of the bride and groom’s best friends), which means bridesmaids are packing their bags and joining the couple too, culminating in what is being termed “bridesmaid bankruptcy”. There is good reason to be grateful that right now just having mini-maids and pageboys is so on-trend, following the weddings of Meghan Markle and Princess Eugenie (royal weddings having long influenced our nuptial fashions). Meghan, now the Duchess of Sussex, chose six mini-maids and two page boys; Eugenie went for six mini-maids and two page boys, with Princess Charlotte and Prince George of Cambridge following both royal brides up the aisle.

Jade Beer is the editor-in-chief of Condé Nast Brides and author of two novels, The Almost Wife and What I Didn’t Say

Flower power Some are following the lead of royal brides Meghan Markle and Princess Eugenie and opting for “mini-maids” and page boys instead of older bridesmaids. Prince William’s children, Prince George (fourth from left) and Princess Charlotte (far left) performed these roles at both weddings

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Art

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL Words by SOPHIE HASTINGS

MEXIC AN-BORN A RT IST ALIZ A NISENBAUM’S PORTR AITS A RE PROFOUNDLY INT IM ATE Y ET STR ANGELY ENIGM AT IC , LE AV ING V IEW ERS WANT ING TO KNOW MORE

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liza Nisenbaum believes that “paying attention can be a political act”, and she’s certainly an artist who knows how to make you concentrate. The subjects of her portraits are so richly contextualized by textiles, plants, flowers, newsprint and photographs that the viewer’s gaze is drawn deep inside the painting, searching for clues. Who are these people, so intensely present yet distant too; absorbed, self-contained, with such palpable interior lives? What is their relationship to one another, to the artist, to us? Born in Mexico City, Nisenbaum is known for her portraits of migrants and people living in marginalized communities. She studied psychology and worked at schools and women’s welfare institutions before moving to the US to enroll at SAIC (the School of the Art Institute of Chicago). “I was very interested in social justice but I had always wanted to make art,” she says, citing Mexico’s radical art tradition as an early influence. She worked in abstraction for 10 years before turning to figurative painting, inspired by the work of Alice Neel and the philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, “who said that all ethics come from face-to-face encounters: we have a responsibility towards the person we are looking at.” Like Neel, she moved to

Harlem, New York, and began volunteering at Tania Bruguera’s community art project in Queens, teaching English to female migrants who became her friends and subjects. “I didn’t intend that to happen,” she says, “but I was so moved by their immigration stories that I had to paint them.” She created a studio in the corner of the classroom, “because I wanted to paint from life. I started to get very involved in their lives. Whole families would sit for me and then we’d all go out to lunch.” Most recently, Nisenbaum has been making portraits of workers on the London subway, commissioned by Art on the Underground, for a residency at London’s Brixton Station until 16 September 2019. Some of the work from this project will be shown at the Anton Kern Gallery in New York City, which will also exhibit a series of portraits of dancers that the artist discovered on the New York salsa scene. “I’ve loved salsa since I was a kid in Mexico, and they all wear such fantastic, exuberant costumes.” Her inspiration, she says, was Alice Walker’s poem, Hard Times Require Furious Dancing. Amen to that. Aliza Nisenbaum, Anton Kern Gallery, NY, from 12 September 2019, for two months. Your address: The St. Regis New York

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Aliza Nisenbaum

K AYHAN READING THE NEW YORK TIMES (RESISTANCE BEGINS AT HOME) 2017, oil on linen Kayhan was one of the first women Nisenbaum painted during her artist’s residency at the New York City Mayor’s Office. “Her family were Iranians who first went to India, then she came to New York to work for Obama.” Kayhan’s relaxed position on the rug and her physical grace create a sense of ease and calm; a happy vulnerability. But the diagonal streak of acid yellow that runs across the canvas, through her pants and into the leaves of the plant, is full of dynamism and, possibly, danger.

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Art

2 YEARS OF CORRESPONDENCE FROM INMATE 39807 2016, oil on linen “The snakes and ladders refers to the way our luck goes up and down at random,” Nisenbaum says of this painting depicting the letters and artworks sent by a friend who had been wrongly incarcerated. Pale papers filled with words and flowers, layered on top of sturdy brown envelopes painted in skin-like tones with jagged, torn edges evoke mind and body, while the tilted head at the center expresses a profound grief that belongs to the subject, the artist – and ultimately the viewer.

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Aliza Nisenbaum

 

NIMO, SUMIYA AND BISHARO HARVESTING FLOWERS AND VEGETABLES AT HOPE COMMUNITY GARDEN 2017, oil on linen “Of all mediums, portraiture is the one that really consolidates power. I am lucky to be able to put different kinds of people in collections so that they are suddenly seen in the public realm.” These Somali women were painted during Nisenbaum’s 2017 residency at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA), where they spent time gardening at the nearby Hope Center, “an incredible place that helps people become leaders.” This work clearly references both French Intimist artists such as Édouard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard and the vibrancy of her own Mexican childhood.

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Art

MORNING SECURITY BRIEFING AT THE MINNEAPOLIS INSTITUTE OF ART, BASEMENT DOOR OPEN ONTO GUARD LOUNGE PET WALL 2017, oil on linen The jaunty title is an indication of how much Nisenbaum enjoyed spending time with the guards at MIA, who had a wall in their lounge covered in photographs of them with their pets, including a cow. “I was asked to paint communities near the museum and I said, ‘We’ll start here with your own workers.’” The painting’s resemblance to a documentary photograph is no mistake: “Photography is seen as the medium of truth,” she explains, “but there’s a real truth in sitting with subjects for so long.”

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Aliza Nisenbaum

VERONICA READING THE NEW YORK TIMES 2018, oil on linen “Skin tone is so nuanced… you even become aware of the change in temperature of someone’s skin as you paint them.” Nisenbaum’s relationship to the individuality of the sitter is crucial to her practice. “I feel like there’s no cheating in painting. You can’t phone it in, people can tell. You want it to be an authentic response to that person.” Nisenbaum has been painting Veronica for six years, and here the artist – who often uses textiles to signal her subject’s origins – has painted her with cushions made by Veronica’s sister.

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A Life In Seven Journeys

SEBASTIAN FAULKS

THE AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR OF BIRDSONG AND CHARLOTTE GRAY REFLECTS ON THE SEVEN JOURNEYS THAT HAVE SHAPED HIS LIFE AND WORK

2 New York City, 1980

My best friend David had got us a flat on Park Avenue, for free, lent by a generous couple called Stark who had befriended his parents on holiday. My brother Edward came with us and we covered every inch of the city on foot from the Battery to the Bronx, pausing only for two-martini lunches and the odd gallery. New York under Mayor Koch in 1980 was desperate to shake off its reputation as dangerous, dirty and drug-filled. Three six-foot guys were OK, though. The problem was the other way around: people ran away if we asked directions.

3 Colombo, 1981

I went to Sri Lanka with the Guardian cricket team and we stayed in a cheap but charming hotel on the Galle Road, with rooms set around a swimming pool and

infested by bandicoots. There was no bottled water and you couldn’t drink the tap water, so it was problematic playing cricket in 38-degree heat [100°F]. The Sri Lankans were curious to meet us and endlessly hospitable. You could quench your thirst on beer or whiskey. There were matches up-country, too, among the hill stations where the tea planters lived. I’m not sure I’ve ever laughed more.

4 Cork, Ireland, 1990

I could take only one week for a honeymoon because I was helping launch a new newspaper, the Independent on Sunday. We took a chance on Ireland in December because my wife, Veronica, had been as a child to Ballymaloe House near Cork and loved it. We arrived late for lunch from London, but they had kept some mussel soup, the best thing I had ever tasted, and gave us some champagne to celebrate. Despite the season, the sun shone and I played golf (every day, it is claimed). Our first child, William, was born nine months after we got back.

5 Agen, France, 1996

We moved to the southwest of France and a beautiful white farm house for a year with our two children, aged five and three, who went to the village school. William learned to speak French without an accent and Holly, who spent the afternoons with an old melon farmer, spoke with the powerful twang of the southwest. Many people came to visit us and I wrote a novel

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called Charlotte Gray, set in rural France. My wife became pregnant with our third child, Arthur, while we were there and it looked as though he would be born in Agen, though in the event he didn’t arrive until we were back in London. A shame, I now sometimes think, as he might have had dual nationality.

6 Moscow, 2016

I went as part of a group of British writers invited by the British Council. It was –10ºC [14°F], or worse. We did talks, interviews and presentations, had vodka and caviar in the Pushkin restaurant and went to the Bolshoi. Then my son William joined me and we took the train to St Petersburg to meet the rest of the family. In the Hermitage we saw Rembrandt’s The Prodigal Son, perhaps the greatest painting I have ever seen. There seemed to be no one else in the room.

7 The Lake District, England, 2017

I went with Arthur, who was taking a year out from college. We stayed in a gastropub, miles from anywhere, and walked all day. In the evenings we had rhubarb-flavored gin and American zinfandel to go with the local food. We visited Wordsworth’s cottage and compared notes after an eight-mile walk. Arthur was developing a stitch; I had a pain in the glute. But we soldiered on. Paris Echo by Sebastian Faulks is out now, published by Hutchinson

Illustration by Tina Berning

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Paris, 1971 I went when I was 17, after leaving school. I lived in a small room in a building off L’avenue de la Grande-Armée, with an old Parisienne and a Japanese student. I walked around the city all day and went to art galleries and cinemas for almost nothing on my student card and to the American Library in the rue du Général Camou. I wanted to meet beautiful Swedish girls and speak English, but I returned three months later having read most of the books on the Cambridge syllabus and tragically fluent in French.


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1. The St. Regis New York * 2. The St. Regis Beijing 3. The St. Regis Rome 4. The St. Regis Houston 5. The St. Regis Washington, D.C. 6. The St. Regis Aspen Resort * 7. The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort 8. The St. Regis San Francisco * 9. The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort 10. The St. Regis Singapore * 11. The St. Regis Bali Resort * 12. The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort 13. The St. Regis Atlanta * 14. The St. Regis Mexico City * 15. The St. Regis Deer Valley * 16. The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico 17. The St. Regis Osaka 18. The St. Regis Lhasa Resort

19. The St. Regis Bangkok * 20. The St. Regis Florence 21. The St. Regis Tianjin 22. The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort 23. The St. Regis Shenzhen 24. The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi 25. The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort * 26. The St. Regis Doha 27. The St. Regis Mauritius Resort 28. The St. Regis Abu Dhabi 29. The St. Regis Chengdu 30. The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya 31. The St. Regis Istanbul 32. The St. Regis Mumbai 33. The St. Regis Macao, Cotai Central 34. The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur * 35. The St. Regis Langkawi 36. The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort

37. The St. Regis Changsha 38. The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan 39. The St. Regis Astana * 40. The St. Regis Zhuhai 41. The St. Regis Toronto * COMING SOON 42. The St. Regis Amman 2019 * 43. The St. Regis Cairo 2019 44. The St. Regis Hong Kong 2019 45. The St. Regis Venice 2019 46. The St. Regis Kanai Resort, Riviera Maya 2020 *

* This property includes St. Regis Residences


ST. REGIS WEDDINGS

The Ultimate Memory, Designed Just for You THE ART OF CELEBRATION #stregiswedding

For further information, visit st-regis.marriott.com/gatherings/weddings-celebrations 2


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ST. R E GI S HON E Y MO ONS

Paradise Found Seductive Sanctuaries, Pinnacle Paradises

Located in the world’s most coveted regions, these idyllic beach destinations are perfectly suited to honeymooners seeking a romantic interlude wrapped in pure paradise. Indoor-outdoor spaces blend seamlessly with elements of the natural environment, setting a truly intimate backdrop for a resort escape for two. For further information, visit us at st-regis.marriott.com/gatherings/weddings-celebrations

A Selection of Paradise Found Hotels and Resorts THE ST. REGIS BAHIA BEACH RESORT, PUERTO RICO THE ST. REGIS LANGKAWI THE ST. REGIS MAURITIUS RESORT THE ST. REGIS SANYA YALONG BAY RESORT

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ST. R E GI S HON E Y MO ONS

Journey’s End Rustic Elegance for the Adventurous Spirit

Nestled in some of the world’s most dramatic landscapes, these rustic yet refined addresses appeal to couples with a shared passion for adventure. From summer pursuits along glittering exotic beaches to thrilling winter sports capped by fireside après-ski, active honeymooners begin their life’s journey with an unforgettable experience. For further information, visit us at st-regis.marriott.com/gatherings/weddings-celebrations

A Selection of Journey’s End Hotels and Resorts THE ST. REGIS ASPEN RESORT THE ST. REGIS DEER VALLEY THE ST. REGIS MARDAVALL MALLORCA RESORT THE ST. REGIS SAADIYAT ISLAND RESORT, ABU DHABI THE ST. REGIS LHASA RESORT

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ST. R E GI S HON E Y MO ONS

Glass House Transcend the Traditional

Outfitted for modern romance, these edited yet stylized addresses appeal to couples who seek an escape from the confines of formality and prefer clean lines and bright, geometric spaces instead. These metropolitan addresses offer guests a series of moments that unfold with warm and ease amidst unpretentious, elegant settings. For further information, visit us at st-regis.marriott.com/gatherings/weddings-celebrations

A Selection of Paradise Found Hotels and Resorts THE ST. REGIS SHENZHEN THE ST. REGIS KUALA LUMPUR THE ST. REGIS TIANJIN THE ST. REGIS BAL HARBOUR RESORT

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ST. R E GI S HON E Y MO ONS

Metropolitan Manor Timeless, Modern Retreats

Steal away for a honeymoon experience that appeals to the discerning. These exquisite cosmopolitan addresses harken to a time of timeless grace and elegance, where each moment is tailored, and where the most refined social and cultural pursuits are at your fingertips. For further information, visit us at st-regis.marriott.com/gatherings/weddings-celebrations

A Selection of Journey's End Hotels and Resorts THE ST. REGIS ATLANTA THE ST. REGIS ROME THE ST. REGIS MACAO THE ST. REGIS SINGAPORE

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ST. R E GI S R E SI DE NC E S

The Privilege of Ownership Live exquisite at St. Regis Residences

St. Regis Residences offer a unique opportunity to expand your incomparable lifestyle. Located in the most idyllic havens, cosmopolitan cities and along golden shores, the impeccable service and unmatched style of St. Regis welcomes you home... to homes that define new standards of extraordinary living. Many of the breathtaking St. Regis Residences located around the globe combine the benefits of ownership with access to adjacent hotel facilities and amenities as well as 24-hour world-class service, delivered with the signature warmth and charm St. Regis is famed for.

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ST. R E GI S R E SI DE NC E S

Enjoy the freedom that comes with your own private residence in the heart of some of the world’s most exciting cities and in the world’s most desirable beachfront locations. With personal butlers, in-residence dining, housekeeping and other personalized services, these breathtaking residences represent a stunning convergence of world-class design and impeccable hospitality. Discover the pleasures of a privileged lifestyle and see for yourself why St. Regis Residences are the world’s preeminent address for luxury living. To find out more, visit st-regis.marriott.com/hotel-directory/luxury-residences

St. Regis Residences in Africa, Middle East & Asia Pacific open

- ASTANA

upcoming

BALI

- AMMAN

BANGKOK

KUALA LUMPUR

DOHA, THE PEARL – QATAR

SINGAPORE

JAKARTA

LIJIANG

St. Regis Residences in The Americas & Europe open

- ASPEN

ATLANTA

upcoming

BAL HARBOUR

- BELGRADE

BERMUDA

DEER VALLEY (UTAH) BOSTON

MEXICO CITY

KANAI (MEXICO)

NEW YORK CITY

LOS CABOS (MEXICO)

SAN FRANCISCO

RYE, NY

TORONTO

TURKS & CAICOS

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The St. Regis Atlas An introduction to St. Regis hotels and resorts around the world, in alphabetical order by region

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AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Abu Dhabi

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The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi

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The St. Regis Cairo

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The St. Regis Doha

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The St. Regis Mauritius Resort

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The St. Regis Aspen Resort

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The St. Regis Atlanta

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The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico

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The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort

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The St. Regis Deer Valley

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The St. Regis Houston

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The St. Regis Mexico City

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The St. Regis New York

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The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort

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The St. Regis San Francisco

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The St. Regis Toronto

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The St. Regis Washington, D.C.

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THE AMERICAS

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ASIA PACIFIC The St. Regis Bali Resort

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The St. Regis Bangkok

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The St. Regis Beijing

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The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort

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The St. Regis Changsha

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The St. Regis Chengdu

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The St. Regis Hong Kong

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The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur

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The St. Regis Langkawi

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The St. Regis Lhasa Resort

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The St. Regis Macao

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The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort

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The St. Regis Mumbai

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The St. Regis Osaka

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The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort

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The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan

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The St. Regis Shenzhen

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The St. Regis Singapore

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The St. Regis Tianjin

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The St. Regis Zhuhai

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The St. Regis Astana

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The St. Regis Florence

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The St. Regis Istanbul

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The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort

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The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya

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The St. Regis Rome

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EUROPE

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Discover the upcoming St. Regis Hotels & Resorts on page 58


THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Abu Dhabi

It’s easy to understand the appeal of The St. Regis Abu Dhabi. The capital of the United Arab Emirates is fast developing a major arts and cultural scene, turning the city into an ever more sophisticated metropolis blessed with cutting-edge architecture and world-class sports. Part of the prestigious Nation Towers complex on the Corniche, a five-mile stretch adjacent to the Arabian Gulf where you’ll find walking and cycling paths and children’s play areas, The St. Regis Abu Dhabi is the ideal home-away-from-home. Don’t miss the Luxury Nation Galleria Vox Cinemas directly connected to The St. Regis Abu Dhabi, with 11 cinemas including four Gold Class. Relax and soak up the sun with a refreshing cocktail on the private beachfront at the exclusive Nation Riviera Beach Club, home to Catch Restaurant and Lounge Abu Dhabi, where an open kitchen allows guests to interact with the chefs and watch as ingredients are transformed into delectable dishes.

AMENITIES 283 Guest Rooms and Suites 7 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Gym Private Beach; Children’s Club

LOCATION Nation Towers Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates T (971) (2) 694 4444 info.abudhabi@stregis.com stregis.com/abudhabi

The lobby of The St. Regis Abu Dhabi; the Nation Riviera Beach Club; Al Hosen Suite

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort

The iconic St. Regis brand extends its legacy to Abu Dhabi with The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi. The award-winning resort is the capital’s most seductive beachfront address, located just 20 minutes from Abu Dhabi International Airport, 10 minutes from the city’s bustling downtown and 5 minutes from the Louvre Abu Dhabi. The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi offers plenty of outlets for relaxation and rejuvenation including a world-class golf course, state-of-the-art fitness facilities at The St. Regis Athletic Club, five swimming pools, a pristine stretch of white sand beach, which is a nesting site for hawksbill turtles, and the signature Iridium Spa, which uses luxury skincare lines for its bespoke wellness rituals. The expansive guest rooms and grand suites combine Mediterranean-influenced architecture with views of the glittering Arabian Gulf from their private balconies. The resort’s newest addition to its impressive repertoire of dining outlets is Buddha-Bar Beach Abu Dhabi. The glamorous day-to-night destination offers delicious Pacific Rim cuisine, finely crafted cocktails and cutting-edge beats by celebrity DJs and a range of live acts.

AMENITIES 376 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Iridium Spa Pool, Gym Beach Golf Children’s Club

LOCATION Saadiyat Island P.O. Box 54345 Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates T (971) (2) 4988888 reservations.saadiyat@stregis.com

Exterior view of the hotel from the beach; Buddha-Bar Beach Abu Dhabi; Olea terrace

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Cairo

The St. Regis Cairo draws guests to the heart of Egypt’s timeless metropolis, on the north end of Corniche Road along the Nile. Exceptionally designed by Michael Graves, the hotel’s 36 stories stand as a unique expression of modern luxury that draws on the city’s influential past while confidently introducing its future. Local heritage is reflected through outstanding views of the Nile and Old Cairo as well as distinctive murals in our guest rooms depicting papyrus gardens and Nile Valley flora. Between mother-of-pearl inlaid nightstands, our sumptuous signature beds are topped by exquisite linen and pillows while bathrooms are clad in light Emperador marble. The St. Regis Butler service remains the ultimate experience for all guest rooms, suites and luxury apartments. Our Astor Grand Ballroom features a dedicated entrance for very special occasions while The Crystal Hall boasts a three-story vaulted ceiling with a dramatic Swarovski chandelier. Overlooking the Nile, the hall’s alabaster grand staircase is bordered by crystal and bronze handrails, portraying the true essence of our Modern Egyptian Grandeur. (Debuts 2019)

AMENITIES 366 Guest Rooms, Suites and Apartments 7 Restaurants, Bars and Lounges Indoor and Outdoor Pools Iridium Spa Athletic Club

LOCATION 1189 Nile Corniche Cairo Egypt T (20) 2 2597 9000 info.cairo@stregis.com stregis.com/cairo

The hotel’s exterior; floating flower bouquets at The Water Garden; Deluxe Bedroom with spectacular Nile view

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Doha

Doha has transformed itself in a very short time. Now the media and arts capital of its region, a major player in the aviation stakes and the host of the 2022 World Cup, it’s an ultra-cosmopolitan capital. Two miles from the city’s main business district, The St. Regis Doha, with its postmodern Arabian architecture and panoramic views of the Arabian Gulf, provides the perfect base. The hotel’s Rooftop Lounge brings the urban chic of New York, Beirut and London to Doha. Guests ascend from the private entrance in the lower floor of the hotel and step onto a breathtaking, stylish and spacious terrace. At The Raw Bar, chef Elias Gemayel brings his creative flair to raw cuisine, turning the finest ingredients into culinary masterpieces in collaboration with celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay. Choose from a wide range of caviars, oysters, carpaccio, ceviche, sushi and sashimi to savor with the finest wines, champagne and exclusive gastronomic signature cocktails. With exceptional signature dishes served through the week and a rare collection of spirits from around the world, The Raw Bar is the best place in Doha to enjoy unique culinary and mixology experiences.

AMENITIES 336 Guest Rooms and Suites 12 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Gym Tennis Private Beach

LOCATION Doha West Bay Doha 14435 Qatar T (974) 44460000 doha.butler@stregis.com stregis.com/doha

The Empire Suite; The St. Regis Doha; the Sarab Lounge Terrace

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Mauritius Resort

The Indian Ocean is famed for many things: blissful beaches, indigo seas, sublime diving and a vibrant culture melding Asian and African traditions. Mauritius brings these together, then adds a few more. Sheltered from the open sea by the world’s third-largest coral reef, the “Pearl of the Indian Ocean” harbors some of the planet’s most beautiful mountain scenery: waterfalls, lush forests and wildlife you won’t find anywhere else, such as the Mauritian flying fox. The St. Regis Mauritius Resort has a beachfront setting at Le Morne, a peninsula at the south-western tip of the island. Featuring five distinct culinary experiences, The St. Regis Mauritius Resort offers epicureans a myriad of gastronomic influences ranging from French-inspired and traditional Mauritian cuisine to the exotic dishes of South-East Asia and fine Japanese selections. There are also spa experiences, world-class kite surfing, activities and excursions. The peninsula has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 2008, and is less than 60 minutes’ drive from the capital and 20 minutes’ drive from the Black River Gorges National Park.

AMENITIES 172 Suites (including the 4-bedroom St. Regis Villa) 5 Restaurants and 2 Bars Iridium Spa 2 Pools, Gym, Tennis Court Kite Flyers Club (kids club) Watersport Center ION Club – Kite Surfing Beach LOCATION Coastal Road Le Morne Peninsula Mauritius T (230) 403 9000 mauritius.butler@stregis.com

Aerial view of Le Morne peninsula; Floating Market; St. Regis Grand Suite Bedroom, steps from the beach

stregismauritius.com

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Aspen Resort

Aspen is a special place where people can lose themselves in nature, yet find great pleasure in the many sports available. Yoga, fly fishing, clay shooting, hiking… the varied menu of sporting experiences rivals the food and drink you’ll enjoy here. There is also an arts scene and great spa-based activities. The Remède Spa was voted Best Spa in the World, 2014 by readers of Travel + Leisure magazine. Located in downtown Aspen, The St. Regis Aspen Resort is walking distance from shops, restaurants and entertainment. Modern Mountain Cuisine meets rustic elegance at the resort’s new signature restaurant, Velvet Buck, which is named for the velvet fur that grows on the antlers of a male deer, while the newly renovated lobby bar and lounge, Mountain Social, is a premier après-ski destination offering refined spirits, handcrafted cocktails and light fare with the majestic backdrop of Aspen Mountain.

AMENITIES 179 Guest Rooms and Suites 3 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool 3 Hot Tubs Gym Ski

LOCATION 315 East Dean Street Aspen Colorado 81611 United States T (970) 920 3300 aspen.reservations@stregis.com

The resort’s heated swimming pool; Grand Deluxe Staircase; Deluxe Double Fireplace Guest Room

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Atlanta

Atlanta is known for its breezy, Southern, uncomplicated approach to life, business, culture… and just about everything else. It’s a perfect city for getting things done and for enjoying some great boutique shopping, cuisine, art, jazz and sports: major league baseball, basketball and football teams are based here. The King Center, the CNN headquarters (which is open for tours), Ponce City Market, Mercedes Benz Stadium, Atlanta History Center, Atlanta Ballet and Symphony Orchestra are all a short drive from The St. Regis Atlanta. Dinner-only restaurant Atlas features a seasonally inspired American menu accented with European influences and decorated with masterpieces from the Lewis Collection by Picasso, Van Gogh and Chagall, among others. If you’re in the mood for a bourbon, try The St. Regis Atlanta Woodford Reserve, hand-selected by our team in Kentucky’s legendary Woodford Reserve Distillery.

AMENITIES 151 Guest Rooms and Suites 4 Restaurants and Bars Spa Outdoor Pool Piazza Athletic Club

LOCATION Eighty-Eight West Paces Ferry Road Atlanta Georgia 30305 United States T (404) 563 7900 stregisatlanta@stregis.com stregis.com/atlanta

The Astor Ballroom; The St. Regis Atlanta entrance; New King Deluxe Guest Room

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is where American and Latin American cultures meld and clash and get up to dance. A key center of the salsa music revolution of the 1960s and 1970s, it is still the home of many star performers. The island is a much-loved beach destination, but is also known for its distinctive cuisine, culture and Caribbean vibe. Located on a former coconut plantation, The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort is the first Five-Diamond hotel on Puerto Rico and is also designated as a Forbes Travel Guide five star resort. The expansive 483-acre property boasts views of El Yunque National Forest and the Atlantic Ocean. There’s a two-mile secluded beach, sanctuaries, an Iridium Spa and a golf course designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr. In addition to The St. Regis Bar, three distinctive dining venues are offered: Paros, a signature fine dining restaurant located on the second floor of The Casa Grande; Seagrapes, a casual poolside restaurant boasting a pizza oven and indoor and outdoor dining; and The Beach Shack, a beachfront kiosk. Guests can also enjoy Beach Club by Chef Jose Enrique, which overlooks the ocean and is located in the Bahia Beach Clubhouse.

AMENITIES 139 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Spa, Pool, Aquatic Park Gym, Tennis Beach Nature Trails Children’s Club

LOCATION State Road 187 kilometer 4.2 Rio Grande Puerto Rico 00745 United States T (787) 809 8000 reservations.bahiabeach@stregis.com

The pool; the Casa Grande entrance; two miles of pristine beach

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort

Miami never loses its buzz. Art Basel, South Beach’s effervescent social whirl, the rediscovery of Art Deco: all these have kept the focus on one of the cities that will define America’s future. Exclusive Bal Harbour, on Miami Beach, has a rich history as a hotspot attracting jazz musicians, including Rat Pack legends. It’s also one of South Florida’s premier retail and restaurant arenas. The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort recently opened a new lobby expansion – a glass-enclosed atrium area with new lounge spaces and a French-inspired eatery, La Gourmandise. The hotel’s latest culinary offering, Atlantikós, with white-and-blue decor inspired by the Greek Isles, offers Greek fare with a Miami twist. Each night begins with a traditional Greek plate-smashing ritual. The afternoon-tea experience in the lobby has been revitalized, with gourmet desserts from one of America’s top pastry chefs.

AMENITIES 216 Guest Rooms and Suites 5 Restaurants and Bars Spa Gym Children’s Club

LOCATION 9703 Collins Avenue Bal Harbour Miami Beach Florida 33154 United States T (305) 993 3300 info.balharbour@stregis.com stregis.com/balharbour

The resort’s oceanside pool; the Presidential Suite, Atlantikós restaurant.

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The St. Regis Deer Valley

Hit the trails or relax in the spa, go on an outdoor adventure or explore historic Main Street‌ The St. Regis Deer Valley is surrounded by the majestic Wasatch Mountains, an all-season playground for both the adventure and relaxation seeker. The true ski-in/ski-out resort is located in the gated Deer Crest community on the slopes of Deer Valley Mountain Resorts and is accessible by a funicular rail line, the only one of its kind in the US, which makes for easy, and unique, access from the base of the mountain to the resort. Once settled in, try our Remède Spa, where a grand spiral staircase leads to 11 peaceful treatment rooms in the 14,000-square foot spa complete with a tranquility room with a reflecting pool. Or enjoy a chef-driven dining experience at J&G Grill, featuring a hyper-local menu and shareable dishes to create memorable moments around the table. With all of The St. Regis Deer Valley year-round family traditions and recreational activities, unique and memorable experiences are waiting at every turn.

AMENITIES 181 Guest Rooms and Suites 3 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Gym Ski

LOCATION 2300 Deer Valley Drive East Park City Utah 84060 United States T (435) 940 5700 deervalley.reservations@stregis.com stregis.com/deervalley

Guest Bedroom with spectacular mountain views; The Lobby; The Pool

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Houston

Energy and power, Texan pride and individuality, open space and outer space, Houston is the big-muscled business capital of the Lone Star State. If the city has a reputation for getting things done and no messing around, The St. Regis Houston, in the tranquil, residential neighborhood of Post Oak Park and River Oaks, is the perfect complement. It is gracious, opulent and discreet. It’s also conveniently located only half a mile from the Galleria retail area and six miles from Houston’s central business district. Celebrated design firm ForrestPerkins has created a warm and welcoming Tea Lounge with a library so guests can punctuate their outings with morning coffee, afternoon tea or pre-dinner cocktails. The spectacular outdoor pool and sundeck, located on the mezzanine level and adjacent to the spa and fitness room, draw guests back time after time. It is open from 5am until 11pm daily, for guests who love to work hard and play hard as well.

AMENITIES 232 Guest Rooms and Suites 2 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Exercise Room

LOCATION 1919 Briar Oaks Lane Houston, Texas 77027-3408 United States t. +1 713 840 7600 houstonreservation@stregis.com stregis.com/houston

Swimming pool; State Suite living room; the master bedroom of the Presidential Suite

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Mexico City

The St. Regis Mexico City, an idyllic urban resort, is the main resident of the Torre Libertad, an architectural masterpiece built by César Pelli. It sits on Mexico City’s Paseo de la Reforma, a thoroughfare modeled on the Old World’s boulevards, and a bridge between the city center and the Imperial Palace in the Chapultepec Forest. From the helipad, you can take in the mind-boggling urban sprawl. Don’t miss the King Cole Bar terrace; this new fully renovated space features superb mixology paired with lively DJ sets to complement the majestic views of Mexico City’s premier address. The hotel’s La Table Krug is the only place in Mexico where the limited-edition Champagne Krug Millesime 2000 can be savored. This season, don’t miss Diana Restaurant’s new menu, which features rising star chef Fernando Sanchez showcasing a tantalizing interpretation of Mexican gastronomy. The Remède Spa, meanwhile, offers luxurious organic spa treatments and skincare products designed to protect your skin from UV rays, artificial light and pollution.

AMENITIES 189 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Remède Spa & Wellness Center Indoor Pool Fitness Center Electric Bicycles Children’s Club

LOCATION Paseo de la Reforma 439 Colonia Cuauhtemoc Mexico City, Federal District 06500 Mexico T (52)(55) 5228 1818 mexico.city@stregis.com

The Atrium, host of the hotel's Champagne Ritual; Mexico City's iconic Torre Libertad; King Cole Bar terrace

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis New York

New York City is a collection of exceptional experiences, from the natural beauty of Central Park to the bustle of Broadway, from contemporary art at MoMA to the cobblestone streets of the Meatpacking District. Located right in the heart of it all is The St. Regis New York, the ultimate Manhattan hotel. Since opening in 1904, the hotel, founded by John Jacob Astor IV, has been synonymous with innovation and luxury. Its rich history includes famous residents (Salvador Dalí, Marlene Dietrich) and the invention of the “Red Snapper” – commonly known as the Bloody Mary – by legendary barman Fernand Petiot in 1934. The classic cocktail can still be enjoyed in front of the same Maxfield Parrish mural at the hotel’s King Cole Bar.

AMENITIES 238 Guest Rooms and Suites 1 Restaurant and Bar Gym

LOCATION 2 East 55th Street at Fifth Avenue New York New York 10022 United States T (212) 753 4500 stregisny.res@stregis.com stregis.com/newyork

The hotel’s famous entrance; the lobby; the living room of the Bentley Suite

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort

On the same latitude as Hawaii, and blessed with year-round balmy sun and ocean breezes, Punta Mita on Mexico’s Pacific Coast is where Mexico City’s high society comes for its beachside retreats. The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort is in the Riviera Nayarit, and has 120 luxurious guest rooms and suites, looking out onto a flawless white sand beach and surrounded by luxuriant tropical flora. In early 2017, the hotel unveiled its newest culinary offering, the Champagne and Oyster Bar: a chic, intimate bar with a seductive menu of oysters and Moët Ice champagne. The resort has two Jack Nicklaus golf courses, five full-service restaurants, villa residences, a Beach Club and the luxe Remède Spa, which recently introduced a mindfulness menu and flotation therapy; the latter is a state-of-the-art float pod that takes relaxation to a new level. But this is no gated island experience: nearby seaside villages stay vibrant by fishing and agriculture and by the indigenous Huichol, who maintain their artisanal traditions.

AMENITIES 120 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars 3 Pools, Beach Spa, Golf Diving Tennis Gym Children’s Club

LOCATION Lote H-4, Carretera Federal 200, KM 19.5, Punta Mita, Nayarit 63734, Mexico T (52)(329) 291 5800 puntamita.butler@stregis.com

The adult pool at Arecas; the living room of the Presidential Suite; the Sea Breeze Bar

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis San Francisco

The Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, cable cars, beaches, beautiful city vistas, the breezes… it’s little wonder San Francisco tops many people’s lists of must-see cities. The St. Regis San Francisco is on the corner of Third and Mission, a short walk from the financial district. When you have downtime, the city is a great playground for cultural days and nights on the town. On your doorstep you’ll find the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of the African Diaspora, worldclass shopping in Union Square, and the Yerba Buena Gardens. Take a trip out of town to enjoy Napa and Sonoma Valleys, the coastal towns of Carmel, Pebble Beach and Monterey, or the redwood trees in Muir Woods. Enjoy a signature cocktail at the Lobby Lounge at The St. Regis. Relax in the Remède Spa, with its exquisite menu of treatments, or simply unwind and enjoy our extraordinary property, starting with the stunning city views from the infinity pool.

AMENITIES 260 Guest Rooms and Suites 1 Restaurant/Bar Spa Pool Gym

LOCATION 125 3rd Street, San Francisco California 94103 United States T (415) 284 4000 sanfrancisco@stregis.com stregis.com/sanfrancisco

The pool; the magnificent mural in the Lobby Lounge; a view across the city from the Astor Suite

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The St. Regis Toronto

Trendsetting and boundary-breaking, St. Regis marks its Canadian debut at the most coveted address in Toronto. Rising 65 stories above Canada’s international enclave for business and culture, The St. Regis Toronto defines a new era of glamour in the heart of the city. The hotel’s remarkably central location is just steps from the city’s world-renowned landmarks, shopping and entertainment including the CN Tower, Toronto International Film Festival, Scotiabank Arena, Rogers Centre, Theatre District, and Saks Fifth Avenue. Exquisite design and bespoke butler service unite amongst the city’s largest luxury guest rooms and suites, blending modern elegance and tranquil respite from the illustrious cityscape. Iconic rituals and epicurean moments captivate the senses and act as a crossroads where travelers and the city’s creative, social and entrepreneurial connoisseurs converge and connect. Allow yourself to escape to Canada’s highest urban oasis in the sky at the Spa, soaring 31 stories above Toronto’s endless skyline.

AMENITIES 258 Guest Rooms 124 Luxury Suites 2 Bars and Restaurants Two-Level Spa on 31st Floor 32nd Floor Pool & Fitness Center

LOCATION 325 Bay Street Toronto Ontario M5H 4G3 Canada T (1) 416 306 5800 reservations.toronto@stregis.com stregistoronto.com

The hotel’s lobby, LOUIX LOUIS grand bar and restaurant, the Caroline Astor Suite master bathroom

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Washington, D.C.

In the city of powerful addresses, the grand, gracious St. Regis Washington, D.C., two blocks north of the White House, remains the powerbrokers’ hotel of choice. It was opened by President Coolidge in 1926; Ronald Reagan used to drop in to see his barber, Milton Pitts; and Jacqueline Onassis, Audrey Hepburn and Elizabeth Taylor were loyal guests. Over the years, redesigns by Henry Wardman and Sills Huniford have enhanced the legendary status of this, one of America’s most iconic hotels. Business and politics are right on the doorstep, but the hotel is also close to the cultural heart of D.C., a short stroll from the splendors of the Smithsonian and the Kennedy Center. Dine at the hotel’s signature restaurant, Alhambra, where our executive chef prepares the freshest local ingredients, influenced by modern Mediterranean cuisine.

AMENITIES 172 Guest Rooms and Suites 1 Restaurant/Bar Gym

LOCATION 923 16th and K Streets N.W. Washington District of Columbia 20006 United States T (202) 638 2626 reservations@stregis.com stregiswashingtondc.com

The St. Regis Washington, D.C.’s elegant façade; a St. Regis Suite; the lobby

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Bali Resort

Bali is the best-known of several thousand Indonesian islands and has been inhabited since 2000 BC. Its natural wonders are the main draw: beautiful beaches, colorful coral reefs, a central mountain range and dense tropical rainforest harboring many species of flora and fauna, including orchids, butterflies, birds and monkeys. The St. Regis Bali Resort is in Nusa Dua, on the island’s southernmost tip overlooking the Indian Ocean, with a private sandy beach, a saltwater swimmable lagoon and The St. Regis Spa with its hydrotherapy pool. Celebrating its 10th year of excellent service, the resort recently underwent a major villa refurbishment, introducing new bespoke elements and artwork as well as comprehensive contemporary design and technology. In the evening, dine in style at Kayuputi or enjoy traditional live gamelan music along with Indonesian specialties at Dulang. For the ultimate in luxury, take the newly renovated beachfront Strand Villa.

AMENITIES 123 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Beach Gym Children's Club

LOCATION Kawasan Pariwisata Lot S6,PO Box 44 Nusa Dua, Bali 80363 Indonesia T (62) (361) 8478 111 stregis.bali@stregis.com

A St. Regis Suite; an aerial view of the St. Regis Bali Resort; Lagoon Villa with Private Pool

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The St. Regis Bangkok

Tuk-tuks, trucks, riverboats, bicycles, boats and buses... the Thai capital is a whirling mass of energy. But Bangkok is also a warm, friendly place, and you can follow up that sweltering morning’s outing, business meeting or hike around the 18th-century Grand Palace with a slow meal of the most fragrant cuisine on earth. The St. Regis Bangkok’s soothing décor immerses guests in luxury from the moment they arrive. It might be in the fast-beating heart of central Bangkok, but it is also moments from the peaceful Lumpini Park. To start your evening in style, what could be better than an extraordinary selection of drinks at The St. Regis Bar, where highlights include evening demonstrations of the art of sabrage and the signature “Siam Mary” – a Thai-accented take on the Bloody Mary, with a backdrop of the setting sun and city lights.

AMENITIES 229 Guest Rooms and Suites 8 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Gym

LOCATION 159 Rajadamri Road Bangkok 10330 Thailand T (66) (2) 207 7777 stregis.bangkok@stregis.com stregis.com/bangkok

Caroline Astor Suite; outdoor swimming pool with scenic golf course view; the Owner’s Penthouse

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The St. Regis Beijing

Beijing is the capital of a great power once more, and The St. Regis Beijing is ideally positioned close to the diplomatic quarter, business district and the Forbidden City, as well as being surrounded by some of the city’s finest restaurants and bars. The signature St. Regis Butler Service, private-dining suites and mansion ambiance reflect the values of New York’s Golden Age, preparing you for your next foray into local business or culture and the dizzying experience of Chinese cuisine, including the highly-esteemed Celestial Court restaurant, serving authentic southern Chinese cuisine in a traditional setting. Or try the creative Italian cuisine in Dianeli’s restaurant, and peruse one of Beijing’s most exciting wine selections. Afterwards, take time to unwind in the hotel’s Iridium Spa, one of the city’s most luxurious, and one that has its own natural hot spring water for soaking in. On the spa menu you will find as many as 40 Western and Chinese therapies, a comprehensive list that is sure to soothe the spirits and rejuvenate the senses.

AMENITIES 258 Guest Rooms and Suites 5 Restaurants and Bars Outdoor Garden Spa Pool Gym

LOCATION 21 Jianguomenwai Dajie Beijing 100020 China T (86) (10) 6460 6688 stregis.beijing@stregishotels.com stregis.com/beijing

The Natural Hot Spring rising from 1,500m underground; the elegant Lobby Lounge; the Mediterranean castle style Danieli’s Italian restaurant

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort

Bora Bora, discovered by Captain Cook in 1769, is a 16-square-mile tropical island surrounded by coral reef and lagoons. This muchmythologized South Pacific island is some 5,000 miles west of Lima and almost 4,000 miles northeast of Sydney, its remoteness matched by its year-round warm climate and outstanding beauty. A step away from the picture-perfect beaches are rugged volcanic mountains covered with lush tropical vegetation. At the secluded 44-acre St. Regis Bora Bora Resort, all rooms have private dining areas, daybeds and state-of-theart entertainment systems, and are elegantly decorated with Polynesian arts and crafts. Rooms either have direct access to the beach or are thatched villas built over water; views are of the extinct volcanoes, the lagoon or the reef. For the utmost privacy, the three-bedroom Royal Estate has four bathrooms, its own beach, a pool and an area with sauna, jacuzzi and hammam. If you are in search of perfect pampering, go to the resort’s Miri Miri Spa by Clarins, a place of deep relaxation on its own private islet.

AMENITIES 90 Guest Villas 4 Restaurants and 2 Bars Spa 2 Pools Beach Gym Tennis Children’s Club

LOCATION Motu Ome’e BP 506 Bora Bora 98730, French Polynesia T (689) 40 607888 reservations@stregisborabora.com

Overwater Villas; terrace of an Overwater Premier Otemanu Villa; view from a Beachside Villa with Pool

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The St. Regis Changsha

Changsha, the capital of Hunan province, has a history spanning 3,500 years and has been one of the most important cities in China since the Qin Dynasty. The St. Regis Changsha is at the heart of the shopping and business districts, within reach of major transportation hubs, museums and historical sites of interests. Housed in Yunda Central Plaza, on the 48th to 63rd floors in one of the city’s tallest skyscrapers, the hotel has its own helipad. The 188 guest rooms and suites feature an intelligent iPad control system and contemporary touches along with local antiques. An expert team of chefs presents unparalleled dining experiences in six venues. The Chinese Restaurant Yan Ting will captivate gastronomes with authentic Cantonese and local dishes, while the Un Japanese restaurant offers extensive Japanese fare and Teppanyaki experience. The St. Regis Changsha provides the chance to relax at The St. Regis Athletic Club, with an indoor swimming pool, beautiful panoramic views and a 24-hour fitness center.

AMENITIES 188 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Ballroom Top-Floor Indoor Swimming Pool Fitness Center

LOCATION Yunda Central Plaza No. 289 Sha Wan Road Yuhua District Changsha 410129 Hunan Province T (86) (731) 8968 8888 stregis.changsha@stregishotels.com stregischangsha.com

Top-Floor Indoor Swimming Pool; Hotel Exterior; Caroline Astor Suite Bedroom

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The St. Regis Chengdu

The capital city of Sichuan province is flourishing as a business hub, in part because of the excellent links to the rest of the province. But this is nothing new for Chengdu. It was one of the first places in the world to issue paper currency and the starting point for part of the Southern Silk Route, from where merchants would take the region’s renowned wares to the wider world. Yet for all its importance, this ancient metropolis, founded in 316 BC, retains a remarkably relaxed atmosphere. You’ll find delicious Sichuan food being served at the hotel’s signature restaurant Yan Ting, numerous tea houses and, for downtime, parks and temples to explore. Thanks to its location, The St. Regis Chengdu is perfectly placed for business meetings, yet within easy reach of prestige boutiques and cultural highlights, including temples, museums and parks. Later, enjoy our signature Chuan Mary cocktail at the Vantage XXVII outdoor sky bar on the 27th floor, open from April to October, with in-house DJ, skyline views and a statement bronze bar.

AMENITIES 279 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Spa Athletic Club Indoor & Outdoor Pools

LOCATION 88 Taisheng Road South Qingyang District Chengdu 610017 Sichuan China T (86) (28) 6287 6666 stregis.chengdu@stregis.coma stregis.com/chengdu

Iridium Spa; Presidential Suite swimming pool; Yun Fu Private Dining Room

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Hong Kong

The glamorous and cosmopolitan city of Hong Kong has long been considered a place where East meets West, thanks to the fusion of its deep Chinese roots and its recent history as a British colony. With interiors created by acclaimed Hong Kong-based designer André Fu, the newly opened St. Regis Hong Kong has 129 guest rooms, many of which feature magnificent views across Victoria Harbour and Kowloon Bay. Located in the heart of historic Wan Chai, one of Hong Kong’s coolest areas, where hip bars and restaurants mingle with old tenement buildings and a major hub for foreign and Chinese culture and arts, the 25-story hotel is also within easy walking distance of the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC). Guests at the hotel enjoy the legendary St. Regis Butler Service, signature Chinese and French restaurants (Rùn and L'Envol), a 360-seat banquet hall and a heated swimming pool, along with many other amenities. An open-air terrace next to the Drawing Room provides the ideal venue for al fresco gatherings while the St. Regis Bar serves up bespoke cocktails, live jazz music and the Canto Mary, the hotel’s rendition of the brand’s signature cocktail, the Bloody Mary. The St. Regis Hong Kong exterior; Grand Deluxe Room; vignette of the bathroom

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AMENITIES 129 Guest Rooms and Suites 4 Restaurants and Bars Spa Treatment Rooms Outdoor Pool

LOCATION 1 Harbour Drive Hong Kong, China T (852) 2138 6888 stregis.hongkong@stregishotels.com stregis.com/hongkong


THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur

The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur is located in KL Sentral, one of the most prestigious and romantic neighborhoods, a stone’s throw from the city’s Lake Gardens, the National Museum and House of Parliament. The hotel is infused with luxurious design details, such as breathtaking Austrian crystals and hand-made Italian gold tiles. Inspired by Polo, the “Sport of Kings”, subtle details include horsehair leather panels, saddle stitch and stirrup motifs. Guests can take a refreshing dip in the outdoor swimming pool, or relax at the 1,100 sq m Iridium Spa. Enjoy eclectic dining experiences, from The Drawing Room, featuring the monumental sculpture Horse – the largest equine sculpture ever made by world-renowned artist, Fernando Botero – to The Brasserie, where seductive French cuisine meets Mediterranean. Sample the freshest sushi at Taka by Sushi Saito by threeMichelin-starred chef, Takashi Saito of Sushi Saito in Tokyo, or Ozaki beef at USHI Restaurant. End the night at Astor Bar and Decanter, which offers an extensive menu of wine, whiskey and champagne, as well as premium cigars; or relax in KL’s coolest rooftop bar, Crystal.

AMENITIES 208 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Spa Fitness Center

LOCATION 6, Jalan Stesen Sentral 2 Kuala Lumpur Sentral 50470 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia T (603) 2727 1111 stregis.kualalumpur@stregis.com stregis.com/kualalumpur

The city’s largest Deluxe Room; Grace Thunders, hand-etched leather mural by Mark Evans; Astor Bar

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The St. Regis Langkawi

The St. Regis Langkawi nestles on the southern tip of Langkawi, the first UNESCO Global Geopark in Southeast Asia. Our discreet address overlooks a sparkling white-sand beach, swaying palm trees and the glistening turquoise Andaman Sea. It is the ideal departure point for exploring the Jewel of Kedah. On the archipelago’s largest island, picturesque villages, majestic mountain peaks and lush tropical jungles filled with remarkable caves and waterfalls contribute to Langkawi’s dramatic natural beauty. The translucent waters invite guests to enjoy endless ocean activities, including snorkeling, fishing, diving and sunset cruises. Settle into the flawless services afforded to each of our 85 suites and four over-water villas, including one with four bedrooms – the Sunset Royal Villa, which features a private swimming pool. Each villa highlights signature design elements bringing the traditions of the brand to life.

AMENITIES 89 Suites and Overwater villas 6 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool

LOCATION Jalan Pantai Beringin Pulau Langkawi 07000 Malaysia T (60) (4) 960 6666 Reservation.Langkawi@stregishotels.com stregis.com/langkawi

The main pool; the living area of the Astor Suite; Premier Andaman Sea Room

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The St. Regis Lhasa Resort

Set 12,000 feet above sea level, Lhasa is surrounded by the snow-capped peaks of the Himalayas, with air as clean as you’ll find anywhere in the world. This awe-inspiring location will take your breath away. For centuries, Lhasa has been the spiritual home of Buddhism, and the city is booming as tourists and pilgrims alike search for enlightenment and peace in the Place of the Gods, the name given to the city by the ancients. The St. Regis Lhasa Resort is a luxury five-star property in the city’s bustling old quarter where the Jokhang Temple, frequented by Buddhist pilgrims, is found, as well as Bakhor Street. The resort’s spectacular view of the Potala Palace from the lobby is paired with a remarkable collection of Tibetan art pieces and paintings displayed throughout the property.

AMENITIES 199 Guest Rooms and Suites 2 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool

LOCATION No. 22, Jiangsu Road Lhasa Tibet (Xizang) 850000 China T (86) (891) 680 8888 reservation.lhasa@stregis.com stregis.com/lhasa

The Gold Energy Pool; the magnificent Potala Palace; the Khailash Suite’s living room

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The St. Regis Macao, Cotai Central

Macao is a city of historic ruins, spiritual temples, and imposing fortresses, which illustrate the evolution of Western and Chinese civilizations over more than four centuries. And The St. Regis Macao is the most elegant, sophisticated address from which to explore the very best the city affords, perfectly situated within a prime center of dining, shopping and entertainment. Guests enjoy the finest restaurants, such as The Manor, an oyster bar and grill which focuses on imported prime-meat cuts, the freshest seafood and Portuguese-inspired cuisine, as well as amenities typified by the incomparable St. Regis Butler Service. To further enhance your stay, the hotel offers convenient access to more than 850 designer boutiques and several premier shopping centers. Refined comforts and elegantly appointed furnishings await in each of The St. Regis Macao’s 400 guest rooms and suites, where state-of-the-art amenities combine with traditional Chinese architectural elements and spectacular views of the Cotai Strip.

The hotel’s exterior; the master bedroom of the Empire Suite; the dining room at The Manor

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AMENITIES 400 Guest Rooms and Suites 3 Restaurants and Bars Outdoor Pool

LOCATION Estrada do Istmo S/N, Cotai Macao SAR P.R. China T (853) 2882 8898 stregis.macao@stregis.com stregis.com/macao


THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort

Poised on its own exclusive island, The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort is surrounded by pristine landscapes, thick tropical vegetation, a fine white-sand beach and the glistening turquoise Indian Ocean. This intimate retreat of 77 luxuriously appointed private villas and an Iridium Spa offers the perfect gateway for embracing the dramatic natural beauty of this island nation, whose 26 atolls comprise 1,192 islands, of which only 200 are inhabited. Enjoy complimentary snorkeling equipment and take in the magnificent underwater world teeming with marine life on our world-renowned private house reef. Immerse yourself in sailing, windsurfing, surfing, parasailing, sea kayaking, jet skiing, water skiing and stand-up paddling. Ocean excursions range from deep-sea fishing to dolphin and sunset cruises. Six dining venues offer distinctive cuisines, from Italian to East Asian, while a beachfront eatery specializes in custom pizzas, fresh juices and homemade ice cream.

AMENITIES 77 Guest Villas 6 Restaurants and Bars Pool Library Children’s Club Spa Diving Center

LOCATION Vommuli Island Dhaalu Atoll, Republic of Maldives T (960) 676 6333 stregis.maldivesvommuli@stregis.com stregis.com/maldives

The Caroline Astor Estate; the private infinity pool of an Overwater Villa; the resort library by the beach

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The St. Regis Mumbai

Mumbai is a spectacular city full of architectural treasures that bear witness to its periods under colonial rule. The St. Regis Mumbai is a luxury oasis in the heart of the city, the striking interiors of the grand lobby welcoming guests with their old-world charm accentuated by Rajasthani Tikri artwork. As the tallest luxury hotel in India, it would be hard to find more panoramic vistas elsewhere. The hotel is ideally located for leisure and business travelers. After a long day of meetings, head to the dedicated Wellness Floor for a massage at the Iridium Spa, known for its award-winning therapists and signature treatments. Dine at Yuuka, the award-winning modern Japanese F&B venue with soaring floor-to-ceiling windows that interprets Japanese cuisine as a compelling mix of tradition and modernity where flavors and flair combine for maximum effect. For those staying over the weekend, the thematic Sunday Brunch presents a variety of cuisines and flavors, while an outstanding Oriental Brunch with stunning bayside views can be enjoyed at Level 37 at By The Mekong.

AMENITIES 395 Guest Rooms and Suites 10 Restaurants and Bars Spa Athletic Club Pool

LOCATION 462 Senapti Bapat Marg Lower Parel Mumbai 400013 India T (91) (22) 6162 8000 stregis.mumbai@stregis.com stregis.com/mumbai

The Great Hall; Yuuka Japanese restaurant; the living room of the Caroline Astor Suite

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The St. Regis Osaka

For many travelers, Osaka has all the urban energy and lively vibe of Tokyo with the heritage and historical riches of Kyoto. On Midosuji Avenue, where The St. Regis Osaka is located, you will find examples of the city’s long history, in the form of architectural masterpieces dating from the Taisho Era (1912-1926) and the following Showa period. The avenue has been dubbed the Champs Elysées of the Orient. The St. Regis Osaka is within a 27-story building, the tallest in the urban renewal zone. It provides striking views over the city and is perfectly positioned for you to explore Osaka’s multi-Michelin-starred restaurant scene, cultural life and Buddhist shrines. The hotel’s garden terrace is lush with plants and has a stone garden around which to take a stroll, or you can sit and take time out from the streetscape below. Don’t miss the seasonal creations of chef Gianluca Visani at our La Veduta restaurant.

AMENITIES 160 Guest Rooms and Suites 4 Restaurants and Bars Spa Exercise Room

LOCATION 3-6-12 Hommachi Chuo-ku Osaka 541-0053 Japan T (81) (6) 6258 3333 stregis.osaka@stregis.com stregis.com/osaka

The lobby; the exterior of The St. Regis Osaka; the hotel’s remarkable Zen Garden

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort

The tropical island of Hainan, China’s smallest province, has clean air, lush vegetation, pristine beaches and offers the perfect escape from the bustle of the mainland cities. Located in the exclusive stretch of Yalong Bay (also called Asian Dragon Bay) on the south coast of Hainan Island in the South China Sea, The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort is the perfect choice for guests looking for a deluxe, relaxing vacation. Its temperature-controlled swimming pool boasts views of tropical gardens, coconut palms and the deep blue ocean. The hotel has access to more than half a mile of coastline where guests can stroll, swim or enjoy a seafood barbecue at the beachfront restaurant.

AMENITIES 396 Guest Rooms and Suites 6 Restaurants and Bars Spa, Pool, Gym Private Beach Water Sports Tennis Children's Club

LOCATION Yalong Bay National Resort District Sanya Yalong Bay Hainan 572016 China T (86) (898) 8855 5555 reservations.sanya@stregis.com The swimming pool; a luxurious villa; the beachfront restaurant

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stregis.com/sanyayalongbay


THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan

Towering 68 floors above the city, The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan invites you to the best address in Shanghai for business and leisure. It’s a short distance from Jingan district’s most treasured sites and historic landmarks, including: the Jingan Temple, the overwater Yu Garden, the 1920s-style architecture of the Bund, People’s Square and People’s Park, and the ancient Chinese relics in the Shanghai Museum. Chic, luxury shopping centers, including Shanghai Center and Plaza 66, are within walking distance. Feng Sheng Li, a profusion of east-meets-west shops, restaurants and bars set amid beautiful Shikumen architecture, is five minutes’ walking distance from the hotel. For added convenience, the Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport is just a 35-minute drive away. The hotel has 433 exquisitely appointed guest rooms and suites with peerless views of the city and Pudong. There are four gourmet restaurants, a rejuvenating spa, and an indoor swimming pool. We also hope guests will enjoy the services offered by the signature St. Regis Butler Service.

AMENITIES 436 Guest Rooms and Suites 55 St. Regis Residential Apartments 6 Restaurants and Bars Pool Iridium Spa Fitness Center

LOCATION 1008 West Beijing Road Jingan District Shanghai China 200041 T (86) (21) 6257 9999 stregis.com/shanghaijingan.com

The exterior of The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan; the Drawing Room; The St. Regis Bar

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Shenzhen

Shenzhen, a commercial hub in southern China, just north of Hong Kong, is one of the country’s most dynamic super cities. The St. Regis Shenzhen opened in 2011 and offers guests its signature butler service and panoramic views of both Shenzhen and rural Hong Kong. The hotel has a private dining room located above its Japanese restaurant MALT, on the 100th floor, which can accommodate around 12 guests. Perched atop the 441m building, the private dining room offers a large range of fresh imported oysters, a fine selection of sashimi, sushi and teppanyaki, all paired with fine wines from around the globe. The hotel has also launched several new programs in the Iridium Spa on the 75th floor – the ideal place to indulge yourself while marveling at stunning views of the city, surrounded by refreshing scents and soothing music. The 700 sq m spa features eight treatment suites, including two large couples’ suites and a Vichy Shower suite. Visitors are guided along a journey of physical and spiritual wellness with extraordinary Aromatherapy Associates treatments to release tension, pain and anxiety while restoring vitality and balance. The St. Regis Shenzhen is located at the top of a building with stunning city views; a Suite; the lobby

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AMENITIES 290 Guest Rooms and Suites 5 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Gym

LOCATION No.5016 Shennan Road East Luohu District Shenzhen Guangdong 518001 China T (86) (755) 8308 8888 stregis.shenzhen@stregis.com stregis.com/shenzhen


THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Singapore

Situated at the heart of the city’s shopping district, with the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Singapore Botanic Gardens on your doorstep, The St. Regis Singapore is the ideal residence for the discerning luxury traveler. The hotel is close to the embassy district, the world-class shopping on Orchard Road, and Dempsey Hill, a revitalized colonial neighborhood with restaurants, clubs, bars, boutiques and antiques stores. The nearby National Gallery Singapore is open to the public after 10 years in the making, as is the offshore Coney Island Park with its exotic flora and fauna. The St. Regis Singapore has one of Asia’s finest private art collections, with works by Miró, Chagall and Fernando Botero, and it was named as one of the best hotels in the world in the prestigious Condé Nast Traveler Gold List 2018, which highlights hotels in over six continents and 54 countries. The St. Regis Singapore is the only Marriott International property in Singapore to be awarded the accolade. It is also one of only two hotels in Singapore, and one of only two St. Regis hotels in the world, to be featured.

AMENITIES 299 Guest Rooms and Suites 4 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Gym

LOCATION 29 Tanglin Road Singapore 247911 T (65) 6506 6888 stregis.singapore@stregis.com stregis.com/singapore

A Specialty Suite; Brasserie Les Saveurs; the Tropical Spa pool

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Tianjin

China’s fourth-largest city, the coastal metropolis of Tianjin has a fascinating history as the entry point for foreigners visiting and trading with Beijing and the rest of northern China. The European-style houses of the French and German concessions add a dash of grandeur to the metropolis, and original turn-of-the-century architecture can still be seen in the Wudadao district. The hotel is opposite the glittering Riverside 66 shopping mall, home to 400 renowned international brands. Many rooms have stunning river views, but if it’s a special trip, book the Presidential Suite, which has Chinese antiques, its own dining room and whirlpool bath. Also try the Xi He Ya Yuan Peking Duck restaurant on the second floor of The St. Regis Tianjin, which continues to build upon our unique Modern Chinese culinary concept, while introducing more Chinese creations, such as our classical interpretation of Peking Duck.

AMENITIES 274 Guest Rooms and Suites 3 Restaurants and Bars Spa Pool Gym

LOCATION 158 Zhangzizhong Road Heping District Tianjin Tianjin 300041 China T (86) (22) 5830 9999 stregis.tianjin@stregis.com stregis.com/tianjin

The hotel’s spectacular exterior; the Riviera Terrace; Grand Deluxe Room

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Zhuhai

Situated on the western bank of the Pearl River Estuary in China’s southern Guangdong Province, Zhuhai is the gateway to Macau and one of the country’s most cherished destinations. Overlooking Zhuhai’s central business district, The St. Regis Zhuhai is located just minutes from the city’s most iconic attractions: the wonderful Yuanming Palace, the famous Fisher Girl statue, and the stunning vistas of Lover’s Road. The hotel inhabits the top floors of the city’s tallest building, offering waterfront views to complement the fantastic dining options: Yan Ting serves modern Cantonese fine dining at Guangdong’s highest culinary level, while the hotel’s remarkable Social Signature Restaurant draws inspiration from the first-class dining salons traditionally reserved for the wealthy in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The St. Regis Bar exudes an aura of elegance with classic jazz music, St. Regis signature Bloody Mary cocktails and afternoon tea. LaBrezza, meanwhile, delights diners with organic, modern Italian fare on the rooftop of the 71st floor, while Air 71 serves the city’s finest cocktails along with a fine selection of wines, champagnes and light appetizers.

AMENITIES 251 Guest Rooms and Suites 5 Restaurants and Bars Indoor and Outdoor Pools Iridium Spa The St. Regis Athletic Club

LOCATION N0. 1663 Yinwan Road Wanzai Xiangzhou District Zhuhai Guangdong, China T (86) (756) 2999 888 stregis.zhuhai@stregis.com stregis.com/zhuhai

King Deluxe Guest Room; exterior of The St. Regis Zhuhai; the Lobby Parlor

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Astana

Introducing a new level of glamour to Kazakhstan, The St. Regis Astana can be found close to Bayterek Tower, at the most prestigious address in the capital, Central Park. Just 15km from the airport, the hotel echoes the refined Kazakh elegance with a bespoke service. It is close to the Presidential Cultural Center, where you can see outstanding collections of Kazakh jewelry, and the Issyk burial mound (where the Golden Man was found in 1969). In the hotel, a sumptuous Presidential Suite includes a drawing room, library, wine vault, a spectacular outdoor terrace and dining table for eight. The Grand Staircase harks back to the glamour of the private mansion of the hotel’s founding family, the Astors. The hotel embraces an epicurean world of celebrated local and international cuisine, with The Grill restaurant, La Rivière restaurant and The St. Regis Bar. The Iridium Spa, which includes an indoor swimming pool, offers guests a refuge to refresh the senses throughout their stay.

AMENITIES 120 Guest Rooms and Suites 3 Restaurants and Bars Indoor Pool Iridium Spa Gym Children’s Club

LOCATION 1 Kabanbay Batyr Avenue Astana Kazakhstan T (7) 7172 790 888 astana.butler@stregis.com stregis.com/astana

The St. Regis Astana’s elegant lobby; the arrival Yurt; a Deluxe Room

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Florence

A palazzo designed in 1432 by Filippo Brunelleschi, the architect of the Duomo Santa Maria del Fiore, The St. Regis Florence was converted into a hotel in the mid-1800s. When Queen Victoria took a Grand Tour, she stayed here. Now there’s a designer suite by Italian luxury fashion house Bottega Veneta, and the hotel spa is collaborating with luxury cosmetics brand My Blend by Clarins. The Michelin-starred Winter Garden by Caino restaurant has a 19th-century illuminated colored-glass ceiling; and in keeping with the Tuscan capital’s Renaissance heritage, there are classic frescoes and antiques throughout the building. Florence is a compact and, in the right season, relaxing city. After you’ve seen the world-class Uffizi Gallery and Michelangelo’s David in the Accademia, make the most of the hotel’s location on the Piazza Ognissanti in the city’s historical heart: order an aperitivo, and sit back and watch as dusk falls over the city’s churches, hills and bell towers.

AMENITIES 99 Guest Rooms and Suites 1 Restaurant and Bar Spa Gym

LOCATION Piazza Ognissanti 1 Florence 50123 Italy T (39) 055 27161 stregisflorence@stregis.com stregis.com/florence

The Royal Suite bedroom, the Duomo and rooftops of Florence; the Presidential Suite living room

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Istanbul

Istanbul has long been the place where Europe and Asia met and exchanged goods, philosophies, cultures and credos. In the past decade, it has become a confident, modern city and has witnessed booms in the art scene, in the quality and range of its nightlife, and in business. Ancient meets modern with confidence in this metropolis, and at The St. Regis Istanbul. Once you’ve ticked off traditional landmarks including Hagia Sophia, the Blue Mosque, Topkapi Palace and the Grand Bazaar, explore modern must-sees such as contemporary art at Istanbul Modern and Galerie Nev, hip fashion boutiques in Cihangir or nightlife in Ortakoy or Beyoglu. The St. Regis Istanbul’s neighborhood of Nisantasi is a quiet one adjoining bustling Beyoglu, so you get the best of both worlds. For the highest luxury, our custom one-bedroom Bentley Suite surrounds you with walls of curved veneer and sumptuous leather fittings, inspired by the seductive interior of the Bentley Continental.

AMENITIES 118 Guest Rooms and Suites 3 Restaurants and Bars Spa Gym

LOCATION Mim Kemal Oke Cad. N° 35 Nisantasi Sisli Istanbul Turkey T (90) (212) 368 0000 stregis.istanbul@stregis.com stregis.com/istanbul

The St. Regis Brasserie; two views of the luxurious Cosmopolitan Suite

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort

All the pleasures and treasures of the Western Mediterranean can be found in Mallorca, the main island of the Balearics. The stunning beaches get a lot of attention, but inland are olive groves and vineyards, mountains and rural mansions, cozy old restaurants and tourist-free towns and villages. In the island’s southwestern corner on Costa d’en Blanes are turquoise waters and a sense of being apart from the hubbub. This is where you’ll find The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort, whose guest rooms were newly designed and remodeled in winter 2017-2018. It is a lovely hideaway and the perfect base for exploring the best of the island. The Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine has been extended, the spa’s product lines now include NIANCE and Maria Galland, a Mimo gourmet shop is part of the hotel’s facilities and Miguel Navarro, chef of the Es Fum restaurant, has reconfirmed his Michelin star for 2018. Continue your stay with a session on the wooden yoga platform, which has a tranquil sea view.

AMENITIES 125 Guest Rooms and Suites 4 Restaurant and Bar Spa Pool Beach Gym Private Jetty Children’s Club

LOCATION Carretera Palma – Andratx 19 Costa d’en Blanes Mallorca 07181, Spain T (34) (971) 629629 info.mardavall@stregis.com

A luxurious Junior Suite with sea view; staircase to the gardens; the outdoor pool of the Arabella Spa

stregis.com/mallorca

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya

One of the world’s greatest cities, Moscow is a powerhouse of business, culture and tourism. Situated in the historic center of the Russian capital, within easy walking distance of the celebrated Bolshoi Theater and the Kremlin, you’ll find The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya, which includes 210 comfortable royal furnished rooms with marvelous panoramic views over the city. The hotel offers a comprehensive array of services and the most modern facilities for leisure and business travelers. It also has exquisite restaurants and bars recognized for their elegant decor and outstanding cuisine. The hotel meets all the needs of the sophisticated traveler.

AMENITIES 210 Guest Rooms and Suites Restaurants and Bars Spa Center with 6 Treatment Rooms Patio Pool, Sauna and Hammam open 24/7 Fitness Center

LOCATION Nikolskaya Street 12 Moscow 109012 Russian Federation T (7) (495) 967 7776 moscow@stregis.com stregis.com/moscow The exterior of the hotel; the Orlov Lobby Lounge; the Rooftop Hall and terrace

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THE ST. REGIS ATL AS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Rome

Rome’s first grand hotel was opened by celebrated hotelier César Ritz in 1894. In November 2018, The St. Regis Rome unveiled its meticulous multimillion euro restoration, ushering in a new era of modern glamour for this Italian icon. The hotel’s exquisite new look was conceived by renowned interior design firm Pierre-Yves Rochon Inc and honors the proud 125-year legacy. To crown the renovation, the hotel features a number of new exclusive partnerships: international art gallery Galleria Continua showcases masterpieces by the best exponents of the contemporary art scene; the employees’ uniforms have all been reimagined by fashion designer Giada Curti; in the lounge bar, Lumen, Cocktails & Cuisine, the menus have been created by Roman-born illustrator Gianluca Biscalchin and bespoke cocktails are served in unique glassware curated by Le Directeur and exclusively designed by Italian contemporary artists Nico Vascellari and Federico Pepe; the hotel’s courtesy car is a vintage Fiat 600 Multipla realized in collaboration with Garage Italia; while the new Bottega Veneta suite reflects the Italian house’s distinguished style as well as the hotel’s character.

AMENITIES 161 Guest Rooms and Suites 1 Restaurant and Bar

LOCATION Via Vittorio E. Orlando 3 Rome 00185 Italy T (39) (06) 47091 stregisrome@stregis.com stregisrome.com

Lumen, Cocktails & Cuisine; the hotel’s Fiat 600 Multipla courtesy car; a newly renovated Suite

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Discover the Upcoming St. Regis Hotels & Resorts

AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Amman

Opening 2019

The St. Regis Cairo

Opening 2019

THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Kanai Resort, Riviera Maya

Opening 2020

ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Hong Kong

Opening 2019

EUROPE

The St. Regis Venice

Opening 2019

stregis.com 58

Profile for St. Regis Hotels & Resorts

Beyond 13, The St. Regis Magazine Issue 13  

Beyond, The St. Regis Magazine, is a twice-yearly publication for guests staying at St. Regis Hotels and Resorts – of which there are now mo...

Beyond 13, The St. Regis Magazine Issue 13  

Beyond, The St. Regis Magazine, is a twice-yearly publication for guests staying at St. Regis Hotels and Resorts – of which there are now mo...

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