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T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

B E Y O N D , T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

ISSUE 10


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T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

Cover photographed by Tobias Lundkvist; styling by Victoria Bain; with thanks to Rosa Lopez Romero, Julia McKelvey and the team at The St. Regis Atlanta

Editorial Editor: Lisa Grainger Design: Vanessa Arnaud Sub-editor: Damon Syson Fashion: Barbara McMillan Photographic director: Lyndsey Price Picture editor: Louisa Bryant Editorial assistant: Alex Moore Editorial director: Gill Morgan Publisher: Crispin Jameson Project manager: Sarah Glyde

Creative and Publishing Brave New World Publishing Ltd, 6 Derby Street, London W1J 7AD T +44 (0)20 3819 7520

Advertising Advertising: Sarah Glyde Represented by: Couture Marketing (couturemarketing.com) in USA Luxx Media (chris@luxx-media.com) in EAME Nexus Ltd (tak.man@nexusmediaasia.com) in Asia Pacific

CALIBER RM 07-01

Š Copyright 2017 Brave New World Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission from the publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for any errors it may contain

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Š Didier Gourdon

Reproduction Color reproduction by: PH Media Printed by: Logical Connections

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CONTRIBUTORS Steve McCurry Since setting off in 1969 from his native Philadelphia, the legendary lensman, famed for his war reportage and his iconic portrait of green-eyed Afghan girl Sharbat Gula, has photographed people all over the globe, from Sudanese tribesmen and Nile boatmen to Himalayan monks. The country he’s looking forward to visiting next is Ethiopia, he tells us in A Life in Seven Journeys (page 96): “My friend runs an NGO there, OMO Child, and has a great rapport with the tribes. Wherever we go, they’re hospitable and relaxed.”

Brette Warshaw The freelance consultant, writer and editor was COO of Lucky Peach, the irreverent New York-based food magazine, which educated gastronomes on subjects ranging from Mexican bread to making beer. Having eaten in more pop-up restaurants than she cares to remember, she was the ideal writer to explain the trend for pop-ups all over the globe (page 82). Now fully fed, the Manhattanite says she’d like to spend her winter “holed up somewhere warm and cozy, ideally with a well-stocked kitchen and a big pile of books”.

Chris Moss The award-winning author of Patagonia: A Cultural History has lived in Argentina for a decade and has spent the past 25 years exploring Latin America, writing more than 20 guidebooks on it. In this issue of Beyond, to celebrate a new exhibition of gold artifacts in New York and Los Angeles, he examines the precious metal’s role in ancient civilizations. His own personal pot of gold this winter would be a trip to Buenos Aires: “To celebrate the centenary of tango song, and catch up with old friends who’d sing and dance with me.”

Stephanie Rafanelli Currently based in Los Angeles, where she is writing a novel, the prolific documentarymaker and journalist has explored subjects from wildlife and footballers to lipstick, for media from PBS and Discovery to Condé Nast Traveler and Elle. For Beyond, she explores why salt is now worth its weight in gold to chefs, beauty therapists and barmen. The topic, she says, has had her hooked. “Who knew that people used to be paid in blocks of salt,” she says, “or that it was sprinkled on stage in Japan to ward off evil spirits?”

Juliet Kinsman The writer, editor and brand consultant has been a journalist for more than two decades, writing on interiors for national newspapers, hip cities for the Louis Vuitton City Guides and green living for her own social enterprise, Bouteco. She has just returned from three months in Bali, where she enrolled her daughter in the Green School (page 92). This winter, they will return for another semester. “I was blessed by holy men, drank kombucha cocktails, visited wild, untouched islands. Those green paddy fields are pulling me back.”

Victoria Bain The Scottish-born stylist and artistic director, who styled our fashion shoot at The St. Regis Atlanta, works her creative magic for brands from Martini to Estée Lauder and Graff Diamonds, while contributing to international titles including Vanity Fair, Vogue and T Magazine. Rather than hunkering down in her homeland this winter, she has dreams of escaping to Kerala, to warm her skin, “or perhaps to a mountain in Aspen, with fresh powder and blue skies, and good skiing. Anywhere, really, with sun.”

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CONTENTS 14 Seven Wonders – The World in Seven Objects –

From antique statues and artists’ prints to classic motoring memorabilia, we present the stories behind seven fascinating objects from around the globe

28 The Road More Traveled – The Journey –

A centuries-old link between East and West, the Silk Road is the world’s most important route. Stanley Stewart embarks on a voyage of discovery along this ancient thoroughfare

38 Royal Touch

50 Age of Elegance

– Interview –

– Fashion –

Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece invites Beyond into her home to discuss everything from working with Andy Warhol to the inspiration behind her luxury children’s clothing brand

The St. Regis Atlanta opens its doors for our seasonal fashion shoot, featuring stylish separates and chic, understated tailoring – the perfect way to look cool and stay warm this winter

42 Smart Packing

63 Finding El Dorado

– Vacation Style –

– Food –

Whether you’re planning a beach holiday in Punta Mita, a glamorous city break to Moscow, skiing in Aspen or a cultural odyssey to Astana, these are the essentials you need to take

From the time of the Incas, gold has helped shape the history of Latin America. On the eve of a landmark museum show, Chris Moss investigates the power of this precious metal

58 Hidden Treasures

66 Hooked on Fishing

– A Little Place I Know –

– The Trend –

Tastemakers share with us their address-book secrets, from Asa Eriksson-Ahuja’s favorite tea shop in Chengdu to a Manhattan cabinet of curiosities chosen by jeweler Pippa Small

Fishing isn’t just about catching fish, it’s about immersing yourself in nature and discovering the ultimate peace. Keith Elliot explains the appeal of this increasingly popular pastime

Cover: crepe trousers, $358, Max Mara, maxmara.com; double-breasted stretch wool coat, $2,085, Emporio Armani, armani.com; leather and patent leather mules, $550, Robert Clergerie, robertclergerie.com; yellow gold-plated metal earrings, $273, Eshvi, eshvi.co.uk; leather clutch, $555, Victoria Beckham, net-a-porter.com. Above: silk embroidered crepe skirt, $1,950, Peter Pilotto, harrods.com; crepe blouse, $710, Balenciaga, net-a-porter; 18-carat gold vermeil hammered Nomad ring, $125, Dower & Hall, dowerandhall.com

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Contents

68 The St. Regis Atlas

86 Food Goes Pop

– The Directory –

– Food –

Our international network of hotels and resorts, from Aspen to Astana and Lhasa to Langkawi, plus our St. Regis Atlas Guide – to help you make the most of your stay

Forget restaurants – art galleries, roof gardens and even trucks are hosting pop-up restaurants to showcase the talents of cutting-edge chefs

70 The White Stuff

91 Kitchen Confidential

– Beauty –

– Food –

Salt was once so highly prized, it was traded pound for pound with gold. Today, as Stephanie Rafanelli discovers, it’s a key commodity in the worlds of spas, cuisine and mixology

Samir Roonwal, The St. Regis Aspen Resort’s new executive chef, reveals why Asian cuisine is so remarkable, and what it’s like to serve 10,000 guests with only a few hours’ notice

78 Treasures of India

92 Green Shoots

– The Connoisseur –

– Interiors –

Mumbai-based jeweler Nirav Modi tells James Collard about his spectacular collection of Indian art, which includes works by many of the twentieth century’s biggest names

Juliet Kinsman was so inspired by the Green School in Bali, she enrolled her daughter there for three months. She charts the dramatic influence of this remarkable institution

80 The Great Escape

96 Steve McCurry

– The Back Story –

– A Life in Seven Journeys –

Seduced by the beauty and culture of Italy, William Waldorf Astor purchased a secluded villa on Italy’s stunning Amalfi coast, and set about transforming it into his dream home

The celebrated photographer describes the journeys that have shaped his life, from hitching to Panama to a boat trip down the Nile

72 Jonas Wood – Art –

Shio’s Studio on Palms, 2015, (Oil and acrylic on canvas, 112 × 132 inches) by LA-based artist Jonas Wood, who is known for his powerful, autobiographical paintings of interior spaces

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THE WORLD IN SEVEN OBJECTS Words by Oliver Bennett Photography by Louisa Parry

UNIQUE, BEAUTIFUL OBJECTS EACH TELL A STORY OF THEIR AGE. FROM CLASSICAL SCULPTURES TO THE MINIATURE REPLICA SPORTS CAR, WE PRESENT SEVEN WONDERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD FOR YOUR DELIGHT

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The charm No one can dislike a charm. Based on a simple talisman hung on a piece of string, it’s one of world’s oldest jewelry styles. While originally charms were carved out of a gem, rock, horn or wood, and worn to ward off evil spirits, in Victorian times, they became more decorative: fashioned from silver or gold and chosen to signify important things in the wearer’s life, from christenings to engagements. When Queen Victoria herself took to wearing clusters of them – some with lockets of hair, others with miniature portraits – the fashion world was quick to embrace them. Soon Chanel and Tiffany (with its iconic Tiffany heart) became renowned for stylish versions, followed subsequently by designers and brands around the globe, from Vivienne Westwood to Chloé, Alison Lou, Jennifer Meyer and Harry Winston

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(pictured). This time, though, as well as the traditional Cinderella coaches, dogs and ponies clinking on wrists, there are 21st-century motifs, from lightning bolts and skulls to smiling emojis and arrows, worn in clusters on necklaces by fashionable young women. Why the sudden resurgence in popularity? Not only because this boho prop has “passage of life”significance – equally appreciated by both a child and a fashionable woman for a special occasion – but because it’s versatile. Single charms can be worn with a pretty dress or you can bring out your inner Esmeralda with a clinking bunch of them. This season, a bit of wizardry has also been added to the mix: Harry Potter charms that bring not just literary characters to the frame, but a little bit of 21st-century magic too. harrywinston.com

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The artist’s print In the past, the art print was considered a lesser commodity to the original artwork, often secreted in a portfolio, or hung en masse on a passageway wall. But recently the print has returned to favor. Why? Not simply because prints are less expensive and more accessible than an original (who can find an original Matisse painting these days to buy, even if one had the tens of millions to acquire it?) Or because, with the rise of online galleries which have grown web-based art trade to around $2 billion a year, it’s now much simpler to find an original work of art and get it delivered to your home as quickly as your groceries. It’s also because prints, like this one from Hang-Up Gallery, have lost their lesser status. Indeed, since the contemporary art market began to soar in the 1980s, a slew of galleries have started up to offer prints from household-name artists at relatively low prices. “It’s a comfortable entry point for people who haven’t necessarily bought art before,” says James Booth-Clibborn, whose company, Manifold Editions, specializes in contemporary artists. He explains that prints are offered in limited edition, averaging fewer than 70, each signed and numbered by the artist. “Prints are an affordable way to collect works by leading contemporary artists. You won’t need a fortune to start your collection.” There may be another factor contributing to the upward trajectory of these once-derided artifacts. As contemporary art moves into the large-scale installation, video and floor-based sculpture, the small scale of the old medium brings art back to that most popular of all spaces: the domestic wall. manifoldeditions.com, hanguppictures.com

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The toy car

You could probably buy a brand new car for the price of a replica classic these days. But that’s not the point. The beauty we have photographed here, from Bentleys London, is a model of a 1950s Ferrari F500 F2: a vehicle that took nine Grand Prix victories and became one of the best-loved cars of all time. The popularity of model cars at collectors’ emporiums and auction houses partially explains the growth in the market for motoring memorabilia in general, from model cars and helmets to driving gloves and watches. When Christie’s Geneva auctioned a collection of Rolex Daytona Cosmograph wristwatches, designed specifically for racing drivers, all 50 watches were sold for a combined total of more than $13 million. The star of the show – a unique model known as the Paul Newman, because the racing-fanatic actor always wore one – fetched over a million dollars, more than four times the expected price. According to Bonhams, the trend extends to old car-sale and promotional books from the Golden Age of motoring, which are achieving impressive prices. Even some rare Scalextric slot cars can reach well over $1,000 apiece. Why? It’s a great way for a car enthusiast to collect, without having to garage a big vehicle. Although, as motoring author Giles Chapman says, what real collectors want to amass is memorabilia from luxury marques such as Aston Martin, Rolls-Royce, Bugatti and Bentley. “It really has to be something connected with a good marque,” he says, explaining that a Spirit of Ecstasy from the hood of a Rolls-Royce will always find a buyer. “No one,” he adds, “is interested in a model Hyundai or Seat.” bentleyslondon.com

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The antiquity

Antiquities that have long gathered dust in museums are at last coming out of hiding and finding new homes in contemporary spaces around the globe. For those fed up with what they believe is the shallowness of contemporary art, the arrival of ancient sculpture in the domestic interior is a welcome relief. Busts are not just visually beautiful – extraordinary examples of master craftsmanship – but a visual dive into deep history. This beautiful 2nd-century white crystalline marble bust of a woman’s head, for instance, from Kallos Gallery, is a depiction of Ariadne, who became the bride of Bacchus, the god of wine. It would have adorned the home of a wealthy Roman, who appreciated not just luxury materials, but the craftsmanship: the wreath here is made of finely carved pine cones and clusters, each finely modeled and hand-drilled. Heads such as this are also becoming extremely valuable at market. In 2010 a Roman marble portrait bust sold at Sotheby’s New York for $23.8 million – ten times the expected $2 million – and in 2014, an Egyptian limestone statue sold for over $20m at Christie’s: almost five times what they expected. Today, dealers and galleries such as Ariadne Galleries, David Ghezelbash, Phoenix Ancient Art, and Gordian Weber Kunsthandel feed an increasingly hungry group of collectors. The current trend is to mix antiquities with modern pieces, in the style of the Belgian seer of modern collecting, Axel Vervoordt. The trick if you get one? Backlight it, says Vervoordt. “That really brings an ancient head to life.” kallosgallery.com

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The turmeric root Having been viewed for decades as a workaday addition to the currymaker’s pot, turmeric is enjoying its moment in the sun as the spice du jour. The gloriously colored root, with its earthy taste and ability to turn your T-shirt into a Buddhist monk’s robe, is no longer being seen merely as a flavorful addition to Eastern food, either sliced from a root or sprinkled as a dried powder, but as a nutritious addition to tinctures, smoothies, teas and lattes. It’s even being used in face packs and scrubs, to soften and soothe skin. So what are its much-lauded benefits? Primarily that it helps with inflammation. “It has curcumin in it, which is a Cox-2 inhibitor that is a proven anti-inflammatory,” says Jeanette Hyde, a nutritionist and author of the popular health bible The Gut Makeover. “People who do a lot of sport swear by it.” There’s also tantalizing talk that regular use of turmeric could help with a range of conditions, from age-related memory loss and arthritis to a variety of skin conditions, including eczema. When the actress and model Priyanka Chopra was asked the secret of her glowing skin at this year’s Oscars, she cited a body rub made with turmeric, sandalwood, Greek yogurt and chickpea flour. Hyde, who uses it to make smoothies, gives a note of warning, though. “It’s very staining,” she says. Not something to drink when you’re wearing your white Balenciaga, then.

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The luxe weight In the fickle world of fitness there’s been a move away from unsightly and complicated high-tech products towards those that are simple and rather beautiful: excellent news for anyone who likes their workout space to be as beautiful as their home. Following on from other such handsome fitness items as cast-iron kettle bells, Indian clubs and Persian “Shena” push-up boards comes a range of new designer dumbbells so beautiful, they could be mistaken for domestic sculpture. Pent, for example, makes bespoke dumbbells from European walnut with steel and brass inlay – a finely tooled look that (hopefully) complements your rippling abdomen – as well as a range of barbells, called the Lesna, with removable weights that are as handsome as contemporary artworks. (Rather wonderfully, they can be engraved, so everyone knows they’re yours.) The German company Hock Design has created a limited-edition run of 50 sets of dumbbells made from 18-carat gold and rare grenadilla wood, which could be used as doorstops should your quest for the perfect body fizzle out. And the Swedish company Tingest makes marble dumbbells (pictured, right) in either black or white, as well as kettlebells, which they launched at the Stockholm furniture fair, that resemble exquisite handbags and could sit as happily in a feminine room as they could in a macho gym. These weights don’t just sit incognito while not in use, but declare themselves proudly. And just perhaps, your body will follow their example. pentfitness.com; hockdesign.com; tingest.com

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The violet

Until now, the scent of a violet has been thought of as, well, a little old-fashioned and prim. But, like many perfumes beloved by Victorian ladies, the fragrance of this most velvet of flowers is muscling its way back into fashion and scenting the smartest spaces once again. Violets are part of the scent of the St. Regis “Caroline’s Four Hundred Candle”, made by Carlos Huber of the perfumer Arquiste, in homage to the glory days of Caroline Astor, the matriarch of the original St. Regis hotel’s founding family, who hosted some of the most glorious parties New York has ever seen. “The violets in this scent formula would have been the same as the ones Mrs Astor would use as centerpieces in the St. Regis ballroom in the Gilded Age,” says Huber. Why is the flower such an olfactory hit? “The scent is intriguing,” says Huber. “It comes and goes. One minute you smell it, and the next it’s gone. This chemical characteristic makes them attractive and ever-new.” Oils extracted for perfume come from the Viola odorata, also called the Sweet Violet, which grows in the Mediterranean region and Asia Minor and produces delicate purple, white or variegated flowers that appear in early spring. The scent itself comes from ionones in the plant, which create its trademark sweetness and powdery, woody-floral characteristics that have been popular for centuries. The French Emperor Napoleon was a lover of violets (they are thought to have therapeutic properties, and help to ward off colds, asthma, rheumatic pains and infections) as was his Empress, Josephine, who wore them on her wedding day. And it’s safe to say there was nothing prim about them.

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The Silk Road

Words by Stanley Stewart

NO OTHER ROUTE ON THE GLOBE HAS SEEN QUITE SO MANY CIVILIZATIONS, RELIGIONS OR PEOPLES PASS BY. BEYOND JOURNEYS THROUGH HISTORY ON THE SILK ROAD

THE

ROAD MORE TRAVELED

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I

The Journey

The Silk Road

“No wife,” I said, relieved. He made a pantomime expression of surprise. His eyes, the color of tea, widened to the size of saucers. “NO WIFE?” he bawled. Then his voice dropped to pianissimo. “Listen carefully, English. Let me tell you how to get a wife.” And leaning back, he embarked upon an explanation of the intricacies of Kyrgyz romance. I was on the Silk Road, that great trans-Asian route that the English traveler Freya Stark described as “the oldest, the longest, the most romantic, the most persistent of all the checkered streams of trade”. For more than 4,000 miles, it follows various routes from the gates of Xi’an in China to the shores of the Mediterranean. But whichever way you pass, Central Asia is its hub, and the people of Central Asia its middlemen. They share nomadic roots, mercantile instincts and a surprising enthusiasm for splendid hats, from the dainty pillbox job of the Uzbek merchant to the tall felt affair of the Kyrgyz horseman. I had come to Central Asia to understand nomads, and to see the remnants of the nomadic culture that still existed in the remoter regions of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. I was following the route of the old Silk Road, from the Crimea across southern Russia, watching the rolling steppes from the windows of the Kazakhstan Express. I left the train

n the Tian Shan Mountains – the Mountains of Heaven, to the Chinese – my guide and I came upon an old man on a white horse. He wore tall leather boots and a splendid white felt hat like an upturned jelly mold. With a jerk of his head, he invited us to come and eat. Beyond San Tash, where Tamerlane left a chilling monument to his slaughtered dead, we found his yurt perched on a bluff above a dark river. Full of the aromas of cooking and wood smoke, it was as snug as a womb. We took our place sprawled on rugs on a raised platform at the rear. Bowls of milky tea laced with butter were handed round and a great plate of petrified cheese was set before us. The old man’s flat Kyrgyz face was the color of walnuts. He gazed at me for a moment without speaking, as if assessing my fate. Then he set about eating, chomping his way through the bread and cheese with a series of deep, throaty growls, before throwing himself back onto the pillows with a grunt and looking at me. “ENGLISH!” he bellowed at me. (I’m not English, but this didn’t seem the moment to quibble about passport details.) “ENGLISH, WHERE IS YOUR WIFE?” I thought for a dreadful moment he knew something about my wife that I didn’t, that he had heard she had run away to the South of France with a member of the Chippendales. Then I remembered I didn’t have a wife.

To the south of Turkestan lie the ruins of Otrar, another ghost on the Silk Road, and the place where Genghis Khan, the great nomadic conqueror, got his start in the business of empire-building. Just beyond a museum cataloging the life of this once-great city, a long featureless mound topped by waves of corn, littered with pot shards and bleached bones. In an excavation pit, where swallows rose in a fluttering cloud, I found the floor of Otrar’s great mosque. All that remained were the shattered bases of brick columns. The layers of sediment exposed in the pit walls showed the strata of the city’s different eras of settlement. Among them, a thick line of ash marked the Mongol era, when Genghis Khan had sent armies to burn this city to the ground, at the very beginning of the Mongol Empire. This conflict between the settled people of cities and the nomadic horsemen of the steppes is one of the central issues of the Silk Road. Time and again, nomads would sweep east and west along the road to conquer settled populations – in China, in Persia, in northern India. Here, in this archaeological pit, in this layer of burnt material, was a moment in history that you could touch. I raked my fingers over it, and the old ash, the ancient antipathies, crumbled onto my boots. In the congested avenues of Almaty, Kazakhstan’s former capital, I found myself sympathizing with the nomads. The city was full of city

in the town of Turkestan, where dust from the Kyzylkum Desert coated the leaves of the shade trees along the main road. Turkestan is home to one of the holiest of Kazakh shrines, the mausoleum of the first great Turkic saint, Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, the founder of a Sufi order in the 12th century. Its blue dome rises on the edge of the desert, the sole survivor of the town’s more glamorous past. It was built by one of the great names of Central Asia: Tamerlane, the 14th-century conqueror who traced his ancestry back to Genghis Khan. The mosque encapsulates the true essence of the Silk Road. Ideas were packed among the goods in the baggage trains on this legendary route. Culture, art and religion passed from one region to another with breathtaking fluidity. Islam spread here from the Middle East – and the ribbed dome of this shrine is part of the great canon of Iranian architecture, an influence that had traveled eastward along the Silk Road for well over 600 miles. The dome hovers above walls of turquoise and azure tiles and delicate traceries of arabesque. I followed passageways from the central chamber into a labyrinth of tall white rooms, the grilled windows of which filtered the outside world to a pale wash of light and a filigree of muted sound. No other religion has captured the longing for a tranquil soul in the form of architecture as exquisitely as Islam.

Paradise found Below: Kazakh eagle-hunters drive their cattle across the steppes on their seasonal migration. Overleaf, from left: the soaring Mountains of Heaven; Registan Square, Samarkand

Opening spread, opposite and right: Getty Images

Nature’s bounty Previous pages: vast flocks of sheep being moved across the dusty foothills by herders on horseback. Below: a nomadic man and his wife, each bedecked in traditional pewter jewelry

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Left: Getty Images. Right: Ian Berry/Magnum


Ideas were packed among the goods in the baggage trains on this legendary route. Culture, art and religion passed from one region to another with breathtaking fluidity


At the end of the lake we drove through apple orchards to Karakol. Tucked away in one of the remotest corners of Central Asia, the town of Karakol still had the cosmopolitan air of a Silk Road town, a place where disparate peoples met and mingled. Blond Russian schoolchildren were trailing home past cottages with blue shutters and white picket fences. Uighurs in their pretty embroidered caps had laid out cheap Chinese imports at makeshift stalls in the main square. In the market, Uzbek butchers were dismembering cows with huge axes. Kazakh men went by on tall horses while old Kyrgyz men with wispy beards gossiped on shady street corners. The next morning, Marat and I took up the trail of Tamerlane, heading east into the Tian Shan mountains. Born in Central Asia, Tamerlane, or Timur, was the last of the great nomadic conquerors, forging an empire in the 14th century that stretched westward along the Silk Road into Iran and much of the Middle East as well as southward into northern India and north into much of Russia. In Samarkand, his capital, he left one of the world’s most beautiful ensembles of Islamic buildings – a model of architectural delicacy and sophistication. Everywhere else, from Baghdad to Delhi, he left vast piles of bones. We rose into high valleys of grass and pine trees, of horsemen and nomads. On the far side of a narrow pass, we came to the valley of Karkara.

hassles – queues, crowds, traffic. In the midday heat, people seemed to move in sluggish slow motion. But when I lifted my eyes beyond the buildings and the rooftops, I could see the mighty Mountains of Heaven, the mighty Tian Shan. They promised escape. So I set off with a guide, the bumbling Marat, to Kyrgyzstan, and that section of the old road that ran along the northern shores of Issyk-kul lake towards the mountain passes to China. In Bishkek, the Kyrgyz capital, the main avenue was still called Silk Road Street. Eastwards, the road ran through velvet foothills. Gangs of hay-makers were out in the fields with pitchforks and scythes. On the far side of a pass of poplars and rosecolored rocks, huge flocks of sheep appeared, with young shepherds on horses cracking long whips in the rolling clouds of dust. We passed the 11th-century Burana Tower, like a lighthouse of the Silk Road, marooned in fields of edelweiss. It marked the ruins of Balasagun, a millennium ago a great Silk Road city. In the small museum were the remnants of the ancient trade: Chinese coins, bracelets of Indian cowrie shells, iron swords, bronze lamps, amulets. In the late afternoon, we came down to Issyk-kul. Its glassy surface held the reflections of snow peaks and high wind-torn clouds. A family went by in a wagon, the patriarch in a tall felt hat, reclining on bolsters of new hay among a tribe of daughters.

The Silk Road

Below, opposite and previous spread: Getty Images

The Journey

It was empty and pristine and full of birdsong. A herd of untended horses were galloping through blue twilight. China lay just beyond the passes. Halfway along the valley floor, we came to the great mound of San Tash, a pile of boulders the height of a house. It was made when Tamerlane embarked on an ill-fated invasion of China. He ordered each soldier to place a stone on the pile as they passed. On their way back from the wars, each took one away again. In this way, Tamerlane could calculate his losses. They numbered in the thousands, a tall cenotaph of stones raised by the fallen to their own memory. I climbed to the top, and the rocks slipped and rumbled beneath my feet like skulls. It was here that we met our Kyrgyz nomad, on his white horse. After supper, he embarked on his matrimonial advice. He was a traditionalist in matters of the heart. In his day, Kyrgyz chaps would cut to the chase when it came to courtship. A young man in possession of a Kyrgyz fortune – numerous sheep – and in need of a wife simply kidnapped the woman of his dreams, and then, through intermediaries, made her family an offer they couldn’t refuse. As soon as the bargaining was completed – quantities of sheep generally needed to change hands – they set a date and the young man and his fiancée emerged from hiding to a welcome from both families. The old man sat back, spreading his hands wide. “That’s the way to get a

decent wife,” he said, slapping my thigh. His own wife, and former hostage, beamed her approval. His was the voice of the old Silk Road, of the nomadic cultures that had been central to these regions. But a new Silk Road is emerging in Central Asia. After decades of Soviet hegemony, trade is again becoming the life blood of these regions. A sense of optimism among the new republics of Central Asia, coupled with China’s expansive trade policies, is transforming the region. Rail lines now carry freight from the heart of China across its mountainous western borders to the Central Asian republics and beyond to Iran, to Turkey and to Europe. A new Silk Road is being forged in Central Asia – part of a modern, globalized world. The great trading caravans of the past nurtured the cities of Central Asia: Merv, Khiva, Bukhara and Samarkand. With the new trading realities, the old cities are prospering again, and new cities are emerging. Among them is Astana, Kazakhstan’s burgeoning capital – a city that now stands at the center of the modern Silk Road. Its gleaming skyscrapers rise confidently from the Kazakh steppe, while luxury hotels like the new St. Regis Astana stand as heirs to the old Silk Road caravanserais. Your address: The St. Regis Astana

Serene vista

Facing the future

Simple lakeside huts in the Tien Shan Mountain range, which straddles the border between China and Kyrgyzstan, present an idyll of peace

Trade is booming once again on the Silk Road, where an ancient culture is being connected with the modern world for the benefit of both

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Profile

Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece

“Warhol said, ‘Scarlett, would you like to sit for me?’ I called myself that then. I was 16” Words by Lisa Grainger Portrait by Julian Broad

PRINCESS MARIE-CHANTAL OF GREECE WELCOMES BEYOND INTO HER HOME TO TALK ABOUT THE EXPANSION OF HER CHILDREN’S CLOTHING EMPIRE, THE BUILDING OF MULTI-GENERATIONAL ST YLE IN HER FAMILY - AND WORKING FOR NEW YORK’S MAESTRO OF POP ART

Opposite and above: Julian Broad/Getty Images

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“It got stuck in a hole, and I haven’t had time to wash it yet.” The cat, though, is the only thing that’s not immaculate in the room. Cushions are artfully arranged on carefully placed sofas. Tight, round “trees” of single-color flowers adorn coffee tables. Photographs of the couple’s wedding – the biggest gathering of royals in London since the nuptials of Princess Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in 1947 – adorn a polished grand piano. And on three of the walls hang Andy Warhol paintings: one that the artist gave her as a gift on her school graduation, and two which she posed for as a 16-year-old intern at his Factory studio in New York. Working for Warhol was “one of the best experiences I could ever have had”, she says. “It was so much fun. It was the 1980s and the art world was booming, and he’d have me do everything: mix paint, serve lunch, run errands, go with him to openings and exhibits, and hang out with Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. I can’t believe my parents let me, to be honest – although I did have a 10pm curfew.” Sitting for Warhol came about by accident. “He said to me one day, ‘Scarlett, would you like to sit for me?’ I called myself Scarlett then – who knows why. I didn’t like Marie-Chantal. I was 16 and trying to invent myself. Maybe it was after Gone with the Wind – I can’t remember. So I sat for him. My father, thankfully, bought the works, which was a good investment.”

pair of matching Vespas is not the first thing you expect to find at the front door of one of Europe’s leading royal families. But, as the electric gates swing back to let me into the London townhouse of Prince Pavlos and Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece, there, by the chic black-lacquered front door, stand two immaculate burgundy scooters: one for him and one for her. If they were the property of any other young London couple, the bikes wouldn’t be of interest. But Pavlos, the Crown Prince of Greece, has connections to half the royals in Europe, with their golden carriages and bulletproof limousines, and his wife Marie-Chantal, the daughter of the DFS (Duty Free Shops) billionaire Robert Miller, is not unaccustomed to a life of personal chauffeurs and private planes. The fact that they whizz about the British capital on two wheels – posting Instagram photographs of themselves with their children on the back – tells you much of what you need to know about this most independent of royal couples. As she leads me into the drawing room of their capacious Chelsea home, her petite frame clad in black J Brand jeans and a cream lace shirt, with Pierre Hardy pumps on her feet, it’s clear she’s no average princess. “Sorry about the cat,” she apologizes, removing a muddy-nosed creature from a cream chair and calling one of her five children to retrieve it.

House style Opposite: Princess Marie-Chantal in the elegant London abode she shares with Prince Pavlos and their family Above: the couple’s home is filled with art, including paintings of herself by Warhol, and of her children

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Profile

Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece

Small wonder Marie-Chantal’s spring/summer 2017 collection for children includes lightweight suits for boys and cool tweed dresses for girls, each beautifully cut

Royal standard Princess Marie-Chantal photographed in the garden of her London townhouse with three of her five children, wearing clothes from their mother’s eponymous range

remainder from Cacharel and Daniel Hechter in Paris.” Even today, as a 48-year-old mother of five children, aged between nine and 21, Marie-Chantal still takes inspiration from her mother’s wardrobe – and borrows from it regularly. “She has great jackets and accessories, and some very good Chanel pieces. What’s funny is that Olympia [her 21-yearold daughter, currently studying photography in New York] is now borrowing my clothes. Our taste is multi-generational.” Other than her mother, from whom she borrowed a navy Chanel couture suit to wear on the evening she met Prince Pavlos, the icons she was inspired by are all from a previous generation. “I know it’s a cliché, but it was women like Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn and Jane Birkin, whose style you don’t see so much today. It’s much more diverse and creative now: girls are mixing street style with high fashion, and pieces from Zara or Topshop. They might buy a designer bag, but that’s it, whereas when I was young and living in Paris in the 1980s, you were loyal to one designer. Mine was Karl Lagerfeld, then Valentino, who made my wedding dress [a pearl-encrusted gown that was rumored to have cost $225,000] and who has since become a friend. I love the way they nurture clients. There’s a real friendship there.” If she had to pick two women now whose style she admires, it would be Inès de la Fressange, Lagerfeld’s muse, “who has

Three decades later, she not only appreciates the name Marie-Chantal, but has created an eponymous business from it: a luxury children’s clothing range that has grown from a small line in a single London store to an internationally recognizable brand sold in more than 30 countries worldwide. When she launched in 2001 in New York, where she has a home, “friends [including loyal followers such as Gwyneth Paltrow, Brad Pitt, Jessica Alba and Victoria Beckham] were very sweet and bought it. We did 18 options for girls, 12 for boys.” Today, she sells as many items online internationally as she does in her original store in the British capital. “I think people crave the nostalgia of an old-fashioned childhood,” she says, praising the Duchess of Cambridge, whose wedding she attended, for helping to revive more traditional childrenswear. “They want gingham and stripes, and pretty dresses for girls, and beautifully cut classics for boys, whether they’re in a big city in Asia or on America’s East Coast. And lovely fabrics that aren’t scratchy and itchy.” Her own mother, she says, has “immaculate taste” and bought only classical styles for her and her sisters, Alexandra von Fürstenberg (now a furniture designer) and Pia Getty (a filmmaker). “We lived in Hong Kong and she would take us to Europe to do our shopping for the year: toiles from Liberty, and kilts and cashmere from The Scotch House, in London; the

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such classic elegance, she could wear white jeans and a white shirt and look fabulous”, and Lauren Santo Domingo, “who’s great at being experimental and carrying off new brands”, and who carries Marie-Chantal’s line on her Moda Operandi online boutique. And designers? “Peter Pilotto, Erdem, Emilia Wickstead and Michael Kors.” As you might expect from someone who regularly appears on lists of the world’s best-dressed women, attending fashion shows and shopping are a key part of her daily life. “The problem is the internet!” she exclaims, rolling her eyes. “I love shopping online and there are so many great places: Matches, Mytheresa, Shopbop for its jeans and T-shirts, Farfetch, Amazon… I can’t remember the last time I went and browsed in a boutique. It just doesn’t happen any more.” Being much the same size as she was when she married 22 years ago means she can mix classics from the 1980s with new things. She stays trim by going to the gym or cycling. “Plus, I haven’t eaten carbohydrates for years, or sugar. If you add up how much sugar is in a diet, what with fruit and veg, and cookies and desserts, it really adds up, so I stopped completely. I try to stop the kids having sugar, too, but it’s a nightmare. Even juices – you really have to read the labels. It’s all hidden. Everyone should watch Food, Inc. and That Sugar Film. Then they’d cut it out completely.”

Two things she believes in, however, are fresh air and a good beauty regime. “My dermatologist advocates a regime of scrub, wash and moisturize, plus vitamin C and glycolic acid,” she says. “And it works.” As for the fresh air, she gets plenty of that on the family estate in Yorkshire, in the north of England, where they go most weekends. “Growing up in Hong Kong, I dreamed of space. Being able to enjoy that now is wonderful. I’m a mix of urban and country, I think.” As are her customers – in her four stores, online shop and sales points around the world. Surprisingly, she says, it’s in Asia that classic dressing has had a particular resurgence. “There, the little girl or boy really represents the family status, so it’s important to dress them well,” she says. Advice to focus her business eastwards has come from a trusted source. Her father grew his DFS and Galleria brands by targeting the Japanese consumer of the 1970s. “Today, it’s the Chinese,” she says, “who love not just luxury but lots of different new brands. It’s growing there like nowhere else.” But really, she says, wherever they are, people of all ages like to look good. “It’s important to make an effort,” she smiles. “People appreciate it. Like manners.” And with that she gets up to make me tea, like the mannerly princess she is. marie-chantal.com

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Smart Packing

Smart Packing

Casual woven crocodile shoes, $5,800, Stefano Ricci, boutique.stefanoricci.com

Classic 57 sunglasses, $380, Saint Laurent, ysl.com

Packaway mac, $350, Paul Smith, paulsmith.com

Linen blend trousers, $264, Frescobol Carioca, matchesfashion.com

Pachora Duffel Bag, $498, Robert Graham, robertgraham.us

Woven belt, $200, Corneliani, corneliani.com

MasterGraff Minute Repeater in white gold, POA, Graff, graffdiamonds.com

MOSCOW COOL FALL IS THE PERFECT TIME OF YEAR TO DISCOVER THE VIBRANT RUSSIAN CAPITAL. BEAT THE SHOWERS WITH OUR SELECTION OF CHIC URBAN FASHION FOR ST YLISH TRAVELERS

Your address: The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya

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Smart Packing

BALHARBOURSHOPS.COM

Smart Packing

FASHION CENTRAL

9700 Collins Ave, Bal Harbour, Florida

PLANNING A TRIP TO THE SPECTACULAR CIT Y OF ASTANA? WHETHER YOU’RE TRAVELING FOR BUSINESS OR PLEASURE, WE’VE GOT YOUR FASHIONABLE URBAN WARDROBE COVERED

Your address: The St. Regis Astana

Cat-eye sunglasses, $315, Prada, mytheresa.com

Small malachite Ark bag, $298, Cult Gaia, cultgaia.com

Fabre belted jacket, $350, Ganni, farfetch.com

Pleated silk-blend skirt, $2,200, Gucci, net-a-porter.com

Elodie flat shoes, $712, The Row, matchesfashion.com

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®

Bvlgari Bvlgari earrings in 18-carat pink gold with jadeite jade and diamonds, $4,350, bulgari.com

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Gingham dress, $890, Rosetta Getty, avenue32.com


Smart Packing

Smart Packing

Barts BV straw hat, $29, selfridges.com

Chloé chambray dress, $126, childrensalon.com

Little Creative Factory swimsuit, $50, smallable.com

Marie-Chantal Liberty-print washbag, $61, mariechantal.com

St. Regis Vilebrequin swim shorts, $120, stregisboutique.com

Seafolly embroidered kaftan, $43, alexandalexa.com

Soludos flamingo espadrilles, $90, alexandalexa.com

BEACH BABES HEADING TO THE PACIFIC PARADISE OF PUNTA MITA FOR A DOSE OF SUN, SEA AND SAND? PACK THE PERFECT BEACHWEAR FOR YOUR JUNIOR TRENDSETTERS

ARIZONA | CALIFORNIA | CONNECTICUT | FLORIDA | GEORGIA | NEVADA NEW JERSEY | NEW YORK | PENNSYLVANIA | TEXAS | WASHINGTON

Your address: The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort

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www.robertgraham.us 47


LET IT SNOW

Smart Packing

Smart Packing

LOOK LIKE A CHAMP ON THE SLOPES AT ASPEN THIS YEAR WITH OUR EDIT OF ST YLISH SKIWEAR. AND DON’T FORGET TO PACK YOUR COZIEST APRES-SKI WARDROBE

Your address: The St. Regis Aspen Resort

Flight Deck Prizm goggles, $200, Oakley, oakley.com

Aurora ski pants, $400, Perfect Moment, perfectmoment.com

PBI Expedition men’s parka, $1,045, Canada Goose, canadagoose.com

Mini Duvet II jacket, $480, Perfect Moment, perfectmoment.com

Oversized khaki sunglasses, $367, Céline, brownsfashion.com

Holby women’s cashmere beanie, $160, Madeleine Thompson, net-a-porter.com

Bexley leather boots, $795, Tabitha Simmons, mytheresa.com

ORLEBARBROWN.COM

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AGE OF ELEGANCE Photography by Tobias Lundkvist Styling by Victoria Bain

GRACE, GRANDEUR AND TIMELESS ELEGANCE ARE THE HALLMARKS OF THE ST. REGIS ATLANTA, WHICH MAKES IT THE PERFECT BACKDROP FOR OUR EDIT OF SLEEK WINTER TAILORING AND LAID-BACK CHIC

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Previous spread: silk Viviana dress, $1,950, Roksanda, roksanda.com; leather heels, $755, CĂŠline, celine.com. Opposite: cashmere rollneck, $905, Agnona, agnona. com, Prince of Wales-checked wool trousers, $765, Stella McCartney, matchesfashion.com; 18-carat gold vermeil hammered Nomad ring, $125, Dower & Hall, dowerandhall.com; patent loafers, $240, Russell & Bromley, russellandbromley.co.uk; metal earrings, $195, Edge of Ember, edgeofember.com. Above: Louisa crepe wrap top, $762, Khaite, matchesfashion.com; bronze and 24-carat gold-plated bronze earrings, $220, Alighieri, alighieri.co.uk; wool trousers, $350, Max Mara, maxmara.com


Above: double faced cashmere, $2210, Agnona, agnona.com. Opposite: wool dress, $390, Nanushka, nanushka.com; 18-carat gold vermeil large domed Nomad ring, $255, Dower & Hall, dowerandhall.com; patent penny loafers, $255, Russell & Bromley, russellandbromley.co.uk; metal earrings, $325, Dior, dior.com

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Above: faux leather coat, $651, Nanushka, nanushka.com; gold-plated drop earrings, $65, Jenny Bird, jenny-bird.com; 18-carat gold vermeil large domed Nomad ring, $255, Dower & Hall, dowerandhall.com; leather and patent leather mules, $550, Robert Clergerie, robertclergerie.com. Opposite: fil coupĂŠ asymmetric skirt, $1595, and fil coupĂŠ cape top, $1425, Peter Pilotto, matchesfashion.com; 24-carat gold-plated bronze earrings, $330, Alighieri, alighieri.co.uk; 18-carat gold vermeil hammered Nomad bangles, both $110, and 18-carat gold vermeil large domed Nomad ring, $255, all Dower & Hall, dowerandhall.com Hair and make-up: Jamile Debow. Model: Alyshia Miller at The Hive Management


A Little Place I Know

A compendium of global treasures in New York by Pippa Small

ADDRESS-BOOK SECRETS FROM LUMINARIES OF THE WORLDS OF FASHION, FOOD AND DESIGN

De Vera, 1 Crosby Street, New York

An Ottoman palace in Istanbul by Leon Jakimič

This store is in a part of Soho that’s forever changing – you might walk one block and it feels quite grimy, and the next it’s impossibly glamorous. It’s an area that’s always in a state of flux. From the outside, it’s pretty difficult to guess what it sells: it’s dark and unreadable, like a treasure box. Inside, it looks part cathedral, part museum and part eccentric collector’s home. It’s lined with 19th-century museum displays stocked with pieces from around the world. There’s Catholic iconography and kitsch Japanese ceramics, found objects, architectural details, little boxes, curiosity cabinets, jewelry made from old stones, seals, ancient beads, pearls, diamonds, antique pieces remade into modern wonders. It’s an appreciation of the natural world. Everything is curated with a strong point of view and vision, and the line between display, decor and product seems blurred in a deliciously “unshoplike” way. You just wander, brushing past some things and peering intently at others as you discover them. I’ve found all sorts of things I love in there: ancient baroque pearls strung into a bracelet, a huge mirror-like old Moghul diamond ring, and strings of colored gems that looked like a child’s string of plastic beads, but actually turned out to be a collection of rubies, corals and emeralds. I often come here just to look. I don’t have to buy anything to feel happy and enriched.

Dolmabahçe Palace, Vişnezade Mahallesi, Dolmabahçe Cd, Istanbul

The palace is set between the ports of Beşiktaş and Kabataş and overlooks the Bosphorus, in which the old Ottoman fleets used to anchor. You can arrive here either on foot, through the little cobbled streets, or by boat, on the glittering waters. Either way, it’s an impressive building – a testament to the opulent life of the Ottoman sultans and the power of their empire. Outside, it’s embellished with intricate white carvings. Inside, every centimeter is decorated with marble, gold and crystal. Built in the 19th century, it’s full of history. Because of my interest in crystal, I was particularly impressed by the world’s largest Bohemian chandelier, in the Ceremonial Hall, which was sent to Istanbul by Queen Victoria of England. It’s an extraordinary example of what can be made by master craftsmen. Of course it’s not the only beautiful thing: each room is different, whether it’s the harem – which was the Sultan’s private area – the study room, the alabaster baths or the throne room. The building is filled with references to other great nations: it was the intention of the Ottoman emperors to build a palace that would match the success of European emperors, culture and architecture. If you’re visiting, it’s also worth going to the neo-baroque Dolmabahçe Clock Tower, the Dolmabahçe Mosque and the Palace Collections Museum. But allow a few days: there’s so much culture and history, you could spend a lifetime here.

Pippa Small is an ethical jeweler who works with marginalized people, from Afghan lapis craftsmen to Kalahari Bushmen. She has a New York boutique at ABC Carpet & Home (pippasmall.com) Your address: The St. Regis New York

A traditional souq in Doha by Jeremy Morris Souq Waqif, Doha

There has been a souq in the vibrant Al Souq area of Doha for more than a century. It was originally a place where Bedouins and locals came together to trade, near the water’s edge, but in 2006 it was renovated in traditional Qatari architectural style, with cobbled lanes and whitewashed buildings, mud-rendered walls and exposed timber beams. Inside, it’s a brilliant assault on the senses: a maze of alleyways with market stall-holders selling brightly colored fabrics, spices and exotic birds, Arabic coffee-sellers and uniformed porters carrying shopping. There’s an amazing choice of restaurants and wonderful coffee shops, with the smell of shisha wafting above it all. You can get pretty much anything from the region here: traditional spices and herbs, preserved lemons and Yemeni honey, Iranian bread and dates from Qatar, as well as incense and perfumes, handcrafted goods in leather, gold, clay or wood. The bird souq is particularly lovely: there are exotic birds chirping away next to magnificent hooded falcons. And I love the vivid colors of the textiles – the deep reds, vibrant greens and ocher yellows always give me inspiration when I’m designing with our precious gemstones. Business colleagues introduced the souq to me, and we had a wonderful traditional meal with soccer on the TV screens behind us – memorable and great fun.

Leon Jakimič is founder of the Czech crystal brand Lasvit (lasvit.com) Your address: The St. Regis Istanbul

A tea shop in Chengdu by Asa Eriksson-Ahuja This little tea house, located in the more commercial south side of Chengdu, is surrounded by modern structures that accentuate its more traditional architecture and materials. Even the entrance – a wooden porch with a thatched roof – makes you feel like you’re entering an ancient garden house. Step inside and you find an airy, Zen-like room, lit by rice-paper windows. The interiors are all tastefully decorated with potted trees, teapots, hanging calligraphy and fans. The owner wanted to create a space that honored the rich traditions of China’s tea-drinking culture, and he sells only premium-quality Chinese tea, as well as refined teaware and tea-serving garments from Japan. One of the best products sold here is a green tea called Meng-Ding Yan cha, found only in Sichuan province on the slopes of the Meng Mountain. My favorite place to drink it is the Japanese-style space on the third floor, sitting on a tatami mat. Before this shop opened in February 2017, there were only traditional Chinese-style tea houses in Chengdu. The combination of Chinese and Japanese elements in this new one makes it very special. Asa Eriksson-Ahuja is the co-founder of the tea-humidor brand Lotusier (lotusier.com) Your address: The St. Regis Chengdu

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Illustrations by David Sparshott

Yao Li Cha Shi, Tiexiangsi Road, Chengdu

Jeremy Morris is the third generation of jewelers at David Morris, which has outlets from Doha and Moscow to Baku (davidmorris.com) Your address: The St. Regis Doha

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FINDING

EL DORADO

Words by Chris Moss

TO UNDERSTAND THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS, YOU HAVE TO UNDERSTAND GOLD. ON THE EVE OF A LANDMARK MUSEUM SHOW, BEYOND DELVES INTO THIS TREASURE TROVE TO TELL A STORY OF ANCIENT PEOPLES, PRECIOUS ARTIFACTS AND UNEARTHLY POWERS

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Gold

Europeans were mesmerized by gold, too. Hernán Cortés is said to have confessed, “We Spaniards know a sickness of the heart that only gold can cure.”

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rom the baking coastal deserts to the fertile terraces of the Sacred Valley, the sun was worshipped by almost all of Peru’s indigenous peoples. And when the Nazca, Salinar, Vicús, Chimú, Moche and Sipán cultures sought a physical expression of this vital power, they turned to their most precious metal: gold. When I first visited Lima’s state-run Museo de Oro and the private Larco museum of Pre-Columbian art in Cuzco, my jaw dropped at the extraordinarily exquisite representations of animals, ceremonial clothing and bags, sculptured hands, ceremonial cups and Tumis (axes with semi-circular blades) and funerary masks. These masterpieces demonstrate how gold, for the nobility, played a role in every aspect of life and death. This story was repeated across the Americas, from the Mayas in Mexico to the Muisca people of Colombia. When the conquistadors came knocking, much of the splendor was scattered. Some traveled to Spain and Europe, some went to the Pope. Many of the extant gold artworks and jewelry are now held in museums or kept in private collections. This is what makes Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas – at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center and then in New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art – a unique event. The show will feature more than 300 works rarely or never-before seen in the United States from more than 50 international lenders, including treasures unearthed in recent excavations across the continent. To understand the history of the Americas, you have to understand gold. The Museo de Oro has pieces dating from as early as 100 AD. In Cuzco, the Incas’ “navel of the world”, Atahualpa was said to possess a portable throne of 15-carat gold that weighed 183 pounds. For many of the pre-Incan cultures, gold and silver were the embodiment of a fundamental dualism of light and dark, male and female, night and day. For the Incas, whose empire stretched from Ecuador to northern Argentina, gold was not merely beautiful and rare, it symbolized unearthly and uncanny power. Archaeologists believe the Inca road network served for ritual activities. The famous Machu Picchu citadel had multiple and overlapping functions, sacred and profane. The most stirring place at the site, for me, is a stone pillar known as the Intihuatana. The name, possibly given to it by Hiram Bingham, the American explorer who rediscovered Machu Picchu in 1911, means “hitching post of the sun”. The Incas, using the stone as an astronomical clock, held ceremonies on the March and September equinoxes when the sun was directly above the pillar. The Inca knew our closest star provided them with crops, fire, life itself and they believed that gold in some way embodied this cosmic force. Whoever owned gold had harnessed the creative energy of the sun. Bogotá’s famous Museo de Oro claims to be the largest collection of gold objects in the world. Representations of fishes and sea snails, decorative plates, surreal anthropomorphs and zoomorphs and a dazzling votive raft express the vivid imaginations and demonstrate the artisanal talents of the Muisca culture, which occupied the Andean highlands from as early as the 16th century BC right up to the Spanish conquest.

Europeans were mesmerized by gold, too. If Columbus’s main goal was a fast route to the Indies, this was because he was seeking spices, silks, and precious stones and metals. Hernán Cortés is said to have confessed, “We Spaniards know a sickness of the heart that only gold can cure.” When Aztec ruler Montezuma made an offering of the precious metal to the invaders, believing them to be divine rather than dastardly, Cortés saw his chance. Much of the hoard was shipped to Europe, to become part of Spain’s imperial treasures, to pay debts, to be melted down, to be shipped on as patronage to the Pope. King Ferdinand of Spain required gold in order to fund further expeditions, to spread the word of God and to secure control over the vast new territories. Some was lost en route, plundered by pirates. In 1975, an octopus fisherman spied something glittering in shallow waters off Punta Gorda, near Veracruz on the Mexican Gulf. He dug into the sand with his free hand. The find, now known as the Fisherman’s Treasure, contained beautiful Aztec bracelets, pendants and ornaments, originally destined for Charles V but sunk en route. Some of these will be on show at Golden Kingdoms. The search for gold would lead colonists and conquistadors to take terrible risks. Even in the deserts of Patagonia, Spanish explorers would, on hearing fantastical rumors told by natives, set off on epic, futile – often fatal – expeditions across the arid plains. Imaginary places like the City of the Caesars became the talk of coffee shops in Seville and Genoa, London and Paris. The 20th century was not immune to gold fever. The recent film The Lost City of Z tells of British explorer, Lieutenant Colonel Percy Fawcett, who traveled to Brazil eight times between 1906 and 1925, searching for vestiges of an ancient civilization. Tales of lost Inca gold turn up perennially in newspapers – and, indeed, ancient sites are being discovered all the time (Golden Kingdoms, for instance, will showcase ornaments from Sipán, the richest unlooted tomb in the ancient Americas, found only in 1988). All these possibilities are captured in the notion of El Dorado – the mythic Golden Man that segued from being a tribal chief associated with the Muisca to become a city, a kingdom and, ultimately, a lost empire. A few years ago, traveling through northern Brazil by bus, I woke to find we’d passed through a place called El Dorado during the night. It seemed fitting: to doze while passing through a place that has occupied so many dreams. Like all those conquistadors before me, I had to make do with the fiery glow of the dawn sun. Anyway, I rationalized, it was bound to have disappointed me. It was a small town, a nowhere place. There had to be dozens of humdrum El Dorados named after that futile, crazed illusion. Then again, perhaps, buried a few inches beneath the ground, was a rusting chest containing a stash of gold that once lit up the faces of Incas or Amazonians, and lay waiting, shining in the dark, if only I could find it. Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas is at the Getty Center, Los Angeles (getty.edu) from September 16, 2017, to January 28, 2018, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (metmuseum.org) from February 27 to May 28, 2018. Your address: The St. Regis New York

Treasures of antiquity Previous page: Aztec serpent labret with articulated tongue. Opposite: artifacts from the Golden Kingdoms exhibition, including a Moche octopus frontlet (top), burial mask (center) and earspool (left)

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The Trend

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Fishing

ave you ever seen a leopard? A giant sloth? A tiger? How about a manta ray or a great white shark? Ever experienced a humpback whale breaching so close that it rocked the boat? Or had your toothpaste stolen by monkeys? I’m not talking about watching those sad-eyed animals that pad endlessly around their cages in zoos, or joining dozens of others on a whale-watching boat. I’ve been lucky enough to see all these creatures up close and personal (in certain cases, a little too close). But I’ve seen them because I go fishing. Why go fishing anyway? Research suggests that more than two-thirds do so to get away from it all. In our increasingly stressful lives, it becomes harder and harder to seek escape. Fishing doesn’t take place in cities, with honking cars and constantly ringing cellphones. It’s best enjoyed in the world’s wilder and less exploited places. Peace within peace. Fishing, you see, is about much more than outwitting a creature with the brain power of a sliced loaf (although you’ll notice that anglers like to attribute superhuman intelligence to their quarry). Angling can be solitary and contemplative; it can break your heart or make it soar like an eagle. It can be restful or exhausting, aesthetic, poetic or scientific. Best of all, you can choose. And as I get older (if none the wiser), I’m not even sure that catching fish is actually the point of it all. I was fishing on a nearby lake when a kingfisher chose the end of my rod as a convenient resting place to gulp down the minnow it had just caught. There it sat, this glorious iridescent-blue bird, just feet from me. I can’t remember what I caught that day, but I’ll always recall that kingfisher, ignoring me and concentrating on lunch. Because I sat there quietly, it took me as part of its world. I’d become part of nature rather than an intrusion. Would I ever have seen that leopard, gliding ghost-like across a ridge at dusk, if I hadn’t been in the Indian jungle fishing for mahseer? Would I have seen that sloth moving in slow motion through treetops in Guyana unless I had traveled to South America hoping to catch an arapaima, the fish I had read about in David Attenborough’s 1956 Zoo Quest to Guiana, and dreamed for 40 years of seeing? Earlier this year, I was fishing in Norway’s Lofoten Islands (a great place to watch the Northern Lights). A group of us were after halibut and giant cod, but we stopped fishing when a pod of killer whales with young came within feet of our little boat. We followed them for miles, marveling at their grace. And what about that time in Belize, when our family spent a couple of hours spotting manatee, then saw a whale shark swim ponderously past the hotel jetty as a bonus? Or that holiday to Puerto Rico, where a pelican came into the pool at 5pm every day, and the staff fed it with fish? That was the trip where, on Christmas Day, I dangled a line off a jetty, attracting children of several nationalities, who took it in turns to catch the dazzling multi-colored, Rothko-esque fish that swarmed at our feet. Surrounded by these excited youngsters, some no older than three or four years old, I felt like the Pied Piper of Hamelin. That they didn’t speak English didn’t matter – we found a universal language of joy. For me, a fishing trip anywhere in the world – whether it’s Langkawi, Vancouver or the Maldives – is my way of experiencing things that most people see only in nature films. The American author John Gierach put it far better than I can. He was once asked, “How was the fishing?” and replied,

“The fishing was wonderful. The catching wasn’t up to much, though.” You may be reading this in one of St. Regis’s elegant resorts, perhaps in Shenzhen, Bora Bora or Puerto Rico. You’re probably gazing out to sea, wondering what to do besides sipping mojitos and putting on more sunscreen. Why not go fishing, and see at first-hand the wonders of nature? We’ve just returned from Costa Rica where, on a half-day fishing trip off the Pacific coast, we were entertained by dolphins, saw shoals of migrating stingrays jumping from the water, manta rays sunning themselves and a huge leatherback turtle drifting on the current. As my wife poetically put it, “And most people think the sea is just a big, empty mass of water.” This makes it sound as if I spend all my time fishing, to the exclusion of everything else. Wishful thinking, but sadly untrue. Family holidays need to be just that – although, if there’s water nearby, I’m always peering into it, wondering what lurks beneath the surface. There’s usually a local boat you can hire for a day, and in more sophisticated resorts you’ll find sleek vessels that will transport you to areas where the fish are big and hungry. If you happen to be staying at one of the St. Regis resorts in southern China, your hotel can set up a trip through Simpson Marine, which runs two boats year-round. The Thai Lady is ideal for a group of four friends, while Fortuna can accommodate up to 30. The crews are vastly experienced and in these waters you’re likely to catch anything from yellowfin tuna and snapper to sailfish and black marlin. It doesn’t matter if you don't know which end to hold a rod. Fishing really isn’t difficult – it’s only fishermen that try to make it so. You can go out to sea with a $1,000 space-age reel and a box full of colorful lures in all shapes and sizes (fishing, after all, has more accessories than the others sports put together), but the person next to you – who could be your 10-year-old grandson or a 75-year-old novice – may still catch the big fish, using tackle supplied by the boat. Worried about seasickness? Buy a Relief Band, a watch-like device that truly works. It generates electric signals (actually, small shocks) that, once transmitted to the body, convince your brain that all is steady. Strap it on to your wrist, set the dial and, suddenly, a rocking boat holds no fears. Mal de mer used to wreck my Hemingway dreams – there’s nothing worse when you’re eager to tangle with ocean giants like marlin, shark and tuna. The moment the horizon started to move, so did my stomach. Not any more. When people ask my greatest memory, I recall a day in Outer Mongolia, hundreds of miles from anywhere. I was relaxing on the riverbank, feeling content after catching two taimen, the very rare salmon that were the primary focus of our trip. A bright yellow sun rested in a flawless blue sky, as if the whole scene had been painted by a child using a palette of primary colors. In the distance, snow covered the hills. Then a group of herders, who had lived the same way for hundreds of years, crossed the river. It was an achingly beautiful scene and I thought: “It doesn't get more wonderful that this. OK, God, take me now.” Thank goodness He wasn’t listening.

The American author John Gierach was once asked, “How was the fishing?” He replied, “The fishing was wonderful. The catching wasn’t up to much, though”

HOOKED ON FISHING Words by Keith Elliott

YOU DON’T GO FISHING TO CATCH FISH. YOU GO TO BE IMMERSED IN NATURE AND TO BE SURROUNDED BY BIRDS, ANIMALS, TREES, SEAS AND SKIES. A LIFETIME AFICIONADO EXPLAINS WHY HOLIDAYMAKERS ARE INCREASINGLY LURED BY THE LINE

simpsonmarine.com. Your address: The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico; The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort; The St. Regis Macao, Cotai Central; The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort; The St. Regis Shenzhen; The St. Regis Langkawi; The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort

Great outdoors Opposite: fishing doesn’t take place in cities with honking cars; it’s peace within peace

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS The St. Regis story around the globe, from the first hotel opening in Manhattan in 1904 to the latest in Astana

1. The St. Regis New York 2. The St. Regis Beijing 3. The St. Regis Rome 4. The St. Regis Houston 5. The St. Regis Washington, D.C. 6. The St. Regis Aspen Resort 7. The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort 8. The St. Regis San Francisco 9. The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort 10. The St. Regis Singapore 11. The St. Regis Bali Resort 12. The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort 13. The St. Regis Atlanta 14. The St. Regis Mexico City 15. The St. Regis Princeville Resort 16. The St. Regis Deer Valley 17. The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico 18. The St. Regis Osaka

19. The St. Regis Lhasa Resort 20. The St. Regis Bangkok 21. The St. Regis Florence 22. The St. Regis Tianjin 23. The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort 24. The St. Regis Shenzhen 25. The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi 26. The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort 27. The St. Regis Doha 28. The St. Regis Mauritius Resort 29. The St. Regis Abu Dhabi 30. The St. Regis Chengdu 31. The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya 32. The St. Regis Istanbul 33. The St. Regis Mumbai 34. The St. Regis Dubai 35. The St. Regis Macao, Cotai Central 36. The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur

37. The St. Regis Langkawi 38. The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort 39. The St. Regis Changsha 40. The St. Regis Shanghai Jing’an 41. The St. Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor Polo Resort & Club 42. The St. Regis Astana

COMING SOON 43. The St. Regis Cairo 2018 44. The St. Regis Amman 2018 45. The St. Regis Kanai Resort 2018 46. The St. Regis Nanjing 2018 47. The St. Regis Quingshui Bay Resort (Sanya) 2018 48. The St. Regis Zhuhai 2018 49. The St. Regis Lijiang Resort 2018 50. The St. Regis Dubai, The Palm 2018


THE WHITE STUFF

in the soda lakes of the Wadi El Natrun or Natron Valley – was used in mummification and added to castor oil to make Egyptian Blue paint, which adorned tombs, aiding the dead’s safe passage to the afterlife. Above all, salt was the earth’s natural healer. The Peng-Tzao-Kan-Mu, a 2700 BC Chinese treatise on pharmacology, was partly devoted to the curative powers of salts. While the Greek physician Hippocrates immersed his patients in seawater to treat arthritis and the Ancient Greeks pioneered thalassotherapy, the Romans turned bathing into a grand, ceremonial affair. Herod the Great built his own winter palace at the oasis of Jericho by the Dead Sea in Israel, and floated on waters where Cleopatra had once bathed. The Dead Sea – in fact a hyper-saline lake – was developed as a spa destination in the 1960s. Today, its chloride-, bromide- and magnesiumrich salt is used worldwide: at The Iridium Spa at The St. Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor Polo Resort & Club, for instance, where it’s mixed with eucalyptus, menthol and lavender oils to hydrate skin; at The St. Regis Cairo, where salt

Words by Stephanie Rafanelli

FOR CENTURIES, SALT HAS BEEN REVERED FOR ITS PRESERVATIVE AND SPIRITUAL PROPERTIES. TODAY, IT IS SPA THERAPISTS, CHEFS AND MIXOLOGISTS WHO PRIZE THIS POWERFUL SUBSTANCE

benefits, salt micro-dosing has become an alchemical art-form, with salts delivered in crystals or slabs, smoked or flavored, absorbed or ingested. Fleur du Sel, harvested by hand in France for food, is highly sought-after, with a price tag to match, and Hawaiian salt much prized for a volcanic baked clay component called Alaea, which is rich in iron oxide, and its activated charcoal ions with detoxifying properties. According to Stephanie Kaluahine Reid, from The St. Regis Princeville Resort on Kauai Island, the making of Pa’akai salt, used in Hawaiian ceremonies, is one the islands’ oldest traditions. “It means ‘to solidify the sea’,” she explains, “and Kauai is the only place in the Hawaiian Islands to make salt according to ancient principles.” (Exfoliating vanilla salt polish and Kauai clay are used in Hanalei Bay Ritual at The St. Regis Princeville Resort’s spa and guava wood-smoked sea-salt gives a local twist to an Aloha Bloody Mary afterwards at the bar.) The newly touted panacea of Himalayan salt comes in pink and black as well. While the latter, also known as kala namak, has a high sulfur content

Magic crystals Above, left to right: salt formations in the southern Dead Sea; salt is used as a luxurious back scrub in spas around the globe; a Bolivian salt crystal

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nder a high, fierce sun, the Tuareg trader’s face is in shadow beneath his black turban. In one hand he carries a femur-like stick, with the other he leads a roped line of 15 laden dromedaries stretching back across the sand dune. “The source of all life,” he says, “is t-èsm-en… salt. It runs in our people’s blood.” Since the sixth century, the Tuareg have walked the 500-mile Azalai caravan route from Timbuktu through Taoudenni to the salt mines of Taghaza, packing their beasts with “white gold” to return to the Malian market city. Those caravans were once 10,000 camels strong, and such was its value, the salt they carried was traded weight-for-weight for gold. Until the mid-20th century, sodium chloride was the most sought-after currency in the Saharan interior, the salt route extending from Mauritania to Ethiopia – where salt slabs were used as coins and the mineral is still traded in bricks – and on to Djibouti. But then, salt runs deep in the veins of all humanity. From Africa to Europe, the Middle East and China, those cubic crystals of sodium chloride were the building blocks of ancient civilizations.

Salt is essential for human life, with sodium playing a vital role in the regulation of many bodily functions, maintaining our fluid balance and enabling the transmission of nerve impulses around the body. But it was this ionic compound’s power to purify and preserve food that was a key catalyst for the progression of Neolithic societies. On the back of salt, whether mined or evaporated from sea or brine waters, cities were founded, religious rituals devised, roads built, gold amassed, old wounds healed in ancient baths, and new lands discovered (after all, Christopher Columbus’s voyage to the Americas was funded by Spanish salt fortunes). But just as sodium chloride bestowed life and wealth, it also took it away. For the sake of salt, wars were fought, cities and empires destroyed. With handfuls of these white crystals, agreements were made in the Middle East, temple sacrifices consecrated by ancient Hebrews, evil spirits warded off by Buddhists, and sumo rings ritually purified in front of the Emperors of Japan. The chemical and political potency of salt also imbued it with connotations of spiritual power. In ancient Egypt, natron – a naturally occurring salt found

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Getty Images

Saline solution Above, left to right: Utah’s Great Salt Lake has been a magnet for visitors since the 1940s; Rock salt is an integral part of many spa treatments; Margarita time

is mixed with an infusion of tomatoes in the foot ritual and with foaming fruit mousse in Glow scrubs; and at The St. Regis Amman, opening this winter, which will be a perfect base from which to take a salt-bathing trip. While over-salinity prevented natural life from flourishing in terminal lakes such as the Dead Sea, the Great Salt Lake of Utah and the evaporated salt plains of Salar de Uyuni in the Bolivian Altiplano, these barren landscapes were restorative to the human eye. Their calming effect on the mind and womb-like release from gravity have been replicated by modern flotation-tank therapy. At The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort in Mexico, a 30 per cent concentration of Epsom salts is used to achieve high water buoyancy in the flotation pod. “The deep state of meditation is very close to that achieved in Mexican shaman purification rituals,” says executive spa director Alejandro Ortiz, “while regular skin exposure to Epsom salts improves the mineral content in the bloodstream; magnesium helps to regulate hundreds of enzymatic systems; and sulphates help to flush toxins out of the body.” Today, with a renewed interest in artisanal salts for their trace-mineral

prized in strong foods, the low-sodium Himalayan Pink contains 84 beneficial minerals, much prized by nutritionists. “Slabs are cut from crystallized sea salt beds millions of years old, deep within the Himalayas,” says David Mulin, director of food and beverage of The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort, where the salt is used to line platters of sushi. “The lava is thought to have protected the salt from modern-day pollution, leading to the belief that Himalayan Pink is the purest salt to be found on earth.” And if you’re looking for colorful ways to ingest trace minerals with your recommended 5mg a day of sodium chloride, here’s another one: sipping a Margarita made by Jorge Carillo, head mixologist at The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort, who encrusts the glasses’ rims with salt ground with chicatana flying ants. This protein-rich delicacy of pre-Columbian Oaxaca adds piquancy: a hint of air, a hint of earth and a strong hit of fire-water. Your address: The St. Regis Amman; The St. Regis Cairo; The St. Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor Polo Resort & Club; The St. Regis Princeville Resort; The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort

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Jonas Wood

ROOMS WITH A VIEW Words by Lisa Johnson

Portrait of Jonas Wood: Manfredi Gioacchini

JONAS WOOD’S POWERFUL, AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL PAINTINGS OF INTERIOR SPACES POSSESS A DREAMLIKE AND SOMETIMES UNSETTLING QUALITY

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t first glance, an interior painting by Los Angeles-based artist Jonas Wood (above, left) feels as fresh as a midsummer garden after a rain shower. Look again, however, and the effect is more disorienting: the flattened perspective and distortions of space are more the stuff of dreams than reality. Other contrasts in Wood’s work are similarly compelling: the playful references to pop art, cubism and artists like Hockney and Matisse in works that are immediately, distinctively Wood’s own; the landscapes contained within the parameters of domestic vessels created by Wood’s wife, the ceramicist Shio Kusaka – the whole world in a pot. Born in 1977 in Boston, Wood grew up surrounded by art – his grandfather collected works by Bacon, Calder and Frankenthaler – yet it was only after studying psychology at

liberal arts college Hobart and William Smith Colleges that he began painting. He met his wife while completing a Fine Arts MA at the University of Washington, after which the couple moved to LA, where they now work side by side in a shared studio. Wood’s work is autobiographical, refracting childhood memories and everyday life through his own particular sensibility. He uses collage as well as paint, starting with photographs he has taken or appropriated – of his family and from old magazines – and rearranging them. His still lifes, portraits, interiors and landscapes also often include pots, which he views as recurring characters. He cites Picasso, Braque, Mondrian, Bonnard and Vuillard as influences, both for their work itself and the way it is interpreted by other contemporary artists. “I love David Hockney and Alex Katz,” he says, “who are looking at modern painting and

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riffing on it. I’m looking at what they’re looking at, but I also get to look at them.” Wood’s work, which now sells for six figures at auction, is held in the permanent collections of the major contemporary art museums of New York, Chicago and LA, and last December he covered the 5,400 square foot facade of LA’s Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) with a vinyl version of his Still Life with Two Owls (2014). The image was “sourced in part from a photograph of a shelf with plants and pottery from a 1970s House & Garden-type magazine”, he says. “I use those and then replace about 70 per cent of the plants and objects with things I’m interested in.” It’s life – but not quite as we know it. Jonas is the honoree of this year’s TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art auction held in Dallas on 28 October, 2017. twoxtwo.org/about

Photo: Brian Forrest; Courtesy of the artist and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago, IL. Mural photo: Elon Schoenholz; Courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, LA

Art

Two Tables with Floral Pattern, 2013. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 100 x 93 inches (Above) Wood shares a studio with his wife, the ceramic artist Shio Kusaka, and her pots are “recurring characters” in his work. “Repeating elements appear in different paintings, and change shape,” he says. The stripes and zigzags are reminiscent of

Still Life with Two Owls (MOCA), 2016 (Opposite, right) Originally shown as part of a joint show with Kusaka, this still life currently graces the facade of the Museum of Contemporary Art in LA. The pots on the shelves are Kusaka’s, the owls were inspired by figures by Akio Takamori in the couple’s collection, and the plants are a mix of Wood’s own and found images

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Jonas Wood

Photos (left and opposite): Brian Forrest; Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York, NY

Art

Kitchen with Jade and Aloe Plants, 2013. Oil and acrylic on linen, 88 x 76 inches

Ovitz’s Library, 2013. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 100 x 132 inches

Cluttered domestic interiors are a favorite subject of Wood’s, refracted through the artist’s emotions: they look familiar and cheery enough, but sudden disconnections have a slightly disconcerting effect

In this object-portrait of celebrated LA art collector Michael Ovitz, the relationship between the subject and his home is revealed through his collection of art and books, which is then filtered through Wood’s memory

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Photo: Brian Forrest; Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery

Jonas Wood

Photo: Brian Forrest; Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery,New York, NY

Art

Leslie and Michael, 2013. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 80 x 90 inches

Children’s Garden, 2015. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 93 x 93 inches

The strong colors and bold patterns turn this double portrait of friends into something more surreal. “I’m interested in exploring the spaces that I’ve inhabited and the psychological impact they’ve had on me and my memories of them,” says Wood. “And then I can create a new memory of that space.”

This painting was “based on an old photograph of a daycare center that my parents started”, says Wood. “It was a room I spent time in as a child. It has signifiers that I like, but there are also patterns, and colors, and weird shapes. It is mysterious and chaotic.”

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The Connoisseur: Nirav Modi

TREASURES

OF INDIA Words by James Collard

“I started with watches. Then it was cars. Now it’s art,” says Nirav Modi. He’s describing his progression as a collector, which has resulted in the superb array of artworks that adorn the Mumbai headquarters of his eponymous jewelry brand. Having recently opened stores in London and Manhattan, Modi has turned the jewelry house he launched in 2010 into a globally recognized contemporary Indian luxury brand. Like his jewelry, which is produced entirely in Mumbai, his art was created almost entirely in India, spanning the century between India’s struggle for independence and its current status as an economic powerhouse. Today, the jeweler owns about 500 pieces of art – some of which are hung in the oceanfront duplex he shares with his wife and three children, and others at their beach house in Alibag, where fashionable Bombayites head for the weekend. Most of the collection, though, is kept at the company’s offices (designed by his mother, an interior designer) and displayed in rotation. Apart, that is, from a few works that never leave his own office: a sculpture of brass cowpats by the contemporary artist Subodh Gupta; Boy With Lemons, a painting by Amrita Sher-Gil, the bold female artist of the Twenties and Thirties sometimes described as India’s Frida Kahlo; and a haunting photographic portrait of Sher-Gil taken by her nephew, Vivan Sundaram. Having grown up in Antwerp, where his family were diamond dealers, and visited the museums of Rome, Paris and Brussels with his mother, Modi says he was attracted to art from a young age. Although at home, “dinner table conversation was all about diamonds: diamonds bought, diamonds sold, diamonds cut”, as a young man he became obsessed with other objects of beauty. His first passion was watches – beginning with one he just had to have. “I spent my first six months’ wages on an IWC perpetual calendar watch,” he recalls, followed by a series of extraordinarily complicated models, from fine watchmakers

such as Philippe Dufour. After that, he discovered cars – “mostly British” – although living in Mumbai, he points out with a wry smile, you don’t really get the chance to make the most of a high-performance automobile. It was only in the Nineties that he started to collect art. “As I was living in India,” he says, “I was most influenced by the Indian modern art I was seeing around me.” Today, Indian art from 1850 until 1970 makes up the core of his collection, which now encompasses something close to a complete canon of artists of that period, and some of its greatest masters. Like most serious collectors, though, for Modi there’s always something missing, something more to add – including, he says, “a masterpiece by Tyeb Mehta” (one of the Bombay Progressive Artists’ Group who gained international recognition in the Sixties and Seventies). According to Mallika Advani, the former head of Christie’s in India who has been Modi’s art adviser for many years, the jeweler is “the dream collector. He knows what he wants and how to work the primary market, but he’s also very good at auction.” He also has, she explains, a passionate desire to acquire key pieces that he believes will enhance his collection, enough knowledge to know when to buy a piece and when to wait, and what he’s missed out on, so he can try and buy it later. The choice to display the collection – and rotate the display – at the semi-public space of his offices rather than at home is a deliberate one, Modi explains. “Art inspires me. There are pieces I’ve had on walls for years and suddenly I notice a nuance, despite having seen the works day in, day out. This quality of art is fascinating. I wanted to create an environment where more people would have the opportunity to be immersed in it.” niravmodi.com Your address: The St. Regis Mumbai

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THE

GREAT ESCAPE Words by Lisa Grainger

THE AMERICAN BUSINESSMAN, HOTELIER AND POLITICIAN WILLIAM WALDORF ASTOR HAD EVERY COMFORT A MAN COULD DESIRE IN NEW YORK. YET HE CHOSE TO SPEND MUCH OF HIS LATER LIFE ON A ROCKY PROMONTORY IN ITALY – ALONE WITH HIS ART AND HIS SCULPTURES. BEYOND TELLS THE TALE OF HIS MAGNIFICENT ITALIAN RETREAT

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The Back Story

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Villa Astor

n his day, in the late 1800s, no other man possessed riches to match those of William Waldorf Astor. Having inherited his family’s estate at the age of 42 – encompassing businesses ranging from fur-trapping companies and a Pacific shipping empire to vast tracts of Manhattan real estate – he had access to almost anything he could possibly wish for. The sort of life he led was reflected in the style of the hotels that he built up, including the Waldorf-Astoria: a joint venture with his cousin, John Jacob Astor IV, the founder of St. Regis. Building great hotels was something of an Astor family tradition. In 1836, the very first John Jacob, founder of the dynasty and the family fortune – and the cousins’ great-grandfather – had opened the Astor House hotel in New York, the city’s first luxury hotel and the last word in American hospitality for several decades. The hotel that the cousins established together was equally groundbreaking, while John Jacob Astor IV’s St. Regis hotel raised the bar still further when it opened in 1904 – setting the style and standard for St. Regis hotels across the world today. Although William Waldorf Astor was at the heart of New York society, the city wasn’t a place in which he found happiness. As he wrote in his memoirs, published in 1917: “We were too prosperous; we were exclusive, not hail fellows
well met; we liked the amenities of foreign travel; we had been known to employ alien servants, French chefs and English butlers; we were un-American. To the press, we were a shining target. On the 20th of September, 1880, when I was 32, the thought occurred to me that we should fare better in another land.” As a young man, like his grandfather and father before him, Astor had been educated in Europe, and had traveled there widely with his parents. Of all of the countries on the continent, the place he loved more than any other was Italy: its culture, its arts, its food, and its countryside. As a new book about his great homes, Villa Astor: Paradise Restored on the Amalfi Coast, explains: “He was enraptured… Italy intrigued his mind and invaded his soul. All at once, this sensitive, cultivated, and intellectually curious young man was exposed to a new land; a rich history he had only ever read about in books; dazzling art ranging from Roman, through Medieval, to Renaissance and Baroque; and a vibrant political and cultural climate.”
 Although after a period studying in Rome, Astor returned to America, where he studied law at Columbia University, learned his family business and entered into the world of politics, he still hankered for Italy. In 1882, at the age of 34, he was given the perfect excuse to return: the offer by the American Republican President, Chester A. Arthur, of a posting to Rome as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary: the equivalent now of an ambassador. It was a posting that would change his life forever.

Having arrived in Rome, and set up home in the 17th-century Palazzo Pallavicini-Rospigliosi in the heart of the city, he and his wife Mary lived like royalty, and were frequent guests of the Italian King Umberto and Queen Margherita. When he wasn’t mixing with Italian society, the young diplomat found time to indulge his loves of sculpture, of art, of classical architecture and of literature. The part of the world he particularly loved, though, was Sorrento. This seaside town, in the country’s south, was not only close to the classical ruins of Pompeii and Paestum, which he enjoyed visiting, but had a beautiful coastline, along which friends had villas in which he could stay. It was in the spring of 1905, visiting a friend, that he spotted a villa perched high on a promontory with stunning views across the Gulf of Naples to Vesuvius – and decided to buy it. Although the house was originally known as Aux Roches Grises, because of the volcanic rocks on which it was built, Astor renamed it Villa Sirena, after the mythological creatures that lured sailors onto rocks. 
 The property had everything he loved: history (the site had been the home of Postumus Agrippa around the time of Christ, and a haunt of Ovid); views of Vesuvius and the coast; seven acres of land with orange and olive groves; monastic ruins and a church; and a grand villa which the art lover could fill with paintings, fine furniture and sculpture. Best of all, it was peaceful, writes his great-grandson, Lord Astor of Hever, in the introduction to Villa Astor. “The light lifted his spirits and he would potter in his orange grove or go for long walks in the hills. He loved the easy tempo of the place, as gentle as a Neapolitan folksong; simple peasant dishes of risotto (which he spelled with a “z”), spaghetti, fried fish or fritto misto, cheese, and rustic wines. And the dry climate improved his gout, which had almost crippled him.”
 Although Astor owned magnificent homes in America and in England, “the Villa,” his great-grandson explains, “holds the key to my great-grandfather’s happiness. It was the place to which he could escape, be free to lead a simple life, and revel in peace. It allowed him to turn the clock back, reminisce, and dream of what might have been.”
Not that creating his dream villa was a simple job; the restoration took almost a decade. Wainscoting, parquet floors and hand-painted ceilings were added to every room, and a glassed-in dining room added so guests had an unimpeded view of Naples and Ischia. The old church cloister was turned into a gallery, which Astor and the famous Roman antiquarian Attilio Simonetti adorned with some of the world’s most beautiful pieces of classical statuary, columns, mosaics, bronzes, ironwork, stoneware, and sarcophagi. The exquisite garden was planted with exotic flowers and plants from all over Europe and orchards of lemon, orange and olive trees, and a magnificent swimming pool was added. In the grounds where

Although Astor owned magnificent homes in America and in England, the villa held the key to his happiness. It was a place to which he could escape, a place where he could be free to lead a simple life

Dream home Previous pages (right): Villa Astor sits high above the Bay of Naples on a rocky promontory dotted with grottoes; (left): a great admirer of ancient Rome, William Waldorf Astor adorned his home with classical statuary. Opposite: the villa has been restored to its full glory by leading French architect Jacques Garcia

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Villa Astor

All images © Eric Sander, from Villa Astor: Paradise Restored on the Amalfi Coast, by Curt DiCamillo, (Flammarion, 2017)

The Back Story

Earthly paradise

Grand designs

The garden Astor created, considered one of the most beautiful in Italy, contains more than one thousand plant species, including exotic flowers, medicinal plants and an impressive palm collection

One of the villa’s magnificent marble bathrooms. The restoration of Villa Sirena took almost a decade, with Astor employing leading craftsmen and using only the finest materials

the cloister once stood, Astor constructed a replica of a Pompeian villa, called Villa Florus, with such authentic-looking floor mosaics, ionic columns and wall paintings that for many years visitors thought they were originals, transferred from Pompeii or Herculaneum. One of the villa’s greatest pleasures for Astor, though, was its location. Situated on a rocky outcrop, far from prying eyes, the house was, as the Villa Astor book explains: “A sanctuary from the day-to-day cares of business and family. It was a place to revere nature, thanks to the spectacular panorama of the sea and mountains surrounding the property: a series of thoughtfully placed windows embellished with fragments of antique columns and sculptures romantically framed the view beyond, leading the eye to the horizon.”
 Between 1905 and 1914, before the outbreak of war, Astor visited the house every year between November and March. Although much of this

time was spent alone (his wife had died in 1894), he had eight staff to attend to his needs, including a prized French chef, who was responsible for ordering what he considered “indispensible” items: foie gras terrines, potted French green peas in butter sauce, Brie and Camembert cheeses, truffles – all furnished through his agent in Paris, Fernand Robert. 
 When he did socialize, he did so in considerable style. As one account, taken from the new book, recalls: “Astor’s house parties are organized exactly on the same order as royalty, only a trifle more so… For example, each morning every lady of the house is sent a superb bouquet of flowers to her room. With them is a huge box of chocolates… Not infrequently, within the inner recesses of the flowers or of the box of sweets is some exquisite trifle in the way of a charm or trinket. In order not to show favor to any one guest, flowers, sweets and jewels are the same for all. Astor has the finest private collection of automobiles in

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Sorrento bolt-hole that he’d spent decades creating. The day before he was finally due to return to it – in October 1919 – he died, and his family subsequently sold the property. Today, more than a century later, the house is owned by another family who still clearly take delight in Astor’s style and historical artifacts. Not only have they employed the leading French architect Jacques Garcia to renovate what is now called “Villa Astor”, keeping its classical elegance and 19th century interiors while updating its amenities, they also rent it out to modern-day travelers who dream of living as Astor might have. Walking into the home, it’s as if the man still lived there, surrounded by his precious antiquities and furnishings, in the land he called his spiritual home.

Europe, and each guest reads over the mantelpiece that by telephoning to a garage, a ‘car’ is always at his or her disposal.”
 But mainly, though, Astor spent his time there alone: walking, exploring, eating at local restaurants. As he wrote to his Americanborn daughter-in-law, Nancy, who became the first female Member of Parliament in Britain: “We have had such exquisite weather that I took advantage of it recently to visit Pompeii and Paestum. I have also amused myself by lunching at odd places within driving distance to feast upon the spaghetti and risotto, which the plainest Italian cook prepares in such perfection... I take good walks and can easily do six miles – to Massa [Lubrense] without over-fatigue. On stormy days I seek my gymnasium or trudge up and down my garden walks for an hour.” 
 When World War I made traveling to Italy impossible, he took refuge in his homes in England and to his dismay he never made it back to the

Villa Astor: Paradise Restored on the Amalfi Coast, is published by Flammarion. Your address: The St. Regis Rome, The St. Regis New York

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The Trend

Pop-up Restaurants

FOOD GOES

POP Words by Brette Warshaw Illustrations by Martin O’Neill

ONCE, THE WORLD’S BEST CUISINE WAS ONLY EVER SERVED IN FORMAL ENVIRONMENTS. TODAY, ART GALLERIES, ROOF GARDENS AND EVEN TRUCKS ARE HOSTING POP-UP RESTAURANTS AND SHOWCASING THE TALENTS OF CUTTING-EDGE CHEFS

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n the fall of 2016, the food world was set ablaze with the news that Noma, the restaurant in Copenhagen that had topped the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list for four years, would be closing at the end of the year. Essays and memorials were penned. Food obsessives booked flights to Copenhagen to pay homage to chef René Redzepi’s particular type of cooking – a genre that can now be described as “new Nordic cuisine” – for the final time. Fans watched over social media as the restaurant plated its final dishes, finished its last service, and ceremoniously took down the sign outside its doors. But in the spring of 2017, Noma started appearing again in geotags and social-media feeds, in essays and reviews. It wasn’t the Noma that had closed in Copenhagen, but Noma Mexico, a pop-up in Tulum where the staff were adapting its particular brand of local, experimental cooking to their new region. They had swapped their sea buckthorns and elderflowers for jackfruit and guanábana fruit, and for the next three months, they would create a new kind of Noma experience, halfway across the world and in a completely different environment. This wasn’t Noma’s first pop-up; in 2015, its chefs pulled up stakes and relocated to Tokyo for three months, and in 2016, to Australia. Other high-profile chefs, too, have started popping up across the world. Ludo Lefebvre, now of Trois Mec, Petit Trois and Trois Familia in Los Angeles, hosted the LudoBites pop-ups back in 2010. The famed New York City restaurant Le Cirque went on tour in 2012, popping up in private spaces in Orlando, Chicago, Houston, and more. The St. Regis San Francisco hosted an eight-week pop-up called The Grill in

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The Trend

Pop-up Restaurants

NEW SX LINE. SX88 LAUNCH SEPTEMBER 2017

YACHT

SX88

The modern pop-up restaurant held on to its whiff of counterculture for years, with chefs popping up in abandoned warehouses, art galleries, even wine cellars consumers, and selling tickets in advance generated hype and eliminated the need for an up-front investment in ingredients and labor. And the audience seemed to love it, too. Having already bought into the food-truck trend – sampling highquality food from the roadside – they had already developed a palate for the hot and the new, for enjoying food outside places with which it had traditionally been associated. As the restaurant environments became ever more innovative, so too did the cooking. The ability to share quickly, online, around the world has created a milieu that is ripe for the exchange of ideas. Instead of having to go to a restaurant to see a new dish, or technique, or even what’s on the menu, chefs can read about it, share photos, direct-message each other, FaceTime each other. And the diners are right there alongside them, gazing at a certain restaurant’s famed dishes half a world away, writing about everything from the cutlery to the dessert cart on Yelp, reading lists and rankings of the hottest new trends, put out by mainstream publications, food blogs, and everything in between. All of a sudden, a chef in Melbourne has an audience in New York, and a chef friend itching to start a collaboration. A flight across the world and a few dinners in a friend’s kitchen is an opportunity for learning, for growth, and, in many instances, for profit. This wave of pop-ups has resulted in even more innovation, more exploration, more experimentation in the culinary arena. And in an era when a younger generation of global foodies is actively seeking out new and unique dining experiences, we can be fully confident that it won’t be stopping any time soon.

March 2016, before it was eventually made a permanent fixture at the hotel. And events like the Grand Gelinaz! Shuffle put an international machine behind the pop-up concept, flying top chefs from all corners of the globe across the world to host dinners in their counterparts’ kitchens for one night only. How did we get here? Why do these Michelin-starred chefs leave the comforts of their gleaming kitchens and devoted clientele to pop up somewhere entirely new? Undercover eating and drinking clubs are hardly new; the first ones appeared in London in 1899, in response to a new law that forced pubs and restaurants to close just after midnight. The opening of private clubs allowed restaurateurs to keep plying their patrons with food and drink all night, in the same way that, when Prohibition began in the United States, supper clubs were an underthe-radar way to serve alcohol. These clubs were, by nature, transitory and elusive, gathering people together for fun and consumption in defiance of societal norms. The modern pop-up restaurant held on to its whiff of counterculture and the underground for years, with chefs popping up in abandoned warehouses, art galleries, even wine cellars. It was only in 2008, when the financial crisis resulted in darkened storefronts, that landlords became more willing to let chefs use their spaces in exchange for buzz and foot traffic. And so the formalized pop-up was born. There were benefits for everyone. For chefs, doing a pop-up was a lot less expensive than starting a restaurant from scratch. Social media made it easier than ever to speak directly to

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YoUR dREAMS, EXPECTATIoNS ANd WISHES WILL SooN TAkE THE MoST AMAzINg SHAPE. FOLLOW THE #SX88jOurnEy On FACEBOOK AnD InSTAGrAM @SAnLOrEnZOyACHT 89


When the conditions are unpredictable you need a watch that isn’t.

Kitchen Confidential SAMIR ROONWAL, THE NEW EXECUTIVE CHEF AT THE ST. REGIS ASPEN RESORT, ON THE GENIUS OF ASIAN CUISINE, WHY HE’S INSPIRED BY GREAT LOCAL PRODUCE, AND PREPARING AN IMPROMPTU FEAST FOR 10,000 GUESTS

Words by Charlotte Hogarth-Jones

900 feet below sea level is no place to find out that your watch won’t function at 900 below sea level. That’s why every Bremont watch is ruthlessly engineered to be fit for purpose. However extreme that purpose might be. Anywhere you can go, a Bremont can go too. And usually further. Your Bremont is probably tougher than you are. The new Supermarine Type 301 has been hand-built and tested on British shores, at our headquarters in Henley-on-Thames. Sure, it has its limits, but you’re unlikely to ever find them.

With over 30 years’ gastronomic experience, Indian-born chef Samir Roonwal has cooked around the globe, from Dubai to Canada. Now, he’s heading up food and drink at The St. Regis Aspen Resort and preparing to launch an exciting new restaurant there this autumn, bringing his passion for outstanding local produce to the menu. Oh, and perfect gnocchi...

Where do you find inspiration for new recipes? If you’d asked me 20 years ago I would have named another chef, but experience has taught me that inspiration is in your backyard. It’s all about going out and meeting local vendors and producers – after all, what’s the point in making incredible menus with ingredients you can’t get locally?

What was the first dish you cooked as a child? Pancakes with chocolate chips. I remember I kept on adding more and more chocolate chips until they were basically all chocolate and no batter! From then on I had them for breakfast every day.

How would you describe the food at your new restaurant? It’s going to be “Modern Mountain” cuisine, so a lot of game and roasted dishes, with cured and smoked meats too. Menus will use Colorado’s finest ingredients. For example, we have brilliant venison and elk here, and the delicious Colorado bass. There will also be a great new bar, stocking regional whiskeys and bourbons, and we have a coffee bar opening as well.

Did you cook a lot growing up? Never. I was kept away from the kitchen as much as possible, but I used to peek in. Once a year I’d be allowed in to bake cakes and make a mess, but when mom had guests over she’d stay in the kitchen for days at a time preparing everything. She was awesome – I think I got my sense of taste from her.

How will it be different from your usual style? People tend to think that because I’m Indian I cook Indian cuisine, but actually I steer away from it – although a love of spice will always be in my blood. I like my menus to take you on a journey around the world, including the greatest hits from the Mediterranean, Asia and the Middle East.

Do you let your sons (aged 6 and 8) in the kitchen now? Yes, but mostly I cook for them. They have traveled the world with me and their demands are crazy – takoyaki, Oreo shakes… We hardly spend any time together as a family, but whenever I’m home we have dinner. I’ll make something simple – usually ramen with greens and a nice broth – and we’ll discuss what they’re doing at school, who’s studying what, who has been in trouble… I think it’s crucial.

What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your own career? Two years ago a sheikh from Abu Dhabi came to me one afternoon and told me he wanted to host a Ramadan feast for 10,000 people... that evening. We had every waiter, every purchasing guy, every single member of staff running around town trying to find lamb and rice. To this day I’m still amazed we managed to pull that one off.

Do you often cook Asian food? Absolutely – I think it’s the most intelligent cuisine. In Vietnamese and Japanese cuisine particularly, they use so few ingredients, and yet the flavors of the dishes are so intense. I’m a huge fan of Middle Eastern cooking as well. When I moved to Dubai I was amazed to discover how much variety there is there. I found a new love for spices: sumac, ras el hanout and raw za’atar leaves, which give a completely different taste from the powdered form.

British Engineering. Tested Beyond Endurance. 90

And the hardest thing to cook? Gnocchi. If you don’t beat the dough properly or poach them right, they become very glutinous. Our chefs train for days until they can do it brilliantly. Octopus is also something I used to really struggle with as a young chef, but I’ve finally perfected it – it’s my absolute favorite bar snack at The St. Regis Aspen Resort, and a personal triumph for me. Your address: The St. Regis Aspen Resort

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Design

GREEN SHOOTS

Green School

Words by Juliet Kinsman

OUR WRITER WAS SO IMPRESSED BY THE VISIONARY IDEAS BEHIND THE GREEN SCHOOL IN BALI, SHE MOVED THERE WITH HER DAUGHTER FOR THREE MONTHS. HERE SHE TELLS THE STORY OF THE FAMILY BEHIND THE SCHOOL AND THE DESIGN REVOLUTION IT INSPIRED


Design

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ali has long attracted free-thinkers: travelers seeking a tropical escape from the usual routine, with a spiritual dimension. When John Hardy arrived in the 1970s, he was struck by the beauty of the island, the lush landscape, the kindness of the people. When I visited the island, it was the unique institution that he and his wife had created there that entranced me: the Green School. This bamboo structure is impressive not just because it’s made from sustainably harvested materials from the surrounding forests, but because of its green ethos and the family behind it. Which is why I am writing this from a balé in the Balinese jungle: I was so inspired by the Green School that I decided to move to the island for three months and enroll my daughter in the school. As she runs around in the sunshine, I can work in the café. The story behind the Green School offers many lessons, not just about what can be achieved by one family with a vision, or what we should be teaching our children, but about the buildings in which they learn. In the past, bamboo was thought of as something to be used in constructing scaffolding, simple huts or basic fishermen’s shelters. But thanks to John and his wife, Cynthia, who opened the Green School in 2008 – having previously operated a successful jewelry business on the island – the plant has been given a dramatic brand repositioning. When the forward-thinking Hardys built their ambitious eco-minded school south of Ubud, nothing had been done like it before. It took the combined brainpower of an engineer from New York, an architect from France and many local artisans to produce this three-floored masterpiece from 2,500 pieces of this light-yet-strong wood. Today, in this stilted 200ft-high, corkscrew-shaped construction, shaded by a sculptural helical thatched roof, you’ll find no glass, no metal nails, no air-con. Air flows through it, and natural scenes flood in from all around. It is one of the finest examples of environmentally-friendly design in the world. The resilience and versatility of the material and the ingenuity of the Balinese people have made this bamboo project an enlightening educational environment in every sense. When it was first built, this kindergarten-through-high school was an attention-grabber because of its innovative, undulating looks. Now it has become a benchmark for environmentally friendly building practices that help not only to foster a collaborative, forward-thinking ecologically-minded community, and contribute to the local economy in a way that empowers Indonesia’s islanders, but that lead by example on an international stage. Bamboo is now being considered not simply as a green material with which to build homes, but also to create furniture. In 2010, the Hardys’ daughter Elora established Ibuku, a structural and decorative consultancy that has grown into a highly respected collective of architects, engineers, and craftspeople known for their surprisingly sleek creations. A former designer for Donna Karan in New York, Elora has never formally studied architecture. Yet today the craftspeople at Ibuku are regularly commissioned to build magnificent multi-story bamboo mansions, as well

as elegant custom-made furniture. Its beautiful handmade objects, such as the teardrop hanging-seat or graceful double bed, are a natural fit with upscale homes. Elora also hosts courses on how to harvest and manage bamboo and invites participants to design and craft their own furniture through old-fashioned carpentry with the help of 3D-printing technology. Elora’s design business – creating new bamboo buildings with her local artisans and exporting natural furniture to eco-homes and green schools around the world – is, if you like, a continuation of what her parents started, but expanded across the globe. “With Ibuku’s architects and craftsmen, there’s an entire new dialogue unfolding with people who have never been to Bali before,” she says, explaining how homes in Florida, Japan, Canada, South America might now be furnished with Ibuku’s pieces. “I’m lucky I can be a connector between them all.” Her younger brother Orin is also involved in putting environmental principles into practice and educating others about permaculture at his Kul Kul Farm, neighboring the Green School, which he runs with his partner Maria. Here they grow organic produce, which feeds the children and is sold through a stall at the bi-weekly farmers’ market, and leads courses to teach families about organic farming methods. He also helps run a small fleet of BioBuses that run on used cooking oil collected from hotels and restaurants, and to supply power for the campus from alternative energy sources — solar panels, a bamboo-sawdust hot water and cooking system, and an ambitious hydro-powered vortex generator. There’s no better way to get a crash course into John Hardy’s vision of how we all might live better than to take a “trash walk” with him through Sayan in Bali’s jungle-covered highlands. As I spear garbage that has washed up from the river, I hear his plans for tree houses and T-shirts made from organic fabrics, his plans to make our world greener. Sarong-wearing John is not shy when it comes to pointing out how we could all be living greener lives. He believes engineers, designers and architects are foolish to fear using bamboo. “Bamboo is truly sustainable: cut it and more comes up,” he declares. “It’s the fastest-growing renewable building material in the world and it has greater tensile strength than steel. You can grow enough to build a building from nothing in five years. It’s beautiful: there’s no ugly bamboo, just as there’s no beautiful concrete.” Brutalists might disagree, yet there’s no denying this grand grass’s sustainable credentials. “And there’s enough for everybody,” he adds. “We can promise every child on the planet a beach hut and a city house made from bamboo.” He pauses for a moment before adding, “Do you know the Queen?” It seems he would love the chance to persuade HRH to send her great-grandchildren, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, to the Green School, to learn about environmental principles. “When Michelle Obama planted gardens at the White House,” he says, “thousands of gardens sprang up all over the world. Great things happen if people lead by example.” Your address: The St. Regis Bali Resort

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Portrait by Tim Street-Porter. All other images courtesy of Ibuku

“Bamboo is truly sustainable: cut it and more comes up. It’s the fastest-growing renewable building material in the world and it has greater tensile strength than steel”

Meet the makers Previous Pages: inside Bali’s eco-friendly Green School. Above: Elora Hardy, founder of Ibuku, has set out to demonstrate that bamboo can be used to make a vast range of products, including beautiful furniture

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A Life In Seven Journeys

Steve McCurry

THE RENOWNED PHOTOGRAPHER REFLECTS ON THE SEVEN JOURNEYS – PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL AND SPIRITUAL – THAT HAVE SHAPED HIS LIFE AND WORK

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Panama, 1972 Hitchhiking was pretty common in those days, and I wanted to learn Spanish, so I caught lifts from Philadelphia to Panama. There wasn’t a real plan; I just wandered, taking it all in and talking Spanish. The country was fascinating: it’s partly on the Caribbean, partly on the Pacific, with lots of Spanish festivals and parades. I took a camera, a Miranda, and took lots of pictures, in black and white, which I still have, loose in boxes.

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Africa, 1973 This was my first trip to Africa – and a big one. I took a boat with a buddy from New York to Haifa, then to Cyprus. He stayed there and I went to

Athens, then Cairo, and took a boat down the Nile to Aswan, went to Sudan, Uganda, Nairobi, and climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. No one did that in those days, so it was difficult. The Sud swamp was particularly crazy. We were in this old steamer, going on a path through the swamp that narrowed, then opened. If you got stuck you could be there for ever, just you and the mosquitoes.

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Asia, 1978 This was the trip that launched me into the world of photography. It was meant to be a short trip round India and instead ended up being a two-year journey through India, Afghanistan, Nepal, Thailand, all over Asia… The thing that impressed me most was the immensity of the Subcontinent, from Calcutta to Ladakh, with its extraordinary variety of people and cultures. By then I had a Nikon, which I’ve stuck with since, and was shooting in color.

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Yemen, 1997 The thing that struck me about Yemen was that here was an Arab country, but with a culture unlike any other. It was so distinct, unlike the Emirates or Saudi Arabia, which are really quite western. Everything about Yemen – the architecture, the food, the way people

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dressed – was original and individual. I ended up staying three or four months, getting great images.

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Tibet, 2001 I went twice into Tibet, once flying into Kathmandu and once overland from Chengdu. I’m very interested in Buddhism and Tibet is its epicenter, the heart of the culture. I stayed at lots of monasteries and found the people’s devotion incredible: very profound and moving. You’re also surrounded by the Himalayas, which is the mightiest mountain range in the world, so going there is always quite an experience.

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Ethiopia, 2012 This was my first trip to the country – with a friend who runs an NGO called OMO Child – and what struck me was that the way all these tribes live traditionally, like they have always done for hundreds of years. I was lucky – my friend has a great rapport with the tribes, so wherever we went they were hospitable and relaxed, with a great sense of humor, and I was able to take photographs all over the region. Steve McCurry’s photographs for Vacheron Constantin can be viewed at overseas.vacheron-constantin.com

Illustration by Tina Berning. Words by Lisa Grainger

London, 1969 I had never traveled outside America before, but in 1969 I spent a year backpacking through Europe – France, and Spain, and Amsterdam – ending up in a youth hostel in Soho, London, which I thought was the coolest thing in the world. There were people camped out in the lobby, in the recreational area, on the floor. I slept under the pool table. I remember the pubs, which were amazing, and thinking how weird it was buying a soft drink that wasn’t cold. In the US, everything was on ice.

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T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

B E Y O N D , T H E S T. R E G I S M A G A Z I N E

ISSUE 10


ST. REGIS WEDDINGS

The Ultimate Memory, Designed Just for You THE ART OF CELEBRATION #stregiswedding

For further information visit us at www.stregis.com/weddings 2

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ST. REGIS HONEYMOONS

Paradise Found Seductive Sanctuaries, Pinnacle Paradises

Located in the world’s most coveted regions, these idyllic beach destinations are perfectly suited to honeymooners seeking a romantic interlude wrapped in pure paradise. Indoor-outdoor spaces blend seamlessly with elements of the natural environment, setting a truly intimate backdrop for a resort escape for two.

A SELECTION OF PARADISE FOUND HOTELS AND RESORTS: THE ST. REGIS BAHIA BEACH RESORT, PUERTO RICO; THE ST. REGIS LANGKAWI; THE ST. REGIS PRINCEVILLE RESORT; THE ST. REGIS SANYA YALONG BAY RESORT

For further information visit us at www.stregis.com/honeymoons 4

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ST. REGIS HONEYMOONS

Journey’s End Rustic Elegance for the Adventurous Spirit

Nestled in some of the world’s most dramatic landscapes, these rustic yet refined addresses appeal to couples with a shared passion for adventure. From summer pursuits along glittering exotic beaches to thrilling winter sports capped by fireside après-ski, active honeymooners begin their life’s journey with an unforgettable experience.

A SELECTION OF JOURNEY’S END HOTELS AND RESORTS: THE ST. REGIS ASPEN RESORT; THE ST. REGIS DEER VALLEY; THE ST. REGIS MARDAVALL MALLORCA RESORT; THE ST. REGIS SAADIYAT ISLAND RESORT, ABU DHABI; THE ST. REGIS LHASA RESORT

For further information visit us at www.stregis.com/honeymoons 6

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ST. REGIS HONEYMOONS

Glass House Transcend the Traditional

Outfitted for modern romance, these edited yet stylized addresses appeal to couples who seek an escape from the confines of formality and prefer clean lines and bright, geometric spaces instead. These metropolitan addresses offer guests a series of moments that unfold with warm and ease amidst unpretentious, elegant settings.

A SELECTION OF GLASS HOUSE HOTELS AND RESORTS: THE ST. REGIS SHENZHEN; THE ST. REGIS KUALA LUMPUR; THE ST. REGIS TIANJIN; THE ST. REGIS BAL HARBOUR RESORT

For further information visit us at www.stregis.com/honeymoons 8

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ST. REGIS HONEYMOONS

Metropolitan Manor Timeless, Modern Retreats

Steal away for a honeymoon experience that appeals to the discerning. These exquisite cosmopolitan addresses harken to a time of timeless grace and elegance, where each moment is tailored, and where the most refined social and cultural pursuits are at your fingertips.

A SELECTION OF METROPOLITAN MANOR HOTELS AND RESORTS: THE ST. REGIS ATLANTA; THE ST. REGIS ROME; THE ST. REGIS MACAO; THE ST. REGIS SINGAPORE

For further information visit us at www.stregis.com/honeymoons 10

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The St. Regis Atlas An introduction to St. Regis hotels and resorts around the world, in alphabetical order by region

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AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Abu Dhabi

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The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi

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The St. Regis Cairo

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The St. Regis Doha

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The St. Regis Dubai

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The St. Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor Polo Resort & Club

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The St. Regis Mauritius Resort

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The St. Regis Aspen Resort

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The St. Regis Atlanta

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The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico

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The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort

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The St. Regis Deer Valley

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The St. Regis Houston

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The St. Regis Mexico City

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The St. Regis New York

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The St. Regis Princeville Resort

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The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort

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The St. Regis San Francisco

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The St. Regis Washington, D.C.

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THE AMERICAS

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

ASIA PACIFIC The St. Regis Bali Resort

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The St. Regis Bangkok

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The St. Regis Beijing

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The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort

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The St. Regis Changsha

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The St. Regis Chengdu

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The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur

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The St. Regis Langkawi

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The St. Regis Lhasa Resort

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The St. Regis Macao

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The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort

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The St. Regis Mumbai

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The St. Regis Osaka

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The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort

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The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan

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The St. Regis Shenzhen

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The St. Regis Singapore

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The St. Regis Tianjin

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The St. Regis Astana

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The St. Regis Florence

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The St. Regis Istanbul

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The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort

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The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya

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The St. Regis Rome

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The St. Regis Abu Dhabi ASK US ABOUT Brunch in the Clouds. A brunch journey where each diner is free to explore the 150,000-dirhamsper-night suite and discover culinary delights in each room, including a cinema full of candy, a cheese-and-dessert room, a caviar ice bar, and a private bar equipped by the hotel’s top mixologists. For a break between tasting, have a shoulder massage in one of the private spas. Zayed Centre in Al Bateen, a hidden gem inside a complex of traditional homes. Once dubbed “Sheikh Zayed’s house”, it houses everything from the late president’s last set of creams and perfumes, stuffed animal gifts and weapons, to his car collection, including his famous late-1970s blue Mercedes.

The Nation Riviera Beach Club; the guest room of the Al Hosen Suite

EUROPE

It’s easy to understand the appeal of The St. Regis Abu Dhabi. The capital of the United Arab Emirates is fast developing a major arts and cultural scene, turning the city into an ever more sophisticated metropolis blessed with cutting-edge architecture and world-class sports. Part of the prestigious Nation Towers complex on the Corniche, a five-mile stretch adjacent to the Arabian Gulf where you’ll find walking and cycling paths and children’s play areas, The St. Regis Abu Dhabi is the ideal home-away-from-home. Don’t miss the Luxury Nation Galleria Vox Cinemas directly connected to The St. Regis Abu Dhabi, with 11 cinemas including four Gold Class. Relax and soak up the sun with a refreshing cocktail on the private beachfront at the exclusive Nation Riviera Beach Club, home to Asia de Cuba, a lounge, restaurant and beach deck complete with outdoor bar, and Catch Restaurant and Lounge Abu Dhabi, where an open kitchen allows guests to interact with the chefs and watch as ingredients are transformed into delectable dishes.

Helipad Sunset Supper, taking place at the highest active helipad in the Middle East at 255 meters. Chefs, mixologists and butlers await you, serving caviar, oysters and canapés. Guests are also treated to a saxophone performance and the St. Regis Champagne sabering ritual. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Yas Waterworld on Yas Island, where funseekers pour in all day long at this state-of-theart theme park. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

LEADING LUXURY HOTEL OF THE YEAR, HOTEL NEWS MIDDLE EAST, LEADERS IN HOSPITALITY AWARDS 2017 BEST BRUNCH – BRUNCH IN THE CLOUDS, FACT DINING AWARDS ABU DHABI 2017

Nation Towers, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates T. (971) (2) 694 4444 info.abudhabi@stregis.com stregis.com/abudhabi Discover the upcoming St. Regis Hotels & Resorts on page 57 14

283 guest rooms and suites; 7 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; private beach; children’s club 15


THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort, Abu Dhabi

The St. Regis Cairo

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Watersports enthusiasts can choose from a wide range of activities including kayaking, paddleboarding and boogie-boarding. Available from 9am to sunset, for adults and children. Book at the watersports station on the beach.

A journey through Old Cairo’s landmarks. Embark on a trip that lies beyond the gates of the old city and take a stroll around the Complex of Religions while your private guide retells classic stories that never cease to delight.

The water fun continues at the 25-meter indoor lap pool where certified coaches provide swimming lessons for beginners and experts alike.

Authentic Felucca Sunset Sail. Cruise down the River Nile and get the most of the city’s mesmerizing views. Enjoy the beauty of the golden hour while sipping Egyptian mint tea.

The Abu Dhabi Pearl Journey. Sail on a traditional dhow among the mangrove trees of the Arabian Gulf for a demonstration of the ancient art of pearl diving.

Exterior view of the hotel from the beach; a premium sea view room

Saadiyat is an island of only ten square miles, but it packs a lot into that space. Just 15 minutes’ drive from the center of Abu Dhabi, it has a white sand beach, a designer golf course and, very soon, offshoots of both the Louvre and Guggenheim museums. It’s a relaxing and chic retreat from the bustle of the city. The St. Regis Saadiyat Island Resort’s architecture and interior design are stunning, showcasing the bold design principles of the award-winning architecture firm Woods Bagot and Johannesburg-based Northpoint Architects. Each room has panoramic vistas of the Gulf or golf course and interiors that meld Spanish and Arabian elements with a contemporary edge. In addition to business facilities, the resort has an Iridium spa offering products from luxury skincare brand ESPA, four swimming pools, a dedicated children’s club and the state-of-the-art St. Regis Athletic Club. Dolphins frolic in the blue waters, while nearby Saadiyat Beach is a nesting site for hawksbill turtles.

Yas Mall. Our staff can arrange transportation to Abu Dhabi’s newest, and biggest, glittering shopping destination, just 10 minutes from the hotel. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Explore the world’s largest indoor theme park, Ferrari World Abu Dhabi. It has more than 20 unique rides and attractions, including the world’s fastest rollercoaster, themed stores and restaurants. Open Tues-Sun, 11am-8pm. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

SONTAYA – BEST ASIAN RESTAURANT, FACT DINING AWARDS ABU DHABI 2017 ABU DHABI’S BEST RESORT SPA, WORLD SPA AWARDS

Cleopatra’s Milk and Honey Bath. The beauty of Queen Cleopatra has intrigued us for centuries. Let us prepare your in-room bath with the recipe of eternal youth from the diaries of the Queen’s beauty secrets.

The hotel’s impressive exterior at night; a guest bedroom with a spectacular Nile view

The St. Regis Cairo draws guests to the heart of Egypt’s timeless metropolis, on the north end of Corniche Road along the Nile. The hotel’s 36 stories stand as a unique expression of modern luxury that draws on the city’s influential past while confidently introducing its future. Local heritage is reflected through outstanding views of the Nile and Old Cairo, and inviting architecture is enhanced by distinctive murals which depict papyrus gardens and the Nile Valley flora in our guest rooms. Between mother-of-pearl inlaid nightstands, our sumptuous signature beds are topped by exquisite linen and pillows. Bathrooms are clad in light Emperador marble and boast flat-screen TVs integrated into mirrors. The St. Regis Butler service remains the ultimate experience for all guest rooms, suites and luxury apartments. Our Astor Grand Ballroom features a dedicated entrance for awe-inspiring occasions while the banquet hall boasts a three-story vaulted ceiling with a dramatic Swarovski chandelier. Overlooking the Nile, the hall’s alabaster grand staircase is bordered by crystal and bronze handrails, portraying the true essence of our Modern Egyptian Grandeur.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The Amulet Club is the place to be seen for our younger guests. Allow us to look after your children while we offer them personalized amenities and treats, mini cooking classes, storytelling afternoons and much more. Mother & Daughter – Father & Son Iridium Spa Retreat: spend quality time with your child with this perfect family bonding experience. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

DEBUTS EARLY 2018

Saadiyat Island, P.O. Box 54345, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates T. (971) (2) 4988888 saadiyat@stregis.com stregis.com/saadiyatisland

1189 Nile Corniche, Cairo, Egypt info.cairo@stregis.com stregis.com/cairo

376 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; Iridium spa; pool; gym; beach; golf; children’s club

366 guest rooms, suites and apartments; 8 restaurants, bars and lounges; Iridium Spa; indoor and outdoor pools; athletic club

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Doha

The St. Regis Dubai ASK US ABOUT

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The St. Regis Grand Brunch. Take Fridays to a new level with this lavish family celebration offering 16 food stations, live entertainment and activities for children.

A heritage falconry and wildlife safari, with a tour through Dubai Desert Conservation Reserve in search of gazelles and oryx. La Perle – the region’s first resident show featuring 65 artists whose skills include acting, acrobatic, aquatic and aerial stunts. These gravity-defying performers will mesmerize as they dive into an on-stage pool.

Festival City recently opened its doors and is rapidly becoming Qatar’s biggest shopping experience in the region, offering the world’s largest Monoprix. MIA (Museum of Islamic Art). Discover Islamic art from three continents over 1,400 years, and stunning views of the Doha skyline.

VIP helicopter tour. A personal aerial tour of Dubai’s historic sites and glistening beaches.

Visit Shahaniya, less than an hour away, where you can experience the famous camel races and the stunning Islamic art of the Sheikh Faisal Museum.

The hotel’s Arabian exterior is bold and welcoming; enjoy the cool ambiance of the Sarab Lounge Terrace

Doha has transformed itself in a very short time. Now the media and arts capital of its region, a major player in the aviation stakes and the host of the 2022 World Cup, it’s an ultra-cosmopolitan capital. The St. Regis Doha, with its postmodern Arabian architecture and panoramic views of the Persian Gulf, is a fitting address for a stay. The Rooftop lounge brings to Doha the urban chic of New York, Beirut and London. Guests ascend from the private entrance in the lower floor of the hotel and step onto a breathtaking, stylish and spacious terrace. The hotel features the new Raw Bar. Chef Elias Gemayel brings his creative flair to raw cuisine, turning the finest ingredients into culinary masterpieces in collaboration with celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay. The Raw Bar boasts a range of caviars, oysters, carpaccio, ceviche, sushi and sashimi to savor with the finest wines, champagne and exclusive gastronomic signature cocktails, including mango and jalapeno mojito, pisco sour and oyster shots.

A traditional wooden dhow cruise. Stop off near the island of Saflia for watersports. Arabian BBQ is served. Explore Dukhan and the west coast. Set off among the oil wells and visit the Zekreet peninsula, Umbrella Rock and the replica ancient Arabian village of Film City. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Desert safari. A thrilling ride into the dunes. Enjoy a picnic lunch, sand boarding, camel riding and desert quad biking. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The hotel’s impressive exterior; an Empire Suite Living Room

Inviting guests to experience John Jacob Astor IV’s vision of the finest hotel in the world, The St. Regis Dubai takes you back to the 18th century with its beauxarts-inspired design with bespoke elements. Located on the arterial Sheikh Zayed Road, the hotel is part of Al Habtoor City, which includes a Las Vegasstyle theatre, La Perle, and is a short drive from The Dubai Mall, Burj Khalifa and Dubai’s financial district. Its Iridium Spa boasts six treatment rooms (three male, three female) and two Hammams. Other facilities include two rooftop pools and a 24-hour fitness center. The hotel’s seven culinary destinations include J&G Steakhouse; Brasserie Quartier, a modern French brasserie; and Le Patio, serving traditional Arabic cuisine with a delicious range of Middle Eastern dishes and refreshing beverages. Inspired by the original address in New York while embracing the world’s new hotspot, Dubai, The St. Regis Dubai pays homage to two iconic cities, emerging as The New World Address.

An overnight safari and sunrise balloon flight. Ride through Dubai’s Desert Conservation Reserve in a vintage Land Rover, enjoy a four-course feast under the stars, sleep in Arabic tents and start the next day with a hot-air balloon ride over the desert. Dubai Water Canal. Several water-taxi stations are walking distance from the St. Regis Dubai. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: A seaplane tour. Marvel at spectacular views of Dubai and Abu Dhabi on a seaplane flight along the Arabian Gulf. Soar over Burj Khalifa and fly to Yas Marina. Guests receive a personalized family welcome ritual. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

WORLD TRAVEL AWARDS: MIDDLE EAST’S LEADING LUXURY BUSINESS HOTEL 2016

MIDDLE EAST’S LEADING NEW HOTEL; DUBAI’S LEADING HOTEL SUITE; WORLDS LEADING NEW HOTEL – WORLD TRAVEL AWARDS, 2016

FOOD AND TRAVEL GCC AWARDS: GORDON RAMSAY, BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT

BEST STEAKHOUSE FOR J&G STEAKHOUSE, TIME OUT DUBAI RESTAURANT AWARDS 2017

Doha West Bay, Doha 14435, Qatar T. (974) 44460000 doha.butler@stregis.com stregis.com/doha

Al Habtoor City, P.O. Box 124405, Sheikh Zayed Road, Dubai, United Arab Emirates T. (971) 4 435 5555 Dubai.Butler@stregis.com stregis.com/dubai

336 guest rooms and suites; 11 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; tennis; private beach

234 guest rooms and suites; 7 restaurants and bars; spa; 2 rooftop pools; helipad

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St.Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor Polo Resort & Club

The St. Regis Mauritius Resort

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Horse-riding school and polo academy. Expert instructors cater to new riders and seasoned equestrians, offering riding lessons, desert riding, pony-club activities and camps. There is also a full program for adults and children to improve dressage, polo and show-jumping skills.

The Chef’s Table. For an evening of culinary mastery, six guests are invited to enter the heart of the hotel’s kitchen, to participate in, and witness, all the action that goes into making our exquisite and delicious cuisine. Horse Racing. Founded in 1812, the Champs de Mars is one of the world’s oldest racetracks and a huge draw every Saturday.

City tours. Landmarks include the Dubai Mall and Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC). Enjoy a walk along the European-style boulevard and the waterfront promenade.

The resort’s polo field; a Deluxe room

Feted as the first equestrian-inspired St. Regis globally, with its roots firmly embedded in the sport of kings, The St. Regis Dubai, Al Habtoor Polo Resort & Club debuted in March 2017. Located at the south-eastern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, the resort has been designed around three polo fields and styled around an Andalusian heritage. In the Equine Library, guests can unwind among the anthology of books and prized artifacts, while The St. Regis Polo Bar creates a sporty, club-lounge atmosphere. The Andalucia restaurant, open throughout the day, serves Mediterranean cuisine. There is also a steakhouse – The Grill Pit – which combines a theater-style kitchen and cellar, and a tapas restaurant with a central, open kitchen. The Iridium Spa offers bespoke treatments. Another pièce de résistance is the 500 sq m ballroom, crowned by a prancing horse and crystal chandelier. As befits its standing, the resort features premium stabling for top-quality horses.

Overnight Safari and Sunrise Balloon Flight. Day 1 starts in a vintage Land Rover, to take you into the desert. Spot Arabian gazelles and oryx and enjoy a four-course feast. Day 2 starts at sunrise with a hot-air-balloon flight across the desert and ends with a complimentary drink and personalized flight certificate. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: A seaplane tour, with spectacular views of Dubai and Abu Dhabi, on a dramatic flight along the Persian Gulf. Soar over the world’s tallest skyscraper, the Burj Khalifa, and fly to Yas Marina for the Ferrari World Amusement Park. Children’s films and activities. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

DEBUTED MARCH 2017

Kite surfing. Expert wave riders may adventure to the One Eye world-famous wave, while others can enjoy the small reef Manawa and Chameaux spots of Le Morne.

Aerial view of Le Morne peninsula; a St. Regis Grand Suite Bedroom, steps from the beach and lagoon

The Indian Ocean is famed for many things: blissful beaches, indigo seas, sublime diving and a vibrant culture melding Asian and African traditions. Mauritius brings these together, then adds a few more. Sheltered from the open sea by the world’s third largest coral reef, the “Pearl of the Indian Ocean” harbors some of the planet’s most beautiful mountain scenery: waterfalls, lush forests and wildlife you won’t find anywhere else, such as the Mauritian flying fox. The St. Regis Mauritius Resort has a beachfront setting at Le Morne, a peninsula at the south-western tip of the island. Our executive chef, Nicolas De Visch, who has worked in Michelin-starred restaurants around the world, presides over Le Manoir Dining Room, bringing a Mauritian touch to his wealth of gastronomic expertise. There are also spa experiences, world-class kite surfing, activities and excursions. The peninsula has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 2008, and is less than 60 minutes’ drive from the capital and 20 minutes’ drive from the Black River Gorges National Park.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Casela Nature & Leisure Park: an interactive family experience immersing you in the area’s conservation and natural heritage. Lagoon Adventure: observe dolphins from a private speedboat and explore the lives of these magnificent marine mammals in their natural aquatic habitat. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT, BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT AND HOTEL OF THE YEAR AT THE FOOD AND TRAVEL GCC AWARDS 2016

Wadi Al Safa 5, Emirates Road 611, Dubai, United Arab Emirates T. (971) 4 435 4444 stregisdubaialhabtoorpoloresort.com

Doha West Bay, Doha 14435, Qatar T. (974) 44460000 doha.butler@stregis.com stregis.com/doha

126 guest rooms and suites; 25 guest villas; 6 restaurants and bars; Iridium spa; pool; horse-riding school; polo academy; 4 polo fields

336 guest rooms and suites; 11 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; tennis; private beach

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The St. Regis Diamond Brunch. Celebrate each last Sunday of the month in a stylish atmosphere with legendary jazz artists at The Boathouse Bar & Grill. Enjoy epicurean delights and beverages from all over the world.

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Aspen Resort

The St. Regis Atlanta ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Live Music. The Lobby Bar hosts a variety of musical performers as part of the après-ski scene. From jazz to rock to blues to pop, there is something to suit every taste.

SkyView Atlanta. Experience breathtaking panoramic views of downtown Atlanta and surrounding areas from nearly 20 stories above Centennial Park. For an enhanced experience, enjoy the VIP gondola, featuring Ferrari-style seats, glass floors, and a longer trip time.

World Snow Polo Championship at Rio Grande Park. Experience the “Sport of Kings” played on snow featuring Nacho Figueras, Captain of The St. Regis team. The VIP tent is not to be missed, with St. Regis Aspen-catered brunch and afternoon tea. Tickets can be purchased through Aspen Valley Polo Club or watch the game for free from the sidelines.

The hotel viewed from the base of Aspen Mountain; a Deluxe Double Fireplace guest room

Aspen is a special place where people can lose themselves in nature, yet find great pleasure in the many sports available. Yoga, fly fishing, clay shooting, snow shoeing, cross-country skiing, dog sledding, sleigh rides… the menu of sporting experiences rivals the food and drink you’ll enjoy here. There is also an arts scene and great spa-based activities. The Remède Spa boasts warm, elegant, earthy tones and was voted Best Spa in the World, 2014 by readers of Travel + Leisure magazine. Redesigned by acclaimed architect Lauren Rottet, and now with a renovated Red Mountain building – with new-look Loft Suites and One Bedroom Fireplace Suites – The St. Regis Aspen Resort is in downtown Aspen, walking distance from Aspen’s shops, restaurants and entertainment. The celebrated Chefs Club adds America’s most innovative cuisine to your resort experience, while the refreshed wine list includes our new sommelier Ericka Briscoe’s recommendations.

The Award-winning Remède Spa offers new signature services inspired by the great outdoors and Mother Nature including a Charcoal Scrub, a Scientific Organics Kombucha Facial and a Hemp-Infused CBD Massage – the first of its kind to be offered in any St. Regis property. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Annual Tree Lighting Ritual. This complimentary community event in the Fountain Courtyard features the Aspen High School Choir and Band, photo booth with Santa Claus, holiday cookies, festive beverages, a dual champagne sabering and more. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

Broadway touring shows at The Fox Theatre. For Fall/Winter 2017-2018, these include The King and I, The Color Purple, Love Never Dies, The Lion King and Rent.

The hotel entrance; the dining room of the Empire Suite

Atlanta is known for its breezy, Southern, uncomplicated approach to life, business, culture… and just about everything else. It’s a perfect city for getting things done and for enjoying some great boutique shopping, cuisine, art, jazz and sports: major league baseball, basketball and football teams are based here. The King Center, the CNN headquarters (which is open for tours), the Atlanta Ballet and Symphony Orchestra are all a short drive from The St. Regis Atlanta. Dinner-only restaurant Atlas features a seasonally inspired American menu accented with European influences and decorated with masterpieces from the Lewis Collection by Picasso, Van Gogh and Chagall, among others. If you’re in the mood for a bourbon, try The St. Regis Atlanta Woodford Reserve, handselected by our team in Kentucky’s legendary Woodford Reserve Distillery.

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Atlanta Opera and Atlanta Ballet. After an intimate dinner at Astor Court, attend one of these outstanding cultural experiences, then go behind scenes to tour the theater and visit the company. In support of the fine arts, 20 per cent of your total hotel bill will be donated to the opera, orchestra or ballet. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The Cacao Atlanta factory. Take a private guided tour and create your own bespoke beanto-bar chocolate. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

VIRTUOSO, BEST OF THE BEST HOTEL AWARDS 2016

AWARDED AAA FIVE DIAMOND, 2016

SMART MEETINGS, BEST MOUNTAIN AND SKI RESORT 2016

FORBES TRAVEL GUIDE 2016 AWARD WINNER

315 East Dean Street, Aspen, Colorado 81611, United States T. (970) 920 3300 aspen.reservations@stregis.com stregis.com/aspen

Eighty-Eight West Paces Ferry Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30305, United States T. (404) 563 7900 stregisatlanta@stregis.com stregis.com/atlanta

179 guest rooms and suites; 3 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; golf; ski

151 guest rooms and suites; 4 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort, Puerto Rico

The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort

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Mini Boat “island Hop and Snorkel Adventure”. Visit the uninhabited Icacos Cay and enjoy vistas of the mountains of El Yunque rainforest, the mangrove-lined coast and Fajardo’s 130-year-old Spanish lighthouse. Swim among schools of colorful tropical fish.

Catch & Cook. A five-hour fishing excursion with executive chef Franck Steigerwald departing from Haulover Marina. Guests then come back and indulge in a five-course dinner at Atlantikos with the freshly caught seafood. The art-access program offering complimentary access to Miami’s top art institutions. Cards are available at the concierge desk.

Art Visionary programing. A local artist creates masterpieces inspired by the natural environment of the property.

A private in-boutique consultation with Graff diamond house. Discover the latest gemstones and watches and receive a special gift from Graff.

A private tour of the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico, home to art from the 17th century to today, with museum director Juan Carlos López.

The Plantation House entrance; two miles of pristine beach

Puerto Rico is where American and Latin American cultures meld and clash and get up to dance. A key center of the salsa music revolution of the 1960s and 1970s, it is still the home of many star performers. The island is a much-loved beach destination, but is also known for its distinctive cuisine, culture and Caribbean vibe. Located on a former coconut plantation, The St. Regis Bahia Beach Resort is the first Five-Diamond resort on Puerto Rico. The expansive 483-acre property boasts views of El Yunque National Forest and the Atlantic Ocean. There’s a two-mile secluded beach, sanctuaries, a Remède spa and a golf course designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr. The Beach Club Restaurant is the favored destination for any guest looking for fresh, creative menu options, capturing the spirit of contemporary Puerto Rican cuisine in a casual setting with spectacular ocean views.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: A day of enchantment at Toro Verde Adventure Park in Orocovis, and experience The Monster – the world’s tallest and longest zipline. A Saturday PJ party, with movies, activities and playtime. Learn about flora and wildlife in The Nature Sanctuary River Tour sponsored by Alma de Bahia, a nonprofit organization that raises money for stray dogs and cats. The Boat House Club for young teens to have adventures on and off the property; participants will receive special rewards and a passport to track their experiences. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The resort’s oceanside pool; the Atlantikós restaurant

Miami never loses its buzz. Art Basel, South Beach’s effervescent social whirl, the rediscovery of Art Deco: all these have kept the focus on one of the cities that will define America’s future. Exclusive Bal Harbour, on Miami Beach, has a rich history as a hotspot attracting jazz musicians, including Rat Pack legends. It’s also one of South Florida’s premier retail and restaurant arenas. The St. Regis Bal Harbour resort recently opened a new lobby expansion – a glass-enclosed atrium area with new lounge spaces, a French-inspired eatery, La Gourmandise, and two new retailers: Vhernier Jewelry from Milan and DeWitt Fine Watch makers. The hotel’s latest culinary offering, Atlantikós, with white-and-blue decor inspired by the Greek Isles, offers Greek fare with a Miami twist. Each night begins with a traditional Greek plate-smashing ritual. The afternoon-tea experience in the lobby has been revitalized, with gourmet desserts from one of America’s top pastry chefs.

AWARDED AAA FIVE DIAMONDS, 2016

FORBES, FIVE STARS, 2016; AWARDED AAA FIVE DIAMOND 2016

FORBES TRAVEL GUIDE FIVE-STAR AWARD

CONDE NAST TRAVELER READER’S CHOICE AWARD – #2 HOTEL ON FLORIDA’S ATLANTIC COAST

State Road 187 kilometer 4.2, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico 00745, United States T. (787) 809 8000 reservations.bahiabeach@stregis.com stregis.com/bahiabeach

9703 Collins Avenue, Bal Harbour, Miami Beach, Florida 33154, United States T. (305) 993 3300

139 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; tennis; beach; children’s club, nature trails, aquatic park

Hire a private guide to show you the coolest film locations. Miami has been a movie set for celluloid classics, such as Goldfinger, Scarface and There’s Something about Mary. Old Miami: rent a vintage car (open-top, of course) and drive around the art deco district, then head out to the Keys. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Our Sea Turtle Club offers full- and half-day programing for younger guests. Family tours of the new Frost Museum of Science in Downtown Miami. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

info.balharbour@stregis.com stregis.com/balharbour 227 guest rooms and suites; 5 restaurants and bars; spa; gym; children’s club

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Deer Valley

The St. Regis Houston ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Bike riding. The hotel has teamed up with Fezzari Bicycles to provide guests with the all-new Kings Peak carbon bike, ideal for traversing sand, snow, mud, rocks and loose terrain.

A tour of the Saint Arnold Brewery. Take a trip around this fascinating Houston landmark, the oldest craft brewery in Texas. Public open house every weekday. Spend an unforgettable Sunday afternoon at Houston Polo Club where private box seats await your family and friends during an action-packed match. At half-time, take to the field and join in the tradition of the divot stomp, accompanied by champagne.

Bobsledding at Utah Olympic Park. Experience the thrill of a lifetime in a Comet Bobsled, with a professional pilot down the 2002 Olympic track.

The pool at The St. Regis Deer Valley; a guest bedroom with a spectacular view

Hit the slopes or relax in the spa, go on a backcountry excursion or explore historic Main Street… The St. Regis Deer Valley is surrounded by the majestic Wasatch Mountains, an all-season playground. The two buildings of The St. Regis Deer Valley are connected by a funicular rail line, the only one of its kind in the U.S., which makes for easy, and unique, access from the base of the mountain to the resorts. Try our Remède Spa where a reflecting pool flows from outside the resort into the spa’s first-floor lobby and a grand spiral staircase leads to 11 peaceful treatment rooms. Or dine in our award-winning JeanGeorges Vongerichten restaurant, J&G Grill, featuring farm-to-table elegance. The hotel has also created its own signature St. Regis spices to purchase, in partnership with renowned Chef Lior Lev Sercarz of La Boîte biscuits and spices in NYC. The spices reflect the essence of a moment and guests can relive their mountain visit with us by taking home our three custom blends.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program. We are proud to partner locally for activities. One is to introduce local authors with book readings and signings in our library, including Jeanine Heil, author of Stetson, Street Dog of Park City and Stetson, Rescue Dog of Park City, Katie Mullaly, author of the Land Of series, and 13-time paralympic medalist Chris Waddell, author of Is it Lonely to Be a Four-Leaf Clover and Things I Want to Remember Not to Forget. A great way for families to gather after skiing and unwind with a good book. We have also partnered with Park City’s Kimball Arts Center to provide families with classes at different locations in the resort, as well as surrounded by nature on the Astor terrace. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The Adios Utopia exhibition, which looks at how Cuba’s revolutionary aspirations for social utopia shaped 65 years of Cuban art and brings together the work of more than 50 Cuban artists and designers.

The destination swimming pool; the master bedroom of the Presidential Suite

Energy and power, Texan pride and individuality, open space and outer space, Houston is the big-muscled business capital of the Lone Star State. If the city has a reputation for getting things done and no messing around, The St. Regis Houston, in the tranquil, residential neighborhood of Post Oak Park and River Oaks, is the perfect complement. It is gracious, opulent and discreet. It’s also conveniently located only half a mile from the Galleria retail area and six miles from Houston’s central business district. Celebrated design firm ForrestPerkins has created a warm and welcoming Tea Lounge with a library so guests can punctuate their outings with morning coffee, afternoon tea or pre-dinner cocktails. The spectacular outdoor pool and sundeck, located on the mezzanine level and adjacent to the spa and fitness room, draw guests back time after time. It is open from 5am until 11pm daily, for guests who love to work hard and play hard as well.

Independence Plaza at Space Center Houston. Enter the shuttle replica Independence, mounted on top of the original NASA 905 shuttle carrier aircraft, then explore the giant plane. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: George Ranch Historical Park is the essence of Texas, a living-history museum tracing the Texas story, with exhibits including a prairie home and a ranch complex with cattle demonstrations. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

AAA FIVE DIAMOND AWARD 2017

AWARDED AAA FIVE DIAMOND, 2015

J&G GRILL, AAA FOUR DIAMOND RATING 2017

GOLD MEDAL WINNER VOTED BY GLOBAL BUSINESS TRAVEL ASSOCIATION

2300 Deer Valley Drive East, Park City, Utah 84060, United States T. (435) 940 5700 deervalley.reservations@stregis.com stregis.com/deervalley

1919 Briar Oaks Lane, Houston, Texas 77027-3408, United States T. (713) 840 7600 res247.stregishouston@stregis.com stregis.com/houston

181 guest rooms and suites; 3 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; ski

232 guest rooms and suites; 2 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; exercise room

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Mexico City

The St. Regis New York ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Mexico City Culinary Experience. A full-day’s activity, with a personalized tour of the San Juan market, led by the J&G Grill culinary team, who will showcase seasonal and exotic ingredients, followed by a cooking class.

An insider’s tour of Grand Central Station. Spend a morning or afternoon behind the scenes, explore the Campbell Apartment and its massive still-sealed vault, the Whispering Gallery and the starry ceiling. To conclude the tour, enjoy guided oyster tasting at the famous Grand Central Oyster Bar.

An indulgent spa ritual. Enjoy the new Shirodara experience, which consists of a Copal exfoliation followed by a Shirodara – an Ayurvedic therapy that involves gently pouring liquids over the forehead to promote profound relaxation and stress release.

Fall is the perfect time for a day trip to upstate New York, when you can enjoy the beautiful colors of the fall foliage and much more. Metropolitan Opera (new season), and the Cirque du Soleil, at the Barclays Center.

Sky Yoga. Book a private yoga session at the resort’s helipad, and enjoy panoramic views.

The sleek hotel dominates the Mexico City skyline; one of the suites’ living rooms

The St. Regis Mexico City, an idyllic urban resort, is the main resident of the Torre Libertad, an architectural masterpiece built by César Pelli. It sits on Mexico City’s Paseo de la Reforma, a thoroughfare modeled on the Old World’s boulevards, and a bridge between the city center and the Imperial Palace in the Chapultepec Forest. From the helipad, you can take in the mind-boggling urban sprawl. Don’t miss the King Cole Bar terrace; this new fully renovated space features superb mixology paired with lively DJ sets to complement the majestic views of Mexico City’s premier address. The hotel’s La Table Krug is the only place in Mexico where the limited-edition Champagne Krug Millesime 2000 can be savored. This season, don’t miss #HiddenBubbles the exceptional speakeasy of La Table Krug offering an exquisite ambiance and the best portfolio of Krug champagne. The Remède Spa, meanwhile, which features the sumptuous Sol & Luna Spa Suite, has added a second suite for couples called Mar y Tierra. These are the only two cabins in the city featuring their own steam room and shower.

Private electric bike tours. The concierges, all certified with Les Clefs d’Or, have curated different biking tours to explore Mexico City, visiting the landmarks closest to the hotel, with the assistance of a certified guide Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The St. Regis Mexico City has introduced Tesla Model S one-seater cars for guests aged 3-8. The cars include working headlights and can reach a speed of 6mph. We also offer mini Bentley cars, a complimentary amenity for toddlers to enjoy when staying at the urban resort. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The hotel’s famous entrance; the living room of the Bentley Suite

New York City is a collection of exceptional experiences, from the natural beauty of Central Park to the bustle of Broadway, from contemporary art at MoMA to the cobblestone streets of the Meatpacking District. In the heart of it is The St. Regis New York, the ultimate Manhattan hotel, which had a stunning renovation in September 201 and has seen the opening of The St. Regis Athletic Club on the 19th floor, plus redesigned meeting spaces on the second floor and lower lobby. Since opening in 1904, the hotel, founded by John Jacob Astor IV, has been synonymous with innovation and luxury. Its rich history includes famous residents (Salvador Dalí, Marlene Dietrich) and the invention of the “Red Snapper” – commonly known as the Bloody Mary – by legendary barman Fernand Petiot in 1934. The classic cocktail can still be enjoyed in front of the same Maxfield Parrish mural at the hotel’s King Cole Bar. Today, the hotel’s influence is as strong as ever, with the new Broadway musical War Paint featuring scenes set at The St. Regis New York.

Motown the Musical. The hit musical recounting the tale of Motown boss Berry Gordy – who launched the careers of Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross and more – returns to Broadway. Not-to-be-missed entertainment with a host of unbeatable songs. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Central Park Escape. Discover the largest park in Manhattan with our family fun expert guides. They will show you the best of the park’s culture, public art and gardens before you relax and enjoy a picnic lunch prepared by the hotel’s chef. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

BEST HOTELS IN MEXICO, US NEWS & WORLD REPORT 2017

LUXURY HOTEL OF THE YEAR 2017, BY LUXURY TRAVEL GUIDE AWARDS 2017

BEST CULINARY EXPERIENCE IN MEXICO, TRAVEL + LEISURE WORLD’S BEST AWARDS 2017

NO. 4 BEST HOTEL IN NEW YORK CITY, US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT 2017 RANKINGS

Paseo de la Reforma 439, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, Mexico City, Federal District 06500, Mexico T. (52)(55) 5228 1818

2 East 55th Street at Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10022, United States T. (212) 753 4500 stregisny.res@stregis.com stregis.com/newyork

mexico.city@stregis.com stregis.com/mexicocity

238 guest rooms and suites; 1 restaurant and bar; gym

189 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; tennis; children’s club 28

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis Princeville Resort

The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge. Offering unsurpassed views of the Pacific, and unique opportunities to see seabirds in their natural habitat and to visit the historic Daniel K. Inouye Kilauea Lighthouse.

Whale-watching expeditions. Enjoy amazing encounters with humpback whales with highly experienced naturalist guides. Witness nature’s wonders; see a 50-tonne mammal rise above water and hear it sing. Encounter the natural wonders of the Marietas Islands. Be part of our conservation efforts with our Adopt a Coral program where you can help to reforest the reef.

Princeville Ranch Adventures. Experience the Kauai zipline on the pristine private lands of Princeville Ranch. The course combines nine ziplines and a suspension bridge spanning a waterfall.

Create your own cocktail with the Mixology Butler. The drink will be placed on the menu during your stay.

Princeville night market. A monthly festival, held every second Sunday, with live music and local artisans.

The stylish dining area of the Royal Suite; the view over the magical Hanalei Bay

The first thing you’ll notice on arrival on the Hawaiian island of Kauai is the remarkable collage of natural beauty wherever you look. Lush tropical foliage is set against a deep blue ocean with a backdrop of majestic mountain peaks. The St. Regis Princeville Resort’s clean, modern exterior is unfussy yet sophisticated, and the lobby is dominated by a cascading chandelier of more than 4,000 pieces of Murano glass, representing the waterfall on Na Molokama mountain. Among the many relaxing treatments on offer at the Halele’a Spa, which utilizes the healing properties of indigenous plants, why not try a Hawaiian Lomi Lomi massage to nurture the body and experience perfect relaxation? Four restaurants serve locally farmed and produced ingredients, and the hotel’s infinity pool overlooks the wide expanse of the Pacific Ocean.

An aerial tour of Kauai. See the magnitude of the Napali Coast, hover over the Waimea Canyon, and view the Manawaiopuna Falls – as seen in Jurassic Park. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Enjoy the awardwinning Makai Golf Course. Each paying adult may bring one free junior golfer (aged 6-15). A junior golf clinic is offered on Sundays from 2-3pm. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

A gourmet cruise through Banderas Bay aboard a luxury yacht with specialty cocktails and exquisite food prepared by the hotel chef. The living room of the Presidential Suite; beach life with a touch of luxury

On the same latitude as Hawaii, and blessed with year-round balmy sun and ocean breezes, Punta Mita on Mexico’s Pacific Coast is where Mexico City’s high society comes for its beachside retreats. The St. Regis Punta Mita Resort is in the Riviera Nayarit, and has 120 luxurious guest rooms and suites, looking out onto a flawless white sand beach and surrounded by luxuriant tropical flora. In early 2017 the

hotel unveiled their newest culinary offering: the Champagne and Oyster Bar: a chic, intimate bar with a seductive menu of oysters and Moët Ice champagne. The resort has two Jack Nicklaus golf courses, five full-service restaurants, villa residences, a Beach Club and the luxe Remède Spa, which recently introduced a mindfulness menu and flotation therapy; the latter is a state-of-the-art float pod that takes relaxation to a new level. But this is no gated island experience: nearby seaside villages stay vibrant by fishing and agriculture and by the indigenous Huichol, who maintain their artisanal traditions.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Teenagers can enjoy fun and games at Marietas garden, including sumo. In-suite glamping, where little guests can take outdoor fun indoors by sleeping in their very own tepee. Guests staying in a suite can reserve the Family Traditions package offering connecting rooms. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

HALELE’S SPA, BEST IN HAWAII 2016, WORLD LUXURY SPA AWARDS

ONE OF THE TOP RESORTS IN WESTERN MEXICO, CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER 2016

READERS’ CHOICE: TOP 30 RESORTS IN HAWAII, 2016 CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER

BEST HOTELS IN MEXICO, US NEWS & WORLD REPORT 2017

5520 Ka Haku Road, Princeville, Kauai, Hawaii 96722, United States T. (808) 826 9644 travelspecialist@stregis.com stregis.com/princeville

Lote H-4, Carretera Federal 200, KM 19.5, Punta Mita, Nayarit 63734, Mexico T. (52)(329) 291 5800 puntamita.butler@stregis.com stregis.com/puntamita

251 guest rooms and suites; 5 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; beach; gym; tennis; golf; children’s club

120 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; 3 pools; beach; spa; golf; diving; tennis; gym; children’s club

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: THE AMERICAS

The St. Regis San Francisco

The St. Regis Washington, D.C. ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

The City and Sonoma: Treat yourself to the best of both worlds in Northern California with The St. Regis San Francisco’s exclusive partnership with Farmhouse Inn. Experience these two world-class locations in style.

The home of President George Washington at his Mount Vernon plantation. Explore this magnificent 75-acre estate along the Potomac River and look behind-the-scenes at the life of American’s first president. A private walking tour of Arlington National Cemetery. See the change of the guard at The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the President Kennedy site, and many more historical figures.

San Francisco Fall Antiques Show, October 26-29. This year’s theme is “flower power” – a hometown nod to the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love.

Enjoy a two-hour tour of Washington with your own private pedicab, seeing some of the D.C.’s most important sites.

A culinary tour of San Francisco, with Emmy Award-winning radio and TV personality Liam Mayclem, aka “The Foodie Chap”.

The magnificent mural in the lobby lounge; a view across the city from the Astor Suite

The Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz, cable cars, beaches, beautiful city vistas, the breezes… it’s little wonder San Francisco tops many people’s lists of must-see cities. The St. Regis San Francisco is on the corner of Third and Mission, a short walk from the financial district. When you have downtime, the city is a great playground for cultural days and nights on the town. On your doorstep you’ll find the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of the African Diaspora, world-class shopping in Union Square, and the Yerba Buena Gardens. Take a trip out of town to enjoy Napa and Sonoma Valleys, the coastal towns of Carmel, Pebble Beach and Monterey, or the redwood trees in Muir Woods. Enjoy a delicious meal at the Grill restaurant at The St. Regis. Relax in the Remède Spa, with its exquisite menu of treatments, or simply unwind and enjoy our extraordinary property, starting with the stunning city views from the infinity pool.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Try our new Master Blender activity, where children can blend their very own grape juice concoction, or visit the Bay Area Discovery Museum and the California Academy of Sciences. Also, The Curated Kid museum tour, where children of all ages are encouraged to create their own works of art at local museums. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The hotel exterior at night on K Street; the elegant St. Regis lobby

In the city of powerful addresses, the grand, gracious St. Regis Washington, D.C., two blocks north of the White House, remains the powerbrokers’ hotel of choice. It was opened by President Coolidge in 1926; Ronald Reagan used to drop in to see his barber, Milton Pitts; and Jacqueline Onassis, Audrey Hepburn and Elizabeth Taylor were loyal guests. Over the years, redesigns by Henry Wardman and Sills Huniford have enhanced the legendary status of this, one of America’s most iconic hotels. Business and politics are right on the doorstep, but the hotel is also close to the cultural heart of D.C., a short stroll from the splendors of the Smithsonian and the Kennedy Center. Eat at the hotel’s signature restaurant, where our executive chef prepares the freshest seasonal local ingredients, influenced by Spanish cuisine, in a D.C. landmark restaurant.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture. The only national museum of its kind, established in 2003 by Act of Congress after years of effort to highlight the contributions of African Americans. A gourmet cruise through Banderas Bay on a luxury yacht with cocktails and exquisite food prepared by the hotel chef. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: A private tour with our biking concierge using our Shinola bikes – a great way to visit the city. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

FIVE-STAR AWARD, FORBES TRAVEL GUIDE; #3 BEST HOTELS IN SAN FRANCISCO, U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT;

4-DIAMOND AWARD AAA 2017

#3 BEST HOTELS IN SAN FRANCISCO, READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS, CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER

THE SILVER PLUME AWARD FOR THE MOST SUPPORTIVE GENERAL MANAGER, WHERE MAGAZINE AND WASHINGTON CONCIERGE ASSOCIATION

125 3rd Street, San Francisco, California 94103, United States T. (415) 284 4000 sanfrancisco@stregis.com stregis.com/sanfrancisco

923 16th and K Streets, N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, 20006 United States T (202) 638 2626 reservations@stregis.com stregis.com/washingtondc

260 guest rooms and suites; restaurant and bar; spa; pool; gym

172 guest rooms and suites; 2 restaurants and bars; gym

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Bali Resort

The St. Regis Bangkok ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Capturing Bali: a personal photography session. Spend an enriching half day with a local professional photographer who can capture your experience on film. The photographer can take guests to well-known sites, such as Bajra Sandhi monument and to hidden gems along the way.

A cookery class at our sumptuous VIU restaurant, which offers an à la carte menu of international cuisine. Located on the 12th floor. Bangkok food tour. Stroll through Bangkok as you’re introduced to Thai dishes and drinks at food stalls and local eateries, all handpicked by a local guide.

Inside Bali. A full-day private immersion tour in local culture, with Agus Cahyadi, a Bali native, who will ensure you experience the best of Bali’s unique culture and entertainment.

A private tour of the city’s treasures. Landmark sights include the Bangkok Noi, Rattanakosin Island and Bang Luang Canals and the flower markets.

Tour the coastline on a superyacht. Begin your journey with a massage at the Remède spa where a special sunscreen formula will be prepared to protect your skin. Suitable for the entire family. The private sandy beach at the southernmost tip of Bali; the exterior of Strand Villa

Bali is the best known of several thousand Indonesian islands and has been inhabited since 2000 BC. Its natural wonders are the main draw: beautiful beaches, colorful coral reefs, a central mountain range and dense tropical rainforest harboring many species of flora and fauna, including orchids, butterflies, ferns, birds and monkeys. The St. Regis Bali Resort is in Nusa Dua, on the island’s southernmost tip overlooking the Indian Ocean, with a private sandy beach, a saltwater swimmable lagoon and the sublime Remède Spa with its hydrotherapy pool. It’s the perfect base for a Bali break. From your journey around the island, take back souvenirs of local crafts, such as woodcarving, weaving and colorful batik textiles, which make wonderful gifts. In the evening, dine in style at Kayuputi or enjoy traditional live gamelan music along with Indonesian specialties at Dulang. For the ultimate in luxury, take the beachfront Strand Villa.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The Children’s Learning Center, in its own tropical park, has intelligent, fun-filled activities. Back to nature: Eco Learning Park – a 10-minute drive from the resort – organizes interactive programs for fun and discovery for all family members, who will learn how to help preserve the environment. A gourmet picnic lunch is included. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

Bangkok’s art institutions, including Whitespace and the Jim Thompson House for a tour of the antiquities collection of the man who “rediscovered” Thai silk.

The St. Regis Bangkok overlooks the Royal Bangkok Sports Club; the living room in the John Jacob Astor Suite

Tuk-tuks, trucks, riverboats, bicycles, boats and buses... the Thai capital is a whirling mass of energy. But Bangkok is also a warm, friendly place, and you can follow up that sweltering morning’s outing, business meeting or hike around the 18th-century Grand Palace with a slow meal of the most fragrant cuisine on earth. The St. Regis Bangkok’s soothing décor immerses guests in luxury from the moment they arrive. It might be in the fast-beating heart of central Bangkok, but it is also moments from the peaceful Lumpini Park. The hotel recently unveiled the new Decanter, featuring Thailand’s first-ever Johnnie Walker Blue Label Room, together with a transformed wine lounge and dining room, on level 12. There is also a new boardroom on the 2nd floor – the same floor as the connecting bridge to BTS skytrain, offering further convenience to guests. For starting your evening, what could be better than cocktails in The Sky Lounge, watching the sun set on another eventful day...

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: A cooking class hosted by our executive chef. Have fun in the kitchen as our chef prepares a special lunch for you to savor together, which may be anything from pizzas to sushi, with child-friendly desserts like cupcakes or tiramisu. Children’s Tent – a special setup in suites for our younger guests; not just an ordinary extra bed –little ones will feel they have their own imaginative world space with a fun atmosphere. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

TOP 10 WORLD’S BEST BEACH HOTEL, TRAVEL+ LEISURE 2017

THE “BEST FIVE HOTELS IN BANGKOK” BY READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS 2016, AWARDED BY DESTINASIAN.COM; VOTED AMONG THE TOP 10 HOTELS IN

TOP 100 BEST HOTELS IN THE WORLD, TRAVEL+LEISURE 2017

BANGKOK BY READERS OF CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER; RESTAURANT JOJO HAS BEEN RECOGNIZED WITH A “TRIPADVISOR 2017 CERTIFICATE OF EXCELLENCE”

Kawasan Pariwisata, Lot S6, PO Box 44, Nusa Dua, Bali 80363, Indonesia T. (62) (361) 8478 111 stregis.bali@stregis.com stregis.com/bali

159 Rajadamri Road Bangkok, 10330 Thailand T. (66) (2) 207 7777 stregis.bangkok@stregis.com stregis.com/bangkok

123 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; beach; gym; children’s club

228 guest rooms and suites; 7 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Beijing

The St. Regis Bora Bora Resort ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

A guided tour of Beijing’s contemporary art centers, via the Red Gate Gallery and China’s largest art community to learn about the 60-year history of this vast former weapons factory.

A Catamaran Sunset Cruise. Enjoy Bora Bora’s stunning scenery aboard Vitamin Sea, a sleek ex-racing catamaran refitted for leisure cruising. Sip on chilled champagne with canapés as the golden hour makes way for pink skies and watch the first stars come out for the evening.

It was Napoleon Bonaparte who famously said: “I drink champagne to celebrate a victory, I also drink champagne to console myself when I was defeated.” Napoleon also used to open champagne with his saber, a practice that has become a signature ceremony performed for guests in our Evening Rituals series. Today, we invite you to toast tradition with champagne sabrage at our Press Club Bar on the first floor daily (except Sundays) at 6pm.

The porte-cochère at night, just a short walk from the Silk Market; a Diplomat Deluxe Room

Beijing is the capital of a great power once more, and The St. Regis Beijing is ideally positioned close to the diplomatic quarter, business district and the Forbidden City, as well as being surrounded by some of the city’s finest restaurants and bars. The signature St. Regis Butler Service, private-dining suites and mansion ambiance reflect the values of old China, preparing you for your next foray into local business or culture and the dizzying experience of Chinese cuisine, including the highly-esteemed Celestial Court restaurant, serving authentic southern Chinese cuisine in a traditional setting. Or try the new Salami Room in Dianeli’s restaurant, and enjoy Beijing’s largest selection of Italian wine. Afterwards, take time to unwind in the hotel’s Iridium Spa, one of Beijing’s most luxurious, and one that has its own natural hot spring water for soaking in. On the spa menu you will find as many as 40 Western and Chinese therapies, a comprehensive list that is sure to soothe the spirits and rejuvenate the senses.

Entertainment at Laoshe Tea House. Everything from kung fu, acrobatics to opera and puppetry. The Broadway musical Wicked. This dazzling show can be seen at Beijing Tianqiao Performing Arts Center, Beijing’s only venue designed for musical theater. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Try the great new food and beverage turndown amenities for children aged up to 17. There are four menus, for four different age groups. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

Outdoor Candlelight Massage. Candles are lit at sunset at the Spa Beach to create an idyllic haven close to the soothing flow of the Resort’s Lagoonarium. Couples unwind with a mediumpressure massage. A private wine class in the lagoon. The sommelier will set up a selection of wines and guests can learn how to distinguish the best grapes as they dip into the crystal-clear lagoon. One of the over water villas facing Mt Otemanu; a Master Bedroom overlooking the lagoon

Bora Bora, discovered by Captain Cook in 1769, is a 16-square-mile tropical island surrounded by coral reef and lagoons. This much-mythologized South Pacific island is some 5,000 miles west of Lima and almost 4,000 miles northeast of Sydney, its remoteness matched by its year-round warm climate and outstanding beauty. A step away from the picture-perfect beaches are rugged volcanic mountains covered with lush tropical vegetation. At the secluded 44-acre St. Regis Bora Bora Resort, all rooms have private dining areas, daybeds and state-of-theart entertainment systems, and are elegantly decorated with Polynesian arts and crafts. Rooms either have direct access to the beach or are thatched villas built over water; views are of the extinct volcanoes, the lagoon or the reef. For the utmost privacy, the three-bedroom Royal Estate has four bathrooms, its own beach, a pool and an area with sauna, jacuzzi and hammam. If you are in search of perfect pampering, go to the resort’s Miri Miri Spa by Clarins, a place of deep relaxation on its own private islet.

THE BEST OUTDOORS WEDDING VENUE, BY HOTEL WEDDING 2016

THIRD BEST RESORT IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC, TRAVEL + LEISURE’S BEST IN THE WORLD, 2016

BEST BUSINESS HOTEL 2016, CLUB MAGAZINE

WINNER, TOP 25 HOTELS IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC, TRIPADVISOR’S TRAVELER’S CHOICE, 2013

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Shark and Ray Tour. Create once-in-a-lifetime memories on an aquatic safari around the island to feed stingrays and black tip reef sharks with a Polynesian guide. Stop on a private islet for lunch served in the water then have fun learning local customs such as Tahitian traditional dance steps or how to open a coconut. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

21 Jianguomenwai Dajie, Beijing 100020, China T. (86) (10) 6460 6688 stregis.beijing@stregis.com stregis.com/beijing

Motu Ome’e BP 506, Bora Bora 98730, French Polynesia T. (689) 40 607888 reservations@stregisborabora.com stregis.com/borabora

258 guest rooms and suites; 5 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym

90 guest villas; 4 restaurants and 2 bars; spa; pool; beach; gym; tennis; children’s club

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Changsha

The St. Regis Chengdu ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Dufu Riverside Pavilion. Located at the east side of Xiang River, the pavilion, long corridor, and tea rooms form the pavilion. Tourists have a great view of Mount Yuelu.

Jinli Ancient Street. See a traditional road dating from the Qin Dynasty (221 to 206 BC). Sample Sichuan food, from hotpots to dumplings, and admire the Wuhou temple and rich culture of the Three Kingdoms period (220 to 280AD).

The Yuelu Academy. Founded in the year 976, this Academy of Classical Learning is the oldest continually operating institute of learning in China and has produced some of the country’s great poets, philosophers and political leaders, including Confucian scholars Zhu Xi and Zhang Shi. Also features amazing traditional architecture and serene gardens.

The hotel’s impressive Great Hall; Caroline Astor Suite bedroom

Changsha, the capital of Hunan province, has a history spanning 3,500 years and has been one of the most important cities in China since the Qin Dynasty. The St. Regis Changsha is at the heart of the shopping and business districts, within reach of major transportation hubs, museums and historical sites of interests. Housed in Yunda Central Plaza, on the 48th to 63rd floors in one of the city’s tallest skyscrapers, the hotel has its own helipad. The 188 guest rooms and suites feature an intelligent iPad control system and contemporary touches along with local antiques. An expert team of chefs presents unparalleled dining experiences in six venues. The Chinese Restaurant Yan Ting will captivate gastronomes with authentic Cantonese and local dishes, while the Un Japanese restaurant offers extensive Japanese fare and Teppanyaki experience. The St. Regis Changsha provides the chance to relax at The St. Regis Athletic Club, with an indoor swimming pool, beautiful panoramic views and a 24-hour fitness center.

Juzi Island. This narrow strip of land in the center of the Xiangjiang River has gardens and orchards with thousands of fruit trees and firework displays. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Enjoy special welcome amenities and rituals including delectable treats, child-sized robes, slippers and step stools for the little ones. Recreational activities, dining options and childcare services can all be arranged. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

Kung Fu Family: a home for martial arts. Classes are headed by Master Li Quan, who will pass on traditional Chinese kung fu to willing disciples and tailors classes to meet individual goals. Sichuan Opera. A perfect blend of local dialect with historic culture, folk music and dances from various regions. The best place to see it is at Chengdu Culture Park on Qingtai Road. The stage is inside the Green- Ram Abbey, a famous Taoist temple. The indoor pool features colored lights and holograms; a Grand Deluxe Room

The capital city of Sichuan province is flourishing as a business hub, in part because of the excellent links to the rest of the province. But this is nothing new for Chengdu. It was one of the first places in the world to issue paper currency and the starting point for part of the Southern Silk Route, from where merchants would take the region’s renowned wares to the wider world. Yet for all its importance, this ancient metropolis, founded in 316 BC, retains a remarkably relaxed atmosphere. You’ll find delicious Sichuan food being served at the hotel’s signature restaurant Yan Ting, numerous tea houses and, for downtime, parks and temples to explore. Thanks to its location, The St. Regis Chengdu is perfectly placed for business meetings, yet within easy reach of prestige boutiques and cultural highlights, including temples, museums and parks. Later, enjoy our signature Chuan Mary cocktail at the Vantage XXVII outdoor sky bar on the 27th floor, open from April to October, with in-house DJ, skyline views and a statement bronze bar.

BEST NEW OPENING HOTEL OF THE YEAR AWARD, THE 2017 CHINA TRAVEL & MEETINGS INDUSTRY AWARDS-LEISURE TRAVEL HOSTED BY

TARGET TASTE 2016 RECOMMENDED CHINESE RESTAURANT: YAN TING

TRAVEL WEEKLY CHINA, NORTHSTAR TRAVEL GROUP

BEST NEW ULTRA LUXURY HOTEL, LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Yunda Central Plaza, No. 289 Sha Wan Road, Yuhua District, Changsha 410129 Hunan Province stregis.changsha@stregis.com st.regis.com/changsha

88 Taisheng Road South, Qingyang District, Chengdu 610017, Sichuan, China T. (86) (28) 6287 6666

188 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars, ballroom; rooftop lap pool; fitness center

Visit the Leshan Buddha. The world’s largest Buddha sculpture overlooks the Min River, about two hours by road south of Chengdu. It’s a humbling experience standing next to this 233-foot colossus, carved into red sandstone cliffs during the ninth century. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding. Closely observe giant pandas in fernleaf hedge bamboo. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

stregis.chengdu@stregis.coma stregis.com/chengdu 279 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; spa; athletic club; indoor & outdoor pools

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur

The St. Regis Langkawi ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Forest bathing. Guests can be transported to the forest for a short escape from the hustle and bustle of the busy city, and experience relaxation in the most natural way.

The cable car and suspension Bridge at Gunung Mat Cincang. The second highest mountain on the island is famous for offering spectacular views of Langkawi.

Learn to play with a Malaysian badminton legend, Ong Beng Teong, a gold medalist at the 1982 Commonwealth Games and at the 1988 and 1999 Swiss Opens. The two-hour lesson will enable you to hone your badminton skills and put them to the test against your coach.

The Seven Wells Waterfall is a picturesque spot where visitors can swim in the cool, clear waters or soak in one of the seven linked natural pools.

Batik painting. Express yourself in the Malaysian art of batik-making. Private lessons are at The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur. A City Tour. Take in the beauty and charm of fascinating old and new Kuala Lumpur. The Mark Evans mural in the lobby; the Astor Lounge Astor Bar

The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur is located in KL Sentral, one of the most prestigious and romantic neighborhoods, a stone’s throw from the city’s Lake Gardens and heritage landmarks such as the National Museum and House of Parliament. The hotel is infused with luxurious design details, such as breathtaking Austrian crystals and hand-made Italian gold tiles. Inspired by Polo, the “Sport of Kings”, subtle details include horsehair leather panels, saddle stitch and stirrup motifs. Guests can take advantage of a refreshing dip in the outdoor swimming pool, or relax and rejuvenate the senses at the 1,100 square meter Iridium Spa. The Japanese Restaurant features the three-star Michelin Saito-san in his first and only venture outside of Tokyo, Taka by Sushi Saito, serving his signature sushi, including his famous Anago Sushi. Guests will also enjoy tempura from Tokyo’s Ginza Tenkuni, which has been serving Edo-style tempura since 1885. With six distinct dining venues, guests seeking incomparable cuisine will be spoiled for choice at The St. Regis Kuala Lumpur.

The living area of the Presidential Suite; the Main Pool

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Discover the art of pewter making at Royal Selangor, a world-famous gift brand founded in 1885. Visitors can enjoy hands-on workshops of 30 or 60 minutes and create their own pewter souvenir. Flower arranging – families can learn this beautiful art together. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The St. Regis Langkawi nestles on the southern tip of Langkawi, the first UNESCO Global Geopark in Southeast Asia. The first new luxury resort on the island for 11 years, our discreet address overlooks a sparkling white-sand beach, swaying palm trees and the glistening turquoise Andaman Sea. It is the ideal departure point for exploring the Jewel of Kedah. On the archipelago’s largest island, picturesque villages, majestic mountain peaks and lush tropical jungles filled with remarkable caves and waterfalls contribute to Langkawi’s dramatic natural beauty. The translucent waters invite guests to enjoy endless ocean activities, including snorkeling, fishing, diving and sunset cruises. Settle into the flawless services afforded to each of our 85 suites and four over-water villas, including one with four bedrooms – the Sunset Royal Villa, which now features a private swimming pool. Each villa highlights signature design elements bringing the traditions of the brand to life.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Little Chefs Program – a hands-on lesson on cooking ingredients, sanitation and organization. Children will learn to measure mix, work cleanly and explore new foods. Every Saturday from 3pm to 5pm; age range: 4-12. A customized Geo-Forest Safari. Visit geological wonders that date back to over half a million years; spot macaques, dusky leaf monkeys and exotic lizards; take a serene river cruise; and witness spectacular marine life in the Andaman Sea. Visit a Virgin Coconut Oil Farm, which takes you into undiscovered Langkawi. Enjoy the bucolic tapestry of Malay kampong houses, paddy fields and rubber plantations. Visitors can learn how to coldpress coconut oil, then take home a jar of the oil. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

BEST HOTEL INTERIOR ASIA PACIFIC AND BEST INTERNATIONAL HOTEL INTERIOR, INTERNATIONAL PROPERTY AWARDS 2016-17 BEST FOR FAMILIES, CONDÉ NAST 2017 AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE

6, Jalan Stesen Sentral 2, Kuala Lumpur Sentral, 50470 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia stregis.kualalumpur@stregis.com stregis.com/kualalumpur

Jalan Pantai Beringin, Pulau Langkawi, 07000 Malaysia newhotels.asiapacific@starwoodhotels.com stregis.com/langkawi

208 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; fitness center; spa

89 suites and villas; 4 restaurants and bars; spa; pool

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Lhasa Resort

The St. Regis Macao, Cotai Central ASK US ABOUT

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The Potala Palace. One of the most famous architectural works in the world and a symbol of the Tibetan people, just 15 minutes from the resort. See it after hours, in an atmosphere of peace and sanctity.

Our iconic Sunday Brunch.

This gourmet buffet includes a seafood bar alongside Asian favorites and an indulgent dessert selection. A continuous flow of wines, cocktails and Bloody Marys make the perfect accompaniment for this relaxing afternoon at The Manor.

Sabrage. St. Regis hotels have a history of embracing this famous ritual: the sabering of a champagne bottle with a sword. The St. Regis Lhasa has added Vajrayana Buddhist elements to this memorable ceremony.

The magnificent Potala Palace overlooking Lhasa; the Khailash Suite’s living room

Set 12,000 ft above sea level, Lhasa is surrounded by the snow-capped peaks of the Himalayas, with air as clean as you’ll find anywhere in the world. This extreme location will most likely take your breath away in more ways than one – you may need time to adjust to the altitude. For centuries, Lhasa has been the spiritual and political home of Buddhism, and the city is booming as tourists and pilgrims alike search for enlightenment and peace in the Place of the Gods, the name given to the city by the ancients. The St. Regis Lhasa Resort is a luxury five-star property in the city’s bustling old quarter where the Jokhang Temple, frequented by Buddhist pilgrims, is found. The resort’s spectacular Iridium spa offers specialist Tibetan treatments, or you might find healthy inspiration at the hotel’s cooking school. Join us also at our bar, Tubo by Decanter, which boasts stunning views of the Potala Palace and Lhasa’s finest selection of wines, cigars, and liquors.

Touring the Jokhang Temple (Balang North Street, Chengguan). This seventhcentury temple is Tibet’s holiest site. Go in the morning when Tibetan Buddhist pilgrims arrive, and stay until the afternoon, when the interior is opened to non-Buddhists. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: With captivating activities and thoughtful, welcoming attention tailored for younger guests and their families, the St. Regis Lhasa is a destination that celebrates the art of play. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

A nourishing gemstone journey at the Iridium Spa, with a massage based on your signature gemstone to energize and rebalance your body. The Taipa Houses Museum. Comprising five houses with typical green Macanese architecture, this is one of the key cultural heritage sites.

The hotel’s impressive exterior; the view from an Empire Suite

Macao is a city of historic ruins, spiritual temples, and imposing fortresses, which illustrate the evolution of Western and Chinese civilizations over more than four centuries. And The St. Regis Macao is the most elegant, sophisticated address from which to explore the very best the city affords, perfectly situated within a prime center of dining, shopping and entertainment. Guests enjoy the finest restaurants, such as The Manor, which focuses on imported prime-meat cuts and seafood, as well as amenities typified by the incomparable St. Regis Butler Service. To further enhance your stay, our hotel offers convenient access to more than 850 designer boutiques and several premier shopping centers. Refined comforts and elegantly appointed furnishings await in each of The St. Regis Macao’s 400 guest rooms and suites, where state-of-the-art amenities combine with traditional Chinese architectural elements and spectacular views of the Cotai Strip.

Macao Tower. This elegant construction offers panoramic views over Macao and much of the Pearl River Delta from its observation deck and revolving restaurant, 223 meters up. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Take a Macao photo tour with a personal tour guide and chauffeured vehicle. You will be presented with a Polaroid camera and a photo album so your children can capture and keep all your favorite tour moments, as well as inscribe notes to create a personalized memento. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

BEST NEW LUXURY HOTEL IN LHASA, HURUN REPORT 2016

ASIA’S MOST EXCELLENT LUXURY HOTEL, 2017 ASIA AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

BEST NEW ULTRA LUXURY HOTEL, LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 2015

BEST URBAN RESORT, 2017 CHINA HOTEL AWARDS

No. 22, Jiangsu Road, Lhasa, Tibet (Xizang) 850000 China u T. (86) (891) 680 8888 reservation.lhasa@stregis.com stregis.com/lhasa

Estrada do Istmo. S/N, Cotai, Macao T. (853) 2882 8898 stregis.macao@stregis.com stregis.com/macao

162 guest rooms and suites; 5 restaurants and bars; spa; pool

400 guest rooms and suites; 3 restaurants and bars; outdoor pool

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort

The St. Regis Mumbai

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Big game fishing. The Maldives is one of the best places in the world for this, and St. Regis chefs will gladly transform your catch into an exquisite dinner.

A trip to Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya – one of India’s premier art and history museums, and a Grade 1 Heritage building.

Blue Hole Pool at the Iridium Spa. Heated seawater and whirlpool jets melt away tension, offering benefits for body and mind.

A curator-led tour of the Dr Bhau Daji Lad Museum. Opened in 1872, Mumbai’s oldest museum is a microcosm of the extraordinary talents of Indian master craftsmen and Early Modern artists.

Charter a yacht and make a voyage of discovery to one of the Maldives’ uninhabited islands.

Aerial view of The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort; the John Jacob Astor Estate

Poised on its own exclusive island, The St. Regis Maldives Vommuli Resort is surrounded by pristine landscapes, thick tropical vegetation, a fine white-sand beach and the glistening turquoise Indian Ocean. This intimate retreat of 77 luxuriously appointed private villas and an Iridium Spa offers the perfect gateway for embracing the dramatic natural beauty of this island nation, whose 26 atolls comprise 1,192 islands, of which only 200 are inhabited. Enjoy complimentary snorkeling equipment and take in the magnificent underwater world teeming with marine life on our world-renowned private house reef. Immerse yourself in sailing, windsurfing, surfing, parasailing, sea kayaking, jet skiing, water skiing and stand-up paddling. Ocean excursions range from deepsea fishing to dolphin and sunset cruises. Six dining venues offer distinctive cuisines, from Italian to East Asian, while a beachfront eatery specializes in custom pizzas, fresh juices and homemade ice cream.

Decanter experiences. A bespoke five-course dinner paired with the perfect wines and champagnes in the cellar’s elegant dining room is the ideal introduction to the wine cellar that houses over 2,000 wines. The resort’s executive chef and a wine director lead guests through each course, prompting them to guess which wine they’re tasting and explaining why it matches each dish. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: A four-hour fishing trip to a Maldivian sandbank in a dhoni, the traditional island sailboat. A splendid barbecue lunch follows. Cooking with chef: in their own special kitchen, children can enjoy a masterclass hosted by chefs. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The Elephanta Caves. This ancient shrine hewn from solid basalt on an island in Mumbai harbor is easily accessible by boat tour from the Gateway of India. The rock-cut stone sculptures date back to at least the eighth century.

The infinity pool; a Grand Deluxe room

India’s largest city, Mumbai is a spectacular metropolis full of architectural treasures that bear witness to its periods under colonial rule. The St. Regis Mumbai is a luxury oasis in the heart of the city, the striking interiors of the grand lobby welcoming guests with their old-world charm accentuated by Rajasthani Tikri artwork. As the tallest luxury hotel in India, it would be hard to find more panoramic vistas elsewhere. The hotel is ideally located for leisure and business travelers. After a long day of meetings, head to the dedicated Wellness Floor for a massage at the Iridium Spa, known for its award-winning therapists and signature treatments. The hotel’s modern European restaurant, Luna, offers elegant décor, unparalleled views, and a fabulous ambiance. Dine at Lower Deck or Upper Deck from Monday to Sunday with earlyhour or late-hour seating. For those staying over the weekend, the thematic Sunday Brunch presents a variety of cuisines and flavors, while an outstanding Oriental Brunch with stunning bayside views can be enjoyed at Level 37 at By The Mekong.

Sanjay Gandhi National Park. Only 90 minutes from bustling Mumbai lie 40 square miles of protected tropical forest, home to everything from spotted deer to mynah birds, not to mention 150 different species of butterfly. You might even glimpse a wild leopard amid the dense foliage. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Cook with your kids. A culinary class with a focus on fun, this is cooking made easy for kids and parents to bond over. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

HOT LIST (US, UK, MIDDLE EAST), CONDÉ NAST 2017; SPECIAL PRIZE EXTERIOR AWARD, PRIX VERSAILLE

BY THE MEKONG, BEST THAI-FINE DINE (SOUTH MUMBAI), TIMES FOOD AWARDS 2017; BEST VENUE FOR BUSINESS MEETINGS IN METRO (UNDER

THREE-STAR AWARD – WORLD’S BEST WINE LISTS

500 GUESTS), WOW GALA & EXPERIENTIAL VENUES AWARDS 2017; MOST LUXURIOUS SPA (HOTEL) AWARD, IRIDIUM SPA, ASIA SPA AWARDS 2017

Vommuli Island, Dhaalu Atoll, Republic of Maldives stregis.maldivesvommuli@stregis.com stregis.com/maldives

462 Senapti Bapat Marg, Lower Parel, Mumbai 400013, India T. (91) (22) 6162 8000 stregis.mumbai@stregis.com stregis.com/mumbai

77 guest villas; 6 restaurants and bars; pool; library; children’s club; spa; diving center

395 guest rooms and suites; 9 restaurants and bars; spa; athletic club, pool

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Osaka

The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

The Osaka river cruise. Departing from Okawa River near Osaka Castle Park and reaching Dotomborigawa Canal in the heart of the Minami shopping and entertainment district.

A luxury yacht sailing experience: Guests can enjoy the opportunity to charter fully staffed Sanya Yalong Bay Yacht Club vessels for private parties, fishing excursions, sunset cruises, corporate events and overnight cruises.

The very first Morning Glass Cafe in Japan, a few blocks from the hotel. The popular cafe chain from Hawaii is co-owned by Eric Rose, a start-up member of Starbucks.

Afternoon Tea Art Time. A delicate afternoon tea combined with an art display in the lobby, where artists bring along their masterpieces. The perfect way to appreciate an aesthetic vacation.

Yamamoto Noh Theater. A behind-the-scenes tour of the home of Japanese musical drama, with its collection of masks and costumes, and see what it feels like to be on stage.

The lobby of The St. Regis Osaka: the hotel’s remarkable Zen Garden

For many travelers, Osaka has all the urban energy and lively vibe of Tokyo with the heritage and historical riches of Kyoto. On Midosuji Avenue, where The St. Regis Osaka is located, you will find examples of the city’s long history, in the form of architectural masterpieces dating from the Taisho Era (1912-1926) and the following Showa period. The avenue has been dubbed the Champs Elysées of the Orient. The St. Regis Osaka is within a 27-story building, the tallest in the urban renewal zone. It provides striking views over the city and is perfectly positioned for you to explore Osaka’s multi-Michelin-starred restaurant scene, cultural life and Buddhist shrines. The hotel’s garden terrace is lush with plants and has a stone garden around which to take a stroll, or you can sit and take time out from the streetscape below. Don’t miss the seasonal creations of chef Mauro Zanusso at our La Veduta restuarant.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: My Cup Noodle Factory – learn about ramen noodles, create a custom noodle soup, design your own cup and explore the museum. Reserve our Family Traditions bespoke package and get the second room for your children at 25 per cent discount and free breakfast for kids under 12. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

Sanya International Duty Free Shopping Complex. The biggest CDF mall in Asia, which offers our guests an outstanding experience.

A luxurious villa; the hotel’s marina

The tropical island of Hainan, China’s smallest province, has clean air, tropical vegetation, pristine beaches and offers the perfect escape from the bustle of the mainland cities. Located in the exclusive Yalong Bay on the south coast of Hainan Island in South China, The St. Regis Sanya Yalong Bay Resort is the perfect choice for guests looking for a deluxe, relaxing vacation. Its heated swimming pool boasts views of tropical gardens, coconut palms and the deep blue ocean. The hotel has access to more than half a mile of coastline on Yalong Bay (also called Asian Dragon Bay), where guests can stroll, swim or enjoy a seafood barbecue at the beachfront bar. Our team can arrange a sailing trip to the hidden treasures of Baifu Bay, a stunning cove with a soft sand beach, clear turquoise waters and a secluded coral reef.

THE ONLY HOTEL IN OSAKA TO BE AWARDED 5 RED PAVILIONS BY THE MICHELIN GUIDE 2017 (TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS)

LUXURY HOTEL IN HAINAN STAR PERFORMER, HURUN REPORT, 2017;

TRIPADVISOR’S TRAVELER’S CHOICE, 2017

WEDDING HOTEL OF THE YEAR, SINA 2017; MOST LIKED SEAFOOD RESTAURANT, T+CITY 2017

3-6-12 Hommachi, Chuo-ku, Osaka 541-0053, Japan T. (81) (6) 6258 3333 stregis.osaka@stregis.com stregis.com/osaka

Yalong Bay National Resort District, Sanya Yalong Bay, Hainan 572016, China T. (86) (898) 8855 5555

160 guest rooms and suites; 3 restaurants and bars; spa; exercise room

The Binglanggu Hainan Li & Miao Ethnic Minority Cultural Heritage Park is a mysterious rainforest where guests can embrace the culture of the Li ethnic group and sample tropical snacks. Yalong Bay Golf Club and Sun Valley Golf Resort. Two golf destinations located near the hotel, both offering guests an exceptional golf vacation. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The Kayak Adventure: a guided kayaking trip to nearby mangrove forests, where you can see cormorants, flamingos and egrets. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

reservations.sanya@stregis.com stregis.com/sanyayalongbay 396 guest rooms and suites; 6 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; private beach; water sports; tennis; children’s club

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan

The St. Regis Shenzhen ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

The Shanghai Tailored Experience. Personally accompanied by the butler of St. Regis Shanghai Jingan, guests can literally have a tailor-made experience at the famous South Bund Fabric Market. Home to hundreds of tailors and seamstresses, with three floors of beautiful cloth, fabrics and textiles, guests can replicate an old favorite or perfectly realize a creative design.

China Folk Culture Village, displaying the daily life and architecture of China’s 56 ethnic groups. Covering 200,000 square meters, it includes 25 villages, houses and streets. The Safari Park. With green mountains to the north, over 30 large animal stone sculptures and rich, green lychees to the south, and the Xili Lake to the west, the park is like a bright pearl in the bustling city.

The Bund. Shanghai’s standout landmark is a grandiose curve of colonial-era buildings, studded with museums and fenced in by skyscrapers.

Wutong Mountain. From the top you can see the splendid beauty of Hong Kong, wide blue sea and the green landscape.

A ride on The Maglev. An exhilarating 431-kilometer-perhour ride on the Maglev from Pudong airport to the city center. The hotel’s exterior; the elegant St. Regis lobby

Towering 68 floors above the city, The St. Regis Shanghai Jingan invites you to the best address in Shanghai for business and leisure. It’s a short distance from Jingan district’s most treasured sites and historic landmarks, including: the Jingan Temple, the overwater Yu Garden, the 1920s-style architecture of the Bund, People’s Square and People’s Park, and the ancient Chinese relics in the Shanghai Museum. Chic, luxury shopping centers, including Shanghai Center and Plaza 66, are within walking distance. Feng Sheng Li, a profusion of eastmeets-west shops, restaurants and bars set amid beautiful Shikumen architecture, is five minutes’ walking distance from the hotel. For added convenience, the Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport is just a 35-minute drive away. The hotel has 433 exquisitely appointed guest rooms and suites with peerless views of the city and Pudong. There are four gourmet restaurants, a rejuvenating spa, and an indoor swimming pool. We also hope guests will enjoy the services offered by the signature St. Regis Butler Service.

Shanghai Circus World. Enjoy a variety of performances, including dance, music competitions, acrobatics and sea-lion shows. China’s modern achievements, such as the first manned spacemission, are also exhibited. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Cookie Foundations – children can conquer their basic cookie-making skills with the hotel’s executive pastry chef. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

Malt, new oysters, sushi, sashimi and teppanyaki bar on the 100th floor; the Iridium spa pool

Shenzhen, a commercial hub in southern China just north of Hong Kong, is one of the country’s most dynamic supercities. Shenzhen International Airport is now operating a new direct flight route, connecting Shenzhen with Melbourne; it also offers a seamless Metro connection to Shenzhen downtown. The St. Regis Shenzhen opened in 2011 and offers guests standard signature service and stunning panoramic views. The hotel has just launched a new private dining room, Malt, on the 100th floor, which can accommodate around 12 guests. Perched atop the 430-meter building, it is the ideal place to immerse yourself in the city view under the magnificent bronze arch. The private dining room offers a large range of fresh imported oysters, a fine selection of sashimi, sushi and teppanyaki, all paired with fine wines from around the globe. After dining in style, head off to explore local theme parks, gardens and a wealth of historical attractions.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Butlers will be delighted to present the Children’s Booklist to families with children, and recommend books according to needs. Shenzhen Bay Park occupies a 13-kilometer-long stretch along the southern coast: your family can enjoy a relaxing cycling trip or fun excursions at mangroves, seeing numerous endangered bird species. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

FASHION RESTAURANT OF THE YEAR, SHENZHEN TASTE

DEBUTED JANUARY 2017

1008 West Beijing Road, Jingan District, Shanghai, China 200041

A private visit to KK Mall, one of Shenzhen’s biggest malls, located in same building as the hotel.

BEST LUXURY HOTEL OF THE YEAR, CTRIP HOTEL AWARDS

T. (86) 21 6257 9999 stregis.com/shanghaijingan.com

436 guest rooms and suites, 55 St. Regis esidential apartments; 6 restaurants and bars, pool, Iridium Spa, fitness center

No.5016 Shennan Road East, Luoh District Shenzhen, Guangdong 518001 China T. (86)(755) 8308 8888 stregis.shenzhen@stregis.com stregis.com/shenzhen 290 guest rooms and suites; 5 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: ASIA PACIFIC

The St. Regis Singapore

The St. Regis Tianjin ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

Shanghai Tang personal shopping. A VIP team will guide you through the luxury brand’s latest collections of fashion, jewelry, leather goods and iconic home range. A reduction is given on regular-priced items and you will receive a special Shanghai Tang gift to take home.

A private men’s shopping experience at shoemaker Berluti. Learn which shoe styles and shapes are best for you from a dedicated Berluti expert, and master Berluti’s glaçage polishing technique while enjoying a glass of champagne. The Tianjin Eye is a spectacular observation wheel dramatically situated on the Yongle Bridge. Enjoy views of the city from a height of up to 394 feet.

A gentleman’s day of pampering at Truefitt & Hill Singapore. Guests will experience a royal haircut, traditional hot-towel wet shave, manicure and pedicure.

Tianjin’s Food Street is the biggest food emporium in China, where you can savor dishes with the flavors of eight Chinese cuisines.

Bespoke tours. Depending on their unique interests, guests can explore personal points of interest with their own tour guide.

A Specialty Suite; the Astor bar

Personal whiskey tasting at the Astor Bar. Our bartender will guide you through a range of over 200 whiskeys from around the world.

Situated at the heart of the city’s shopping district, with the world-class shopping of Orchard Road and the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Singapore Botanic Gardens on your doorstep, The St. Regis Singapore is the ideal residence for the discerning luxury traveler. The hotel recently welcomed Armando Aristarco, the new chef de cuisine at its destination dining establishment, LaBrezza. The hotel’s partner restaurant, Shinji by Kanesaka, renowned for its omakase, was recently awarded a Michelin star. The hotel is close to the financial district, the famous shopping on Orchard Road, and Dempsey Hill, a revitalized colonial neighborhood with restaurants, clubs, bars, boutiques and antiques stores. The nearby National Gallery Singapore is open to the public after 10 years in the making, as is the offshore Coney Island Park with its exotic flora and fauna. St. Regis Singapore has one of Asia’s finest private art collections, with works by Miró, Chagall and Fernando Botero.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The Singapore Botanic Gardens offers an exciting array of attractions. Children will be delighted by the Tree House and Waterplay Area. This experience includes a two-hour tour, roundtrip transportation and a picnic lunch. Guests can capture the special moments of their time in the city with a personal photographer. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

The hotel’s spectacular exterior – part of the city’s march skywards; a Grand Deluxe Room with a river view

China’s fourth-largest city, the coastal metropolis of Tianjin has a fascinating history as the entry point for foreigners visiting and trading with Beijing and the rest of northern China. The European-style houses of the French and German concessions add a dash of grandeur to the metropolis, and original turn-of-thecentury architecture can still be seen in the Wudadao district. The hotel is opposite the glittering Riverside 66 shopping mall, home to 400 renowned international brands. Many rooms have stunning river views, but if it’s a special trip, book the Presidential Suite, which has Chinese antiques, its own dining room and whirlpool bath. Also try the Xi He Ya Yuan Peking Duck restaurant on the second floor of The St. Regis Tianjin, which continues to build upon our unique Modern Chinese culinary concept, while introducing more Chinese creations, such as our classical interpretation of Peking Duck.

DESTINASIAN READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS TOP FIVE BEST SINGAPORE HOTELS 2016

BEST BUSINESS HOTEL IN NORTH CHINA, 2017 TTG CHINA TRAVEL AWARDS

THE SINGAPORE TOURISM AWARDS FOR BEST HOTEL EXPERIENCE 2016

BEST LUXURY HOTEL, 2016 CTRIP ANNUAL AWARDS

Xiang Sheng translates as “crosstalk” and is a dialogue between two comedians. It is one of China’s most popular performing arts, typically spoken in the Tianjin dialect. A booking service is available through your butler. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Taste of China tour. Experience the flavors and heritage of Tianjin as locals guide you along the famed Nanshi Food Street, home to over one hundred restaurants. Sample a variety of dishes and visit a famous snack shop where you and your children can help the chefs make Goubuli meat stuffed buns. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

29 Tanglin Road, Singapore 247911 T. (65) 6506 6888 stregis.singapore@stregis.com stregis.com/singapore

158 Zhangzizhong Road, Heping District Tianjin, Tianjin 300041, China T. (86) (22) 5830 9999 stregis.tianjin@stregis.com stregis.com/tianjin

299 guest rooms and suites; 4 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym; tennis

274 guest rooms and suites; 3 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; gym

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: EUROPE

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Astana

The St. Regis Florence ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

The Presidential Cultural Center. See outstanding collections of Kazakh jewelry; the art of goldmaking; replicas from Scythian burial mounds at Berel and the Issyk burial mound, replicas of the “Golden Man” and the “second Golden Man”; and a bejeweled replica of a horse from the Berel tomb.

A private visit to the laboratory and shop of renowned parfumier Aquaflor, including a chance to create a unique fragrance. Ferrari driving experience in Tuscany. A wonderful tour through the Chianti hills. Appointment with AtelierC for a tailor-made shopping experience headed by the most skilled artisans in one of the finest ateliers in Florence.

Atameken. Located a few steps from The St. Regis Astana, you can take a fascinating 200m-long walk around a country map with models of major buildings.

The hotel exterior; the Presidential Suite

Introducing a new level of glamour to Kazakhstan, The St. Regis Astana can be found close to Bayterek Tower, at the most prestigious address in the capital, Central Park. Just 15km from the airport, the hotel echoes the refined Kazakh elegance with a bespoke service. It is close to the Presidential Cultural Center, where you can see outstanding collections of Kazakh jewelry, and the Issyk burial mound (where the Golden Man was found in 1969). In the hotel, a sumptuous Presidential Suite includes a drawing room, library, wine vault, a spectacular outdoor terrace and dining table for eight. The Grand Staircase harks back to the glamour of the private mansion of the hotel’s founding family, the Astors. The hotel embraces an epicurean world of celebrated local and international cuisine, with a signature restaurant, an all-day restaurant and The St. Regis Bar. The Iridium Spa, which includes an indoor swimming pool, offers guests a refuge to refresh the senses throughout their stay.

Bayterek Monument. Nurzhul Bulvar’s centerpiece is the 97m-high monument – a latticed tower crowned by a glass orb. This embodies a Kazakh legend in which the mythical bird Samruk lays a golden egg containing the secrets of human happiness in a poplar tree, beyond human reach. A lift glides visitors up inside the egg, where you can enjoy expansive views and place your hand in a print of President Nazarbayev’s palm. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: The Children’s Club at The St. Regis Astana offers an exciting schedule of activities for children aged 5-12 years. Children’s masterclasses with Executive Chef Oreste Mancini. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

SABRE SECURITY CERTIFICATION: THE FIRST HOTEL DEVELOPMENT IN THE WORLD TO BE AWARDED CERTIFICATION BY LPCB

Uffizi Gallery Museum – hosting works of art by great Italian artists such as Botticelli, Giotto, Cimabue, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Raffaello.

The Duomo and the rooftops of Florence; the Presidential Suite

A palazzo designed in 1432 by Filippo Brunelleschi, the architect of the Duomo Santa Maria del Fiore, The St. Regis Florence was converted into a hotel in the mid-1800s. When Queen Victoria took a Grand Tour, she stayed here. Now there’s a designer suite by Italian luxury fashion house Bottega Veneta, and the hotel spa is collaborating with luxury cosmetics brand My Blend by Clarins. The Michelinstarred Winter Garden by Caino restaurant has a 19th-century illuminated colored-glass ceiling; and in keeping with the Tuscan capital’s Renaissance heritage, there are classic frescoes and antiques throughout the building. Florence is a compact and, in the right season, relaxing city. After you’ve seen the world-class Uffizi Gallery and Michelangelo’s David in the Accademia, make the most of the hotel’s location on the Piazza Ognissanti in the city’s historical heart: order an aperitivo, and sit back and watch as dusk falls over the city’s churches, hills and belltowers.

Old Pharmacy of Santa Maria Novella. Said to be the oldest extant pharmacy in the world. Established in 1221 by the Dominicans, it is still dispensing prescriptions today. St. Regis Spa My Blend by Clarins offers an individual treatment for your skin. In addition there are new high tech treatments available for your personalized skin care. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Renaissance Discovery. Unearth history with an interactive, immersive tour of the Palazzo Vecchio. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

TRIVAGO NATIONAL AWARD 2017 FOUR-STAR AWARD, FORBES TRAVEL GUIDE

1 Kabanbay Batyr Avenue, Astana, Kazakhstan T. (7) 7172 790 888 stregis.astana@stregis.com stregis.com/astana

Piazza Ognissanti 1, Florence 50123, Italy T. 0039 055 27161 stregisflorence@stregis.com stregis.com/florence

120 guest rooms and suites; 3 restaurants and bars; indoor pool; Iridium spa; gym; children’s club

99 guest rooms and suites; 1 restaurant and bar; spa; gym

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: EUROPE

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Istanbul

The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

A shopping trip to Harvey Nichols. Enjoy a trip to the world-famous fashion store’s Istanbul outpost, with VIP transfers and personal styling service from the store’s personal shopping experts.

The Es Baluard Museum in Palma de Mallorca, which features over 600 pieces of Mediterranean and Balearic art by contemporary and modern artists. The museum brings together contemporary trends, history and education.

A private, curator-led tour through Istanbul Museum of Modern Art’s permanent and current collections.

Royal Marivent Palace, where the king and queen of Spain reside when they visit Mallorca.

A shopping trip to the new Galeries Lafayette – the luxury chain featuring collections from prestigious designers worldwide.

The Sóller Railway. Enjoy the best excursion on the island on the gleaming wooden narrow-gauge Palma to Sóller train. The spectacular route runs across the natural barrier of the Sierra de Alfabia mountain range. The railway rises up 199 meters, crosses several bridges and the five-arched “cinc-ponts” viaduct.

Your discount at luxury boutiques. The St. Regis Istanbul guest benefits from 10 per cent discount on purchases at leading stores, such as Tom Ford, Alexander McQueen, and Salvatore Ferragamo. Two views of the luxurious Cosmopolitan Suite

Istanbul has long been the place where Europe and Asia met and exchanged goods, philosophies, cultures and credos. In the past decade, it has become a confident, modern city and has witnessed booms in the art scene, in the quality and range of its nightlife, and in business. Ancient meets modern with confidence in this metropolis, and at The St. Regis Istanbul. Once you’ve ticked off traditional landmarks including Hagia Sophia, the Blue Mosque, Topkapi Palace and the Grand Bazaar, explore modern must-sees such as contemporary art at Istanbul Modern and Galerie Nev, hip fashion boutiques in Cihangir or nightlife in Ortakoy or Beyoglu. The St. Regis Istanbul’s neighborhood of Sisli is a quiet one adjoining bustling Beyoglu, so you get the best of both worlds. For the highest luxury, our custom one-bedroom Bentley Suite surrounds you with walls of curved veneer and sumptuous leather fittings, inspired by the seductive interior of the Bentley Continental.

The living room of an Ocean One Suite; the outdoor pool of the Arabella Spa

Visit gentleman’s tailor Civan and make your own bow tie with owner Bahar Gozkun. Following this, enjoy a visit to A La Turca House to view their collection of antiques and Kilim rugs. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: A private city tour led by local writer Özgür Gezer, ending with a boat tour on Haliç Creek and great views of the Old City. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

BEST CITY HOTEL, WORLD TOURISM AWARD 2017 ROBB REPORT BEST OF THE BEST 2015

All the pleasures and treasures of the Western Mediterranean are in Mallorca, the main island of the Balearics. The stunning beaches get much attention, but inland are olive groves and vineyards, mountains and rural mansions, cozy old restaurants and tourist-free towns and villages. In the island’s southwestern corner on Costa d’en Blanes are turquoise waters and a sense of being apart from the hubbub. This is where you’ll find The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca Resort, whose guest rooms were designed by Claudio Carbone. It is a lovely hideaway and the perfect base for exploring the best of the island. The Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine has been extended; the spa’s product lines now include NIANCE and Maria Galland. A Mimo gourmet shop is now part of the hotel’s facilities, and we have a new chef, José Miguel Navarro, at the Es Fum Michelin-starred restaurant. Continue your stay with a session on the wooden yoga platform, which has a tranquil sea view.

St. Anthony. In January, festivals are held in honor of the patron saint of farm animals. People dance around huge bonfires in the village streets and squares, and children play primitive musical instruments. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: the Tramuntana Mountains, close to the hotel, are one of Mallorca’s greatest natural assets and a World Heritage Site. Walks to suit all take place in this exquisite landscape. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

RESTAURANT ES FUM HAS HELD ONE MICHELIN STAR SINCE 2011

Mim Kemal Oke Cad. N° 35, Nisantasi, Sisli, Istanbul, Turkey T. (90)(212) 368 0000 stregis.istanbul@stregis.com stregis.com/istanbul

Carretera Palma – Andratx 19, Costa d’en Blanes, Mallorca 07181, Spain T. (34)(971) 629629 info.mardavall@stregis.com stregis.com/mallorca

118 guest rooms and suites; 3 restaurants and bars; spa; gym

125 guest rooms and suites; 4 restaurants and bars; spa; pool; beach; gym; private jetty; children’s club

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THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: EUROPE

THE ST. REGIS ATLAS: EUROPE

The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya

The St. Regis Rome

ASK US ABOUT

ASK US ABOUT

A unique signature treatment created by Thalgo exclusively for the Iridium Spa: an exceptional radiance age-prevention ritual including a St. Regis afternoon tea ceremony.

Pizza making. This workshop, in a traditional Roman pizzeria, gives the opportunity to learn how to make fresh home-made pizza. Finger’s Roma. A new Japanese/ Brazilian sushi restaurant opened near Piazza del Popolo by chef Roberto Okabe.

Private golf class at Moscow City Golf Club with all the necessary equipment and a personal instructor.

La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty). Paolo Sorrentino’s homage to the Eternal City won the 2014 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. Take a tour of the timeless landmarks photographed in the movie.

Travel in style in a Bentley Flying Spur. We are delighted to offer guests the chance to discover Moscow in the impeccable surroundings of a Bentley Flying Spur, which can also be provided for airport/railway transfers.

The Orlov Lobby Lounge; the Rooftop Hall and terrace

One of the world’s greatest cities, Moscow is a powerhouse of business, culture and tourism. Situated in the historic center of the Russian capital, within easy walking distance of the celebrated Bolshoi Theater and the Kremlin, you’ll find The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya. A stone’s throw also from major business centers and the Duma – Russia’s parliament – the hotel’s business center provides outstanding conference facilities and responsive service for business travelers. For leisure travelers, the hotel promises a heady mix of high culture and world-class retail in the boutiques of Nikolskaya Plaza, the city’s new luxury shopping destination. For dining, guests can choose between Orlov Lobby Bar and Lounge and Osteria A Tavola, a delightful contemporary Italian restaurant.

Moscow Cinema. First opened in 1936, this is a true cultural icon for Muscovites. Any suite guest at The St. Regis Moscow Nikolskaya is invited to attend a performance at this luxurious cinema with their family. Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Painting for kids. In keeping with our mission to celebrate the art of play, children of guests are given a traditional wooden Russian Matryoshka doll to paint. Brushes and paints are provided. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

#1 BUSINESS HOTEL, CONDÉ NAST TRAVELER HOT LIST, 2015

Caelum Lounge & Bar; a Junior Suite

Behind Palatial Doors. This tour provides an intimate peek into Rome’s past, inviting guests into amazing palaces that are closed to the public. See masterpieces by artists such as Bronzino, Ghirlandaio and Tintoretto.

For history, beauty, style, culture and romance, Rome has few rivals, with ancient palaces, temples, churches and monuments sitting alongside contemporary attractions of a modern European capital. Such a city deserves a hotel of classical proportions, and The St. Regis Rome, built beside the ruins of the Baths of Diocletian, more than lives up to those expectations. Rome’s first grand hotel, this palazzo was opened by celebrated hotelier César Ritz in 1894, and it retains its majesty in the life of this great city. The hotel, with its luxurious interiors, beautiful ballroom, chandeliers and hand-painted frescoes, is embracing a new era of glamour. The meticulous renovation of The St. Regis Rome embraces both past and present. All 160 rooms and suites have been fashioned in light tones and enriched by precious Rubelli fabrics and handpicked objets d’art – creating a unique sanctuary where every stay is enhanced by the seamless and personal attention of The St. Regis Butler Service. At the social heart of the hotel, Cælum Bar, where fashion and art converge in the light-filled piazza reminiscent of a winter garden.

Family Traditions at St. Regis program: Myths and Heroes. Discover the richness of Greek and Roman mythology with a fun-filled journey through the Capitoline Museums, led by a guide retelling these classic stories. Ice-cream making: learn the art of authentic gelato with Gelateria Fatamorgana. The owner will teach families how to make perfect, delicious gelato using only seasonal fruits and fresh ingredients. Learn more at stregis.com/familytraditions

FORBES TRAVEL GUIDE 2017 SPG MEMBER FAVORITES 2017

Nikolskaya Street 12, Moscow, 109012, Russian Federation T. (7)(495) 967 7776 moscow@stregis.com stregis.com/moscow

Via Vittorio E. Orlando 3, Rome 00185, Italy T. (39)(06) 47091 stregisgrandrome@stregis.com stregisrome.com

210 guest rooms and suites; 5 restaurants and bars; pool; spa; fitness center

161 guest rooms and suites; 2 restaurants and bars; spa

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Discover the Upcoming St. Regis Hotels & Resorts AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST

The St. Regis Amman

Opening 2018

The St. Regis Dubai, The Palm

Opening 2018

The St. Regis Kanai Resort

Opening 2018

The St. Regis Nanjing

Opening 2018

The St. Regis Quingshui Bay Resort (Sanya)

Opening 2018

The St. Regis Zhuhai

Opening 2018

The St. Regis Lijiang Resort

Opening 2018

ASIA PACIFIC

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Beyond 10, The St. Regis Magazine Issue 10  

eyond, The St. Regis Magazine, is a twice-yearly publication for guests staying at St. Regis Hotels and Resorts – of which there are now mor...

Beyond 10, The St. Regis Magazine Issue 10  

eyond, The St. Regis Magazine, is a twice-yearly publication for guests staying at St. Regis Hotels and Resorts – of which there are now mor...

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