Stowe Guide & Magazine Winter/Spring 2022-23

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STOWE

PEOPLE • ARTS & EVENTS • DINING • SHOPPING • OUTDOORS • LIFESTYLE • THINGS TO DO
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winter / spring 2022-2023
PAUL ROGERS;
MILLER 62 The never-ending ride Family and friends remember Jake Burton Carpenter, the father of snowboarding by Bill Donahue 74 Frost Photographer Paul Rogers captures winter’s beauty through these stunning window icescapes by Paul Rogers 80 Blast from the past Primitive biathlon tests stamina, accuracy—and your beard! by Tommy Gardner 86 Bucket list Six wintertime adventures to make your Stowe visit complete by Mark Aiken 114 ‘She leaves the light on’ Artist Sue Gilkey finds quiet beauty in the ordinary by Avalon Styles-Ashley 150 Patience & process How Idletyme Brewing Company broke from the past, created a new future. by Aaron Calvin 170 Saying goodbye to Parker A story from 2010: A man confronts the end of his beloved dog’s life by Rob Kiener 190 From the ground up Newcomers to Stowe build their dream house by Robert Kiener features 86 62 80 74 150
CONTENTS
FROM BOTTOM LEFT: NATHANAEL ASARO; JEFF CURTES;
GORDON MILLER;

This summer’s cover, “Stowe Hollow,” is an original oil, 16"x18", by Sue Gilkey, a talented artist who splits her time between Stowe and her seaside cottage in Ireland.

She describes her work as “observational, expressive, and intuitive.” We would agree. “The painting process for me is a meditation on the aesthetics of the subject I’m observing. I am always interested in developing a painting that will connect to the viewer and evoke a sense of shared experience,” she says.

Gilkey studied painting at the University of New Hampshire and the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and strives “to combine an emotional element along with direct observation.”

is represented by galleries in both Ireland and on this side of the pond. “Stowe Hollow” is in a private collection.

our

on Gilkey on p.114.

6 CONTENTS
FROM TOP LEFT: ELISABETH VIILU; COURTESY
She
See
ON OUR COVER essentials 8 Contributors 18 Rural route: Heidi retires • Madi Party pix • ‘The Long Way Home’ Globetrotters • Hall of fame Luigi Lucioni paints Stowe 56 Outdoor primer: On skinny skis Ice skating • Snowmobiling Ice fish • Snowshoe 94 Things to do The Current • Exhibits and openings Spruce Peak Arts • Road trips 144 Edibles: Piecemeal Pies • American Flatbread • Modern Times Theater winter / spring 2022-2023 45 GETTING OUTDOORS 94 SHOPPING & GALLERIES 134 DINING & LODGING 168 REAL ESTATE & HOMES 214 BUSINESSES & SERVICES AROUND departments 10 From the editor: ‘We love you, too’ 14 First person: Father’s Day 46 On mountain: Ski Stowe 48 Trail journal: Down the Bruce 50 Sweet spot: Trial by snow 54 Stowe jobs: Earn your turns 58 Boarder patrol: Acy Craig 96 The Current: Contemporary art 98 History lesson: Coffin windows 102 Cool places: Museum celebrates 20 106 Stowe people: Wonder women 110 Music lesson: Peter Schmeeckle 128 Found in Vermont: Shopping list 130 Shop keep: Rogue Herbalist 176 Lifestyle: Death doulas 180 Spotlight: Brenna B. Brochhausen 186 House for sale: Got $2 mil? GETTING 106 40 104 Mountainfilm on tour
profile

TOMMY GARDNER

IN THIS ISSUE: Acy Shade of Winter, p.58

Behind the scenes: I caught up with Alan Craig one hot summer afternoon at a Stowe watering hole and he spoke with pride about how his daughter had joined the U.S. Snowboard Team. I like to imagine that, over the past 75 years or so, these types of encounters just casually happen in a talent pool as deep as Stowe. “Oh, did you hear that so and so is training for the Olympics?” “Oh yeah? Great kid.”

Currently: Tommy is news editor at the Vermont Community Newspaper Group and a snowboarder. In this case, that’s kind of like saying two pieces of bread is a sandwich.

ROB KIENER

IN THIS ISSUE: Luigi Lucioni, p.38

Behind the scenes: While the 1931 oil painting of Stowe, “Village of Stowe, Vermont,” is popular and much admired, Luigi Lucioni, the talented artist behind this impressive en plein air landscape is not as well known as he once was. But thanks to art enthusiasts, a recent book, and a well-received, comprehensive exhibition of Lucioni’s work at the Shelburne Museum, many feel that his star is once again on the ascendant. As Katie Wood Kirchoff, curator at the museum, says, “He was such an intriguing, masterful artist as his painting of Stowe proves.”

Currently: Rob, a frequent contributor to Stowe Magazine, has been an editor and staff writer with Reader’s Digest in Asia, Europe, and Canada, and now writes for the magazine and other publications from his base in Stowe. robertkiener.com.

AARON CALVIN

IN THIS ISSUE: Idletyme, p.150

KATE CARTER

IN

THIS ISSUE: Wonder women, p.106

Behind the scenes: Meeting, interviewing, and photographing the seven wonder women who run Spruce Peak Arts was a scheduling feat I wasn’t confident would happen. When it finally did, I found out what it is like to interview seven people at once, which turned out to be an exercise in focus, staying sharp, and furiously scribbling notes like a court stenographer. Oh, how I regret not taking shorthand in high school.

Currently: Kate is a freelance writer and photographer, and when she’s not researching stories she is photographing homes for Vermont real estate agents, builders, interior designers, concierges, and this magazine. Contact her at vtrealestatephotos.com.

AVALON STYLES-ASHLEY

IN THIS ISSUE: Artist Sue Gilkey, p.114

Behind the scenes: One conversation with Sue Gilkey that didn’t make it into the story was her love of fairytales. After meeting, I might have guessed her favorite would be something bucolic or of the Grimm variety, but after pondering her paintings, her true favorite—”The Lord of the Rings”—makes perfect sense. She’s a classical painter with a wisp of wanderer about her, but not all those who wander are lost.

Currently: When Avalon isn’t writing for Stowe Magazine or Stowe Weddings, she works as a domestic violence advocate in Morrisville. On your average Sunday afternoon, you might find this California native hiking Camel’s Hump, reading Gabriel Garcia Marquez, or canning dilly beans.

Behind the scenes: While the focus of the Idletyme profile in this issue was the extraordinary feat of management and production required to run the restaurant, Idletyme would certainly not do the volume it does without a worthwhile menu. Come for the cheddar fritters and stay for the Rueben—the addition of hot cherry peppers is reallly remarkable.

Currently: Aaron lives in northern Vermont with his partner, son, and two cats. He’s a staff writer for the Stowe Reporter and News & Citizen where he covers everything from barn fires to municipal policy. His work has also appeared in The Guardian, Vice, The Intercept, and other publications. More at aaroncalvin.com.

CONTRIB UTORS
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WE LOVE YOU, TOO

I love putting this magazine together. Even though it means weeks and weeks in a row of late nights, no weekends, and friends who wonder if I could become any duller. The jury, as they say, is still out on that one.

Why do I love it? Because it’s so different from my day job editing five weekly newspapers—typically between 112 and 136 pages per week—while simultaneously running a small company. None of it would be possible without our incredibly talented, albeit small, crew of writers and reporters, graphic artists, salespeople, and our crack, one-person business office. They all work incredibly hard, they care about the communities they serve, they worry about a future when journalists become even more endangered, replaced by the Musks, Zuckerbergs, Thiels, and their ilk.

We should all worry.

But back to why I love overseeing this project. During the recent lunar-eclipse, bloodmoon hullabaloo the first week of November, here’s just a smattering of public outreach in how we consistently flop:

• “The Stowe Reporter is starting to look more and more like Seven Days rubbish up in Burlington with all the leftish propaganda.” (Seven Days, Vermont’s alternative weekly, is awesome. If you don’t already, read it.)

• Commenting on a piece about the death of Charlie Vallee, who suffered from long Covid, the same writer said it wasn’t the coronavirus, but the vaccine that led to his death, citing all the MAGA-world bullshit one side of the aisle has been peddling for almost three years now.

• Charlie’s dad, Skip, a high-rolling GOP donor and Vermont fuel magnate, is setting up a foundation to study the effects of long Covid, and someone felt compelled to write, “I feel terrible for his loss of son (sic), but on the community side I still think Skip is a terrible person.” Really? Can we never put politics aside? Have we lost all humanity? Good grief, this poor family just lost its 27-year-old son.

• From another: I think you could use a better proofreader: “Article on long Covid, myalogic? Myalgic, maybe?” “A man arrested for violin conditions? Sounds intriguing.” We have fine proofreaders, the same four reporters who put out those aforementioned pages of content every week. Expect a few more misses.

• During this blood moon, a high-level guy quits his job at school, mid-semester, no reason given. The headline says he “quit.” He quit, right? No, see, it’s hurtful to use such a word “because that’s not the Vermont way.”

Huh? He quit. No one said he’s a bad person.

• That bloody moon also brought about my cancellation, which I’m surprised hasn’t happened sooner. I’m canceled because we took out some Nazi references in a man’s anti-abortion letter and changed phrases like “human in the womb” to more concise terms like fetus. Where I really went off the rails, though, was my choice to use a photo for Halloween of a particularly gleeful young lady who, with her classmates, spent the month of October creating a community haunted house at Cambridge Elementary School. She was “bloody,” looked a bit maniacal, clearly having the time of her life, and stood in front of a nearly life-sized plastic doll. A second gentleman called a few days later to ask for an “apology on the front page of the News & Citizen.” (It was Halloween, not a political statement, for goodness sake.)

• Another Halloween arbiter pointed out the

“lost opportunity” when we ran the photo above instead of a photo of a child, whose “day we would have made. Please reconsider your cover photo decisions for Halloween 2023.” The editor says to always take the best shot on the cover, regardless of age.

Honestly, no one likes criticism—just ask some of the people we cover in news stories— but we’re lucky that our readers and our communities care enough to reach out to criticize, cajole, pile on, and give us our comeuppance. Frankly, it makes us better. But thank goodness blood moons don’t rise in the sky every month.

So, back to why I love putting together this magazine. Unless we make some egregious error, which rarely happens, all we get is The Love.

Please keep that coming too, and thank you for continuing to read.

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THE EDITOR GREG POPA
FROM
LEE KROHN

Gregory J. Popa

Bryan Meszkat, Patrick Immordino, Judy Kearns, Wendy Ewing, Michael Kitchen, and Nicole Brock

Gregory J. Popa

Katerina Hrdlicka

Kate Carter, Robert Kiener, and Tommy Gardner

Leslie Lafountain

Leslie Lafountain

Gordon Miller

Kate Carter, Orah Moore, Paul Rogers, Kevin Walsh

Mark Aiken, Avalon Styles Ashley, Aaron Calvin, Kate Carter, Nancy Crowe, Willy Dietrich, Biddle Duke, Elinor Earle, Tommy Gardner, Robert Kiener, Brian Lindner, Peter Miller, Amy Kolb Noyes, David Rocchio, Julia Shipley, Nancy Wolfe Stead, Kevin Walsh

Stowe Guide & Magazine & Stowe-Smugglers’ Guide & Magazine are published twice a year: Winter/Spring & Summer/Fall

Vermont Community Newspaper Group LLC P.O. Box 489, Stowe VT 05672

Website: stowetoday.com, vtcng.com

Editorial inquiries: gpopa@stowereporter.com

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Phone: (802) 253-2101 Fax: (802) 253-8332

Copyright: Articles and photographs are protected by copyright and cannot be used without permission.

Editorial submissions are welcome:

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14 FIRST PERSON
ESSAY / David Rocchio Anthony Rocchio, wearing number 14, driving the ball, a life ahead of him.

MEMORIES OF DAD And a memory that’s fading

Several years ago, I took my dad for Thai food. We were in Hanover, N.H. My pop lived in Hanover a long time. He taught high school English there when I was a kid. He’d coached football as well—state championship coaching—and directed plays. A Renaissance man.

That day, we’d been walking around for a while. It was warm, so I suggested we find a spot, get something to eat. I asked my pop what he’d like. He steered us without words to the new Thai place.

Dad was pretty confused when we first sat down. It was noisy, busy, chaotic. He looked anxious. I started to say it was a bad idea, but Dad jumped in, “This is nice,” he said. He gestured to the menu, “Just pick some things.” So I did.

Then, as sometimes happens in restaurants, all the noise and chaos paused. My dad calmed and we talked. Real conversation. A bit like it used to be.

Dad smiled at something I said, smoothed the napkin on the table, like he used to do when thinking, and I looked at my pop and said, “I bet you were a happy drunk.”

That made him smile some more. He smiles with his eyes. He said, “Well, you know, it could be. I know what you mean. Yes, I was a happy drunk.”

We don’t really talk about what is happening to him. We talk around it. At this point, I don’t even know if we could talk about it. My dad has dementia—a slow build but it is getting worse, creeping in like an oily shadow. But that’s the happy drunk part; even as this darkness settles in, my pop holds the lovely joy he has about life.

Before this disease replaced all other frustrations, I had two great beefs with my pop.

The first was his always being late, or just being too distracted to show up. He’d say we would do things, but mostly we wouldn’t. Jim Croce wrote a song about it.

The second great frustration (tragedy, even) is my dad is a wonderful writer but never really wrote. Dad sees how people make things worse or better or just get washed up in what they are living, and how

Stowe Resort Homes

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that can derail a person, lead someone to unintended and tragic consequences.

He sees how the simple humanity of life makes the most important sort of story. “Shakespeare’s got nothing on this,” he’d say when describing some events or people in his life. He’d say it with a smile, with kindness, without glee. He’d relate the tale and make me think. That is a gift: to see, make it all relatable, and not judge.

But he never really wrote any of it down. He always said he would, but he never did. Now he can’t. Maybe it is why I write. Maybe that’s a gift he gave me.

Another great gift he gave me is a singular road trip. A time he did show up. In 1972, when I was 11, just after my parents split, Dad and I pushed his fire-engine-red Plymouth Scamp across the heart of America.

Top memories: watching two teens steal a car in a small town in Oklahoma; Mexican food in a sun-bleached Amarillo, Texas; a Charles Bronson movie in an old-school cinema in Colorado Springs; Dad shows me where the Army made him a mountaineer; Cheyenne, Wyo., back when it was a cow town; and Chicago, where Dad of course found an Italian neighborhood and a dive of an Italian restaurant, which the police did not raid until just as we left.

I memorized each minute of that trip.

I don’t try to talk with him about memories anymore; that’s too hard. I still love to listen to my old man, though. I don’t care that I can’t always follow. I just let his words come as they do.

It’s his voice, laugh, and hands. He talks with his hands. They move in front of him like a conductor’s baton.

As so many can attest, dementia and Alzheimer’s are hard to watch take and wring a loved one. There is a slight silver lining. Dad is still here. He still has a light in his eyes and sees what is around him with joy.

Here’s how I see what is happening: My dad stands at the stern of a ship leaving port. He leans against the fantail, waves and shouts to me as the boat pulls away. I pretend to hear and understand. I smile. I wave back. I shout over the distance and the noise of the ship and the sea. I shout, ‘You are a Great Man!’ I shout, ‘I love you!’ I shout and hope he can hear me.

As I write this, Sunday is Father’s Day. Given that, I want to say two things. First, to my lovely wife and kids, did you happen to see that 40liter Pata-gucci tech backpack in the catalog? Isn’t it cool in orange? Just saying.

Second, even if a few days early, I want to shout to my dad from shore: Happy Father’s Day; I love you; as Jim Croce sang would happen, I don’t see you enough, I think about you every day. n

David M. Rocchio lives, works, and writes in Stowe. This column first appeared in the Stowe Reporter, June 14, 2018. Anthony Rocchio died Oct. 8, 2022.

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Longtime Stowe rep says no to another run

Stowe’s sole voice in the Vermont House of Representatives has decided not to seek re-election.

“It has been my privilege and my most sincere honor to serve the people of my hometown for the last 16 years,” Rep. Heidi Scheuermann announced in mid May. “Growing up in Stowe, I never imagined such a tremendous opportunity, and have been so grateful for the support of my friends and neighbors throughout these years.”

Scheuermann was first elected in 2006, succeeding Dick Marron, a fellow Republican—and, at the time, fellow Stowe Selectboard member—who was first appointed in 1997.

She first cut her teeth in politics working for U.S. Sen. Jim Jeffords, twice. During her first stint with Jeffords, she helped draft education and disability legislation, working with Vermont educators and disability advocates to make sure Jeffords’ work was good for the state.

She later returned to Jeffords’ office to serve as his liaison to the Vermont Legislature, keeping state lawmakers up to speed with the goings on in Washington.

Scheuermann grew up in Stowe village as one of six children and attended Stowe High School, where she was a standout field hockey player. Golf is also a big part of the Scheuermann family, with her mother and sister participating at the pro level.

In her day job, Scheuermann works as a property manager for her company, Allegro Properties, operating the easy-to-recognize West Branch Apartments, which offers independent living for low-income senior citizens.

As part of the minority party in a staunchly Democratic and Progressive state, Scheuermann hasn’t often had to worry about a challenge from either her left or her right. She had an opponent in her first race in 2006, but no one stepped up to the plate for another 12 years.

Scheuermann has been something of an omnivore when it comes to her work in the House. Ending a career as a ranking member of the House Committee on Energy and Technology, she also served in previous legislative sessions on the House General, Housing and Military Affairs Committee; the Commerce and Economic Development Committee—her longest stint, at six years; House Judiciary before that, and House Transportation when she first started in the Legislature.

Scheuermann told the Stowe Reporter in 2019 that she remembered an old newspaper story talking about her and her family’s “athletic exploits,” in which her mother said Scheuermann was the most versatile athlete in the family.

“I’ve looked fondly back at that as I’ve been assigned to various committees during my service here,” she said. “Maybe, just maybe, I am the most versatile legislator.”

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STOWE GUIDE ARCHIVES
MANY FACES OF HEIDI From top left, Heidi Scheuermann in 1988 as a Stowe highschooler, with teacher Norm Williams. As a legislator braving the dunk tank at a local community event. Serving on the Stowe Selectboard. With legislative page Chip Genung of Stowe in 2020.

TOP DOGS From left, graphic designer and webmaster Kristen Braley, news editor and reporter Tommy Gardner, and reporters Avalon Styles-Ashley, Corey McDonald, and Aaron Calvin.

Inset: Greg Popa.

FILLING A NICHE

Greg Popa, editor and publisher of the Vermont Community Newspaper Group, was inducted into the New England Newspaper Hall of Fame in May, and the publications he oversees received dozens of awards for writing, photography, and design.

Popa was one of six journalists inducted into the hall this year, as part of the annual New England Newspaper Convention, held in Boston and organized by the New England Newspaper and Press Association.

Vermont Community Newspaper Group publications also received 33 awards during the association’s annual Better Newspaper Competition.

Hall of fame

Much like the head chef at a restaurant who started his career as a dishwasher, Popa rose through the ranks by doing it all. He started as a photographer at the Stowe Reporter in 1986 and has, at various times, been a photographer, reporter, editor, and advertising manager. He became publisher in 2014, shortly before the Stowe Reporter bought the neighboring News & Citizen, which has been covering Lamoille County since 1881.

Popa applied the same methods of writing, design, and photography that made the Stowe Reporter an annual awards earner at the annual newspaper competition. He later replicated that company consistency to what is now known as the Vermont Community Newspaper Group, with Chittenden County papers The Other Paper, Shelburne News and The Citizen

Popa has for decades nearly single-handedly—with a talented stable of photographers, writers and designers, he’s quick to point out—produced the twice-yearly Stowe Guide and Magazine, a 240-page package that has regularly been awarded best niche publication in New England.

Popa was inducted by a pair of fellow hall-of-famers, Tom Kearney—

former executive editor of the Stowe Reporter—and Mike Donoghue, a veteran Burlington Free Press reporter, head of the Vermont Press Association, and a post-retirement correspondent for the VTCNG papers and several other Vermont weeklies.

Editorial awards

Last spring’s annual newspaper competition netted the newsroom 21 awards, a haul that includes eight first-place winners for writing and photojournalism. Once again, the Stowe Guide & Magazine was named the overall best niche publication in New England and was also given a second nod as the publication with the best overall design and presentation.

News editor and staff writer Tommy Gardner took home seven reporting awards in the weekly newspaper categories, which included two first place awards—a local personality profile of Rusty “The Logger” Dewees and a sports feature about local Scholars’ Bowl teams during the pandemic.

Photographer Gordon Miller won six awards, including three firstplace shots, while Biddle Duke won first place in the sports feature category for his story on what it’s like being the parent of a competitive ski racer. Other awards included:

• Gardner took second place for a personality profile of a man who picks up roadside trash in his hometown every day.

• Stowe Weddings took second place as best niche publication.

• Carol Vasta Folley won a second place award for her humor column throwing shade at appetizers, while David Rocchio took second in the serious columnist category for his rumination on inheriting a snowblower.

The graphics staff earned a dozen awards. The News & Citizen won second place for overall advertising general excellence for New England weekly newspapers, while production manager Katerina Hrdlicka got a third-place nod in the best overall ad designer category, with judges noting her “clean, clear design sense.”

—Tommy Gardner

HEY, HAR! From the News and Citizen police blotter ••• March 17 at 11:46 a.m., a box of vinyl records was reported stolen from a Jersey Way home. ••• Bababooey?

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Beth Gadbois

‘Back up your opinions with facts’

Beth Gadbois is a seventh-generation Vermonter with roots in America going back to 1620. “My grandmother says we are descendants of William Bradford, who arrived on the Mayflower and was governor of Provincetown,” she said. Gadbois owns Body Lounge, located in the Red Barn shops on Mountain Road. Her parents were from Bakersfield and Sheldon, and she grew up first in St. Albans and then Franklin. She has two adult sons, Ethan and Jacob, and lives in Stowe with her partner, Chip Dillon, vice president of construction at PurposeEnergy, a company that biodigests waste from the food industry, specifically breweries.

the intErviEw

Did you go to college in Vermont?

I went to Johnson State, when it was still called Johnson State, and I’ll probably always call it Johnson State. I majored in anthropology and sociology and minored in art. I probably should have taken a few more business courses. My roommate had a car and worked in Stowe, and I said, “Yeah, I’d like to work in Stowe, too.” It was my first foray, at age 19, before the drinking age changed from 18 to 21 in 1986.

What did you do after college?

Right after college I backpacked through Europe for four months, then I joined the Peace Corps and went to Senegal, West Africa, for a year. I lived in a small village and worked at a clinic doing health education outreach. I had to learn French and Mandinka. It was hard. I had no training in the languages and I got sick a lot. When I came back to Stowe, I got a job at the community health center in Enosburg and also had a side hustle as a waitress in Stowe. Then I went to Copley Hospital and continued to do community health education and outreach.

Why did you open Body Lounge?

When I left public relations, I started freelance publishing. I had a baby and wanted to spend as much time with him as I could, as well as work. We did three days a week at day care and the other days I worked at home, publishing a health directory and a home renovation directory, both magazines with free distribution. I wanted more stability, so I started Quality Cleaning in Stowe, and I still have that business and one employee. One of the accounts I had in the health directory publication was Lunaroma. I liked their merchandise, and we bartered ads for product. On a whim I decided to open a little shop with the goal of natural and organic products, and it kept growing to what it is now. In 2005 I added an arnica wholesale component and trained myself to make various lotions, creams, salts, salves, and bath balms. A few years ago, I added CBD-infused arnica formulated products. I have 200 accounts, mostly in New England, in retail stores, therapy offices, and many massage and physical therapists use them. My arnica products make up 40-percent of my business, including wholesale and retail. Body Lounge is not just body products, it’s a really cute and fun gift store. I have the best socks and cards!

What is the hardest part about running Body Lounge?

Finding employees. If there’s anyone reading this who wants a job, call me.

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GORDON MILLER
INTERVIEW CONDUCTED & COMPILED BY KATE CARTER

You are community oriented and politically outspoken. Where does that come from?

I’ve always been outspoken. In the past, it was an unchecked passion. Over the years I’ve become more articulate, and I work hard to express myself in a kinder way. Everyone has something difficult going on and we all should be kind to others because we probably have no idea what’s happening in their lives. People think the internet is a license to complain with no nicety or respect. I believe everyone has the right to their own opinion, but they don’t have the right to their own facts. Back up what you say with facts. Don’t just be mean on the internet because you can. I do a lot of good things for my community. I raise money and walk the talk. I started Hunger’s Hard, Baking’s Easy with Leslie Whitaker, where everyone in town makes food for people in need during Thanksgiving and Christmas. Leslie and I organize and execute it. I also started the Shop Till You Drop fundraising events. Years ago, I volunteered at an animal shelter on Garfield Road, and not long after I became a founder of North Country Animal League, but then I had kids and now I’m founder emeritus, but I stay involved.

What do you do for fun?

My latest thing is clay. I decided I needed something artistic just for me, so I took a beginner’s throwing class at River Arts, and it really resonated. It demands focus—I’m like Tigger, all over the place—and it’s good for me to focus on one specific thing. I love River Arts. It’s a grassroots organization and I’m drawn to it. It brings me back to a place where I want to be, mentally healthy, lending leadership talents, being social. It’s art for all. I love to travel. We went to Iceland in September and will be going to Kenya in January. I want to see big animals before they are all hunted into extinction. My superpower is finding inexpensive, awesome travel deals. Another thing I’m working on in my spare time is renovating a camper. I wanted to renovate a tiny home, but instead Chip and I are doing a camper. We have gutted it and so far, we’ve put over 200 hours into it. It’s going to be gorgeous.

Is there anything people don’t know about you?

I don’t know. Come talk to me, let’s go for coffee, ask me. I’m working on an edited eloquent filter, and I believe in being present in the things I believe in. Making money is not my main objective. I want to live a meaningful life and be comfortable with myself. It is so important to honor and be true to yourself, who you are at your core. n

Wednesday - Friday: 7:30 am - 2:00 pm • Saturday + Sunday: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm 29 Stowe St., Waterbury • 882-8229 • StoweStreetCafe.com

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breakfast • lunch • take & bake meals • catering espresso • lattes • locally roasted coffee • fresh juice unique art + gifts from VT + beyond

ROUTE

Inever tire of watching the aerial acrobatics of swallows as they swoop over fields, darting back and forth to snap up flying insects. With their smooth, flowing flight and pointed wings, they are beautiful, graceful fliers. Tree swallows and barn swallows are the most abundant and widespread of our six northeastern swallow species, and these are the birds I see hunting insects on summer evenings.

The tree swallow, with its iridescent blue-green back and bright white breast, is the first swallow to return in spring from its wintering grounds in the southeastern U.S. or Central or South America. If insects are still scarce, it will eat seeds and berries.

Tree swallows prefer to breed near water in marshes, swamps, or wet meadows that produce lots of flying insects. They most often nest in tree cavities or birdhouses and regularly use bluebird boxes.

In his book “Life Histories of North American Birds” (1942), ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent described how tree swallows forage: “tour(ing) over meadows, ponds, and rivers, veering from side to side, doubling back with marvelous quickness, snatching up insects as they overtake them or meet them in the air, coursing low down over the meadow grass where flies abound, or mounting, crisscross through the swarms of higher flying insects, gorging their throats.”

Barn swallows have a shiny cobalt-blue back, orange throat, pale orange breast, and deeplyforked tail. They return from wintering grounds in Central and South America about a month after tree swallows to open areas such as farm fields, parks, and beaches. Historically, these birds nested in colonies in rock caves, but after European settlement, they began building their nests in barns, outbuildings, and under bridges.

Barn swallows regularly follow farmers plowing or mowing to catch the insects stirred up in the process. They will also glean insects off the backs of livestock. Like tree swallows, they drink and

bathe on the wing by skimming their bodies across the water.

Populations of swallows have declined significantly in recent decades, likely due to multiple factors. According to the North American Breeding Bird Survey, the population of barn swallows decreased 46 percent between 1966 and 2014, and the population of tree swallows dropped by 49 percent.

One way to help tree swallows and barn swallows is to provide nest boxes. Plans are available at nestwatch.org. These birds will help control insects in your yard, and watching these graceful fliers can provide hours of enjoyment. — Susan Shea

Susan Shea is a naturalist, writer, and conservationist who lives in Brookfield. The Outside Story is edited by Northern Woodlands magazine and sponsored by the Wellborn Ecology Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, nhcf.org.

24 RURAL
BUILD A BOX, THEY WILL COME Populations of both tree and barn swallows are on the decline. One way to help is to provide nest boxes. ADELAIDE MURPHY TYROL

Community, family remember her kindness, faith, generosity

Despite her famous surname, Rosmarie Trapp was better known to residents of Stowe for her kindness, generosity, and devoutness than she ever was for her singing ability.

These were the common themes shared in her remembrance among family—both her blood relatives and the community she was devoted to—at Stowe Community Church and in the wedding field at Trapp Family Lodge on Sunday, June 9.

“Everybody loved Rosmarie and they treated her with kindness, love, and respect because she was a shining light and we’re all going to miss her,” said Jean Mudgett, who eulogized her friend at the church.

Trapp, who died in May at 93, came into Mudgett’s life by pure happenstance, as she often did with many who knew her. Throughout her life, though particularly after she stopped driving in 2006, Trapp walked everywhere and was a constant fixture on the Stowe Recreation Path. Mudgett offered to give her a ride home from their Bible study group when it was raining and her offer to give a ride any time she needed one was taken very seriously by Trapp.

“I don’t know why we were friends. I am sarcastic and flip, and I’m all rough edges. Rosmarie was sweet and soft and caring. There’s no reason the two of us got together, except I do believe the Lord put us together because there’s no other explanation,” Mudgett said.

Famous story, famous family

The second youngest child born to Maria von Trapp, whose flight from the Nazis with family patriarch Capt. Georg von Trapp, was immortalized in the musical “The Sound of Music,” Rosmarie Trapp was born in the Aigen district of Salzburg, Austria.

According to Mudgett, Trapp said her mother “didn’t know what to do with her” and her relative rambunctiousness compared to her staid siblings. She joined her family in the globespanning concert performances that helped propagate the family’s fame after begging her mother for release from boarding school.

In a letter in the Stowe Reporter, Trapp said she even spent a year in a mental hospital due to anger issues, which she said was eventually remedied by her turn to Christianity and a general attitude of gentleness with humanity. She enjoyed the kibbutz lifestyle on a visit to Israel so much

that she overstayed her visa and was banned from the country for five years.

No one who eulogized Trapp did so without touching on her devout faith. She often discussed her faith, particularly in a series of slice-of-life letters to the editor that were published so often over the years that she received her own column in the Stowe Reporter called “Rosmarie’s Corner.”

For Trapp, her faith was not some abstract idea or confined to a personal relationship with God. It was based in acts of service. In a letter from 2018, Trapp wrote of a stranger picking up the bill for one of her beloved mocha lattes, an act she saw not just as a simple act of kindness but proof of Jesus’ abiding love.

Trapp was preceded in death by her parents and her many siblings and half-siblings. She maintained an encyclopedic knowledge of the many branches of the von Trapp family and was devoted to each of them individually. They populated the remembrance gathering, the men easily recognizable by their height and their unique trachten dress jackets.

Johannes von Trapp— Rosmarie’s younger brother, now the only living child of Georg and Maria and the architect of Trapp Family Lodge—cut a warm and stoic figure as he quietly led the mourning of his sister.

With sun dappled mountains in the foreground on the hill where his family, once refugees, made their home, he was still able to call out a hoarse yodel to attract the attention of his guests as they stood to pay tribute to the enduring legacy of his sister’s kindness. —Aaron Calvin

ONE OF A KIND Friends look over a memory board at a memorial service at Trapp Family Lodge for Rosmarie Trapp, who died in May in Stowe. Her nephew, Sam von Trapp, blows on the ibex horn as his mother, Lynne, looks on. Inset: A still of Trapp from an interview on YouTube.

26 RURAL ROUTE GORDON MILLER

1. Kasha Rigby, who grew up in Stowe, has traveled the world for three years working for the World Food Programme. She’s shown here in Cox’s Bazaar in Bangladesh, where the organization provides food and educational support to a large refugee camp of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar. 2. Chuck and Lesley Riffenburg with “our ol’ faithful reading material at Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park” on their honeymoon in July. 3. Debi Diender, a longtime resident and business owner in Stowe, loved Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro last January.

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RURAL ROUTE ➊ ➋ ➌
Do you have a photo of our magazine on some far-flung island or rugged mountain peak? Send it along to us at ads@stowereporter.com, with Stowe Magazine in the subject line. We’ll pick the best one—or two!—and run it in the next edition.
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DEEP BENCH Madi Springer-Miller Kraus, who won the Stowe Sugar Slalom in 1952 for the women, was an Olympian, a U.S. national combined downhill and slalom champion, and a member of the U.S. team.

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Madi Springer-Miller Kraus won the Stowe Sugar Slalom in 1952.

She was also a 1952 Olympian, the 1957 U.S. national combined downhill and slalom champion, and a member of the U.S. team at the 1958 World Championships.

Of course, in 1952 she was just Madi Springer-Miller from Stowe. In that Sugar Slalom she finished nine seconds ahead of the second-place finisher, Lena Gale, also of Stowe.

Madi’s time was only 15 seconds slower than the men’s winner, Doug Burden of Middlebury College.

The race times were actually noted in the April 21, 1952, edition of the New York Times Not sure this winter’s Sugar Slalom will get coverage in The Times!

In 2022, Kraus not only celebrated the 70th anniversary of her win, but also her 90th birthday. She spent part of the season skiing in Sun Valley. Last season, due to COVID-19, she spent almost the entire season there and earned the distinction of being the oldest to get a Sun Valley 100-day pin.

Kraus is also aunt of John Springer-Miller and Frank Springer of Stowe. Her father, Frank Springer-Miller, fled Austria after World War I and eventually settled in Stowe. He was also integral to the early success of the Mt. Mansfield Ski Club.

Greg Morrill, a retired computer programmer and college professor, contributes a weekly column to the Stowe Reporter. More at retroskiing.com.

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The same roads, the same homes year in year out look different each time around. Decades of driving and riding shotgun, shooting images blurred by snowstorms and dust storms while gravel and sand spit up and under the fenders and rocker panels of this truck, the second vehicle we’ve learned to love

Barns, silos and out-buildings all in stages of disrepair—like us the wear and tear of seven decades etched on our faces, evidence of many road trips and time together.

“Vermont is an all-season destination” the rich fall with earthy pungency sweet decay, spectacular colors and then a bite of early frost. Winter lasts the longest—cold, true, then a slow spring and mud season sucks up our tires and wheels, scuffing the truck’s frame and underbody.

If you get distracted by the warm air coming in through a rolled down window, or get annoyed by the first mosquitos or black flies you can lose your vehicle, or your life

Before you know it’s summer glorious, romantic and the roads are dotted with construction crews repairing frost heaves, collapsed culverts and broken shoulders. My buddy Gene says all weather is good weather if you have the right attitude and clothing.

I can see he misses the winter, reflecting “There was a lot of winter this winter” or “I miss winter, didn’t really say goodbye didn’t have that last March storm …” and the truck is filled with silence. “Some of these barns took a beating” I reply, and gesture for him to pull over. “This one is barely upright” yet still stands nobly in its hardscrabble way.

There have been good years and bad when drought destroyed crops and banks cut off loans. Marginal farmers caught in no man’s land, forced to seek day jobs while Gentlemen Farmers put a fresh coat of paint on outbuilding doors or stained their barn’s siding.

Relief and belief, the soul of the countryside lives in these barns. Enduring, the people who have worked the land hold onto a tradition gripping and slipping through some family’s hands, the work, the labor—back breaking heart breaking, then new crops, new calves new dreams and the cycle begins again. Wealth and wear, prosperity and poverty.

Get in the truck, hit the road Driving, driving the same roads, the same homes some have fallen a few have risen. I’m taking pictures Gene is speaking “I always felt it was privilege to own a car and drive, I hitchhiked a lot as a young man … I’m fortunate and grateful”

Images rolling by, recording the transitions, riding shotgun, capturing the landscape, and seasons of a man’s life

You have 75 years my friend more than three decades in Vermont we’ve been riding these roads again and again, always thankful always taking the long way around.

Richard Dana, of Lincoln, Mass., wrote this poem about the Stowe area, which reflects years of friendship and admiration for the Vermont countryside and its farmers.

“It is also about friendship, the shared experience of change and the passage of time. I have spent a great deal of time in northern Vermont over the last 50 years. My friend, who the poem was written for, is a Stowe resident and contributor to your magazine.”

32 RURAL ROUTE
the poEm the long way

The Current gala: ‘Springtime in Paris’

Spruce Peak at Stowe, April 30 Laurie Sasko, Sarah Rovetto, Caren Merson, and Ed Rovetto on the dance floor.
36
ELISABETH VIILU PHOTOGRAPHY Robin and Scott Coggins, Ethan Carlson, Tim Bryan, Erik Eliason. Clarke and Jennifer Andelin, and Molly Triffin. Sarah Rovetto and Mila Lonetto. Luke Goodermote. Kristy Carlson. Emily Bland. Rusty DeWees.
37
Rob Foregger, Kristi Lovell, Sue Kearney, Alison Frye, Rebecca Chase, chair of The Current board of directors, and Erika and Joel Furey. The Current executive director Rachel Moore. Haley Finnegan and Tad Davis. Steve Sayce. Scott Weathers and Mikaela Saccoccio. Kendra Knapik and Danielle Nichols.

RURAL ROUTE

Life magazine in 1937 dubbed the Italian American artist Luigi Lucioni the “painter laureate” of Vermont.

A critic said of his art, “There is perhaps no artist whose work provides a more crystalline twentieth-century expression of the bucolic and highly romanticized Vermont landscape.” Another wrote, “At once timeless and

timely, he captured the elliptical, even enigmatic, nature of his adopted New England.”

Lucioni’s works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Whitney, the National Gallery in Washington D.C., the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and many others. Once nationally recognized and widely collected, his reputation, however, has diminished somewhat since his death in 1988 at the age of 88. As the Wall Street Journal recently noted, “Today, Lucioni’s name generally evokes a blank look, except for those in a small coterie of American art scholars and connoisseurs.”

Happily, thanks to a recent comprehensive exhibit of Lucioni’s paintings and etchings, “Luigi Lucioni: Modern Light,” at the Shelburne Museum and in a newly published book of the same name, his star may be on the rise again.

For many of his fans in Stowe, however, he is as admired as he has ever been. That’s largely due to the popularity of what is considered by many to be his magnum opus, the 24-inch by 34-inch oil on canvas landscape, “Village of Stowe, Vermont.” Indeed, at its recent show the Shelburne Museum gave the painting pride of place, hanging it at the very entrance of the gallery.

Said Barbara Baraw, president of the Stowe Historical Society, “Although it is nearly a century

38
TIMELESSNESS Luigi Lucioni, “Village of Stowe, Vermont,” 1931, oil on canvas, 231⁄2" by 331⁄2". Minneapolis Institute of Art. Inset: This Lucioni work appeared on the cover of the Stowe Guide & Magazine in the summer of 2006. The scene below also appeared on the cover of the magazine.
ONE ARTIST’S LOVE AFFAIR WITH VERMONT
LUCIONI
LUIGI
COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM

old, the work is easily the most recognizable painting of Stowe ever made.”

Lucioni immigrated from northern Italy to the United States with his mother and three sisters in July 1911 when he was 10, following his father who had found work in New York City as a coppersmith and tinsmith. The talented youngster was admitted to the Cooper Union in 1915 and later to the National Academy of Design where he studied art.

His lifelong love affair with Vermont first blossomed at 17, when he went to Barre to stay with his father’s second cousin. He would spend many summers and autumns in the state over the rest of his life. The state was special to him, partly because it reminded him of his homeland north of Milan. He once said visiting Vermont was “like seeing the mountainsides of my birthplace ... I was reborn in this majestic setting, and I fell in love with Vermont.”

He eventually bought a summer home in Manchester and enjoyed visiting and painting in Stowe. In 1948, writing in Vermont Life magazine about his 1936 work, “Trees and Mountains,” he said, “It was a view looking north to Mount Mansfield for which I had had a soft spot in my heart since I had a few years before spent two very pleasant summers in Stowe.”

In 1931 he was commissioned by a Minneapolis lawyer, George P. Douglas, to paint (for a fee of $1,000) the village of Stowe, which then was home to about 1,500 people. The en plein air painting is notable, as are many of his landscapes, for its lack of people, animals, or even cars and trucks. Critics have explained this helped Lucioni convey a sense of “timelessness” in his paintings.

Some have called the Stowe painting “mythical” or “idealized.” Baraw says, “There is just enough whimsy in the painting to cause viewers to do a double take.”

In the book “Luigi Lucioni: Modern Light,” Richard Saunders, director of the Middlebury College of Art writes, “The painting is a grand panorama of Mount Mansfield, Vermont’s tallest peak, with the village nestled beneath. Using an increasingly reductive style steeped in clarity and precision, Lucioni reaffirmed the mythical image of Vermont as a pastoral haven from the complexities of modern, twentieth century life.” >>

39
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STOWE VIEWS

According to Stuart Embury’s 2006 catalogue raisonné, Luigi Lucioni painted a number of views of Stowe in the early 1930s. While there are likely more that are not explicitly titled as such, here’s a quick survey of those that are:

• Stowe Hollow, 1931

• Village of Stowe, 1931

• Four Winds Farm, 1931

• Stowe Hollow and Hogback, 1931

• Main Street, Stowe, 1932

• Vermont Castles, 1933, features a building located at Route 100 and Stagecoach Road owned by the McKinley family

• Stowe Village, 1933

• Etching titled “Stowe Village,” 1933

• Stowe Warehouse, 1933

• Stowe Hollow, 1934

Others have compared the Stowe painting to the works of 15th- and 16th-century Italian landscape painters.

Thomas Denenberg, the director of the Shelburne Museum, notes that Lucioni returned to Italy for visits throughout his career and was undoubtedly influenced by the masterful Italian painters he admired. “They informed his work,” he explains.

Interestingly, Stowe and Lucioni’s home town of Malnate have a lot in common. Both are mountain towns, located at similar latitudes, with similar terrain, vegetation, and light.

According to Stanford art professor Alexander Nemerov, there are strong links between the works of the Italian masters and Lucioni’s Stowe painting.

He explains, “Lucioni’s ‘Village of Stowe, Vermont’ is also a heaven on earth, a town in the transubstantiation of rain, aglow in green. It is heaven made by the painter’s art, heaven as a dream of perfected earth, of enchanted vision and fantasy’s spire, too real to be believed, forever beyond reach.”

Mythical? Romanticized? Too real to be believed?

Whatever the explanation, there is little doubt that Lucioni’s oil painting of Stowe continues to rank—sorry, Walton Blodgett—as the most popular painting ever done of the town. Would he care? Well, in 1971 he told an interviewer that once he’d finished a painting he didn’t “care very much afterwards.”

As for his reputation? As he said, “Let posterity take care of you, if there is any.”

Perhaps the last word on the painting should be given to Lucioni himself. In 1932, a year after he completed “Village of Stowe, Vermont,” he told Art Weekly, “My chief desire is to paint not what I see but what I know and feel about objects and nature. I try to create objects that have an existence of their own, landscapes that have space, and solid forms and figures that have life and vitality.” n

40 RURAL ROUTE
SELF MADE Luigi Lucioni, “Self-Portrait,” 1949, oil on canvas, 32"x26", Southern Vermont Arts Center. “Paul Sample, Vermont Farm,” 1937, oil on canvas, 24"x30", collection of Shelburne Museum. “Shelburne House (with elms),” 1937, oil on canvas, 20"x321⁄4", private collection. FROM LEFT: SOUTHERN VERMONT ARTS CENTER; ANDY DUBACK; DUBACK
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Jogbra co-founder Hinda Miller makes hall of fame

istory won’t remember if it was a dark and stormy night in Burlington, 1971, when a few young women Frankenstein’d together a pair of jockstraps to create the world’s first sports bra.

Hinda Miller remembers it as one of the most exciting times in her life.

She was 27, single, a college grad with a master’s degree in theater design, and a runner without support—for the ladies. So when she, Lisa Lindahl, and Polly Smith set out to create a bra for jogging, the goal was to fix a problem that they experienced in their own lives and knew other athletes felt too.

They had no idea that their invention would become the sports bra, turn into its own category of athletic wear, and change the game for not only the sports industry, but for women’s empowerment and representation across the world.

Neither could they have predicted that about 50 years later, all three co-founders of the sports bra would be officially inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. While they were part of the Class of 2020 inductees, the coronavirus pandemic put celebrations on hold until this year.

“You can say that it was a product of the right time, in the right place, with the right two women who were strong enough to survive each other and keep going, do the work. We just were very hard workers and we believed in our running, and we believed in our sisters. There was a lot of belief and passion and love that drove us,” Miller said, speaking of her and Lindahl, who co-founded their company, Jogbra Inc. (later renamed JBI) in 1977 and patented the sports bra design in 1979. Smith, a childhood friend of Lindahl’s, helped design and sew the initial prototype but later moved on to become a designer with the Jim Henson Company.

Playtex Apparel bought JBI in 1990 and Sara Lee, owner of Champion Products, later bought out Playtex and formed a division dedicated to sports bras, now a household name in ready-to-wear clothing and a must-have for many athletes who need the support.

Let’s be candid—running hurts—as any athlete with boobs can tell you.

A Montreal native who lived and worked in Chittenden County for many years, Miller now lives in Stowe.

Business champion

Since selling JBI, where she served in various roles from president to CEO to vice president of communications at Champion Jogbra, Miller has led a varied career: mentoring young entrepreneurs, serving as a Chittenden County state senator from 2002-2013, writing books, backing small business start-ups, and more. She even ran for mayor of Burlington in 2006, a bid she lost to Bob Kiss.

But her proudest accomplishment, the through line in all her endeavors, has been all the jobs she’s created, Miller said.

“I love what business does for people, especially women who own it. You have to grow in areas you never wanted to grow in, you have got to trust people, create relationships, create ecosystems that work. I love that part. That’s what Jogbra allowed me to do,” Miller said. “Seeing women run and seeing women in sports, just knowing that we had a part in that—it changed everything.”

Now she’s finding passion in being a “sultana,” as she describes herself: coaching, mentoring, and acting as a sage to young people through her work at the Venture Mentoring Team in Florida and her YouTube channel, Old Butterfly Sultanas.

As a sultana, a term Miller has loved ever since visiting Turkey and hearing the story of Ottoman queen mother of Suleiman the Magnificent, Miller’s next goal is to pass on her experience, her stories, and the lessons she’s learned over her more than 50-year career.

She knows exactly what it feels like to be a young 20-something with no experience in business, spurred on by support from her sisters and a groundbreaking idea burning a hole in her soul.

42 RURAL ROUTE
h COURTESY PHOTO
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SKI STOWE

cross-country, and freestyle skiers—and snowboarders—continue to bring world fame to this proud mountain community. In fact, of all of America’s winter Olympic teams, few have failed to have a representative from Stowe.

Mount Mansfield and Spruce Peak capture skiers’ and snowboarders’ interest because they boast a total of 2,360 feet of vertical on 485 acres, offering the longest average trail length in the East. Skiers and riders will find every type of terrain, from wide-open cruisers to narrow, winding trails and glades.

What makes Stowe so special? It starts with Mount Mansfield, Vermont’s highest mountain at 4,393 feet and home to the East’s greatest natural ski terrain. Stowe thrills with its famous double-diamond Front Four trails: National, Liftline, Starr, and Goat. The Front Four are the quintessential classic New England trails, with steeps and bumps that pump even the most accomplished skier’s adrenaline. They hold their place with the world’s great runs, and among skiers the world over they’re household words.

Long history of skiers

Its awesome and timeless beauty inevitably strikes first-time skiers at Mount Mansfield and Spruce Peak. Gliding toward the top of Mansfield, one is embraced by the stillness of a panoramic bowl that stretches toward forbidding cliffs guarding the narrow pass known as Smugglers Notch. Many of the trails gracing the flanks of Vermont’s highest mountain can trace their history back to the birth of skiing in North America. Nathaniel Goodrich, a Dartmouth College librarian, made the first recorded descent in 1914. Others soon followed. By the 1930s, even before the first lift, skiers flocked to Stowe. These ski pioneers came here first for a simple reason: best mountain, best snow.

Areas of Stowe Mountain Resort marked outside of the ski area boundary on trail maps and with signage on the mountain itself, is hazardous backcountry terrain, containing unmarked hazards such as cliffs, thick, brushy terrain, riverbeds, stumps, rocks, avalanches. This area is not patrolled or maintained. Vermont law states that any person who uses ski area facilities to access terrain that is outside the open and designated trails shall be liable for any costs of rescue, medical, or other services. —stowe.com

ON MOUNTAIN

Most of Stowe’s trails were cut in the first half of the 1900s, and without the benefit of bulldozers. The first ones were handcut by the Civilian Conservation Corps. in the 1940s. Charlie Lord, the architect of trails like Nose Dive, Goat, and Perry Merrill, had a natural sense of a mountain’s fall line. His trails flow down the mountain like poetry.

Those of you who like to follow the sun will find Stowe is laid out perfectly to ski around the mountain. In the morning, the Front Four bask in soft morning light. In the early afternoon, work your way to the right and ski off the gondola. And to catch that elusive afternoon warmth, head to Spruce, which gets magnificent afternoon sunshine. The forgiving terrain of Spruce Peak’s sunwashed slopes also provides a haven for the youngest or newest skiers.

On Mansfield, the 3.7-mile-long Toll Road is the perfect spot for beginners. The wonderful thing about the Toll Road is that it allows beginners to enjoy an experience that advanced skiers get all the time: seeing the whole mountain.

Intermediate skiers can test themselves on miles of groomed cruising runs. The broad expanses of Gondolier and Perry Merrill at the Gondola, or Sunrise and Standard, where the sun shines late on the shortest days of winter, are popular with skiers and riders of every ability. Skiers who like wide cruisers will be completely exhilarated after taking a few runs down Gondolier.

A favorite of many skiers is at the top, off the quad. Ridgeview, not quite as wide open as Gondolier, provides the perfect place to practice short-radius turns. Spruce Peak is also an intermediate skier’s paradise.

For those learning to tackle bumps, Gulch is covered with medium-sized moguls, so skiers can concentrate on technique without being tossed around.

For the adventurous, Mount Mansfield also has premier glade skiing. After a storm, when there’s a solid base of snow, advanced intermediates will want to head for the consummate off-piste experience. Stowe Mountain Resort offers a number of gladed areas—all described on the ski area’s interactive trail map—including Tres Amigos, Sunrise, and Nose Dive glades. n

STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT
47

Remembering that first run DOWN THE BRUCE

My 7-year-old son—who has a fascination with maps—was studying the trails of Stowe Mountain Resort on Google Earth when he discovered a trail not listed on the resort’s trail map.

“That’s the Bruce,” I told him.

Named for logger Horace Bruce, Charlie Lord and a crew of Civilian Conservation Corps workers cut the Bruce in the winter of 1933-34 using axes and crosscut saws. It was the first dedicated ski trail on Mt. Mansfield.

Although not an official resort trail—it leads to the Stowe Cross Country Center and not back to a lift—skiing the Bruce is a rite of passage for any Stowe enthusiast, whether they skin up or descend from the Forerunner Quad.

But back to my son, who insisted he was ready for the trail and brought me down a few woodsy resort runs to back up the claim. Finally, one afternoon after a day in Stowebusters, he and I made the four-mile descent down the Bruce. It was a run that neither he (nor I) will ever forget.

“It was hard, then mostly easy,” he said, referring to the trail’s steep first turns and long, flat runout through the Nordic center.

Later, I became curious about what a few Stowe locals remembered about their first runs down the Bruce. Here’s what they said.

Ed Gill, a longtime Stowe pro, estimates he has skied the Bruce 300 times. “One year I skied it 46 times!” he said.

Almost everyone who skis the Bruce gets “brought” down the first time. “Barry Edwards brought me,” Gill said. “Barry Edwards, the telemarking backcountry legend.” Since that first time, Gill has become the guy who has initiated scores of friends, newcomers, and Bruce firsttimers. “I learn something new every time I take a run. I like explaining the forefathers of Stowe and why we appreciate them.

“We wouldn’t have what we have today without the Bruce.”

Nate Gardner, Stowe Ski and Ride School training manager, vaguely remembers his first time around 2003 or 2004. Unlike most, his first descent on the historic run was solo.

Last winter, Nate took to ascending the Bruce on Saturday mornings before work. “I would start my trip around five each morning in complete darkness and would be somewhere around the headwall as dawn would hit,” he said. “I like the idea of skiing an iconic trail in the same way (although with greatly improved gear) as the folks who originally cut the Bruce. They really took into account the trip up and the trip down.”

Pascale Savard, a board member of Green Mountain Adaptive Sports, said, “It was my first year skiing at Stowe—1991,” with a bunch of Tuesday Stowe ski bum racers.

“Possibly after a few beers on the deck?” she mused.

Clearer are her memories of trips with her kids and fellow Mt. Mansfield Ski Club racers and friends pulling out snacks along the way.

IN THE WOODS From top, the Bruce power wedge. A photo from the 1930s when Stowe trail engineer Charlie Lord and his crew cut the trail.

The trips would end with dinner at the Matterhorn, with the kids playing round after round of video games.

Savard’s most memorable descent was an adaptive event with Wounded Warriors. “We got to the top with four or five monoskiers. Mind you, these were amputees and very strong skiers—quite the daredevils too,” she said.

They plunged down the Bruce, stopping occasionally to dig a monoskier out of a ditch or untangle one from tree branches along the side. They worked together over the flat push along the Burt trail at the bottom before meeting a van with wheelchairs.

“We hit the Matterhorn all sweaty and happy for some well-deserved beverages,” she said. “It was one for the books.”

Andy Millick, a member of Stowe Mountain Rescue, was working at Stowe Rocks in the resort’s adventure center in February 2017 when a large group of coworkers announced they were skiing the Bruce.

“What better way to experience the classic trail than potentially eating it front of your coworkers?” he said.

Thankfully, he didn’t.

Millick has more recently been on the Bruce in his role with Stowe Mountain Rescue. “We’ve been on some calls,” he said. Generally, they come from people who have lost their way.

“All called for help after dark,” he said. The team uses all-terrain vehicles and snowshoes to find missing people. “When we’re lucky, we have a cellphone ping.”

He doesn’t begrudge those who call for help, understanding that sometimes the unexpected happens. “I really enjoy the quietness the trail brings. I love what you and the mountain feel.” n

48 TRAIL JOURNAL
STORY & PHOTO / Mark Aiken
49

TRIAL BY SNOW

I learned to ski on the swath of field between where my parents parked their rust-flecked Volkswagen and the cabin perched at the height of that field. It wasn’t far—maybe 1,000 feet—but it was uphill, and from the vantage point of a toddler precariously balanced on his first pair of skis, it might as well have been 1,000 miles. Thus, it often seemed easier to throw myself against the high snowbank left by the town plow and wail, my tears cold on my cheeks, because (as I’m sure you’ve discovered) wailing almost always fixes what needs fixing. Alas, even if my parents had been inclined to carry me through the snow and up the hill (which they were not), I was too big to carry. Instead, I would strap on my little skis and follow in the tracks of my parents to the dark cabin at the top of the hill. After we’d moved from the cabin, I didn’t ski much at all. At the time, my father had just taken his first full-time, career-oriented job, and we still teetered on the edge of poverty. Downhill skiing was not within our means, nor was I much interested. I remember the occasional foray on cross-country skis, but that’s about it.

I came back to skiing in my early teens. My uncle, an alpine skier who lived in the Colorado mountains, sent me a pair of his old Rossignols. They featured colorful racing stripes and complicated bindings and looked impossibly fast. On weekends, my mother took me to Bolton Mountain, where I gamely tried to keep pace with my friends, many of whom had been downhill skiing since I was sobbing in snowbanks. While I had good balance and general familiarity with snow, the ease with which one could build speed when pointed down a mountainside—especially if one did not know how to turn, which I did not—frightened me. And I simply could not determine how to navigate the moguls. If I went over them, I crashed. If I tried to weave around them, I crashed. I tumbled off their peaks and rag-dolled through their valleys. I bruised my legs, my arms, my butt, my face. Since this was before anyone wore helmets on the mountain, I rang my bell repeatedly. Basically, I hated it.

So I quit skiing again, for about another five years. By now, I was working in a bike and ski shop in Montpelier, and it just seemed weird

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MATT KIEDAISCH SWEET SPOT
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‘Slowly, achingly, agonizingly, I improved’
ESSAY / Ben Hewitt

that I didn’t ski. All my co-workers skied, as did most of my friends. And the memory of those moguls was becoming more distant with every passing. Besides, I’d been but a boy then; now, I was a man. The mountain would be mine.

That’s not quite how it worked out, of course. Indeed, the learning curve was as steep and unforgiving as the so-called intermediate slopes my so-called good friends cajoled me into tackling. “Come on,” they’d say. “This one is easy. You’ll be fine.” We’d push off from the top, and this would be the last I’d see of them until I arrived at the bottom of the mountain to find them looking as fresh as if they’d all just stepped off the pages of a tourism brochure, while I’d be lucky to still be in possession of my major appendages. The trial-by-fire approach of my ski buddies was like moving to a foreign country (say, Kyrgyzstan) without knowing customs, culture, or language. But slowly, achingly, agonizingly, I improved. The way I saw it, I had

POWDER Someone, not Ben, rediscovering the magic on a powder day in Stowe.

little choice but to sink or swim, and this time, darn it, I was determined to swim. I skied nearly 40 days that first year, and more than 50 the next. I fell in with a group of hard-charging, harddrinking granite workers who’d cut numerous gladed runs on a remote mountain north of Barre. We’d hike up the mountain by the light of our headlamps and ski until the wee hours of the morning. From them I not only learned to be a better skier, but also many things that probably shouldn’t be mentioned in print.

About this time, I began writing for ski magazines, and soon scored what I still consider to be one of the sweetest freelance gigs of my career: I became eastern editor at SKIING magazine. In essence, this meant I got paid to ski and then write about it, both of which I would gladly have done for free. Alas, the great recession of 2008 brought an end to my contract.

I don’t do much alpine skiing these days; it’s just too time-consuming, and the ski-for-free perks I enjoyed as a magazine editor have long since expired. But early last April, we awoke to the cruelest joke of all: Nearly a foot of fresh snow. I tried to maintain my good humor as I trudged through chores, but snow fell down my boot tops and by the time I’d finished, my socks were soaked, and my spirits were in the gutter. My sons didn’t even try for good humor. “This sucks,” Rye exclaimed at breakfast. This was the most printable of their laments.

“I’ve got an idea,” said Penny, perhaps inspired by the prospect of exiling us and our sour moods from the house. “Why don’t you go skiing?”

And this is how my sons and I found ourselves at the peak of Burke Mountain, them on rented gear, me on the dusty, dull-edged boards I’d dragged out of their resting place atop a bed of hay. I’d found my boots in the corner of the barn, and when I’d tipped them over, two mice scuttled out of sight. Yeah, it had been a while.

It wasn’t the first time either of my sons had been downhill skiing, but it was close. I led them to the top of Willoughby, a long, straight, intermediate run, wearing immaculate corduroy from the morning groomer. “Come on,” I said. “This one is easy. You’ll be fine.”

And you know what? They were. n

Ben Hewitt was born and raised in northwestern Vermont in a two-room cabin situated on the 165-acre homestead his father purchased in the late 1960s. He now lives with his family in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, where they operate a small-scale, diversified hill farm. Read his blog at benhewitt.net. This essay first appeared on state14.com.

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RESORT
STOWE MOUNTAIN
SWEET SPOT

FINDING

HIS NICHE

Stowe’s Don Allen earned his turns

on Allen, owner of Mountain Ops—the ski shop located in the red barn on Mountain Road across from Topnotch Resort—doesn’t remember his first time skiing.

“I was too young,” he said. He does, however, have an early memory around the sport. “I was recovering from a lower leg fracture.”

His family, who never lived in the same place for more than two years during Allen’s upbringing, went on a skiing holiday in New Hampshire. Because of his injury, the young

Don was left to hang out in the base chalet. (Yes, people used to leave their kids in the lodge.)

“I decided it would be a good idea to slide down the banister of the chalet,” he said. “I fell off and broke my arm.”

Despite the inauspicious beginning, Allen grew to love the snow. He also grew to love the sport of rugby—a passion for which he is well-known—and even chose a college, then called Johnson State, in part, for its proximity to good skiing.

Armed with a degree in environmental studies, Allen worked for years at Stowe’s AJ’s Ski and Sports before leaving to manage the Nordic

center at Topnotch. When Topnotch closed the doors of its center, Allen opened his own ski shop business in the same space.

Complete package

The perfect mountain town is hard to find, but Allen said they do exist.

“Having traveled around New England, the West, and Europe to some extent, Stowe has a great ski area, a really cool village, nice restaurants and coffee houses, and some really passionate skiers,” he said.

Some resorts kick up the awesomeness quotient, but they lack a character-filled vil-

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STORY & PHOTOGRAPHS / Mark Aiken SKI JOBS

lage. Others have a nice city but lack a worldclass resort. “Stowe has a pretty complete package.”

His passion is alpine touring, and that’s reflected in his shop’s inventory.

“It’s not a stupid retail move either,” Allen said, noting that most shops focus on alpine skiing and snowboarding. Offering an inventory that fills a gap—telemark, Nordic, backcountry, and alpine touring—makes good business sense.

Mountain Ops also carries alpine equipment and fat bikes—and mountain bikes for the summer.

“As you age, gravity becomes less of a friend,” Allen said. “But although I may ride the lift more than before, there’s still nothing as rewarding as earning your turns.”

Cool stuff

A lucky few get to match their passions with their careers, and Allen is that guy. Since 1995,

he has operated his ski shop in the same red barn. “I work in the coolest spot in the coolest barn on the coolest road by the coolest ski area,” he said.

amount of dust for an old barn, and a surprising amount of space for mountain gear.

Don takes pride in staffing the shop with outdoors-minded employees. He said he tries to discover what they like to do and encourages them to focus on those areas at work.

“It’s nice to come into a shop where everyone speaks this language,” he said.

What’s in a name?

By 2015, Allen had been pondering his shop’s name choice—Mountain Ops—for at least half a decade. Having opened his business as the Nordic Barn, he realized that the name didn’t reflect his increasingly diverse inventory. As the years pass, he said, “We get fewer and fewer people identifying us by our old name.”

After his nomadic childhood, Allen has now now lived in northern Vermont for over 30 years, and running a business has been a learning experience and a journey.

To be sure, it is hard not to notice the red barn as one drives up Mountain Road—especially with the conspicuous racks of skis and bikes (depending on the season) in front. Stepping into the 19th-century barn, one sees old wooden posts and beams, an appropriate

“It wasn’t easy, and it took a really long time to sort of get over the hump,” he said. “I don’t want to sound like I have anything figured out, but I don’t think I would change anything either.

“At this point I know exactly what I’m doing for my living. I’m running this store.” n

55
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On skinny skis

Stowe boasts one of the most diverse cross-country trail systems in the United States. More than 150 kilometers of groomed and 100 kilometers of backcountry trails crisscross its landscape. One of those backcountry trails is the Catamount Trail, 300 miles of wilderness skiing over the spine of the Green Mountains from Massachusetts to Quebec. It connects 15 ski centers throughout the state, including those in Stowe. Trapp Family Lodge, the first commercial ski center in the U.S., is the heart of Stowe’s network with 60k of groomed trails and 100k of backcountry trails. Stowe Mountain Resort Cross-Country Ski Center’s accessibility to the downhill ski area creates an uncommon fusion of Nordic and alpine skiing. Stowe Mountain Resort’s 45k of groomed and 30k of backcountry trails are the highest in elevation in Stowe. Topnotch at Stowe Resort and Spa offers additional terrain. Over the mountain in Cambridge, the Smugglers’ Cross Country Center at Smugglers’ Resort offers 30k of trails dedicated to cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.

Figure 8, anyone?

Public skating is offered daily at Stowe Arena. The arena has skate rentals. For public skating schedules, check out stowerec.org.

Winter fish tales

This may be the Ski Capital of the East, but don’t tell the fish that! Fish do not go dormant in the winter. Their metabolism slows, but they still need to eat. So if you enjoy eating—or just catching— fish, there’s nothing better than a mess of yellow perch out of Vermont’s frigid waters. Local outfitters will be thrilled to help you set your line.

Snowshoe heaven

The Stowe area is home to some of the most extensive and diverse hiking trails in the East, making it the perfect destination for snowshoeing. From the flat 5.3-mile Stowe Recreation Path to the challenging summit of Madonna Mountain, snowshoers go at their own pace and reap the benefits of safe, aerobic exercise. The Green Mountain Club, on Route 100 in Waterbury Center (green mountainclub.org), has compiled a list of favorite snowshoe hikes in the Stowe-Smugglers’ area. Stowe Land Trust (stowelandtrust.org) allows snowshoeing on many of its conserved properties.

It’s VAST out there

Imagine a 5,000-mile highway that suddenly appears every winter. One that goes through backcountry and snow-covered mountains, secluded valleys, and friendly villages. In Vermont, you don’t have to imagine it; it’s the winter world of snowmobiling. All riders in Vermont must belong to the Vermont Association of Snow Travelers (VAST), a non-profit, private group of over a hundred snowmobile clubs with tens of thousands of members. (See our list of local clubs at left.)

Maple mojo

Mid- to late-winter means maple time in Vermont, producer of the world’s best maple syrup. Many maple producers keep their sugarhouses open year round. It’s most fun during boiling time. A great resource is vermontmaple.org. n

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ACY SHADE OF WINTER

Sitting down with Stowe-raised Team USA athlete

towe native Acy Craig has been training with the U.S. Snowboard Development Team ahead of a season full of World Cup races. Her goal for the 2022-23 winter season is to accumulate enough points to move up the ranks, with the ultimate aim of competing in the 2026 Winter Olympic Games in Milan, Italy.

The 20-year-old Craig recently sat down for an interview when she had a free moment during her busy winter season. It had already snowed in Park City, where she lives and trains, and she and her fellow athletes were anxious to start their competition season.

For those who might not be familiar with boardercross, can you walk us through the course?

No course is ever really the same, but you always have a start section that has some techie features—some tabletops or some Wu-Tangs. It all depends on who’s building the course and what they think would fit. Then it usually

goes into some berms, a few jumps, and some rollers. There are often different features in courses that you don’t see in every course, like a drop turn or some weird offset roller pack.

The fun thing is you don’t get tired of racing because you’re never riding the same course. The easiest way I explain it to people is that it’s motocross on a snowboard.

How much of boardercross is a contact sport?

It’s not supposed to be a contact sport at all. There’s no pushing or anything allowed, but you can guard your area. So, if you sense somebody’s coming up beside you or behind you, and they’re going to push into you, you can put your hands up or your arms up and block your area.

There are times where you run into somebody or somebody runs into you and it’s definitely full contact, but it’s not on purpose.

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BOARDER PATROL
TALENT POOL In Sunshine Village, Alberta, in 2021-2022, where Acy Craig won her first North American Cup race. At right, after being named overall 2022 women’s NorAms champ, which secured her spot on the U.S. Snowboard Team for the upcoming season.
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Is there a favorite venue or two where you’ve raced?

I’d have to say Mont Orignal in Quebec. There’s one lift and a rope tow and that’s it, but they seem to pull off a really good course every single year, with good features, techy starts. They always seem to do a really good there.

I imagine you’re most excited to visit Milan at this point, right?

Yes, definitely. I think I will be heading there this season for a World Cup. The more time I can spend on that course before, hopefully, 2026, the more comfortable and confident I’ll be going into it.

Training for the World Cup circuit must basically be a full-time job. What’s your typical workday?

I go to the gym in the morning from around nine to 12:30, and I’m with my trainer or my strength coach working out the whole time. After that, we have a chef at our training facility, so I get to eat lunch there. Then usually I come home if I have stuff to do.

I belong to a climbing gym that’s right down the street from my apartment. I like doing that after, just as something else to do. I definitely noticed a big change in my upper body strength since I starting climbing. For me, that’s helpful for my starts—the stronger my start is, the faster I’m going to get out in front of everyone.

When you’re not training specifically for boardercross, what’s your favorite way to enjoy a powder day?

I ride at Park City every day when we get snow, which we didn’t get a lot of last year. There are two different mountains you can go back and forth to and everything’s really wide open, with a lot of steep terrain. Riding with my team is my favorite thing ever because they always make it fun. My coach makes it fun. We always find a way to have a good day on hill even if we haven’t gotten snow.

Snowboarding and other winter activities are often seen as solo pursuits. What’s it like to be part of Team USA, with all that pride and that support?

Honestly, going into this when I first got named to the team, I was so scared to meet everybody. I was scared that I was just going to be the runt of the litter, basically, and I wouldn’t get to see them or hang out with them a lot. But from the moment that I first went into the gym to start training, they welcomed me.

The ones that I have met so far are family to me now and I love spending time with all of them. They’re all just genuine people who care about one another and want to succeed in their careers.

Is there a sense of patriotism?

When you get the opportunity to represent an entire country for a sport that you’ve loved doing for your whole life, I think you definitely develop a sense of pride for everything you do. All my jackets have an American flag on them and say U.S. Snowboard Team. It’s still kind of crazy to me that I actually made it.

Are there people back in Vermont who helped you get where you are that you'd like to mention?

Obviously, my parents. Each and every day I’m thankful for them and how much they’ve been able to provide for me so I can chase my dream.

I want to thank some of my early coaches. Sam Lukens was my first real coach besides my dad, and I don’t see him very often anymore. He definitely made me love this sport even more.

I was beyond surprised to see how many people came out for the fundraiser that my parents put on (in October at Alfie’s Wild Ride). Seeing how supportive everyone is really means a lot, because without them I wouldn’t be able to do what I do.

What boards do you like riding the most?

My race board is a custom Oxess from Switzerland. There are three main board companies that put out boardercross boards, and that’s the one that I got onto and really liked the most. As far as free riding, I’ll always be a Burton girl.

Goofy or regular?

I ride regular.

What’s your favorite pre-race fuel?

I always lean toward a cheeseburger in the lodge. I have this thing of trying to find which resort has the best cheeseburger.

Who’s winning so far?

Honestly, even though I do not like the venue or the course very much, Ski Cooper in Colorado. Their lodge has the best cheeseburgers. n

60 BOARDER PATROL
BACK TO BACK After Craig’s consecutive NorAm snowboard cross wins at Gore Mountain, N.Y. on Feb. 6-7, 2022. Inset: On course several years ago.

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©DONNA CARPENTER
Jake Carpenter launched Burton Snowboards in Vermont in 1977.

“He worked 14 hours a day and survived on Slim Jims and black coffee. He was that focused on making snowboards.”

THE NEVER-ENDING RIDE

Jake Burton Carpenter was the father of snowboarding, the mind behind the sport’s most celebrated brand and the man who first stood up for scraggly renegade boarders, demanding they be allowed access to the exclusive, manicured snows of the nation’s ski resorts. During the four decades Jake ran Burton, he spawned and evolved a rebel culture whose spirit—both raucous and human, both nature-loving and fearless—now permeates the entire action sports universe.

Burton died of cancer in 2019. In November 2021, HBO Max, in association with Red Bull Media House, released “Dear Rider,” an HBO original documentary that chronicles how Burton pioneered the sport. We interviewed some of the film’s key players, and they told Red Bull Burton’s life story in their own words.

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STORY
: bill donahue

THE

EARLY YEARS: 1954 TO 1970

Clockwise from above: Jake, far left, with sister Carolyn, cousin Bradley, and sister Katherine. Jake rides an early version of a snowboard controlled by a rope. Young Jake.

Jake grew up in an upper-middle-class family on Long Island, the youngest of four children.

Timi Carpenter, 25, Jake’s youngest son; creative director, Mine77, a Burton brand

Jake lost his older brother in Vietnam when he was 12, and George was a very proper dude. He was the co-captain of the football team at his boarding school, and the senior prefect and the class president. He went to Yale. He was a Marine. He was the good son in the family, and I think Jake’s dad was kind of taken aback by his death. It fucked up the family dynamic, so that Jake felt pretty alone. He started getting into trouble.

Donna Carpenter, 58, Jake’s widow; owner, Burton Snowboards

It took him a very long time with me before he would talk about losing his brother. Or his mom. She passed away when he was 17. Those deaths were really painful for him. But I think they shaped him. They made him see how important it is to live in the moment, to have fun.

Timi Carpenter

Jake was a little mischievous. He just wanted to have a good time.

Mark Heingartner, 58, two-time snowboarding world champion; early Burton employee

Early on, he bought a Snurfer for 10 dollars, and he surfed the golf courses.

Donna Carpenter

It became a theme in his life that he loved to dress in drag. He took any excuse—Halloween, a costume party. He would just go for it. When he was a little kid, his sisters would spend hours dressing him up, putting on makeup, wigs, dresses.

At Brooks School (in Massachusetts), where Jake was a boarding student, they had this tradition among the derelicts. It involved a secret set of keys that opened every lock in the school, including the one on the headmaster’s gun cabinet, and one year Jake was picked as the keeper of the keys.

This was totally underground, but a janitor found the keys in Jake’s bag. The school called his father, and on the five-hour ride home, he said to Jake, “If you don’t get your shit together, the whole family’s going to have to move.” (His dad didn’t want Jake to go to the local public school.)

Timi Carpenter

It was apparently a very quiet car ride. My dad was angry at the world and in this pit of despair. He told me that’s when he decided that whatever the fuck he was going to do in life, he was going to apply himself.

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PAGES: ©BURTON AND DONNA CARPENTER

BURTON’S BEGINNINGS: 1970-1982

At his next boarding school–Marvelwood, in Connecticut—Jake became valedictorian. In college at New York University, he was the captain of the swim team. Then, upon graduation, he plied a conventional path and landed a job at an investment banking firm that, as he says in “Dear Rider,” “sold little companies to big companies.” He was bored, and, in 1977, he remembered his Snurfing days and concocted what he once called a “get-rich-quick scheme.” He moved to Vermont and into a remote farmhouse, to launch Burton Snowboards.

Mark Heingartner

The showroom was in the dining room, the basement was the shipping area, and the barn was where manufacturing happened. The barn was basically a wood shop, and every board was hand-cut and hand-sawed.

I started working for him when I was a punk kid in high school. It was just me and three other kids in the factory, and Jake was like an older brother to us. He was the grown-up in the room, and he took a lot of pride in the product from the get-go.

Donna Carpenter

He worked 14 hours a day and survived on Slim Jims and black coffee. He was that focused on making snowboards. And this is a guy who started out with no technical skills. He failed shop class. He couldn’t fucking change a lightbulb.

When I first met him on New Year’s Eve in 1982, at a bar in Londonderry, Vermont, he was drinking Jack Daniel’s and milk. For a pre-ulcerous stomach, he said. He told me his name was Jake and that he made snowboards. I thought, “This business is going nowhere.”

But I started coming up on the weekends from New York, to help him. He was taking these pre-laminated pieces of wood and dipping them into polyurethane and hanging them to dry. It was a very toxic process. We wore these respirators connected to a hole in the wall, and sometimes people would blow marijuana smoke into the hole, so I’d get high. Jake thought that was hilarious.

Mike Cox, 56, Burton global brand ambassador

He was a prankster. Once, when we were hiking up Mount Mansfield in Vermont, we came across this young couple. Jake asked them, “Do you want us to take your picture?” Then he had me take the camera, and he got up behind them and mooned me in their picture. They had no idea.

Mark Heingartner

He had a way of making everything fun. Whenever it snowed, he gave us a few hours off to go ride.

Donna Carpenter

But he was lonely up there in Vermont. He was busting his ass, trying to figure out how to launch the business and not run out of money. His friends in New York were looking at him, thinking, “What are you doing with your life?”

The ski areas were actively fighting him, trying to keep snowboarders off their mountains. They told him, “Oh, our insurance won’t cover it.”

At our first trade show–Ski Industries of America (SIA) in 1982—they literally sent union guys, the setup guys, to remove us. They told us, “You are not part of this industry.” I remember Jake getting into a tug of war over a board. And somehow, we stayed.

“My dad had a certain energy about him,” says son Timi. “I realized at a young age that people wanted to be around him because he was authentic and real.”

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MARK GALLUP; PREVIOUS PAGE: ©BURTON AND DONNA CARPENTER

From left, sons Taylor, George, and Timi with Jake and Donna Carpenter at Baldface Lodge in British Columbia in 2012.

METHODICAL GROWTH AND THE SOUND OF PUNK: 1982-1996

The first National Snowboarding Championships took place at a small Vermont ski area, Suicide Six, in 1982. A contingent of Michigan-based Snurfers came east to race and slept on Jake’s floor, and one daredevil hit 63 miles an hour, in basketball shoes. In 1985, with Jake as host and emcee, the event moved to Stratton Mountain, a larger Vermont resort, and officially became the U.S. Open Snowboarding Championships. Burton employee Andy Coghlan won the slalom by .01 seconds.

Donna Carpenter

There were women competing at the U.S. Open early on, and I remember asking him, “Hey, what are we going to do about the women and prize money?” He said, “Why wouldn’t we pay them the same?”

Kelly Clark, 38, Olympic gold medalist, halfpipe

Burton did more for women’s snowboarding than probably any other company. They didn’t treat us less than the guys and they made a place for us. I was a direct recipient of that kind of investment.

Mark Heingartner

His goal was to grow the sport. We started going to ski areas, a few other Burton riders and I, and our job was to prove to the ski patrol and to the mountain management that snowboarding was safe, that we could make turns and stop on a dime, that it was compatible with skiing.

Mike Cox

At sales meetings, Jake was really intimidating and super focused. At the very first meeting in 1990, he listened to us present products and then said, “These guys are supposed to be the best of the best?” I was like, “Ugh.” But when he spoke, it was really inspirational. He talked about what snowboarding meant to him, and about how we were a community. It felt like we were a family and the customers could become a part of it.

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©BURTON/JEFF CURTES

Night session at Whistler, circa 2001. “Even into his mid-50s, he was still going for it,” says Timi.

Donna Carpenter

We hired a guy to work with the insurance companies and to iron out legalities with the ski areas. But we were bringing to the mountain all these 15- and 16-year-old kids who didn’t know the protocol of ski areas. So for a while there, we focused on manners and etiquette in our communications to customers.

We said, “Hey, you’ve got to follow the rules at ski areas.” But this was a demographic that was just going to say “fuck you” anyway.

Mike Cox

At the SIA trade shows in the ’90s, one company had a school bus as a booth, and there were Vegas strippers and showgirls in there. They had porn stars signing posters. The ski side of the arena was super boring, super stale. But on the snowboard side, there was buzz. Every night at 5, they’d start serving beer. Punk bands played live, and it was so loud you couldn’t do meetings—nobody could hear. I remember one day Jake and I just stood away from the Burton booth a little bit, and it looked like a beehive, with people coming and going, and we just looked at each other and nodded, thinking “Holy shit! It’s game on!”

GALLUP
©MARK

WORLD DOMINATION AND A BUSTLING FAMILY LIFE: 1996-2011

By 1996, Jake and Donna were the parents of three young sons and also the lords of a multimillion-dollar business that was growing 25 to 30 percent every year. In 1998, snowboarding made its Olympic debut in Nagano, Japan. Four years later, when the Olympics were held in Park City, two Burton team riders scored gold. In 2006, Burton rider Shaun White—the Flying Tomato, the most legendary snowboarder of all time—found himself on the cover of Rolling Stone, shirtless and draped in the American flag. Jake was now the paterfamilias of a global brand—and also the Pied Piper of an ever-growing band of outsiders.

Jake and Donna had this party every year, the Fall Bash, which started with 25 guests and has grown to 1,200 people. And everyone gets to walk through their house, their closets, their barn, their yard.

He wasn’t afraid to have a good time—like having a fireworks show at his house in Vermont on a Tuesday.

What Jake tapped into—what he realized, starting snowboarding—is that humans need to play, even when they’re adults. Up until our kids were all 6 feet tall, we had a basketball hoop in our living room, and Jake and the boys would all play PIG to see who took out the garbage.

Timi Carpenter

The ball was small, but it was a legit hoop with a metal rim 8 feet high, and you had to dribble—there was no traveling allowed. We would break so much shit—so many picture frames and lights—and Jake would just get them replaced. The games would get physical. At the Fall Bash one time, late night, Jake took a pretty hard foul from one of his buddies. He went down face first and got two black eyes. He had a TV interview the next day, and he had to wear these big sunglasses to cover the bruises. He was my Little League coach, and one day when it was pouring rain, he decided to teach us how to slide. So he just started running, full sprint, and then dove headfirst into home. Just ruined all his clothing. Then he was like, “That’s how you do it.”

On good snow days, my dad let us skip school and go riding. He was good. He was so quick through the trees, and when I was younger, he would hit the jumps and some little rails. Even into his mid-50s, he was still going for it, and my brothers and I still talk about the last time he ever hit a box jump.

When you get on a box, you have to stay completely flat, but my dad got nervous, and he tried to turn off the box. He fell hard. He hit his back on this piece of metal. He was like, “That’s it. I’m done. I’m going to stick to the trees and the backcountry.”

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Danny Davis in the air at a “Ride for Jake” event at the Burton U.S. Open in February 2020. ©GABRIEL L'HEUREUX

THE LONG FIGHT: 2011-2019

In 2011, Jake sent his 800 employees a memo saying, “The bad news is that I have cancer. The good news is that it is as curable as it gets.” He underwent chemotherapy for seminoma, a form of testicular cancer, and was able to beat it. But then four years later, in 2015, he was diagnosed with Miller Fisher syndrome, a rare disease that temporarily paralyzes the nervous system.

Donna Carpenter

The doctor told him, “If this is what we think it is, tomorrow you’re not going to be able to open your eyes, the next day you’re not going to be able to swallow, and the day after that you’re not going to be able to breathe.” Soon, the doctors told us, “We don’t know how long he’ll be paralyzed. We don’t know if we can stop the paralysis.”

Timi Carpenter

He was the most active person I ever met. And all of a sudden, he was in a hospital bed, locked in his body.

Donna Carpenter

By the third week, he was distraught. You could see it, watching his heart monitor. His pulse went from like 52 to 160. He never lost the ability to move his hands, though. He could write, even if he couldn’t see, and one night, when our sons were visiting, he wrote, “I want to commit suicide.”

Then, the next morning, I’ll never forget it, I walked in and he’d written this long note saying, “I realize I have no control over this. I surrender.” When the nurses took him outside and sat him in front of the mountains (we were in New Hampshire), he wrote, “I want to live now.”

We got to the rehab a couple of days before his birthday, and he said to me—he was on a ventilator; he was doing this by writing—“I want to give every patient and doctor a cupcake.” So I had this friend of mine order 300 cupcakes.

Timi Carpenter

Once he got back on his feet, he was just off to the races. He started riding a hundred days a year again. We went to snowboard events in Europe and hung out with the riders all night. For my 21st birthday in 2017, he took me to Burning Man. I remember him dancing at this party and schmoozing this crowd. This girl I was talking with was like, “Wow, that dude’s super fun and rad.” And I was like, “Yeah, that’s my dad.”

Donna Carpenter

When he was 63, he said, “I think my best friend right now is Mark McMorris.” And he was a 20-something pro snowboarder from Saskatchewan, Canada.

Mark McMorris, 27, nine-time X Games gold medalist

We were homies. We fed off each other. He was super inspiring to me, and a good friend. In 2017, when I hit a tree at Whistler and got hospitalized, he flew to visit me, the founder of the biggest snowboard brand

in the world. I don’t think that would have happened at any other company of that scale. We just kicked it. He brought me food. We hung out.

All over the world, Jake and I would check out clothes and different products for inspiration. No one cared more about product than that guy. He obsessed over the most minuscule details. He could talk about a backpack strap for an hour and a half—where it was snagging, whatever. He looked to me for what was cool and what was next. For a while, he would only listen to hip-hop because we listened to hip-hop.

Timi Carpenter

I was worried about Jake. I told him, “Hey, man, you were just laid up for a long time. You probably need to ease back into life and take better care of yourself.” But he was kind of having none of it. He said, “I’m on my victory lap.”

Then one day he called me, and there was just something in his voice. I could tell right away. “The cancer came back,” he said, “but I’m doing everything I can to fight it.” He told me, “I’ve beaten it before. I’ll beat it again.” But he sounded flat and defeated.

Donna Carpenter

I think that if Miller Fisher hadn’t happened, he could have fought the cancer a second time. But now I think he just knew in his heart that he had fought all he could. He saw what chemotherapy does to you. He didn’t want to waste away and die like that. He didn’t really have his sense of humor anymore—that’s how I knew.

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©JEFF CURTES: NEXT PAGE: ©MARK GALLUP

THE NEVER-ENDING RIDE

Jake Burton passed away on November 20, 2019.

Mike Cox

Right after Jake died, an old Burton rep called me. He said, “I realize that Jake didn’t just bring us snowboarding. He opened up his lifestyle to all of us, and then we all looked at it and said, ‘Yeah, I want to live like that, too.’”

Donna Carpenter

If people want to honor his legacy, they should get out there and ride. Snowboarding is the best way to get in the moment and to be one with nature. Stay a community. Have each other’s backs.

Kelly Clark

He always put snowboarding first, and he listened to the riders. I think he’d be proud if we could continue that legacy.

Mark McMorris

We just gotta keep it core. Enjoy the mountains with your friends, push the boundaries. Don’t be the skier on the hill. Stay rebellious. Standing sideways is the dopest thing ever. n

Watch “Dear Rider” at burton.com/us/en/c/dear-rider. This article originally appeared in the December 2021 issue of The Red Bulletin magazine.

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Jake Burton Carpenter passed away in 2019, but his legacy lives on through Burton Snowboards, the company he founded.

FRosT

Look upon winter. It speaks through glass on the coldest of nights in scapes of forest and fern.

Flowers whorl. Islands float and flagged swords pierce chilly hues.

Are we surprised that by breath the creator offers a glimpse of dragon and pomegranate?

Do we wonder whether this cr ystal realm might for our eyes be frosted in silver and blue?

Look close but not for long. The warmth of our hearts makes not fast this world’s ephemera.

Though a lens brought close ever closer might fix the likeness sharing beauty defying gravity another ‘way of remembering what it would impoverish us to forget.’ *

* “Poetry s a way of remembering what it would impoverish us to forget” is attributed to Robert Frost.

POEM
AND PHOTOGRAPHS : paul rogers
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blast from the past

Primitive Biathlon tests stamina, accuracy

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n Harland Blodgett

the shooter pushes on with haste through the negative 37-degree woods, the crunch of snow beneath birchwood and rawhide snowshoes drowning out the huff and puff of breath. Both are lost in the explosion of a direct hit from the ancient flintlock musket. The shooter, protected from the cold with hides and woolies, takes another deep breath and strides off, on to the next target.

This is not the event you’re accustomed to seeing at the Olympic Games, featuring Nordic skiers trained within an inch of their lives, clad in Lycra and armed with 21st-century rifles.

Welcome to the Primitive Biathlon, an annual Lamoille County event that captures the spirit of the modern sport, but with athletes racing on bygone-era snowshoes and shooting with muzzleloaders, often bedecked in the fashion of the late 1770s.

There are considerably more beards.

The annual event was founded nearly 30 years ago in the woods of Cambridge and is now organized by and staged at the Lamoille Valley Fish and Game Club of Morrisville.

Organizer Keith Ulrich, a club officer and head of its shotgun range, said the frontloading firearms are typically replicas—often “absolutely marvelous pieces of art and history” that draw appreciative nods from gun enthusiasts.

“In many cases, it wasn’t the working man’s firearm that survived to this day,” Ulrich said. “I think a lot of them ended up supporting a barn door or something.”

Generally speaking, a muzzleloader is any gun that is loaded from the front of the barrel, historically with black gunpowder poured from a powder horn or premeasured paper packets jammed down the barrel.

Harland Blodgett, another fish and game club officer, said a Belvidere man, Ray Saloomey, founded the Primitive Biathlon in 1995 in Cambridge and ran it there for about 20 years. Blodgett has participated in the biathlon since its third year, in 1997.

He has numerous muzzleloaders that he swaps out after every lap of the biathlon course. He said it is a good excuse to bring them out—he wouldn’t expose them to the rigors and elements of black power hunting season.

“My flintlock is kind of a nice gun and I hated to shoot it at first, but what good was it doing hanging on the wall?” he said.

Whether the muzzleloader be flintlock, cap lock or inline, or feature a smooth or rifled bore, its use in the Primitive Biathlon is the same: shoot at four metal gong targets, each up to 60 yards out, spread out over a two-mile course.

Competitors are scored based on overall time, and accuracy counts—missed shots mean a time penalty, on top of the time it takes to reload and aim again.

Sometimes the athletes really are just that, leaving the older folks like Ulrich to simply aim sharper and enjoy the journey.

“We see people who are very athletic and are really pushing themselves to excel. Then there are others who are just out for a walk in the woods in winter and are just enjoying the whole sight and sound and smell,” he said. “Do I expect to win against an 18-year-old who runs track?”

AT A GLANCE: The 2023 Primitive Biathlon is Jan. 28-29 at the Lamoille Valley Fish and Game Club, off Garfield Road in Morristown. More information at lvfgc.com.

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m Sandy MacWilliams n Jean Goodell, Bob Lindemann, and Keith Ulrich

bucket list do stowe like a local

Winter in Stowe is always special, but no Stowe winter is complete without checking off certain activities. Note: this Bucket List isn’t necessarily a list of things to do before you die; rather, it’s a list of things to do each year before the snow melts and another winter dies. This seasonal bucket list is for those who spend significant time outdoors and one that will make your Stowe winter complete.

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moonlight snowshoe

Anyone who complains about traffic, liftlines, and overcrowding obviously doesn’t know where to look—or which sport to play. You don’t have to stray far from the beaten path in order to find the peace, solitude, and magic that you seek. Strapped into a pair of snowshoes, you’ll keep warm even on the coldest nights. Alone under the moon and stars, everything winter is supposed to be comes rushing back—sparkling snow crystals, crisp fresh air, and a thermos of cocoa, alone in the Vermont woods.

skin up

Stowe Mountain Resort designates certain trails during off-hours for uphill traffic. Why? Because skinning up is so darn rewarding. Be warned: Gravity does not work in your favor when you’re skinning up, and that’s exactly why skinning before first chair is on the bucket list. No Stowe winter is complete until you have earned your turns. (Opening spread, photo by Nathanael Asaro)

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TEXT : Mark Aiken PHOTOGRAPHS : Various Artists
NATHANAEL ASARO
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❸ four in one

Any expert can ski a Front Four trail, and anyone can do all four. But who can do all four in one day? That, friends, is a memorable day. Not only do conditions and weather need to line up—how often are all four even open on the same day?—but you need to stay focused as you check off the hardest runs in the East. Other single-day milestones would be 20 total runs (can you say lunch on the lift?), three runs down The Bruce, or hiking and skiing the Chin—twice.

❹ spruce spin

It is easy to gripe about the price of living in a mountain town. At the center of the 20-year-long Spruce Peak base area renovation project that cost hundreds of millions, however, is the Spruce skating rink— open to all and completely free. Regardless of age and skating ability, when you put on a pair of skates, see your breath, and skate laps in the fresh air, you’ll turn back into a kid again.

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NATHANAEL ASARO
GORDON MILLER
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notch ski shuttle ride

You don’t have to worry about a jack-knifed 18-wheeler tying up the Notch now; Vermont 108 belongs to skiers, snowshoers, and dogwalkers come winter. And a rite of passage is to click into a skinny pair of skis at the Barnes lot at the gate across the road to make the climb to the top, descend on the other side to the upper lot at Smugglers’ Notch Resort, and then turn around and do it again. Whether you skateski or classic, you are in for quiet climbs in one of planet Earth’s beautiful places— and wild rides on the downhills.

Most haven’t done this, the line of cars on Mountain Road on a snowy Saturday the proof. This winter, the resort and Green Mountain Transit say they are upping their shuttle game. So why not take advantage of a ride to the front door and a DD on the way home? Why not give it a go, and make a winter in Stowe a bit more carbon-free.

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❻ PAUL ROGERS
GORDON MILLER

SHOP

ARTS

EXPLORE

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ART AS ACTIVISM Artist-in-residence Julia Pontes gives a talk in August at The Current, Stowe’s contemporary center for art. Pontes showed her work as part of the summer exhibition, “When the well is dry,” which explored the intersection of environment, climate change, culture, and communities through the work of visual artists and storytellers. See more about The Current, p.96. GORDON MILLER

CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

Enhancing the human condition through visual arts

THE CURRENT IS YOUR CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART.

Exhibitions of acclaimed international and Vermont artists and public programs, adult and children’s art classes and private lessons, school tours, student shows, and summer art camps. The Current is made possible through the generous support of the town of Stowe, its members, and sponsors.

THE CURRENT

90 Pond St., Stowe Village. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Free. Visit thecurrentnow.org for monthly public events. Donations welcome. (802) 253-8358.

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Through December 10

When the well is dry A focus on the climate crisis that brings together contemporary visual artists, visual storytellers, and documentary photographers from around the world to see how their respective countries are responding.

Winter Exhibition

To be determined. Main gallery. Spring 2023 Student art show

Members’ Art Show and Sale Members exhibit their work in variety of mediums.

Exposed. 2023

Annual summer outdoor sculpture exhibition includes public programs, walking tours, artist talks, more.

Spring gala Stowe’s not-to-be-missed spring gala. Lodge at Spruce Peak. Tickets: thecurrentnow.org.

At top, artist Meleko Mokgosi and Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi, curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, in conversation about Mokgosi’s recent show, Scripto-visual, a neologism that explored the links between image and textual work in relation to the politics of representation. Murray Dewart’s “Blue Gilead,” painted aluminum on granite base, 9'x7'x2', part of this summer’s Exposed outdoor sculpture exhibit.

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GORDON MILLER

WITCH, BEGONE! Depending upon who you ask, the sideways windows found on many old Vermont homes—and some new, high-end ones—are called various things: coffin window, witch windows, or, simply, Vermont windows.

COFFIN WINDOW

So what’s up with those funky sideways windows?

One of my favorite pieces of obscure Vermont is a mixture of architecture vernacular and good old-fashioned Yankee ingenuity.

Do you see the diagonally tilted window placed in the gable end of this old farmhouse with its long edge parallel to the roof? A lot of people, Vermonters or flatlanders, seem to be flummoxed about these peculiarly slanted windows. That’s because their orientational existence isn’t found in any other states, though someone did tell me that they think they saw one somewhere in New Hampshire not too long ago.

To add a bit more rapturous froth to the isolated mystery, our Vermont parlance labels them “coffin windows,” or sometimes “witch windows,” depending on who you are I guess. Growing up, my mother would always point them out as coffin windows whenever we would take a trip out of suburban Chittenden County to more rural parts of the state, where older structures far outnumbered the new. I wasn’t introduced to witch windows until much later.

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STORY & PHOTOGRAPHS / CHAD ABRAMOVICH

HISTORY LESSON

The etymology behind the monikers vary, and can’t really be traced back to a material point of origin. Going alphabetically—it’s said these are called coffin windows because if a family member died upstairs, it was far easier to maneuver the needed coffin out the window and slide it down the roof as opposed to figuring out how to haul it down a steep and narrow Vermont farmhouse staircase. And trust me, some of them are very steep and narrow to the point of over-cautiousness when walking up or down one—enough for me to sympathize with anyone who would groan at the prospect of dragging anything like a coffin down them.

The name witch window gets a bit more on the superstitious side. It’s said that an old belief was that a witch could not enter your dwelling through a crooked window or opening (a similiar superstition that comes to mind is how the ancient Chinese thought bad spirits traveled in straight lines, so their architecture took on steeply pitched rooflines).

I know old Vermonters are a superstitious bunch. Our collective state history and folklore include such grim things as incriminating real people accused of vampirism, or desecrating the graves of dead people accused of postmortem vampirism.

Our most famous vampire execution was a man named Corwin, whose remains still loam underneath Woodstock’s boat shaped town green.

But witches?

There isn’t much known on how scared Vermonters were of witches, leaving this just an intriguing speculation. However, I was able to dig up a small number of succinct accounts in old state newspapers around the late 1700s and early 1800s of various Vermonters who

locals suspected were witches, but in reality were probably nothing more than eccentrics living in a more narrow-minded time.

One article amusingly reported that a Stowe woman was blamed for making several farmers’ milk cows run dry.

A more practical theory, and probably the most likely of the three, was that these windows were a creative solution to let light into the cramped spaces upstairs. Gables didn’t often leave room for traditional sized windows and poor farmers didn’t want to spend the money on drafty dormers or getting a custom window made—a costly purchase many families couldn’t afford.

They also enabled fresh air and ventilation to keep the house inhabitable. Though there are far more scolding environments than Vermont, our summers do get pretty humid, and the upper floors of an old house easily turn into ovens.

Further down the line, these windows adopted yet another sobriquet with less dour and more civic pride: Vermont windows. Although I haven’t heard that term nearly as much as the aforementioned other two.

In a world that loves things to fall into human-made symmetry, who knew that a window installed at a tilt could conjure up so many declaratory ideologies. n

Chad Abramovich is a 28-year-old Aspergian Vermont writer, photographer, and local weird worker. He considers himself to be creatively maladjusted, is struggling through his depression/anxiety duality, and drinks too much coffee. More at obscurevermont.com.

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COOL PLACES

‘IT TAKES A VILLAGE’

Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum celebrates two decades

Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum celebrates 20 years in Stowe this year.

Andrea Mead Lawrence, who won two gold medals at the 1952 Winter Olympics, officially cut the ribbon at its grand opening of what was initially called the Vermont Ski Museum on Aug. 16, 2002.

Since then, the museum collection has more than doubled, with 8,000 individual items. Ski equipment includes about 275 pairs of boots, 400 pairs of skis, 100 pairs of poles, 55 pairs of climbing skins, and 60 loose bindings for both cross country and downhill skiing, and the necessary carrying equipment—bags, boot trees, and ski racks.

On the museum’s main floor an annual featured exhibit usually runs from Thanksgiving until the following October. This year, the exhibit showcases the art of Vermont native Scott Lenhardt, who has created over 55 graphics for Burton Snowboards, including signature graphics for Olympians Ross Powers and Danny Davis. In addition to snowboard graphics, he’s done work for Phish, Nike, Adidas, Mountain Dew, and

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RED BENCH The ongoing Red Bench Speaker Series at Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum takes its name from the red bench on its main floor, which sat in front of the central fireplace in the original Octagon built atop Mt. Mansfield. Inset, Andrea Mead Lawrence cuts the ribbon at museum’s grand opening in 2002.
MAGAZINE ARCHIVES
STOWE
STORY / GREG MORRILL

Vice Magazine. He also does pet portraits and a very humorous series called “Twenty Four Hour Woman,” but he’s best known for his work with Burton.

The museum features several permanent exhibits such as the 10th Mountain Division collection, which includes early fleece, climbing equipment, World War II rations, medals and archival material, and one on the National Ski Patrol. Both trace their beginnings to Vermont.

The museum’s opening in Stowe also ushered in the Vermont Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame. A special induction event is held each year, and Mead Lawrence was the first inductee in 2002. Vermonters in the 10th Mountain Division were inducted in 2003, while other notable hall of famers include Billy Kidd, Cochran family, Bill Koch, Martha Rockwell, Jake Burton, Donna Carpenter, and Ross Powers.

Founding father

The Vermont Ski Museum was actually founded by Roy Newton in 1988. Newton, a Vermont editor and publisher in Castleton, published the Lakeside News and Rutland Sun. But in the 1980s he was the publisher of Vermont Ski News. Newton traveled around the state collecting news, soliciting advertisements, and distributing his newspaper.

One day driving toward Burlington from Montpelier, he decided that Vermont, with all its skiing history, should have its own ski museum. He came to this decision with such conviction that he turned his car around, returned to Montpelier, and registered the name with the state.

Setting the museum up as a nonprofit required a board, so Newton called some of those who had supported his Vermont Ski News as advertisers, which included Chuck and Jann Perkins, founders of the Alpine Shop in South Burlington.

The Perkinses remember board meetings were informal, usually over lunch in the Killington area. Fundraising was always a challenge. They ran various events around Killington including wet T-shirt contests at the Wobbly Barn. Eventually they secured a location on Route 4 between Rutland and Pico near the Cortina Inn. While this seemed like a good location, motorists whizzing by wasn’t interested in stopping for a museum visit.

Finances eventually forced them to move the museum collection into >>

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Exclusively Featuring Vermont Artisans and Crafts People Jewelry • Stained Glass Photography • Pottery Paintings • Illustrations Woodwork and much more! 151 Main Street, Stowe | 802.760.6513

VERMONT SKI AND SNOWBOARD MUSEUM

One South Main Street, Stowe. Thursday to Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Free. Daily ski and snowboard movies. Visit vtssm.org for events added as the winter progresses. (802) 253-9911.

Ongoing exhibits

10th Mountain Division, National Ski Patrol, Kick and Glide, Slope Style Fashion

December 1

Red Bench Speaker Series

“Heroes in Good Company” with Skyler Bailey. The human experience of the 10th Mountain Division during World War II. 7 p.m. Virtual, registration required. $10 suggested donation.

December 2

Exhibit opening party

“Scott Lenhardt’s Artistic Contributions to Burton Snowboards 1994-Present.” 5 p.m. Free, donations appreciated.

January 19

Red Bench Speaker Series

Scott Lenhardt’s “Artistic Contributions to Burton Snowboards 1994-Present.” 7 p.m. Virtual, registration required. $10 suggested donation.

March 24 – April 2

Snow sports online auction: Vintage Memorabilia + Equipment

Online auction to raise important funds for the museum. Includes unique ski and snowboard vintage items.

a shed behind the Brandon Inn. Fast forward to the late 1990s when a a group of local Stowe businessmen began negotiations with Newton to acquire rights to the museum and move it to Stowe. Ken Biedermann, Chris Francis, Bruce Nourjian, and John Springer-Miller negotiated and financed the acquisition.

If you build it …

The Town Meeting House in Stowe was built in 1818 and is the oldest active public building in town. The meeting house originally occupied the lot on north Main Street on the site of today’s Stowe Community Church. The meetinghouse was to be used as a church for all religious groups and as a place for civic meetings. For more than 40 years various denominations worshiped in this common church building until they erected individual churches.

In 1861 the Universalists obtained the land where the meetinghouse sat. To make room for their church—which become Stowe Community Church in 1920—the old meetinghouse was moved by a team of oxen to its current location on South Main Street. By the 1890s it was used as a town hall and gymnasium.

When the Akeley Memorial Building became Stowe’s town hall in the early 1900s, the old meetinghouse continued to house various town services, including the Stowe Fire Department, which used the building until 1973.

Stowe Water and Light Department was the building’s last occupant and moved out of the building in 2000. Stowe was now faced with the decision of what to do with the old meetinghouse, in need of costly repairs to restore it for useful purposes

It takes a village

To Biedermann, Francis, Nourjian, and Springer-Miller, the old meetinghouse seemed the logical choice to house the museum. But to take on a project of that magnitude, the group knew they needed to recruit help from the town and the greater Stowe community. One of those recruited was Scott Noble, who had just moved to Stowe and was opening an art gallery on Main Street.

He recalls going into Biedermann’s office and asking him how he could help. Biedermann handed Noble stack of papers and said: “This is the ski museum. We need to make it happen!”

A $1.4 million fund-raising campaign was launched. Managed by volunteers throughout the state, the campaign reunited Vermont ski racers, 10th Mountain Division members, area developers, self-professed ski bums, and industry pioneers. Chuck and Jann Perkins played a significant role in the campaign.

As Chuck tells it, he had just sold one of their Stowe properties when he found out the renovation campaign would be named for a top-level donor. Chuck came home and told Jann, “I gave the money from the house away.”

When the financial goal was reached, the project began. The town would still own the building and lease it to the museum for a nominal fee. Much of the building’s structure had to be redone. A decision to include a restoration of the old bell tower, which had been removed years before, was made. Since the old bell was long gone, a comparable bell was found in Stanstead, Quebec. Getting it into the United States turned out to be complicated until it was determined the bell was manufactured in Troy, N.Y.

One new addition to the building was a giant moving mobile to display the museum’s historic ski lift exhibit. The mobile contains the progression of lifts from Bromley’s J-bar through Stowe’s single chair to Sugarbush’s 3-person gondola.

On Aug. 16, 2002, the museum officially opened in the 1818 Town Meeting Hall, now named the Charles N. and Janet B. Perkins Building.

Name change

In 2010 the museum’s name was officially changed to the Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum to recognize the impact Vermont and Vermonters had on the growth of snowboarding.

Since 2018 the museum has hosted the Red Bench series of speakers, interviews, and panels. The series gets its name from the red bench on its main exhibit floor, which was around the central fireplace in the original Octagon built in 1940 atop Mount Mansfield. It was the place people swapped tales of skiing adventures and prowess.

From the vision of a small group of individuals through the support of Stowe, the state, and beyond, the museum celebrates 20 years in Stowe. If you’re a visitor, plan to include the museum on your visit. If you’re a local, even if you’ve visited the museum before, there’s always something new to discover. n

COOL PLACES
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Chuck and Jann Perkins with members of the 10th Mountain Division. Fashion from the ongoing Slope Style exhibit.
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LADIES OF SPRUCE

How many women does it take to run an arts center?

The world has seven wonders.

Spruce Peak Arts has seven wonder women.

Seven women do all the work needed to bring performing arts to the base of the mountains in Stowe.

“It wasn’t intentional that there are no men, it just worked out that way,” executive director Hope Sullivan said. “It’s amazing to have all these women in leadership roles. It’s a unique moment where we can celebrate women and it’s great for the younger women to have a career path. There’s a diversity of experience and growth that is shared with all of us. Our strategic plan includes cross-training, so we can all fill in for each other.”

Spruce Peak Arts, a year-round presenter of performing arts and educational and family programs, is based at the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, one of the most acoustically perfect auditoriums in New England, where each of the 420 seats is a great one.

The mission? “To inspire, educate, and entertain all of us, all year round.”

“We all wear a lot of hats,” said marketing manager Hayley Fien, who has a degree in arts administration and joined Spruce Peak Arts in 2019. “It’s the nature of a nonprofit and being so

lean in numbers, running a show, fundraising, acquiring grants, and donor outreach. Sixty percent of our support is through contributions from the community.”

Linda Hunter, former owner of 10 Acres Bistro in Stowe, joined as finance director, but is now taking on a larger role as deputy director. “The heart of SPA is programming, but the soul is education. It’s been amazing to work with an all-woman staff. Everyone has different strengths and talents; we are learning new skills and can step in and help each other out.”

“Who we are is becoming more defined,” said Sullivan. “Our mission is to serve the community. We have been doing surveys to

106 STOWE PEOPLE
SPRUCE PEAK ARTS TEAM Katya Luchanskaya, director of development; Hayley Fien (sitting), marketing manager; Belinda Emerson, technical director; Julianne Nickerson, director of education; Linda Hunter, deputy director; Rosalie Wasser, development associate and box office assistant ; and Hope Sullivan, executive director. Not pictured: Adlai Waxman, social media coordinator and technology.
STORY / KATE CARTER

find out what the community wants, and it is diverse, from big acts to giving a platform to local talent. There is a lot of interest in supporting local talent.”

The nonprofit is governed by a 13member board, but the team responsible for all the great performances and community outreach are the seven wonder women.

Community connections

Connecting with children and schools is a primary goal, and to that end the group has introduced new programs to the curriculum.

“We had a chance to reevaluate our objectives during the pandemic and are now diving deeper,” Julianne Nickerson, director of education, said. “We have had a successful partnership with the Flynn student matinee series and now we are doing all our own student programming, such as week-long residencies for adults and children. We bring professionals and students of all ages together to practice and learn from each other, culminating in a Saturday evening performance.”

There are also camps and classes, afterschool programs, and a partnership with Lamoille North Supervisory Union and its diversity, equity, and inclusion department, helping bring arts and culture programs into the schools. One of those programs, “In My Voice,” is in partnership with Northern Vermont University’s theater department and gives voice to the lives and experiences of eighth graders. The younger kids develop their stories, and the college students perform them.

“We have lots of fun stuff happening here,” Nickerson said.

Fun like the Electric Brain Campaign, spearheaded by director of development Katya Luchanskaya, a pianist with degrees in music and Russian studies. “Pre-K to age 24 is where we are focused. It’s about turning on the brain. There’s also a public health component, using arts to access kids and resolve issues.”

The Electric Brain Campaign’s objectives are to bring world-class artists from the Spruce Peak Arts’ stage to local schools and community centers; to fund scholarships and subsidize free tickets for students to experience the performing; and to remove financial means as a barrier to receiving >>

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hands-on training and work experience in the performing arts through internships and mentorships for local high school students.

Giving support to the community outreach and fundraising programs is Rosalie Wasser, the youngest and most recent to join the staff. She joined one day after graduating from the University of Vermont last spring and she’ll also run the box office.

The show must go on!

The woman responsible for making sure everything is ready to go for a show is technical director Belinda Emerson, who has been with

the performing arts center since day one. She loves how subtle visual lighting changes can profoundly affect how a viewer responds to and experiences an event and the physical sensation when the lights “feel right.”

Emerson is the one who is truly behind the scenes, coordinating everything from the start of a show to the encore. n

A full schedule of performances, from ice dancing to magic to music, is set for the winter season. For ongoing updates, go to sprucepeakarts.org/calendar and see our calendar below.

SPRUCE PEAK ARTS CENTER

SPRUCE PEAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

122 Hourglass Drive, Spruce Peak at Stowe Mountain Resort. sprucepeakarts.org. (802) 760-4634.

Friday, November 25

Jason Bishop: Magic and Illusion Award-winning sleight of hand, exclusive grand illusions, and close-up magic projected onto a huge movie screen. 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday, December 3

SUNY Plattsburgh Gospel Choir: ‘A Soulful Christmas’

The 40-voice choir and seven-piece band take on several Motown Christmas tunes such as the Temptations’ version of “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer,” “Silent Night,” and Nat King-Cole’s “The Christmas Song,” among other Christmas classics. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, December 8

An Evening with Martin Sexton Acclaimed singer-songwriter known for his incendiary live show, honest lyrics, and vocal prowess. 8 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday, December 10 – 11

Elan Ballet Theater: ‘Clara Dreams!’ Clara helps her Nutcracker defeat the Mouse King, and journeys to the Land of the Sweets, where she is entertained by the Sugar Plum Fairy and her royal court. 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, December 17

Liberty Stand-up with Tony Deyo, Kerri Louise, and MC Shaun Eli

Trio of popular comedians from late-night TV & Comedy Central. 7 p.m.

Wednesday, December 28, 5 p.m.

Jazz at the Peak

Join Aran Bedrosian, Jake Whitesell, Peter Schmeeckle, and Kenny Dunbar for this eclectic improvised journey to the stratosphere and back. 5 p.m.

Saturday, January 14

Mountainfilm on Tour: Stowe

Selection of culturally rich, adventure-packed, and inspiring documentary films curated from the Mountainfilm festival in Telluride, Colo. Films inlude “Like A River,” “Janwaar,” “Annapurna,” “This is Beth,” “Midair,” “Fight or Flight,” “Ibach,” “Stranger at the Gate,” and “Fuel.” 7 p.m.

Saturday, January 28

Liberty Stand-up with Tony Deyo, Kerri Louise, and MC Shaun Eli

Trio of popular comedians from late-night TV & Comedy Central. 7 p.m.

Saturday, February 4

Jazz at the Peak

Join Vermont jazzers Rich Davidian, Dave Ellis, Ira Friedman, Glendon Ingalls, and Peter Schmeeckle for an evening of classic jazz. 5 p.m.

Saturday, February 18

American Heartbeat Spruce Peak Chamber Music Society musicians showcase influences in American music from American composers paired with immigrant composers’ unforgettable storytelling in music. 7 p.m.

Saturday, February 25

Liberty Stand-up with Tony Deyo, Kerri Louise, and MC Shaun Eli

Trio of popular comedians from late-night TV & Comedy Central. 7 p.m.

Saturday, March 11

Jazz at the Peak

Join Peter Schmeeckle and his quintet in a tribute to the music of the Jazz Messengers. 5 p.m.

Thursday, March 16

‘Cross that River: A Black Cowboy Musical’ Award-winning musician Allan Harris wrote “Cross That River” to tell the untold story of the Black West and to empower Americans with an inspiring story of hope and freedom. 7 p.m.

Saturday, March 25

Vienna 19th-centry Hausmusik

An evening of Viennese music with the Spruce Peak Chamber Music Society. 7 p.m.

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STOWE PEOPLE

If you’re going to have a musical instrument in your home, chances are it will be a piano, even if it only serves to display family photos. Not so for Peter Schmeeckle. He grew up in a house where the family’s musical instrument, dead center in the living room, was a drum set.

“My older brother played guitar and he wanted to jam,” Schmeeckle said. “So, my father bought a drum set. I was drafted into being the family drummer, and even though I didn’t live with my

father anymore, he supported me in my drumming pursuits. He took me to see Herbie Higgins at Jazz Alley in Seattle. Cedar Walton was there, and Higgins was playing with him. Music was a connection I had with my dad.”

Schmeeckle grew up in Barre in a musical family before moving to Seattle, then to LA where he went to high school and played in several garage bands and the high school marching band. He returned to

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MUSIC CENTER STORY & PORTRAIT / KATE CARTER >>
‘I’m actually a jazz trumpeter trapped in drummer’s body’

1593 Pucker Street (Route 100N), Stowe 802-253-4157 stowefamilydentistry.com

Seattle to attend the University of Washington, where he got his bachelor’s in jazz studies and his master’s in music.

He plays many instruments, not just drums, and trumpet is his favorite. “I’m actually a jazz trumpeter trapped in a drummer’s body. I also play guitar and sing.”

While finishing college, Schmeeckle taught snowboarding, and that passion brought him back to Vermont. He got a job teaching snowboarding at Stowe Mountain Resort, but music was always present in his life, and in 2015 he opened Stowe Music Center, now located on Route 100 south of Stowe, above The Kids’ School, where he gives private lessons on multiple instruments.

“I teach local kids and bring them together to play. Some of my students played in the first Stowe Jazz Festival. Their group was called Black Diamond and they played all over the area.”

He also brought together another band, the Skeleton Keys. “Those kids were good, but the pandemic blew up that band and they all went their separate ways.”

Like so many artists, the pandemic also put Schmeeckle out of work. He rode out it out with the help of unemployment relief and teaching people to snowboard.

His goals shifted to keeping jazz alive in Stowe, and he teamed up with Stowe Vibrancy to produce the inaugural “Indigenous Peoples’ Day Rocks!” The event gave locals something to replace the holiday formerly known as Columbus Day.

At the same time, Vermont Jazz Trio was born, with jazz pianist Remi Savard of Montpelier, double bassist Jeremy Hill of Waterbury, and Schmeeckle on percussion. They played Stowe Vibrancy’s Main Street Live, jam-session brunches at The Round Hearth, and other gigs in the area, often with guest artists likes guitarist Paul Asbell, trumpeter Tom Morse, saxophonist Marty Fogel, who played with Lou Reed, and Bill Pierce, a nationally renowned sax player who was part of the legendary Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers in the 1980s.

During COVID-19, Schmeeckle, whose idols are Beethoven and Miles Davis, began working on a rock opera about Ethan Allen and the birth of Vermont.

“The opera has seven or eight themes that get recycled—Ethan Allen, Henry Knox, Benedict Arnold, George Washington, even Hamilton, Ann Story, Remember Baker, and Desire Baker. I work on the opera anywhere

and everywhere and am happiest working with a pen and an X-acto blade to erase mistakes. It’s my happy place,” Schmeeckle said.

Meanwhile, Schmeeckle is back jamming with other musicians and building up his private teaching, his primary source of income, and has about a dozen students and a few ensembles.

“I love Stowe, the mountain, ski school. I feel like I’m at home here, with a nice base of

families that keep me going and I’m always looking for new students. Bands come and go, but it’s still fun to create a new band and to also record new music with old friends.”

For Schmeeckle, it’s all about the music.

“Music feeds the spirit. As things crumbled away and disappeared from my life, music was always there. I’m not making a killing teaching, but I love my job. I love to perform, and I also like writing and composing. Being in a band is fun, it’s like being on a good soccer team, with everyone and everything jamming. It can heal, make you forget troubles, plus, it’s physical. Good music feels good. Teaching wasn’t what I set out to do, I’m still a performer, but I do enjoy working with the students.”

As for the future, Schmeeckle has embarked on a new venture with Spruce Peak Arts.

“Jazz at the Peak: Stolen Moments” will feature three different jazz performances at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center this winter. The first is Wednesday, Dec. 28 with Aram Bedrosian, Jake Whitesell, and Kenny Dunbar. (More at sprucepeakarts.org). n

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PETER SCHMEECKLE Peter Schmeeckle, Remi Savard, Jeremy Hill.
ALWAYS WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS BEAUTIFUL SMILES FOR MORE THAN 40 YEARS hellbrookink.com @hellbrookink SISTER-OWNED TATTOOS, ART AND PERMANENT MAKEUP
CELEBRATING 33 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE Joëlle Blouin • Acrylic Silmar • Acrylic
Westphalen • Photograph
Jim

‘she leaves the light on’

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Artist Sue Gilkey finds quiet beauty in the ordinary
STORY : avalon styles-ashley | PORTRAITS : gordon miller | CANVASES : sue gilkey
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m July Waterlilies, oil, 26"x26"

ust less than 3,000 miles from where half her heart lives in an Irish cottage by the sea, artist Sue Gilkey sat at her kitchen table in Stowe, gazing at a canvas she’d painted of her palelashed Irish neighbor, Victor, the cow.

He and his cohort often lumber past her cottage—something many Vermonters can relate to. It’s one of the things Gilkey, 64, loves about her new home in Vermont, where she’s often dreamed of living, and Ireland, a place that changed her life as an artist 12 years ago.

“It takes a while to understand what you’re doing as an artist, your process, your journey,” Gilkey said. “I used to think that paintings

should fly off the brush. Sometimes they do, if I start a painting and I’m fresh as a daisy it can fly, but then I realized that paintings don’t always do that. Some can be struggles and that’s OK too.”

An impressionist oil painter soaked through to the bone, Gilkey’s canvases each emanate a soft glow, some carrying a feeling almost mystical, but not quite magical, despite their humble settings: a blue bedroom cast in shadow, golden hour on a summer porch, a girl walking through a field of wild garlic.

Like the romantics of old, wandering lonely as a cloud, Gilkey seems to find endless beauty in ordinary things, equally entranced by Victor as she is by the water lilies in the pond behind her home.

Humble beginnings

Gilkey has always known she wanted to be an artist—this she answers immediately—and since receiving her Bachelor of Fine Arts

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m Hillside Laundry,
oil, 11"x18"
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“AS AN ARTIST, IT’S A LIFELONG JOURNEY. YOU NEVER REALLY MAKE IT: YOU’RE ON YOUR WAY.”
—Sue Gilkey

degree at the University of New Hampshire and doing post-grad work at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, she has painted consistently and taught classes out of her studio.

Still, she’s not naive to the trials required to break into the field, advocate for oneself, and be successful. Her notion of success, whatever that means, has also changed as she’s grown older.

“When I was younger, I would get some accolade and I would think, ‘Oh, I’ve made it.’ But as an artist, it’s a lifelong journey. You never really make it: you’re on your way,” Gilkey said.

A “sensitive and shy” artist when she was first starting, Gilkey eventually moved into teaching for 26 years before a trip to Ireland lit a new spark in her career.

“What I love about (Ireland) is there are so many stories there. The landscape is just thick with history and shape, it’s just beautiful. Everywhere you look there is something to paint,” she said.

Scenes of County Cork started appearing on her canvases and more people began buying her paintings. Now she has two home galleries, one in Ireland where she and her husband own a cottage, and one at Gallery Antonia on the Cape in Massachusetts.

Gilkey isn’t one to toot her own horn, but when she does volunteer an accomplishment—receiving awards at the American Artist Professional League and the Guild of Boston Artists or having her work chosen as a flagship painting for the Salmagundi Club’s Centennial exhibit—she appears more excited than boastful.

Fellow artists in her life echoed this sentiment: Gilkey is modest, but her paintings seem to speak for themselves.

One of her peers, Lauren Pizzi, has known Gilkey over half her life and considers the artist a mentor, teacher, and friend.

The pair met in 1996 when, at 11 years old, Pizzi began taking painting classes from Gilkey. That first class turned out to be a “pivotal” moment for her, Pizzi said, acknowledging that she’s known she wanted to be an artist since she was little but that something clicked in Gilkey’s studio.

“I remember just watching her stir up the colors on the pallete. I’m a little kid thinking, ‘She’s a magician.’ The way she placed paint—it was just incredible,” Pizzi said.

Over the years, as a student and then as a friend, Pizzi has witnessed Gilkey’s style shift. She noticed a hint of narrative filtering into Gilkey’s paintings,

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Sue Gilkey in studio.
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The Kerry Girl, oil, 36"x22", private collection
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“I

WATCHING

more interior spaces, more figures, and changes in her process.

“She started slowing down more and editing as she painted. That takes a humongous amount of restraint and high intelligence to hone that editing eye,” Pizzi said.

Pizzi was drawn to one of her favorites, “Paris Hotel, 6 p.m.,” for the color and texture of a couch in the background before she noticed a man in the foreground, almost entirely obscured save for his arm leisurely resting on a chair, hand clasped around a glass.

“She’s got grit and dedication like no one I’ve ever met, but she keeps it to herself. She’s there under the radar,” Pizzi said. “She works hard and she’s so humble about it. I think her work speaks for itself. I think it’s great we’re still friends and I think Stowe deserves someone like her.”

That hint of narrative has ebbed into some of Gilkey’s work since Ireland, where she found herself surrounded by stories. One of her favorites was about a cottage she drives by on her way home that is always lit, even though no one lives there. After asking around, she learned that the tenant died but his niece still leaves a light on for him.

That led her to paint, “She Leaves the Light On,” a soft night scene of the cottage that manages to convey a dim sleepiness without the menace of total darkness. The moon shines full over the tranquil countryside, beams joining with the soft orange glow from the niece’s light.

In addition to pieces that have been inspired by narrative, Gilkey’s portfolio includes landscapes, interior scenes, still lives, figures, nautical scenes, and more.

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“When I think of Sue, I think of her wide range. It’s just really wonderful,” said Domonic Boreffi, gallery owner at Gallery Antonia where Gilkey has shown her work since 2011. “She’s one of my top few artists here. I think it’s because of that.” REMEMBER JUST
HER STIR UP THE COLORS ON
THE PALLETE, I’M A LITTLE KID THINKING, ‘SHE’S A MAGICIAN.’ THE WAY SHE PLACED PAINT—IT WAS JUST INCREDIBLE.”
Story continues p.124 / art on p.122
—Lauren Pizzi

m Solitude, oil, 24"x26"

m Beltane, oil, 23"x26", private collection

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Victor, oil, private collection k
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FINDING A HOME

Sue Gilkey has lived in Stowe with her husband since 2019 but has longed for the tranquil peace of Vermont’s rolling green hills, quiet, cold winters and, yes, the abundance of cows, for years.

When she was in the third grade, Gilkey recalled doing a school project about the states and specifically choosing Vermont.

“I think I’ve always wanted to live here,” she said. She prefers the tranquility of nature and is perhaps more comfortable helping birth a calf or swimming in the Green River Reservoir than in a bustling city. That’s pretty perfect for the Green Mountain State which, like Gilkey, seems to recognize the beauty in ordinary things.

Quiet beauty

Recently, Gilkey’s range has led her back to one of her true loves: flowers. She’s taken to studying the horde of water lilies that grow in her pond in Stowe, although she is not just a water lily painter—Gilkey emphasizes this, not wanting to be boxed in—but, god, can she paint them.

It’s easy to compare her to Claude Monet (one of her favorites), who was similarly fascinated with the flower, but Gilkey’s soft brush strokes and blending of colors, blushing purples and blues, seem uniquely her own. Everything feels a bit quieter and a bit duskier, like her pond is deeper than her audience can see and holding some mystery.

She also seems more interested in the space between the lilies than the flowers themselves, observing every shimmering layer of color along the surface of the water.

Monet inspires her not only on the canvas but also through his writing.

“I read a lot of his letters. It’s fascinating that he was always so unsatisfied with what he was doing, and I think, wow, a lot of artists question themselves. It’s refreshing to know even someone like him wasn’t sure he was doing anything good,” Gilkey said.

That humility is something Boreffi noted as well, adding that Gilkey’s attention to detail and ability to envision the whole painting, beyond just color or subject matter, is part of what makes her such a stellar artist.

“As a person she’s just so generous and lovely,” he said. “The whole look of what she’s doing is quality. She thinks about those other components, the frame, the canvas, making it a total package. That’s the professional artist side of her.”

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The two have worked together for over a decade and in that time Boreffi has consistently sold her work—he never says no when she brings him a selection.

“The work I’ve seen throughout the years is so versatile,” he said. “Her interiors are so gorgeous. I’m always asking her for more. Whenever she gives me them, they sell.”

Aside from her impressionist inspirations

like Monet, John Singer Sargent, Anders Zorn, and Vermont painter Richard Schmid, Gilkey also often feels inspired by the spirit of her late grandfather.

Not an artist, but an engineer and a musician, her grandfather had an amazing talent for the saxophone and was one of the first to provide her with art materials.

“I can remember when we were little, we

would go out to the Maine coast and walk along on the rocks. He would say, ‘That one looks like an elephant, doesn’t it? Well, let’s make it an elephant.’ And we would draw an elephant on the rocks. He just was a creative spirit.” n

More at suegilkey.com.

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m Angeline in the Forest, oil, 28"x24", private collection
127 57 Mountain Rd. Across from the covered walking bridge Stowe • 802-253-8319 fun@stowetoys.com nancyteed@comcast.net STOWETOYS.COM TOYS AND TREATS FOR ALL AGES FROM THE RIDICULOUS TO THE SUBLIME! From tender lovies for the newborn to ninja lines for the adventurous to crystal pendants for the mystical 46 YEARS OLD AND STILL GROWING! HAVING A BIRTHDAY? Stop by to get a FREE balloon!

WHO’S A GREAT DOG?

Every dog is a good dog and that’s why they deserve Bellcate School Dog Treats—all natural, non-GMO, no preservatives, eco-friendly, and made in Vermont. With names like Peanut Butter Pumpkin, Carrot Beet Spinach, and Maple Moose, they could pass as human snacks. But the heart and soul of Bellcate School’s dog treats go way beyond the pups. Students in special education with disabilities need meaningful education and employment and Bellcate provides that. Students mix, bake, package, label, and distribute all the treats as part of Bellcate’s progressive employment model. When you buy Bellcate School Dog Treats for your BDF, you support students with special needs. It’s a win win, so woof woof!

INFO: bellcateschooldogtreats.com

TRAVEL POSTERS

You’ve probably seen them. They are everywhere. People adore them and the latest trend is to decorate every Airbnb in Vermont with them. They are Vermont Travel Posters, faux vintage posters by Vermont artist Kevin Ruelle. Ruelle uses watercolors, oils, charcoal to create the originals, and then makes prints using archival inks on archival paper and canvas. His themes run the gamut, from seasons to sports to locations to nature, with Vermont (and a few other locations) as the binding theme. They are colorful, moody, reminiscent, endearing. No wonder everyone loves them. Prices range from $39 to $165 depending on the size, with or without matte and frame.

INFO: vermont-travel-poster.square.site

LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE

Three buds—mothers, daughters, sisters—believe in the healing power of plants for body, mind, spirit, and scent. That’s why they formed Three Buds Apothecary in Waitsfield. Their hand-poured vegan soy candles will give you light, warm your soul, and delight your sense of smell. All their products, including candles, skin serums, bath salts, and some special lubricants, are made from botanical-based ingredients, some of which are CBD-infused, and certified organic essential oils. The huge array of wildly and mildly scented candles come in two sizes of reusable, attractive jars, so once you’ve burned one down to the stump, you can reuse the jar it came in. So, when you’re feeling dark, light up a Three Buds candle and breathe.

INFO: three-buds.com

If you want to get really Vermont-y and folksy, look no further than the Shaker-inspired Vermont folk rocker. Their rockers provide a gentle, even movement, and a secure feeling as you rock back, and they are as visually appealing as they are comforting. The rockers come in two sizes—regular and tall-wide—and accom modate most body types. The “weave” construction allows for form-molding to your own body, making them incredibly comfortable. Vermont Folk Rockers are made to last for generations and are the perfect wedding gift, housewarming, or for new parents. Knitters appreciated the rocker for its thoughtfully designed arm rests. Beware … once you start rocking you might not stop.

INFO: vermontfolkrocker.com

Have a product you’d like us to feature? Send us, not your sales rep, a two-sentence description of why our readers need to know to news@stowereporter.com.

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FOUND IN VERMONT

TICKLE YOUR PICKLE

Pickles and booze, what could be a better flavor combo? Not sure? Then try a Tipsy Pickle! They collaborate with a variety of Vermont brewers and distillers to create handmade pickles with unique flavors. Each style reflects the booze they get pickled in. The alcohol is cooked out, so even minors can topple into these crunchy nuggets. Tipsy Pickles are made using as many fresh and local ingredients as possible.

There are 24 flavors, including savory-sour Heady Pickles, with a taste of hops, vinegar, cucumbers, garlic, dill, pickling spices and, of course, Alchemist Brewery’s Heady Topper. Bourbon Barrel Aged Rum Pickles are bread-and-butter pickles made with apple cider vinegar, cucumbers, pickling spices, sugar, and Smugglers’ Notch Distillery’s bourbon barrel-aged rum. Wow, now those have some serious kick.

INFO: thetipsypickle.com. Available at the Smugglers’ Notch Distillery, Stowe Cider, Edelweiss, and Stowe Public House.

129 COMPILED BY KATE CARTER / COURTESY PHOTOS
Beautiful Variety of YARNS Classes • Workshops • Events 80 S. Main St Waterbury, VT (802) 241­2244 Friendly Fiber Community

WILDCRAFTER AT HEART

Herbalist hones hyper-local healing

As if decorated by a kindly magpie with a penchant for plants, the inside of the Rogue Herbalist apothecary feels like a cozy living room.

Scattered among the herbal tinctures, teas, and other remedies are prints by local artists, sparkly rocks, incense cones, a handmade wreath gifted from a client, a Green Mountain Boys flag, and a print of a wizard discovered at the Waterbury Flea Market. In the spring and summer, the garden out front bursts with chamomile, lavender, rosemary, marsh mallow, and wormwood—herbs that business owner and herbalist Charles “Chuck’ Riffenburg, often uses in teas for his clients.

Heady vibes? A little, but in the best of ways, and it’s backed up by Riffenburg, a Castleton native, whose knowledge of herbs and plantbased medicine is no joke.

His goal to restore the tradition of local apothecary shops goes beyond just reconnecting communities with nature and involving them in their

own healing, but extends to every aspect of his business. As seen by the presence of community in the physical store—the handwritten thank you notes, the stock of products from area farmers and herbalists—part of that happens through local relationships.

“It used to be that people were a lot more connected to the land. That still survives but it’s definitely been fractured,” Riffenburg said. “The goal is to bring back the local apothecary and regenerate that spirit. Morrisville is a good place to do it. There is a strong community of natural healing here.”

If you haven’t heard the term apothecary since you read “Romeo & Juliet” in high school, here’s a little refresher: Arising in early modern Europe before being established as a profession in the 1600s, apothecaries once functioned similar to how pharmacies do now in terms of the mixing, dispensing, and sale of medicines. However, apothecaries, which

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TEA FOR THE TILLERMAN Charles Riffenburg in his shop, Rogue Herbalist, an apothecary in Morrisville village. Riffenburg weighs some loose leaf tea for a customer.

refer both to the store and the profession, additionally dealt in diagnosis and determination of treatment, according to the Center for the History of Medicine at Harvard.

As a local herbalist, Riffenburg strives to meet with patients and treat the whole person using natural remedies such as teas, salves, plant tinctures and syrups, CBD, and a myriad of other products. He often personalizes treatment for clients based on their needs, whether their shoulder hurts when they wake up in the morning, they’re having trouble sleeping, or a bad bout with the coronavirus has left their throat raw from coughing.

“People like that it’s customizable. They feel you’re taking the time to make something just for them,” Riffenburg said. One client just came in the other day after taking Riffenburg’s sweet fern cough syrup, saying it “worked like a dream!”

Josh Corn, a naturopathic doctor at Stowe Natural Family Wellness who often works

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with Riffenburg, referring patients back and forth, confirmed the popularity of sweet fern cough syrup, in addition to other products, adding that the practice keeps selling out and that they’ve doubled their orders.

“Chuck is very smart and well educated about what he’s doing,” Corn, who taught a class with Riffenburg last spring about detoxification, said. “He’s helping to expand what people think of as medicine.”

Riffenburg is not a doctor but studies and uses plants to create medicinal or therapeutic remedies, often working with physicians in the area like Corn and fellow naturopath Morgan DeVoe, also at Stowe Natural Family Wellness.

As Riffenburg explains, “If I get hit by a car, I want emergency technology to save my life, but for the most part plants and herbs can do so much, it’s remarkable.”

Other ways he’s using local connection in his business is through materials—some-

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thing that he believes makes for better medicine as well as community. For instance, the water he uses to make many remedies is local maple water gathered through the reverse osmosis process; all the honey he uses is locally harvested; and many of the other products he stocks are made by fellow Vermont-based herbalists.

“It’s hyper-local. I love that, and I think a lot of patients really resonate with that. It’s pretty beneficial to have medicine that comes from where you live,” Corn said.

Riffenburg also doesn’t claim to be a master herbalist, shying away from the idea of being perfect at anything.

“You’re never a master of anything, especially something like this. There are so many plants in the world and there is so much to learn in terms of human health. It’s always changing, we’re always learning,” he said.

Riffenburg has a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and religion from Flagler College, and over the past decade has taken various classes in herbalism, botany, wildcrafting or foraging, human nutrition, and more. He also holds a family herbalist certification from the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism.

In addition to growing his retail operation,

Riffenburg hopes to hold more workshops like the one he taught with Corn and to launch an herb certification course. Putting agency and knowledge back into people’s hands and gar-

dens is an important part of his goal.

“I want people to come here to the shop all the time, but I also want people to grow and learn for themselves,” he said. n

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INDULG

The Stowe area boasts a variety of cuisines and dining atmospheres, from swanky bistros that embrace the local food movement to fine-dining establishments featuring award-winning chefs and busy pubs with the latest microbrews—and everything in between! Check out the area’s great places to stay, as well, from full-service resorts to quaint country inns. Our guide to dining and lodging outlines the myriad choices from which to choose.

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MAGAZINE ARCHIVES
STOWE

BRITISH INVASION

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>> MEAT PIE, ANYONE? English pastry takes center stage at Piecemeal Pies
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Piecemeal Pie flavors include rabbit and bacon, smoked trout and fennel, chicken and leek, and pork and parsnip.

There is a certain architectural sensibility re-quired to successfully construct the traditional English hand pie.

The circular walls and round floor of buttery pastry must have the strength to bear the pie’s hardy filling while retaining some moisture and savoriness after it exits the oven, golden brown.

Its ceiling, crimped into place atop the pie, must be thick and sturdy enough to resist the filling’s natural compulsion to stream up and outward while remaining vulnerable to the thwack or dig of the devourer’s fork.

Keeping this in mind, the transition from his former life as an architect to chef for Piecemeal Pie’s executive chef Justin Barrett is a more

organic one than it might first appear.

“I feel like architecture and cooking are both very sort of equally right brain, left brain,” Barrett said. “There is that room for creativity, but also you have to work within the confines of physics and chemistry.”

Barrett may have left the drawing table behind over a decade ago, but he carried over a sense of precision and mathematical acuity. He worked with April Bloomfield at The Spotted Pig, her celebrated, Michelin-rated restaurant, but it was a sojourn to serve with London restaurant legend Fergus Henderson—himself a son of architects—that would shape Barrett’s culinary voice.

Henderson made his own mark on the London food scene in the nineties pioneering a “nose to tail” food ethic at his restaurant, St. John, a philosophy of food whose fingerprints can be found all over Barrett’s cooking.

After returning stateside, Barrett opened The Fat Radish in Manhattan with two young British chefs, an experience he described as his “upbringing in the food world.” The highly competitive restaurant scene in the city that never sleeps and the slim margins endemic to it prompted him to turn his attention northward.

“I was in Manhattan for three years and I couldn’t even afford to buy a tomato at the >>

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farmers market for myself,” Barrett said. “So, I moved up here and spent a couple of years farming, learning how to raise food, how to grow stuff. I feel like it’s important for a chef to know the difference in germination time between a carrot seed and a radish seed.”

In the rocky New England soil, his newfound closeness to organic food systems and the important lessons of his culinary career fermented. After opening a restaurant in Maine, he turned his attention to Vermont, where he opened the Piecemeal Pies in White River Junction in 2016.

From there, the path to opening another pie place in Stowe seemed nearly as direct as the route up Interstate 89 that connects the two towns.

Barrett found a warm reception to his English delights at the annual British Invasion car show and a restaurant scene that could be accommodating to an unconventional restaurant that blends modern sensibility with the ubiquitous foodstuffs of a former foreign empire.

After a pandemic and supply chain woes waylaid its opening, Barrett’s meticulous renovation of the former Carriage House on Main Street—which he designed himself, of course—opened in fall 2022.

Proto-hand pie recipes have been identified by historians in Richard II’s 14th century court and even as far back as classical Roman cookbooks,

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EDIBLES
NOSE TO TAIL Justin Barrett shaped his culinary voice at The Spotted Pig and his own Fat Radish, both in Manhattan.
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but its modern iteration took shape in the 18th century, according to Victorian historian Annie Gray in a survey of the subject in “Serious Eats.”

Each region of England has its own variation and tradition of meat pies, but Barrett’s pies are a beast all their own, and certainly a far cry from the often stodgy pork pies mass produced in that country.

Take Piecemeal Pies flagship offering, for example. What the knife reveals within the rabbit and bacon pie feels like a hat trick, wherein a meat and vegetable stew has been suspended. Despite its tenderness, there is not one drop of excess moisture that would endanger the structural integrity of its pastry encasement.

The filling comes about when rabbits are braised in chicken stock and wine with locally sourced bacon, onions, garlic, potatoes, carrots, and a bushel of thyme before being poured over soaked prunes. The rabbit bones are then roasted to pitch black and made into a rich stock with cider, which is then made into gravy.

The result is a confluence of form and flavor both hearty and heartwarming, an ideal balm for Vermont’s cold, dark evenings.

Though Barrett was initially worried a rabbit pie might appear too gamey to uncertain American palettes, his worries were quickly dispelled. The pie also fits snugly within his matrix of sustainability and delectability.

“We get basically this farmer’s large rabbits that restaurants don’t normally want, and we are able to get them at a lower price point,” he said. “The farmer also then gets money for something he spent resources raising but might not be able to easily sell.”

Whether it’s the rabbit and bacon pie or Piecemeal Pies’ other enticing offerings—curried lamb, pork and parsnip, beef, mushroom and blue cheese, trout and fennel, and more—each filling follows a similar through line of remarkable flavor and tenderness without excess moisture.

Each is also encased within the same circular crust, which can be cracked through and eaten with its ingredients, or its walls pulled down to be used as a delivery mechanism for the filling itself.

Sausage rolls, another English everyman food available at shops and small markets throughout the United Kingdom, see new heights at Piecemeal Pies. Even the massive cookies in the shop display case with their crispy lattice exterior and soft chewy interior are indicative of Barrett’s commitment to an attention to detail that sets his menu apart.

“That’s the sort of level of pride we take in even the simplest of things, and that’s something I don’t really talk about enough. It’s just how we do it,” Barrett said. n

142 EDIBLES
LIGHT, AIRY Barrett, an architect, meticulously renovated the former Carriage House on Stowe’s Main Street to house his new restaurant.
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WOOD-FIRED American Flatbread opens ovens in Stowe EDIBLES
STORY
PIZZA PIE! Michael Burnett takes a fresh baked pie out of the wood-fired oven at American Flatbread’s new location in Stowe.

NAILED IT

American Flatbread lit its clay ovens on Mountain Road this fall, bringing the uniquely Vermont cuisine to the slopes of Stowe.

The Waitsfield-born brand opened where Mark Frier and Chad Fry’s Tres Amigos once served up unconventional taco variations, and where the beloved Rusty Nail music venue long operated.

The $2.1 million purchase was made in March 2022 by Third Place, a restaurant group that owns the American Flatbread Burlington location and a collection of other breweries and restaurants. It officially opened in September.

The restaurant’s menu is a carbon copy of its Burlington location’s offerings, with Third Place following an “if it’s not broke, don’t fix it” mentality. An extensive list of wood-fired, not-quite-pizzas are its centerpiece.

American Flatbread was founded by George Schenk, who came from Connecticut but watched his grandmother cook in her wood-fired oven on her Northeast Kingdom dairy farm in his childhood.

After developing an interest in Alice Waters’ New American cuisine movement in the 1970s, being exposed to the proto-pizza flatbread while traveling in France, and experimenting with stone and clay wood-fired ovens, Schenk opened the first American Flatbread on Lareau Farm in Waitsfield in 1985.

Schenk established himself as an early leader in the wood-fired pizza craze that would only grow in popularity and a willing avatar for the organic, farmto-table aesthetic that would come to characterize Vermont dining over the next several decades.

Schenk developed and popularized his brand of wood-fired flatbread through the 1990s at festivals and culinary events. The original location

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The new eatery lives in the spot last occupied by Tres Amigo, which for decades was home to the famed Rusty Nail Nightclub. Manager Ben Hamilton

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was decimated by flooding in the summer of 1998 but bounced back.

In the 2000s, American Flatbread undertook a broader expansion. Third Place formed in 2002 to help open the Bobcat Café in Bristol and the second American Flatbread location in Middlebury in 2003, which was eventually sold back to Schenk. It was that year that American Flatbread also entered frozen food aisles for the first time.

Bill Davis, who joined Third Place’s board after the group purchased his Idletyme restaurant, owned the Rusty Nail before its purchase by Fry and Frier and has now returned to be involved in the location once again.

According to executive Rob Downey, Third Place had long been in the market for a Stowe location. When the Tres Amigos location came up for sale, the restaurant group pounced.

“We’ve got some more visions for where we want to take the space, but you can only do so much. What we’ve got there is what we thought we could handle right away, from a sort of financial and staffing standpoint,” Downey said. “It feels like the right fit. The start has been great. The community has been so welcoming.”

After extensive renovations, plans for the cavernous chamber that formerly housed the Rusty Nail nightclub are still up in the air, though new electric car chargers have been installed in the gravel lot in partnership with Stowe Electric.

“We’re looking at a range of options,” Downey said. “All those options have a price tag on them. So, we’re trying to weigh all that. One thing that we have in Burlington at the Flatbread there is a brew pub, so we’re likely to repeat that idea.” n

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HOT COALS! Pizzas bake in the oven, popularized by founder George Schenk, who first opened Flatbread in the Mad River Valley.

patience & process

How Idletyme Brewing Company broke with the past, created a new future STORY : aaron calvin | PHOTOGRAPHS : gordon miller

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Like other restaurants in Stowe, the United States, and the world, the COVID-19 pandemic threatened to bring everything about Idletyme Brewing Company’s operation to a screeching halt.

But unlike other restaurants, Idletyme would never close its doors, not for a day.

“March 17, 2020, at 2 p.m., the governor said everybody had to close without any real guidance as far as what was going to happen after that,” said John Neville, Idletyme general manager. “We reopened the next day at noon for to-go service.”

“We sat down when the news came out that we had to close,” assistant general manager C.J. Grimes said about that fateful day. “We looked each other in the eyes, and we said, ‘Do we try to stay open this entire time?’ Then, ‘Let’s do this.’

The pandemic threatened to destroy everything Neville and Grimes had worked to build since their arrival at Idletyme in 2019: The efficiencies and systems that helped them impose consistency and quality on the 300-top, open-seven-days-a-week space that serves, on average, 1,200 people a day during the tourist seasons, and the decade-plus that then-owners Bill and Charla Davis spent constructing the restaurant’s identity from scratch.

All of it was suddenly in jeopardy.

Instead of closing operations at one of Stowe’s largest dine-in operations for even a single day, Neville, Grimes, the Davises, and Idletyme’s cast of over 100 employees pivoted on the fly to a takeout-only operation.

Neville and Grimes continued to cook, clean, and man the registers when staff was furloughed in the initial total lockdown phase of the pandemic. They cut regular supply orders drastically with no way to predict

what the demand for takeout would be and hoped those suppliers would be as reactive to the situation as they were.

When Idletyme reopened its back patio, which was expanded during the pandemic summer to accommodate more seating, normal profits had dipped by nearly 70 percent during the first few months of the unprecedented health crisis.

In a testament to the restaurant’s relationship with the Stowe community and the strength of its employee retention programs, Idletyme not only navigated and survived early pandemic uncertainty, but readapted when restrictions were lifted a year later after the release of the COVID-19 vaccine, despite the supply chain issues and labor problems that hobbled or closed some other restaurants.

No one knows how long sought, how challenging the process to build Idletyme’s success was better than the Davises, who had been seeking sustainable profitability since the closing of The Shed a decade before the pandemic hit.

“It’s been an example of a lot of hard work and management,” Bill Davis said. “It’s not an easy business, seven days a week, but we’re pretty proud of how far we’ve come.”

The road forward

The road to Idletyme began with the closing of The Shed.

The iconic Stowe bar and restaurant, originally built as a blacksmith’s shop, was a local’s local hangout run by Ken and Kathy Strong, with a cadre of regulars made up of the town’s most recognizable residents. And it closed in 2011 after nearly a half century.

Davis had made a substantial personal investment into the restaurant over the years, first to help the Strongs get back on their feet after a fire decimated the structure in 1994 and again in 2006 when creditors

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LAGER, ANYONE? In a region where IPA is king, lager is the foundational plank of brewmaster Will Gilson’s craft brewing, all done on-site.
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prepared to foreclose, giving the Strongs a five-year runway to make the place profitable.

“The last thing I wanted to do after retiring in 2010 was to have a restaurant; it was not my intent,” Davis said. “I tried to help Ken Strong out. The restaurant was too big. He didn’t have enough volume, didn’t have enough business. So regretfully, I ended up with a building that I had to figure out.”

The massive size of the building is both its strongest attribute and its greatest problem for anyone looking to run a profitable restaurant in a mercurial hospitality scene that lives and dies on the ebb and flow of seasonal tourism.

The Shed, which opened in 1965, first became a central node in Stowe public life at the turn of the 20th century as a cider mill and later a youth hostel, tennis camp, and gas station complex from which Idletyme eventually took its name.

After a contentious, emotional closing of The Shed, Davis reopened the space as Crop Bistro, where a New England Culinary Institute-trained executive chef presided over a farm-to-table operation with an on-site microbrewery.

Despite assurances that it would still be the place for locals to gather, the abrupt tonal shift from “dive” bar to bistro seemed to immediately alienate its former clientele. The bistro’s brief existence was marked by a revolving door for management and an uncertain identity.

Chip Haggerty, a 68-year-old waiter and veteran of the Stowe restaurant scene, had his first shift at The Shed the summer before it closed and remains employed at Idletyme. In the decade of transformations, large and small, at the Mountain Road restaurant, he’s seen it all and weathered its many changing winds.

“I sort of developed an attitude of like, ‘OK, I’m just hanging in there,” he said. “I got less and less worried every time (a management change) happened because I seemed to be surviving.”

In 2015, Charla and Bill Davis set aside their other businesses and turned full attention to the flagging Crop. They brought in Laura and Michael Kloeti, who had established their fine dining destination Michael’s on the Hill in Waterbury Center and who were already consulting with the Davises, to helm a full rebrand of the restaurant.

By renaming the restaurant Idletyme, the Kloetis looked to draw upon Stowe history and the location’s connection to one of its ski legends, Sepp Ruschp, who owned and operated the 1930s camp complex, and reinvigorate the local connection lost with Crop.

Will Gilson, who started brewing authentic German lager at the location in 2012 when it

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PARTY CENTRAL The outdoor bar, with two large dining areas, remains popular with guests even as the temperatures start to turn.

was still Crop Bistro, has also been a major contributor to the restaurant’s identity

“We wanted to have a place where people want to go every day, which is different from Michael’s on the Hill,” Laura Kloeti said. “People were used to going to The Shed, and there was such a rich history, and we wanted to continue that.”

Though the Kloetis departed after just two years, the Davises credit them with righting the ship and putting Idletyme on the course toward the profitability and stability it now enjoys.

“When it was Crop, it seemed like a lot of people felt it had turned into not so much of a local location. That was what a lot of people told us, that we were really going to have to prove that we changed it. So, I think we did succeed in turning that around,” Kloeti said.

An eagerness to succeed

Neville pulled into Idletyme’s gravel parking lot in the summer of 2019 as concrete was being poured for the expansion of the restaurant’s expansive outdoor back patio area.

The hospitality business is in Neville’s blood. His first job was bussing tables at his dad’s restaurant in his hometown of Trumbull, Conn. In 2002, he followed a girlfriend to Syracuse, N.Y.

Though the relationship didn’t pan out, he built a strong track record

managing restaurant-breweries and eventually met the woman he would marry. The couple has four children.

Neville was a finalist in Davis’ search to replace the Kloetis and finally fulfill his long-term vision for the restaurant. What put Neville over the top was his willingness to move his family to Stowe, where he would integrate into the community he hoped to make consistent customers.

Other newcomers without any real sense of the history had at times complicated Idletyme’s relationship with locals, so Neville just observed for a time before diving into creating new systems that would finally turn the business around.

Neville brought on Grimes, an engineer by trade who found himself pulled into the restaurant world through his family’s former ownership of the Stowehof Inn, to assist in making his vision a reality.

Grimes provided the local background that Neville lacked but also proved eager to implement productivity enhancing methods more commonly found in large franchise restaurants, which would prove essential to making Idletyme’s high-capacity, high-volume operation work.

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THE A-TEAM John Neville, left, general manager at Idletyme, and Jason Mercia, one of its managers. Like many restaurants in Stowe, Idletyme continues to do a brisk takeout business even with its dining rooms full of patrons.
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In a five-year plan for the restaurant, Grimes advocated for valuing consistency above all else.

Idletyme’s focus on affordable, new American comfort food has its quirks, with dishes like a Reuben sandwich that includes hot cherry peppers, but nothing changes on the menu if it can’t be consistently produced.

“That’s probably one of the hardest elements of all this, is that balance between wanting to have something that is going to get some ‘wow factor’ or really stand out and then be able to make sure that we can produce several 100 of those flawlessly every day for 126 days, consecutively,” Grimes said.

Neville put it a little more simply.

“We sell burgers, and we sell beer in the simplest form. That’s where we can pull off the kind of production that we do, because we keep it simple. There’s no need to overcomplicate things, there’s no need to try and be upscale. People want to come here and have a cold beer, have a good burger, or pasta or even a steak, and feel like they’re getting value for their meals, and be able to bring their kids,” he said.

This central tension of character and efficiency, what’s valued and how it’s executed is also part of the core question Neville posed when discussing the business of Idletyme.

“How do we accommodate 1,200 tourists on a Saturday afternoon and not alienate the 4,000 people who live in town?” Neville asked. “I think that’s a really difficult responsibility for anybody in town that runs a

restaurant, because you want the guy down the street who wants to come here on a Friday afternoon and have his beer be able to walk in and get a barstool and not have to wait 30 to 40 minutes for a seat.”

Like The Shed.

Thirst quenchers

Although Idletyme’s pandemic adaptability helped secure ongoing stability and success, the system Neville and Grimes have established is one of a million variables in need of navigating, from moving the outdoor guests inside when clouds begin to move across Mt. Mansfield to ensuring indoor and outdoor waitstaff see balanced service.

While Haggerty said he “floats on the surface” to an extent, he also said that the effect of the duo’s management policies could be immediately felt. Neville’s policy of community outreach and involvement with local organizations like Stowe Rotary was one he saw as particularly effective in ingratiating the restaurant with the community.

Neville credits his method of leading by example, of diving into work alongside cooks and dishwashers to make sure what needs doing gets done, as part of what inspires such dedication and teamwork among his staff, which allows Idletyme to avoid the complications of a contracting labor market. That, alongside thoughtful perks like scholarship money for young employees.

He also noted Gilson’s great expertise and craft producing lager in a region of the country where IPA is king as a foundational plank of Idletyme’s offerings.

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LOADS OF CHOICES

Idletyme offers a half dozen distinct dining areas, and three bars. Because the volume is so high, food offerings are kept simple to ensure quality and consistency. The Burgertyme burger features Angus beef, tomato, lettuce, candied bacon, fire-roasted jalapeño aioli and a cheddar fritter.

At one time, Neville and Gilson attempted to navigate the complex process of packaging and selling the beer using a mobile canner. After reaching the point where Idletyme needed every drop of the Helles and other brews produced by Gilson to quench the thirst of inhouse guests, they abandoned the project.

Stepping back

Turning 72 and with the worst of the pandemic in the rearview, Davis looked to take a step back from day-to-day ownership duties of Idletyme last year and sold the restaurant to the Third Place restaurant group, joining its board as a minority owner.

Third Place and its executive, Rob Downey, initially approached the Davises looking to expand their American Flatbread restaurant brand by taking over the Idletyme location, but the restaurant’s growth and profitability convinced them to eventually purchase the former Tres Amigos-Rusty Nail location down the road.

Since 2015, Charla Davis said, she and her husband played the role of undercover owner in monitoring Idletyme’s operations from the perspective of the average customer.

“If we wanted to get dinner there, we would actually call and do a takeout order, just as a customer would, or I would go online and do an order,” she said. “You find out so many things that you could do better just by sitting in the customer’s shoes.”

Though he declined to confirm hard numbers around the restaurant’s profitability, Bill Davis said Idletyme brought in three times the revenue that The Shed did in its final year.

“My view, as the owner, has been that it’s a total team effort,” he said. “It’s everybody from the kitchen—all the servers, bartenders, everybody—and one of the things that you have when you have a seven-day-a-week business, you have to have the team there that can make it happen every day.” n ••••

Read more about The Shed, “Ken Strong: The Shed, the stories, the times, the man,” at bit.ly/3U81Xu7; and “The Shed: Requiem for a skier’s bar,” at bit.ly/3zBaPjN.

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MODERN TIMES THEATER

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GRANGE STAGE Justin Lander and Rose Friedman, the founders and talent behind Modern Times Theater.
STORY / KATE CARTER >> DYLAN GRIFFIN
‘Our jokes will make everybody laugh’
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she sings and plays ukulele and tuba. He plays cornet, upright bass, and bicycle pump. This musical combo doesn’t seem particularly harmonic—it might even seem a bit strange, almost barnyard-like—but you’d be surprised what happens when a uke accompanies a cornet and the musicians are a couple whose goal is to make people of all ages laugh.

Justin Lander and Rose Friedman of East Hardwick are the heart and soul of Modern Times Theater, a comedy, puppetry, and music production company that provides light-hearted entertainment for all.

“We love to bring people together for a good, shared experience of laughter. Getting people in the same room who don’t necessarily agree with each other and wouldn’t be socializing together, we get them to laugh together. Laughter is one of the richer human emotions and there’s no replacement for it,” Lander said.

What the two really love is a full house of people of all ages and backgrounds in an historic or unexpected place. “We shy away from theaters, but love old town halls,” added Friedman. “Our style and the audiences we want to connect with is our focus. Our jokes will make everybody laugh.”

Friedman and Lander have pursued their mutual, but separate, goals of comedy since they first met while performing with Bread and Puppet Theater. It wasn’t until they were working in a nationwide touring company under the direction of Peter Schumann, the founder of Bread and Puppet, that their mutual interests deepened their relationship.

“We were both always trying to find ways to make something funnier,” said Friedman. “We realized we both wanted to continue theater work but also be rooted in East Hardwick. We had a desire to perform without traveling, which meant cultivating an audience by performing new and different shows in front of the same people. We wanted to be in touch with and serve an audience, and we both felt this really strongly.”

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THAT ’ S ENTERTAINMENT
AT TOP: BEANA BERN; OTHERS, MODERN TIMES THEATER
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STAGE DOOR A publicity still of Rose Friedman and Justin Lander during their pandemic tours of socially distanced, outdoor performances. At a 2022 Memorial Day appearance in Hardwick. The couple’s mobile stage. Lander against the backdrop of the puppet stage on the town green in Lyndonville.
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The two settled in East Hardwick on a homestead with beef cows, meat birds, laying hens, and a veggie garden. Now, over a decade later, they have Jo, 12, and Charlie, 7, who both make cameo appearances with their parents when the situation allows.

“We used to feed ourselves more completely, but lately, theater work and having kids, dogs, cats, chickens, and cows takes up a lot of time,” said Lander. As for getting the kids involved in performances, they have a structure of acts the kids can do if they want to.

“We never pressure them, if they want to perform, they can, and we take each show as it comes,” added Friedman.

Many people first become acquainted with Modern Times Theater when the duo performs with Vermont Vaudeville. Friedman and Lander are co-founders of Vermont Vaudeville with Brent and Maya McCoy. Twice a year they team up for a huge mobilization of vaudeville acts, performing several routines and shorts throughout Vermont.

But today, the work is mostly Modern Times Theater.

“Our performances are for the masses,” explained Friedman. “Circus, vaudeville, parade, affordable as opposed to more pricey opera, ballet, the Met, and other acts and venues not found in urban centers. Everything

we do now is related to theater work and teaching and promoting other events.”

When they first started Modern Times Theater in 2007, it was a revival of Friedman’s parent’s company. In the late 1970s, her parents, who lived in New York City, toured nationally for 10 years, performing acts mostly written by her father, Steve Friedman, and directed by her mother, Denny Partridge. Their professional name? Modern Times Theater.

When they started a family and stopped traveling, they also stopped performing and became involved in the academic theater world. But daughter Rose was hooked.

“I’ve always enjoyed singing and acting and experimenting with various slightly unlikely musical instruments. For example, a cigar box and muted cornet have the right sound for the era and style of music we like to play,” she said.

Friedman studied at the Moscow Art Theater and New School University and went on to work as a performer and workshop leader with Bread and Puppet Theater for over a decade. She also holds a master’s degree in education, with a license in early childhood. She continues to work as a teaching artist for all ages.

Lander, on the other hand grew up in New Jersey. His parents were scientists.

“The arts were not a part of our life,” he

164 THAT ’ S ENTERTAINMENT
‘EVICTED VAUDEVILLE’ Friedman and Lander joined physical comedian Tom Murphy and Tomáš Kubínek in a show outdoors behind Murphy’s Barn in Waterbury Center during the pandemic.
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KATE CARTER
165 802.253.4525 1880 Mountain Road Stowe VT 05672 Mon.-Sat. 10-7 • Sun. 11-6

said. But stand-up comedy was always present, and as a teen he played in a rock band. He studied psychology and neuroscience at Bates College, but drifted away from the family’s scientific leanings after working in a mental health hospital and with refugees seeking asylum. Now a comedian, puppeteer, musician, and auctioneer Lander has toured puppet shows nationally and internationally since 2002 and has been a Professor of Mr. Punch since 2006. He teaches workshops for kids and adults in puppetry, “junk” music, and improv.

Lander’s signature puppet show, the Punch and Judy Show, is based on the long tradition of … Punch and Judy shows. It stars Lander’s handcrafted puppets made of papier-mâché, garbage, and up-cycled material. Some he designs with unexpected surprises, such as a monkey that sticks out its tongue, a cyclops whose eye pops out of its socket, and a baby that pees by spraying water … on the audience.

During shows, Lander magically works the puppets behind the set while out front Friedman narrates and plays ukulele. Although the show is clearly geared for kids, the wit and fast-paced humor often flies over their heads and lands squarely on the adults.

Once everyone is laughing, it’s hard to stop.

A new addition to Modern Times Theater is The Baffo Box Show, a compact cardboard comedy act that the two wrote together.

Friedman directs and Lander performs, sometimes with son Charlie, when they do their ventriloquist routine. The Baffo Box is hung from and supported by Lander’s body, while fake hands mounted on both sides appear to hold up the box, allowing Lander to skillfully manipulate the puppets. It’s clever, creative—and hilarious.

Modern Times Theater recently received a grant from Vermont Arts Council, intended specifically for presentation in small historic venues throughout Vermont. The duo is now in full practice mode with a new show, “We’re Not From Here,” which opened this fall. The show presents a million years of history in just under 75 minutes and includes music, puppetry, and schtick.

“We can’t not do this, it’s not a choice,” said Friedman. “Both of us grew up with a mandate to do humor and try it out on people. We are constantly experimenting to find ways to bring people together like theater does. We have no rules, we are just trying to do what we do, better and different.” n

ESSENTIALS: For upcoming shows, go to moderntimestheater.com.

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167 MarriageQuest.org Dr. Israel & Cathie Helfand Helping couples for over 35 years! Better than a year of therapy! PRIVATE 3-DAY RETREAT IN VERMONT “#1 Marriage Retreat in US” — Guide Doc SPECIALIZING IN MARRIAGE AND SEX THERAPY

REAL ESTATE • HOMES

Are you searching for the perfect home or vacation getaway? Looking to update your 1970s kitchen, add a great room, or find a stone mason to redo your uneven terrace? Well, the search is over. Our guide to real estate and homes is your one-stop shop to find a new home or connect with the finest architects, interior designers, builders, and other craftsmen and suppliers for everything home-related. Our newspapers and websites—Stowe Reporter (stowetoday.com and stowereporter.com) and News & Citizen (newsandcitizen.com)—are great community and real estate resources.

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170 FLASH BACK

SAYING GOODBYE TO PARKER

Will Buchan and his dog Parker in the woods near his home in Stowe.

Editor’s note: Just before press, we had to pull a reprint from Sports Illustrated from Dec. 19, 1955, entitled “Skiing: A Builders’ Year” about the early days of Stowe as a modern ski area, due to copyright issues. We could print the text—to the tune of $1,500!—but securing the rights to Toni Frissell’s photos proved too problematic. Fortuitously, while commiserating with friend and contributor Rob Kiener, he reminded me about his summer 2010 story about Will Buchan and his beloved Brittany spaniel, Parker, which still holds the record for the most-commented-upon story we have ever run. It’s about a dog, after all. So, thank you Sports Illustrated for this lovely trip down memory lane.

Will Buchan knew it was time. His beloved 13-year-old Brittany spaniel, Parker, was lying in her dog bed, listless, barely breathing. Deaf, blind, and wracked by diabetes, she’d defied the odds and—thanks to years of nursing and nurturing by her owner—had lived longer than anyone thought possible. But Will knew the end was near. Parker wouldn’t eat and could barely lift her head.

He called up his friend Gregg Goodson, the local veterinarian who had hunted for grouse and woodcock with Will and Parker numerous times, and said, “It’s time, Gregg. I’m bringing in Parker.”

Will gingerly bundled Parker into his four-wheel drive. He stroked her brown-and-white head and

remembered Parker in her prime, walking at his side as they hunted in Stowe’s Sterling Valley or lush woods in northern New Hampshire.

It was always a privilege to watch her work, he thought. He’d marvel as he watched her catch scent of a game bird and haltingly tiptoe deeper into the woods until, suddenly, she’d lock up on point, and wait for Will to flush the bird from its cover. Then, after he dispatched the bird with his 1903 Parker double-barreled 20-gauge shotgun (hence her name), the dog would race to retrieve it and drop it at his feet.

Often Will would deliberately miss a bird, shooting above or behind it. For him the hunt was not about the number of birds he shot—he’d often return home empty-handed— but more about the joy of watching Parker work.

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Watching Will Buchan and his dog Parker working a bird was like observing an intricate dance. The duo had done it so many times before. But now, after so many hunts, Buchan knew it was time Parker anticipates the hunt.
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There was something elegant about the way Will and Parker worked together. This was a dog born to hunt and a master who had trained her to perform impeccably in the field. Watching the two of them working a bird was like observing an intricate dance. Will would blow one short blast on his whistle and Parker would instantly run to her left; two blasts, and she would move to the right. A long blast and she’d instantly return to Will’s side.

The British aristocracy, who preferred setters, had looked down their noses at Brittany spaniels and dubbed them “poachers’ dogs.” But Brittany owners know better. Indeed, a Brittany took top prize at the Westminster Dog Show a few years ago. This was no surprise to Will.

In less than a year she began collapsing as she walked. Goodson explained that Parker’s pancreas was so destroyed she had developed diabetes. For the rest of her life Will would have to give her insulin shots twice a day and keep her on a restricted diet. In time her vision went and she lost her hearing, due to the diabetes.

One day a friend asked, “Have you thought about putting her to sleep?” Will was amazed; as long as Parker seemed happy, he could never consider ending her life. He told the friend, “I’ve never put a dog of mine down. Never even considered it.”

They were a pair. Wherever Will went, he took Parker. When he spent a month living on his old lobster boat off Nantucket, Parker went with him. Will devised a special harness for her so he could lift her in and out of the boat and keep her from falling overboard.

Best of all, he still took her hunting. But the “dance” had changed. Because Parker was now totally blind, Will brought her to open fields where he knew birds often roosted in adjacent wooded areas. He’d tie a 20-foot lead to Parker and position her downwind of the woods, so her still-powerful nose could catch scent of a bird. Instead of using a whistle to guide Parker, he clapped his hands. She was deaf but could feel the vibrations.

Once, when a passerby took Will’s attention away from the hunt for some 20 minutes, Parker stayed locked on point. She was unflappable.

It also helped that, as Gregg Goodson often said, Parker “had more lives than a cat.” There was the time she jumped into Will’s open Suburban on a 100-plus degree summer day and somehow the door slammed shut. Two hours later Will found her near death from heatstroke. Panicking, he grabbed her from the car and threw her into a nearby rain barrel. When that failed to revive her, he wrapped his mouth around hers and gave her “mouth-to-snout” resuscitation. Slowly, remarkably, she began to come around. But she was still desperately weak.

He laid her in the car, turned up the air conditioning full blast and called Gregg Goodson. “I’ve got Parker in the car and she needs an IV, Gregg,” he shouted into his cellphone as he rushed into Stowe. Within minutes Goodson had her hooked up to an I.V. drip in his animal clinic and covered in ice packs. A day later she was home. Within a week she was back hunting with Will.

A few years later Parker disappeared for 45 minutes during a hunt and returned licking her chops. That evening she refused to eat and became violently ill. Will figured she must have eaten a long-dead kill and been poisoned. Again he rushed her to Goodson’s animal hospital where she teetered between life and death for nearly four days. Eventually, thanks to large doses of antibiotics and an IV drip, she came around. But she would never be the same.

He’d allow her to walk through the open field, guiding her so she wouldn’t bump into trees or other obstructions until she would pick up a scent. Then he’d release her and she’d boldly follow her nose into the woods, perhaps crashing into a few trees or running into a bush, before she located a bird and locked up, pointing. Although deaf and blind, she’d hold ramrod straight, waiting for her master to flush the bird, raise his double-barreled shotgun to the skies and shoot.

Will loved seeing her like this. For a moment, she looked like the Parker of old, the skilled hunter who had mastered the chase. She was a study in concentration, sniffing the air hungrily and wagging her tail. It was as if the years and the diseases that had crippled her had melted away. She had always been more alive and alert in the field than anywhere else; this was her real home.

Recently when someone asked Will why he still took Parker hunting he said, “I love the dog and she loves to do this. It’s what she was born to do.”

Many days Will returned home without a bird but he didn’t care; the hunt was now more for Parker’s benefit than his. He knew her days were numbered. •••••

This January, as a deep snow covered the fields that Parker and her master had walked over so often, Will Buchan carried his 13-year-old friend into Gregg Goodson’s animal clinic for the last time.

“It’s time to say goodbye, Gregg,” he said. “It’s time to say goodbye to Parker.” n

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Buchan’s 1903 Parker double-barreled 20-gauge shotgun.
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STORY / AVALON STYLES-ASHLEY PORTRAIT / GORDON MILLER
CURTAIN Death doulas highlight life’s beauty >>
END OF LIFE Linda Cannon-Huffman and Maxine Adams are both death doulas who live around the corner from each other in Hyde Park. They met by chance after Cannon-Huffman gave a talk on end-of-life planning last summer.
FINAL
DECORATIVE BATH & ARCHITECTURAL HARDWARE 257 PINE STREET BURLINGTON, VT 802.861.3200 CLOSETOHOMEVT.COM

A strong, honey-sweet Southern twang rings through Linda CannonHuffman’s voice, a remnant of her childhood in South Carolina. Red and gold leaves fall softly from trees looming overhead as she leans back in a chair outside her Hyde Park home.

This is the perfect time to talk about death, she said, gesturing to the foliage and balding trees.

As a death doula, Cannon-Huffman holds a friendly reverence for that final exit; an appreciation she’s grown for 15 years when she first decided to help people and their loved ones through death.

Not everyone shares her feelings toward death—nor her light humor—partly due to what she described as the institutionalization and commercialization that death has undergone in the last century. But in recent years, she’s noticed a resurging interest in end-of-life midwifery, which often works collaboratively with existing hospice and nursing home staff to offer more emotional and spiritual supports.

son’s hand, massaging their feet or reading poetry. Sometimes death doulas can help with final wishes, Cannon-Huffman said.

“I think there’s a beautiful, spiritual component to death midwifery now. Not that it’s something that you force on the dying person. The dying person is the one who you’re the advocate for,” she said, adding that the work is non-denominational.

“Preparing for death doesn’t mean you’re inviting it. It means you’re opening up space around it; space to see choices we have now before death narrows choices,” she said.

Sitting vigil

For both Cannon-Huffman and Adams, sitting vigil is at the core of being a death doula. In 2015, Adams sat with her mother, who had come to live with Adams as her memory rapidly deteriorated.

“All of our siblings were out in the living room, and we were talking. We had just been in there a few seconds ago, and then when we went back five minutes later, she was gone,” Adams recalled. But people should never feel guilty for not being present at the death of their loved one, she said.

Cannon-Huffman sat with her father as he died 22 years ago. That process, which made her wonder what more she could do for her father and family, set her on the death doula path. It also revealed some of the mysterious aspects of death noted by Adams.

“He was in the final stage. I knew he was going but it was taking a while. I got up to go to the bathroom. When I came back, he was gone. I had an aunt that I was sitting with. I went to sleep that night and when I woke up, she was gone,” she said. “I have been told—I don’t know if it’s true, but I choose to believe that it is—that sometimes they wait until the loved one is not around or is asleep to leave because it’s easier on the loved one.”

It was a privilege to sit with her loved ones as they died, Cannon-Huffman said. After those experiences as a young adult, she wondered what more she could do.

“The sad part of not thinking about it too is that if you do contemplate death—boy, life is so precious. I mean, if you really think about, you know: I am gonna die and I don’t know when, I mean, I could get hit by a truck and be gone tomorrow. Blue sky, beautiful fallen leaves—there’s so much preciousness to life,”

Cannon-Huffman said.

Maxine Adams, who happens to live around the corner from CannonHuffman, began a certificate program at the University of Vermont medical college to become an end-of-life doula during the pandemic.

Both women seem to greet death like something dear. Both have sat vigil with a parent as they died, and both hope that, as people learn more about death doulas, the death planning process, and in turn, life, they can come to better appreciate the sacredness of it all.

What is a death doula?

Like birth doulas, who don’t offer strict medical care but emotional and practical support bringing babies into the world, a death doula, or endof-life doula, offers an array of support services to help people as they die and the loved ones they leave behind.

What kinds of supports all depends on the person, said CannonHuffman. It could mean helping with the mountain of paperwork that seems to follow death around or helping a family recognize signs of approaching death or process their grief. It could mean holding the per-

Adams added that one of the main concepts she learned is to “lean into pain and lean into grief. Let it happen. Don’t try to cover it up or suppress it.”

Finding the lightness

“Death is sacred, and it’s such an honor to be with someone, they don’t even have to die while you’re there—I think it can be very draining but it’s very worth it,” Cannon-Huffman said.

Both women have thought about their own deaths, of course.

Adams has been coordinating writing the story of her life with her two sisters, a tradition among the women in her family. She said she’s picking up tips in her coursework and burgeoning work as a death doula—“figure out how I’m going to do it with style,” she said, laughing.

That’s another thing the women have in common—a sense of humor and lightness.

“Death is a long process, and it can be hard work and it can be messy,” Cannon-Huffman said. “I would just love for people not to be so afraid to talk about it and to not be afraid of death.” n

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Linda Cannon-Huffman and Maxine Adams, both death doulas, help people with the end of life.
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BRENNA B. BROCHHAUSEN

My 50-year-old brain got rebooted! >>

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STORY & PHOTOGRAPHS / KATE CARTER
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The pretty interior design boutique on Mountain Road, within shouting distance from the village, is Brenna B Interiors, owned by Brenna Bull Brochhausen, or simply Brenna B. Brenna took a circuitous route to her interior design career, starting in Rochester, N.Y., where she grew up, then graduating from University of Buffalo with degrees in psychology and biochemistry, followed by marriage and a family. She and her husband Jim live in Stowe and have two grown children who live in the New York City area and a son who will graduate from Stowe High School in 2023.

How did you end up in Stowe?

My husband was tired of traveling overseas for his job in the toy industry. We decided to move to Vermont in 2000 to be closer to family. At first, we thought we’d do a bed and breakfast a la the Newhart show. Thank goodness we didn’t! Instead, Jim decided to do consulting on a smaller scale, and I dabbled in helping friends with interior design ideas.

When did you land in your current location?

After a major renovation on the space, we opened in July 2019.

When did you become a professional interior designer?

I was always interested in art and doing tactile things, like pottery and weaving. Interior design was a natural direction for me to go. Our youngest was born in 2005 and by 2007 I was getting antsy, so I got more involved in designing. At first it was Brenna & Co. and I worked out of my house, helping friends. In 2015 I rented space from interior designer Linda Post, who encouraged me to just get started. So, I did. I had an office in her studio on School Street, and by word of mouth my business grew. In 2017 I opened my own studio and became Brenna B Interiors. So much happened in those eight years from 2015 to now. My 50-year-old brain got rebooted!

Do you have a staff?

Christine Flynn is an assistant designer. Chrissy jumped right into projects with her willingness to help and her calm, easy-going personality. She has always loved interior design and transforming a house into a home.

What was your first big job?

It was a new-house build with a contractor and there was a huge learning curve. Huge! My second big job was redoing Harrison’s restaurant. I love the owners, the Kneales, as well as the space, and it was exciting to go with the original footprint and make it a cozy den that is comfortable and soft, warm and inviting.

Where do you get your inspiration?

By traveling and getting out of Stowe, reading magazines, Instagram, and from seeing a house that needs my help. I have to see the house first, before anything else happens. It all begins with the house.

What makes a good interior designer?

The given is having an eye. Then learning the clients’ stories, listening to what they say and acknowledging it, and finding out how they want to live and function in their homes. Communication is key during the entire process. So much is going on in my head and they need to know what that is.

Sometimes people don’t know what they want, so I often ask, “What don’t you like?” People always know what they don’t like, but they don’t always know what they do like. I always encourage people to take their time and not rush into things. >>

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GREAT IDEAS, GOOD EYE “The client for this remodeling project is an avid athlete and skier, so a mud room that is functional, while incorporating sports equipment in an organized and accessible way, was high on their list,” says Brochhausen, who creates custom cubbies and drawers for storage, while skis, poles, and other equipment hang from galvanized steel.
183 Handcrafted Quality in Building 59 Old Creamery Road | Morrisville, VT | 802.888.3629 | stowebuilder.com Ryan
Bent Photography

What is your style?

My main goal for anyone is to make their space timeless. I want something that makes my client happy and comfortable.

How do you stay on top of trends?

I don’t really follow trends. In the end, you might wish you didn’t jump on board with a trend, they come and go, like the Pantone color of the year, which is right now reverting to the ’70s. I attend the High Point Show in North Carolina every year, and while that doesn’t necessarily guide me, it gives me ideas. I always come back to timelessness. You could have a neutral living area and then have fun with another space, like choosing an interesting, colorful wallpaper for the powder room.

Where do you source your materials?

All my vendors are in the U.S, most of whom I meet at the High Point Show. I try to source from smaller boutique companies. I like boutique-unique and finding things that nobody else carries. There’s nothing worse that finding out you have the same coffee table as your neighbor.

What’s one of your favorite jobs?

During the pandemic I did a house virtually in Texarkana. My clients wanted a southwestern feel, and we did it all from afar. They were incredible to work with. The focal point was things they acquired while traveling. They were into the unusual and being very colorful. It was so fun for me.

What do you want people to know about you and your interior design boutique?

Since launching in 2010, I have accumulated an extensive working knowledge on a broad range of projects, from custom design-build homes to remodels and everything in between. I understand the importance of great collaboration between the architect, builder, and designer, and have built solid relationships with excellent contractors and trade professionals. My passion for design and ability to understand each client’s style while weaving in fresh, clean interiors results in homes that are not only inviting and approachable but, most important, feel like home. We will do just one thing or a whole house.

What is your favorite part of a project?

Being on site and seeing everything coming together, seeing the spaces and the contractors and developing relationships with them. The final two weeks are always intense. We come in at the very end and bring the zhuzh. Then we get to see the client’s reaction, which really is the best part. n

184 SPOT LIGHT
PROPER FLOW A custom bar and sitting area ties together the dining and kitchen areas with the living room so friends and family can be close by no matter where they are sitting.

Stowe, Craftsbury, Waitsfield

STOWE / $1,999,000

New build in a new and ongoing development 2,913 square feet • Built in 2021 • Taxes: $13,993 • Agency: Averill Cook, Landvest Inc.

This brand-new mountain modern home is located in the Wildewood development of closely spaced houses, and is a short distance from Stowe Mountain Resort. The four-bedroom, four-bath home features three floors of finished living space, with a first-floor primary suite. Other assets include a two-car garage, covered porch, den, large windows, floor-to-ceiling fireplace, modern kitchen with huge island, hot tub, and finished walk-out basement. $500 monthly association fee for landscaping, plowing, common acreage, in-ground pool, tennis court, and trash removal.

Outside: World-class mountain biking, hiking, and backcountry skiing right outside the door. Downhill skiing and snowboarding is just 2 miles away.

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WHAT $2 MILL WILL GET YOU
STORY & PHOTOGRAPHS / KATE CARTER
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CRAFTSBURY / $1,700,000

Glorious estate on the edge of the Northeast Kingdom

6,893 square feet / 171 acres

Built in 1997

Taxes: $26,197

Agency: Shelly Jungwirth, Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty

Antique English oak doors set the tone for this amazing four-bedroom, four-bath home full of architectural details and mountain vistas visible throughout the house and property. The stately great room has gorgeous stonework and six balcony doors that open to the great outdoors. A roomy pub has a game area and grand fireplace. The primary suite is accessible by stairway or elevator. A guest house has additional bedrooms and a sauna. Follow an idyllic path to a large barn with office, horse stalls, and storage areas. Located just five minutes from the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, home of world-class cross-country skiing, sculling, mountain biking, and hiking.

Outside: 171 diverse acres with meadows, fields, woods, spring-fed pond, and abundant wildlife. Stonework around the residence, bocce cour t, in-ground pool, outdoor fireplace. A short walk to a chapel, picnic pavilion, and open space for games and gatherings.

WAITSFIELD / $2,128,000

You can’t get much higher than this!

3,200 square feet / 15 acres

Built in 1996

Taxes: $21,553

Agency: Caroline Marhefka, Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty

This home sits at 1,485-feet elevation, just below the “Forest Reserve District,” so we mean it when we say “You can’t get much higher than this!”

Amazing mountain views of Sugarbush and Mad River ski resorts, Mad River Valley, and Granville Gulf. This fully furnished five-bedroom, four-bath home features 10-foot ceilings, a huge deck, custom white ash woodwork throughout, radiant heat and Rumford fireplace in main living area, mainfloor en-suite primary bedroom, backup power generator, and high-speed fiber optic internet.

Outside: Views, views views! Well-maintained sugar maples and private trails, VAST snowmobile trails close by. The von Trapp greenhouse and farm store is just around the corner. n

188 REAL ESTATE
SHELLY JUNGWIRTH
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from the ground up

Newcomers to Stowe build dream home

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STORY : robert kiener PHOTOGRAPHS : ryan bent & kate carter
RYAN BENT

rika Dodge smiles broadly as she remembers her first meeting with the clients who eventually hired her to design their “dream home” on the lot they’d recently purchased in Robinson Springs. The couple, who decided to relocate to Stowe with their three young boys from their home in Chicago, were interviewing architects because they decided to build after they couldn’t find an existing home that appealed to them.

“They were very clear about what they didn’t want,” says Dodge.

“They didn’t want a home that looked like a traditional country house or a farmhouse or a dated ski house. As the wife told me, they were looking for a design that said ‘modern mountain’ and was warm, welcoming, yet elegant.”

In other words: No antler chandeliers, no vintage skis, no “log cabin-y” features.

story, p.210 photographs, p.194 >>

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RYAN BENT; INSET: KATE CARTER

VIEWS GALORE

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195 It’s all about the details. • Custom home builders • renovations • Additions • custom cabinetry & woodworking • Painting - Exterior and interior • Professional project management Stowe, VT (802) 253-3757 www.pattersonandsmith.com Building Homes. Building Long Term Relationships. PATTERSON & SMITH Construction RYAN BENT

GREAT ROOM

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RYAN
BENT
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OPEN PLAN

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199 626 Mountain Road, Stowe | 802.253.9367 gordondixonconstruction.com FINE HOMES, ADDITIONS & RENOVATIONS FOR OVER 30 YEARS GDC CUSTOM BUILDERS Kathleen Dever, Allied ASID | 626 Mountain Road | 802-253-9600 dsofstowe@stowevt.net | designstudiovt.com | designstudiovt The Furniture Shop & Design Studio of Stowe FROM TOP: KATE CARTER; RYAN BENT

DINE IN

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RYAN BENT
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SLUMBER TIME

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FROM TOP: RYAN BENT; KATE CARTER; CARTER

COMFORT ZONE

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PHOTOS BY KATE
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MUD ROOM

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BENT
RYAN
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PLAYGROUND

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FROM LEFT: KATE CARTER; RYAN BENT; CARTER

Like many clients, the couple had put together a dream book of pictures of homes they’d found that appealed to them. Says Dodge, “We were flipping through their pictures when the wife stopped at one she’d found on Pinterest and told me, ‘Now this one; it’s almost exactly what we’re looking for.’

“I couldn’t believe it,” says Dodge, who only recently had set up her own practice in Stowe after working for TruexCullins in Burlington and an architectural firm in California. “It was a house near Lake Tahoe, and I knew it very well. In fact, I had helped design it when I worked out West!”

As the homeowner explains, “I still get goose bumps when I remember Erika telling me she had worked on that house. Call it serendipity. We were on the same page, and I knew, almost immediately, we had found the perfect architect for our new mountain modern home in Stowe.”

The next step: Assemble a team. With Dodge on board, the wife signed up Colchester-based Red House Building, interior designer Krista Fox from New Canaan, Conn., and Burlington-based landscape architect Cynthia Knauf.

“I was confident that we had assembled a great team and we broke ground in late 2019,” says the homeowner.

Although this was the seventh home the owners had built, they quickly realized that building in Stowe was far different from building a home in Chicago, the location of their six previous homes. The wife remembers, “I thought, given our experience, I knew most of what I needed to know about building. Boy, was I in for a surprise. First off, I learned that we needed an engineer. Huh? Well, we needed to plan for a septic tank and a leachfield—all new to us. We also needed to drill a well for our water. Also new. And electric services, and the list went on and on. In Chicago we had just hooked up to the city’s utilities.

210 >>
••••
KATE CARTER
211 Sales & Rentals RedBarnVT.com | 802.253.4994 Visit us at 394 Mountain Road, Stowe Toby Merk Broker | Rich Drill Broker Associate | Zoe Bedell Broker Associate Susi Benoit Realtor | Jaime Moses Realtor | KC Chambers Realtor Lynn Davis Realtor | Terrie Wehse Realtor Ashley Correia Rentals | Katy Lanpher Rentals | Nick Wilder Rentals Cheryl DeMinico Office & Rentals Manager

This was a real learning process.”

As the couple discovered, assembling a team from day one meant they could all collaborate and help problem solve. For example, Knauf worked with Dodge to lay out and landscape the curving driveway to establish the most attractive approach to the home. Fox worked with Dodge to choose exterior colors and trim and then worked to bring them inside for a cohesive design. Red House’s owner Dunbar Oehmig and his team helped consult with engineers on everything from site work to drainage issues.

“The collaboration on this project was great,” says Oehmig. “Everyone worked hand in hand.”

While the initial designs were based on the California home Dodge helped to design, the owners asked her to consider several “must haves” when she began formulating her plans. “We stressed that one of our most important requirements was to take full advantage of the view,” says the wife. “The minute we saw the distant views of Mount Mansfield and its ski runs, we knew these would be the focal point of the design. We didn’t want anything to obscure the views or distract from them.”

The couple also asked for an open, lightfilled floor plan with a great room, high ceilings, a “killer” fireplace, a primary bedroom and bath, three separate bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms for their boys, a three-car garage, his-and-her home offices and a basement with 10-foot ceilings. “Our boys wanted a basement/playroom where they could play basketball,” says the wife. “Everyone said we were crazy, but it works.”

What started out as a 4,000 square foot house, gradually evolved into a home of more than 6,000 square feet.

After siting the home to take best advantage of the views, Dodge cleverly angled the threecar garage wing at 90 degrees to the main structure of the home to lessen the mass of the residence. She added a front porch that, as she explains, “also helps break up the large home and provides a welcoming sense of entry.”

The front porch, like some other features of the house, such as the staggered rooflines and the stone and wood used on the exterior, also reference the Vermont vernacular, explains Dodge. “The owners wanted the home to look like it was ‘of the land’ instead of a structure that was simply placed upon the lot,” she says.

By design, once visitors come inside, their eyes are drawn through the high-ceilinged great room to the distant, picture-postcard views of Mt. Mansfield. There is nothing to obscure the scene. Massive pocket sliders open and disappear into the walls and the screening is retractable. Even the pool is set lower than the home so as not to detract from the view.

As landscape architect Knauf notes, “We worked together to design the pool area as an extension to the house, instead of having it appear as a separate element. There is a nice, seamless flow, or a connection, from inside

212

ROLL THE CREDITS

ARCHITECT: Erika Dodge, ELD Architecture

INTERIOR

LANDSCAPE

ARCHITECT:

Cynthia Knauf, Knauf Landscape Architecture

the house to the immediate outdoor space. Again, this was done so as not to distract from the distant views.”

Based on the wife’s request for an interior that resembled what she termed, “hotel chic,” Fox chose a color palette that included soft, natural and neutral colors such as creams, off whites, and grays. “We took a lot of our cues from the home’s natural materials—the wood and stone outside, the granite in the fireplace, the beams inside, and the white oak floors. It was a very organic scheme.”

Again, the design took full advantage of the views as even the furniture in the great room featured low backs so as not to obscure the views to the outside.

Details were important. For example, because there were numerous species of wood used in the home, the design team tested many stains to find, as Fox explains, “Just the right tones and finishes that worked together. It took a lot of sampling to find the custom color and tones that spoke to one another. Everything had to balance.”

The design team ended up using eight different custom wood stains throughout the home.

The wife also explained that because she lived with three boys and her husband, she needed some soft, feminine touches. “She loves crystal, and we included that in custom chandeliers in the great room and over the breakfast table,” says Fox.

Adds Dodge,” There are also many little features, such as light fixtures and door hardware, that add feminine touches throughout the house, almost like bits of jewelry.”

••••

Recently, when showing off her home to a visitor, the wife explained, “We couldn’t be happier. This is the seventh house we’ve built, and we are still learning. But the most important lesson we learned while building here in Stowe is this: You have to choose the right people. Trust them. Then let them do their thing. It’s as simple as that.” n

213 Traditional Vermont Homes and
Local Vermont Timber Energy-Efficient Construction 4663 Route 2, E. Montpelier, VT 802.229.7770 WinterwoodTimberFrames.com
Outbuildings
hellbrookink.com @hellbrookink SISTER-OWNED TATTOOS, ART AND PERMANENT MAKEUP

ANTIQUES

BITTNER ANTIQUES

Third-generation Vermont antique dealer Brian Bittner: broad experience with pocket and wristwatches, jewelry, silver, artwork, coins/paper money, historical/military, older collectibles, heirlooms. Free house visits, (802) 489-5210, info@bittnerantiques.com, bittnerantiques.com.

ARCHITECTS

ANDREW VOLANSKY, AIA / VOLANSKY STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING

The term studio speaks to an open process of collaborating with our clients and general contractors who execute our designs. This respectful approach has proven to contribute significantly to project success. (802) 793-4999, volanskystudio.com.

ECK MACNEELY ARCHITECTS

Home is a place where comfort is found and given. Since 1976, we have considered every design detail an opportunity to create the spirit of home. 560 Harrison Ave., Suite 403, Boston 02118. (617) 367-9696. eckmacneely.com.

ELD ARCHITECTURE

Creating thoughtful, site-specific designs with an emphasis on custom residential projects throughout New England. We utilize state-of-the-art software to help our clients envision their home before construction begins. eldarchitecture.com. (802) 521-7101.

ELIZABETH HERRMANN ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

EHA+D is an award-winning residential architecture firm based in Central Vermont. We specialize in designing exceptionally beautiful, well-crafted, energy-efficient homes. (802) 453-6401, eharchitect.com.

HARRY HUNT ARCHITECTS

Modern green homes—true to the spirit of Vermont. Member American Institute of Architects. Certified passive house designer. harryhuntarchitects.com, (802) 253-2374.

J. GRAHAM GOLDSMITH, ARCHITECTS

Quality design and professional architectural services specializing in high-end residential development. Member Stowe Area. (800) 862-4053. jggarchitects.com. Email: vt@jggarchitects.com.

LEE HUNTER ARCHITECT, AIA

Stowe-based architectural firm offering a personal approach to creative, elegant design. Residential, commercial, and renovations. (802) 253-9928. leehunterarchitect.com.

MAD MOOSE ARCHITECTURE

Mad Moose Architecture was founded on a commitment to provide a more thoughtful way of designing shelter, with reverence for the environment and respect for the earth and its inhabitants. madmoosearchitecture.com. (802) 234-5720.

METHOD ARCHITECTURE STUDIO PLLC

A Stowe-based architectural studio specializing in energy efficient, modern timber frame, custom home designs. View our process, portfolio, and client stories at methodarch.com. 259 Summit View Drive, Stowe. (802) 585-3161.

PASTELLA BURNS

A full-service architectural design and building firm. As specialists in luxury homes and hospitality, we focus on developing unique architectural designs that echo our clients’ personalities and compliment their lifestyle. (267) 750-0452. pastellaburns.com.

SAM SCOFIELD, ARCHITECT, AIA

Professional architectural services for all phases of design and construction. Residential and commercial. Carlson Building, Main Street, Stowe. samscofieldarchitect.com. (802) 253-9948.

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

CUSHMAN DESIGN GROUP

Architectural, interior, and landscape design featuring beauty, craftsmanship, and excellent energy efficiency. Creative, intuitive, functional, efficient. (802) 253-2169. cushmandesign.com.

ART GALLERIES

ARTISANS’ GALLERY

An inspired collection of fine art and craft from Vermont’s established and emerging artists. A must-see destination. Gifts and cards for every occasion. 11-6 daily. Historic Bridge Street, Waitsfield 05674. (802) 496-6256. vtartisansgallery.com.

THE CURRENT

A center for contemporary art and art education, established in 1981. Exhibitions of acclaimed artists. Art classes. Cultural events. Schedule: Tuesday-Friday 10-5, Saturday 10-3. 90 Pond St., Stowe. (802) 253-8358, thecurrentnow.org.

NORTHWOOD GALLERY

Gallery exclusively featuring Vermont artisans. Jewelry, pottery, prints, and more. We host artist workshops, live demonstrations, and provide custom woodwork. 151 Main St., Stowe. info.northwoodgallery@gmail.com. (802) 760-6513.

ROBERT PAUL GALLERIES

An outstanding selection of original paintings, sculpture, and fine art glass by locally, nationally, and internationally acclaimed artists. Celebrating 31 years. 394 Mountain Road, Baggy Knees Shopping Center, Stowe. robertpaulgalleries.com. (802) 253-7282.

ART SOURCING

AXEL’S FRAME SHOP & GALLERY

Inspiration to installation—comprehensive consulting and sourcing services to help you shape your space. Let us help you in your search. Discover the hundreds of artists we’ve worked with. 5 Stowe St., Waterbury. (802) 244-7801. axelsgallery.com.

AWNINGS

OTTER CREEK AWNINGS

Expand your outdoor living space with the help of Otter Creek Awnings. Providing custom outdoor shading solutions since 1976. Free onsite estimates. Showroom at 19 Echo Place, Williston, or othercreekawnings.com. (802) 864-3009.

BAKERIES

BLACK CAP COFFEE & BAKERY OF VERMONT

Croissants, danishes, muffins, scones, tarts, cakes. Everything made in house. Gluten-free/vegan options. A fun place to work, meet, or hang out. Open daily. Stowe and Morrisville downtowns, Waterbury Train Station. blackcapvermont.com.

BIKE SHOPS & BIKE INSTRUCTION

HITCHHIKER BIKE SHOP

Hitchhiker Bike Shop is Stowe’s local bike shop. We offer sales and service and specialize in mountain and gravel bikes. hitchhikerbikes.com, (802) 585-3344. @hitchhikerbikeshop.

BOOKSTORES

BEAR POND BOOKS

Complete family bookstore. NY Times bestsellers and new releases. Children and adult hardcovers, paperbacks, Vermont authors, daily papers, puzzles, greeting cards. Open daily. Depot Building, Main Street, Stowe. (802) 253-8236.

BREWERIES & CIDERIES

THE ALCHEMIST

A family-owned brewery focused on using our business as force for good. Powered by solar. The Alchemist specializes in fresh, unfiltered IPA, with an unmatched focus on quality and consistency. alchemistbeer.com. 100 Cottage Club Road, Stowe.

LAWSON’S FINEST LIQUIDS

Award-winning brewery, taproom, and retail store located in Waitsfield. Featuring freshly crafted beers, wine, hard cider, non-alcoholic beverages, and local light fare in a stunning timber frame taproom. (802) 496-HOPS. lawsonsfinest.com.

ROCK ART BREWERY

Brewing beers we love for you to enjoy. Visit our brewery tasting room and Vermont artisan gallery. Come over and celebrate our 25th anniversary with us. (802) 888-9400. rockartbrewery.com.

STOWE CIDER

Stowe Cider is excited to celebrate its ninth year in business with the opening of a newly expanded, family-friendly taproom, event space, and future kitchen on Mountain Road. (802) 253-2065, stowecider.com.

VON TRAPP BREWING & BIERHALL

Located at Trapp Family Lodge, the von Trapp Brewing Bierhall is situated on the lodge’s cross country and mountain bike trails. Fresh lagers and a selection of freshly prepared Austrian lunch and dinner selections. (802) 253-5750. vontrappbrewing.com.

BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS

DONALD P. BLAKE JR INC.

Handcrafted quality in building, offering experienced and reliable contracting services since 1985. Specializing in custom home new construction, renovations, commercial construction, construction management, property services. (802) 888-3629, stowebuilder.com.

GORDON DIXON CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Fine craftsmanship, attention to detail, integrity, and dependable workmanship. 30 years of award-winning experience. Custom homes, additions, renovations, design/build, project management. Stop in at 626 Mountain Rd., Stowe. (802) 253-9367 or visit gordondixonconstruction.com.

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GYLLENBORG CONSTRUCTION

Recognized for high-quality craftsmanship. Our priority is to encourage and promote environmentally friendly living. Individualized customer service and attention to detail for custom homebuilding, renovations, and additions. Established 1995. gyllenborgconstruction.com. (802) 888-9288.

MOUNTAIN LOGWORKS, LLC

Handcrafted log homes. Specializing in Scandinavian Full Scribe and Adirondack-style log structures with log diameters up to 30 inches. In-house design service available. (802) 748-5929. mountainlogworks.com

PASTELLA BURNS

A full-service architectural design and building firm. As specialists in luxury homes and hospitality, we focus on developing unique architectural designs that echo our clients’ personalities and compliment their lifestyle. (267) 750-0452. pastellaburns.com.

PATTERSON & SMITH CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Custom builder, remodeling firm, and general contractor in Stowe. Our mission is to provide each customer and their designer/architect with the highest degree of customer service, management, and craftsmanship. (802) 253-3757. pattersonandsmith.com.

RED HOUSE BULDERS

Full-service, employee-owned building company with an emphasis on timeless craftsmanship. Meeting the challenges of unique and demanding building projects, from contemporary mountain retreats to meticulously restored historic buildings and high-efficiency homes. (802) 655-0043. redhousebuilding.com.

SISLER BUILDERS INC.

Custom home building, remodeling, woodworking, home energy audits and retrofits, quality craftsmanship, resource efficient construction, modest additions to multi-million-dollar estates. Over 35 years in Stowe. References available. sislerbuilders.com. (802) 253-5672.

WINTERWOOD TIMBER FRAMES, LLC

Hand-crafted, custom-designed timber-frame structures and woodwork, SIPs insulation, sourcing local timber and fine hardwoods, building in the Vermont vernacular. Cabinetry, flooring, butcher-block tops, and staircases. (802) 229-7770. winterwoodtimberframes.com.

YANKEE BARN HOMES

For over 50 years, Yankee Barn Homes has been designing and prefabricating custom post-and-beam homes built with the finest materials for durability, weather protection, and energy conservation. yankeebarnhomes.com, (800) 258-9786.

BUILDERS / ROOFERS

PROSPECT CONTRACTING LLC

Recognized for our attention to detail, quality, and craftsmanship, we specialize in standing-seam, slate, EcoStar, and copper roofs. Offering long-lasting roof replacement, repairs, fabrication, and installation for new or existing construction. 25 years of experience. prospectcontracting.com. (802) 582-8669.

BUILDING MATERIALS

CAMARA SLATE

National supplier of roofing slate, slate flooring, flagstone, countertops, and other structural components. Committed to delivering a standard beyond our competitors’ abilities with excellent service and quality-valued products. Fair Haven, Vt. (802) 265-3200, camaraslate.com, info@camaraslate.com.

LOEWEN WINDOW CENTER OF VT & NH

Beautifully crafted Douglas fir windows and doors for the discerning homeowner. Double- and triple-glazed options available in aluminum, copper, and bronze clad. Style Inspired by You. loewenvtnh.com, (802) 295-6555, info@loewenvtnh.com.

RK MILES

Founded in 1940, rk Miles is a family-owned company providing services and materials for all types of building and design. Ten locations serving Vermont and western Massachusetts. rkmiles.com.

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CANNABIS

LAMOILLE COUNTY CANNABIS

High-quality cannabis products in a safe, friendly, and comfortable environment. Knowledgeable staff is passionate about cannabis. We’ll help you find what you’re looking for, whether you are a first-time visitor or an old friend. 76 Stafford Avenue, Morristown. lamoillecountycannabis.com.

CHURCHES & SYNAGOGUES

BLESSED SACRAMENT CATHOLIC CHURCH

Mass schedule: Saturday, 4:30 p.m., Sunday, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. See bulletin for daily masses. Confession Saturday 3:30-4 p.m. Father John Schnobrich, Pastor. 728 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 253-7536.

HUNGER MOUNTAIN CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY

Route 100, Waterbury Center. Sunday worship service at 10 a.m. (802) 244-5921.

JEWISH COMMUNITY OF GREATER STOWE

For information regarding services, holiday gatherings, classes, and workshops: JCOGS, Stowe, Vt. 05672. 1189 Cape Cod Road, Stowe. (802) 253-1800 or jcogs.org.

ST. JOHN’S IN THE MOUNTAINS EPISCOPAL

At the crossroads of Mountain and Luce Hill roads in Stowe. Holy Eucharist Sundays at 10 a.m., in person and online. St. John’s is wheelchair friendly, visitors and children welcome. Office open Tuesday and Thursday. Rev. Rick Swanson, rector. stjohnsinthemountains.com. (802) 253-7578.

STOWE COMMUNITY CHURCH

The iconic church on Stowe’s Main Street is multi-denominational, inclusive, and welcoming. Services every Sunday at 9:30 a.m., and home to many public and private events. Join us. (802) 253-7257. stowecommunitychurch.org.

STOWE MOUNTAIN CHAPEL

The perfect location for you intimate wedding, memorial, or vow renewal. Winter lift service provides a ski or ride inand-out ceremony site. For Sunday service or other information, go to stowemountainchapel.org.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP

Sunday services at 4:30 p.m., St. John’s in the Mountains Episcopal Church, Mountain and Luce Hill roads, Stowe. Weekly September to June. All welcome. For information: UU Fellowship of Stowe on Facebook, or bit.ly/stoweuu.

WATERBURY CENTER COMMUNITY

Route 100 next to the Cider Mill. We warmly welcome visitors. (802) 244-6286. Sunday worship 10:30 a.m. Handicapped accessible. Church is a National Historic Place. Pastor Shirley Nolan.

CLOSETS

LAKE CHAMPLAIN CLOSETS

Stay organized and save time with custom closets and storage spaces designed specifically for your needs. Discover your perfect storage solution with Lake Champlain Closets. 68 Randall St., South Burlington, (802) 251-7080, lccvt.com.

CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

ARCHERY CLOSE

Women’s clothing boutique with a curated collection of emerging designers, trend-setting styles, and cult brands. 25 S. Main St., Stowe. archeryclose.com, @archeryclose. (802) 242-0448.

BOUTIQUE AT STOWE MERCANTILE

Fabulous contemporary fashion for women. From casual to professional, Boutique can make you feel beautiful any time. Lingerie, dresses, skirts, tops, jeans, sweaters, more. We’ll dress you for any occasion. Depot Building, Main Street, Stowe. (802) 253-3712.

FORGET-ME-NOT-SHOP

Treasure hunt through our huge selection of famous label off price clothing for men, women, and teens at 60 to 80 percent off. Route 15 Johnson, just 1.5 miles west of Johnson Village. Open 10-7.

GREEN ENVY

Women’s boutique. On-trend luxe clothing, shoes, handbags, accessories. Veronica Beard, Ulla Johnson, Rag & Bone, Tata Harper, Ganni, Mother, The Great. Over 300 brands. Unmatched selection of premium denim. 1800 Mountain Road, Stowe. 3 Main St., Burlington. (802) 253-2661, shopgreenenvy.com.

HELLY HANSEN BURLINGTON

Making professional-grade gear to help people stay and feel alive for more than 140 years. Come in to shop our latest selection of hiking, sailing, ski, and mountain lifestyle apparel. 66 Church St., Burlington. (802) 651-7010.

IN COMPANY CLOTHING

Celebrating 22 years. Specializing in personalized service and top designer labels. Come see what’s in. 10-5 daily. 344 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 253-4595. incompanyclothing.com, @incompanyclothing.

JESS BOUTIQUE

Jess Boutique pairs an extensive, uniquely curated collection with exceptional, personalized service for women seeking the perfect ensemble for any special occasion or event, including bridal parties, mothers, and guests. jessboutique.com.

JOHNSON WOOLEN MILLS

Home of famous Johnson Woolen Outerwear and headquarters for Carhartt, Filson, Pendleton, Woolrich, woolen blankets, fine men’s and ladies sportswear, sweaters, hats, gloves, scarves, socks. Since 1842. Johnson. (802) 635-2271. johnsonwoolenmills.com.

MOUNTAIN ROAD OUTFITTERS / MALOJA (MAH-LOW-YA) FLAGSHIP STORE

Made for the mountains. A European outdoor sport, lifestyle, apparel, and accessories brand. Winter: Nordic and alpine ski. Summer: mountain and road bike. 409 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 760-6605. mountainroadoutfitters.com.

ROAM VERMONT

Adventurous footwear and apparel for men and women. Explore in style with Patagonia, Kuhl, Birkenstock, Prana, Dansko, and Blundstone. Located on historic Langdon Street in downtown Montpelier. Open Monday to Saturday. (802) 613-3902. roamvt.com.

SPORTIVE

Largest Bogner selection in northern New England. Toni Sailer, Sportalm of Kitzbuhel, Kjus, Parajumpers, Kinross Cashmere, Repeat Cashmere, White + Warren, Hestra gloves, Eisbar hat, Pajar, Alpen Rock, more. (802) 496-3272. Route 100, Waitsfield. sportiveinc.com.

WELL HEELED

Sophisticated collection of shoes, boots, clothing, and accessories for an effortlessly chic lifestyle. Stylish interior combined with personalized service and by appointment shopping available—a #mustdoinstowe. Daily 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. (802) 253-6077, wellheeledstowe.com.

YELLOW TURTLE

Clothing, toys, baby rentals and gifts for your baby, kids, and teens. 1799 Mountain Road, Stowe. yellow-turtle.com.

COFFEE HOUSES

BLACK CAP COFFEE & BAKERY OF VERMONT

Locally roasted coffee. Lattes, smoothies, teas, chais. Fresh pastries, breakfast, lunch. Gluten-free/vegan options. A fun place to work, meet, or hang out. Open daily. Stowe and Morrisville downtowns, Waterbury Train Station. blackcapvermont.com.

FRONT SEAT COFFEE

Great coffee and baked goods made from scratch. Locally roasted coffee, local grass-fed milk and local produce and meat. Specializing in espresso drinks, croissants, and empanadas—a great place to hang out. Daily. 110 Main St., Hardwick. (802) 472-7947, frontseatcoffee.com.

GIRAKOFI

Coffee your way. Locally roasted espresso and drip coffees. Customizable breakfast sandwiches and freshly baked pastries. Lunch options. Heated indoor and patio seating. Wi-Fi, knowledgeable staff, and Vermont gifts. 1880 Mountain Road, Stowe. girakofi.com, (802) 585-7710.

LAUGHING MOON CHOCOLATES

Delicious, handmade chocolates and confections from Stowe. Fudge, hot chocolate, espresso and coffee. Workshops. 78 South Main St., Stowe Village. laughingmoonchocolates.com.

STOWE STREET CAFÉ

Discover our community-oriented cafe featuring local coffee, food, and art, including breakfast, lunch, and weekend brunch. Shop our unique collection of art and gifts made in Vermont and beyond. 29 Stowe St., Waterbury. stowestreetcafe.com.

VERMONT ARTISAN COFFEE & TEA CO.

Stop by our state-of-the-art coffee roastery and coffee bar. Delicious coffee espresso drinks, whole bean coffees, and premium teas. 11 Cabin Lane, Waterbury Center, vtartisan.com.

DELICATESSEN

THE BAGEL

Bagels boiled and baked daily. Breakfast and lunch sandwiches, baked goods. Gluten-free options available. Seasonal specialties. 394 Mountain Rd, Stowe. (802) 253-9943. 6:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. daily.

EDELWEISS MOUNTAIN DELI

We are all about local. Farm-to-table prepared foods. Delicious deli sandwiches, salads, baked goods. Craft beer, wine, and local spirits. Daily 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 2251 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 253-4034.

DENTISTRY

STOWE DENTAL ASSOCIATES

Christopher P. Altadonna, DDS, and Jeffrey R. McKechnie, DMD. (802) 253-7932. stowedentalassociates.com. stowedentist@gmail.com.

STOWE FAMILY DENTISTRY

Creating beautiful smiles for over 40 years. Always welcoming new patients. 1593 Pucker St., Stowe. (802) 253-4157.

216 S TOWE GUIDE & MAGAZINE BUSINESS DIRECTORY

DISTILLERIES

GREEN MOUNTAIN DISTILLERY

Vermont’s No. 1 organic distillery. Vodkas, gin, maple liqueur, and small-batch whiskey. 171 Whiskey Run, (Route 100 between Stowe and Morrisville; turn on Goeltz Road). (802) 253-0064, greendistillers.com.

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH DISTILLERY

Come taste our award-winning vodkas, gins, rum, bourbon, maple bourbon, and rye whiskey. Tasting rooms in Jeffersonville, Waterbury Center, and Burlington for samples, sales and more. Daily. (802) 309-3077, smugglersnotchdistillery.com.

EDUCATION & COLLEGES

VERMONT STATE UNIVERSITY

With cross-campus collaborations and hybrid and online options, our students are connected to a network of learning opportunities across the Green Mountains. Beginning July 1, 2023. vermontstate.edu.

ENGINEERS

MUMLEY ENGINEERING INC.

Civil engineering services for residential and commercial land development, including subdivisions, site plans, wastewater and water systems, and stormwater management. Permitting for local zoning, state, and Act 250. Contact tyler@mumleyinc.com, (802) 851-8882.

EXCAVATING

DALE E. PERCY, INC.

Excavating contractors, commercial and residential. Earthmoving equipment. Site work, trucking, sand, gravel, soil, sewer, water, drainage systems, and supplies. Snow removal, salting, sanding. Weeks Hill Road. (802) 253-8503.

FISHING & HUNTING

FLY ROD SHOP

Vermont’s most experienced guide service. Guided fly fishing, ice fishing and family tours. Weekly taste of Vermont tours. Fly tackle, fly tying supplies, spin and ice fishing tackle. Route 100 South, Stowe. flyrodshop.com, (802) 253-7346.

FLOORING

FLOORING AMERICA

Customize your home with flooring that compliments your space while honoring your style. Choose from our leading collection of hardwood, carpet, tile, laminate, vinyl, and rug selections. Williston, (802) 862-5757, flooringamerica-vt.com.

FURNITURE

BURLINGTON FURNITURE

Vermont’s destination for contemporary furniture, outdoor furniture, lighting, rugs, and interior design services. Voted Best Furniture Store, 10 years in a row. Visit us at 747 Pine St., Burlington. burlingtonfurniture.us, (802) 862-5056.

NOVELLO FURNITURE

The area’s largest selection of beautiful furniture and mattresses, combined with professional home design and decorating services to give your home that special touch. 1021 Route 302, Berlin. (802) 476-7900. novellofurniture.com.

STOWE LIVING

Welcome to your new favorite store. Unique home décor and take-home furniture for the entire home. Gourmet kitchenware, gadgets, specialty foods, bedding, bath, clothing, jewelry, gifts. Ship and deliver. 1813 Mountain Rd. (802) 253-8050. Shop online at stoweliving.net.

GENERAL STORE

WILLEY’S STORE

Clothing, convenience, deli, fishing supplies, fuel, gifts, kitchen and bath, natural foods. Packing and shipping. Pet supplies, shoes, specialty foods, sporting goods, toys and games. Wine and beverages. In scenic Greensboro village.

GIFT & SPECIALTY SHOPS

BLACK CAP COFFEE & BAKERY OF VERMONT

Fun selection of gifts and cards within Stowe’s favorite coffee shop and bakery. A fun place to work, meet, or hang out. Open daily. Stowe and Morrisville downtowns, Waterbury Train Station. blackcapvermont.com.

THE BODY LOUNGE

A natural body and bath shop with an additionally large selection of whimsical gifts, cards, beautiful artisan jewelry and local art. Red Barn Shops, 1799 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 253-7333. bodyloungevt.com. More gifts l

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MAGAZINE BUSINESS DIRECTORY

BUTTERNUT MOUNTAIN FARM & MARVIN’S COUNTRY STORE

A country store focused on all things maple. Shop a thoughtfully curated selection of celebrated local products including specialty cheeses, honey, jams, Vermont-made products, crafts, and gifts. (800) 899-6349, marvinscountrystore.com.

THE COUNTRY STORE ON MAIN

Luxury bedding, dreamy candles, kitchen gadgets, children’s items, pet goods, rugs, frames, clocks, greeting cards, and more. Located in the former Lackey’s building next to Stowe Community Church. 109 Main Street, (802) 253-7653, countrystorevt.com.

GREEN MOUNTAIN DRY GOODS

A well-curated collection of Vermont-designed, Vermontmade, Vermont-inspired gifts for all ages. We’re the gateway to your Waterbury-Stowe Road shopping experience. 132 Waterbury-Stowe Road, Waterbury.

MOSS BOUTIQUE

Artist-owned boutique featuring contemporary Vermont oil paintings by Jennifer Hubbard alongside crafts by other independent designers, as well as beautiful and unique home furnishings, decor, gifts, and jewelry. Portland Street, downtown Morrisville. (802) 851-8461, mossboutiquevt.com.

STOWE MERCANTILE

Fabulous old country store, Vermont specialty foods, penny candy, clothing, bath and body, wine, craft beer and cider, and toys. Play a game of checkers or a tune on our piano. Depot Building, Main Street. (802) 253-4554. stowemercantile.com.

STOWE STREET CAFÉ

Discover our community-oriented cafe featuring local coffee, food, and art, including breakfast, lunch, and weekend brunch. Shop our unique collection of art and gifts made in Vermont and beyond. 29 Stowe St., Waterbury. stowestreetcafe.com.

TANGERINE AND OLIVE

Independent makers from across North America. Clothing, jewelry, letterpress cards and stationery, maple syrup, and inspired gifts for the outdoor lover. Downer Farm Shops, 232 Mountain Road. (802) 760-6692, tangerineandolive.com.

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE GIFT & SPORT SHOPS

Trapp Family Lodge books, music, clothing, and food. Austrian specialty gifts, gourmet products, Vermont-made products, and maple syrup. Visit our two locations or shop online: trappfamily.com. (802) 253-8511. trappfamily.com.

HARDWARE

STOWE HARDWARE

Unique hardware store providing North Country necessities and quality products. Craftsman tools, Cabot stain, complete selection of fasteners, housewares, home-care products. Open 8-4 Monday-Saturday, Sundays 9-3:30 p.m. 430 Mountain Road. Established since 1829. (802) 253-7205.

HEALTH CARE

COPLEY HOSPITAL

Exceptional care. Community focused. 24-hour emergency services, The Women’s Center, Mansfield Orthopaedics, general surgery, cardiology, neurology, diagnostic imaging, laboratory, oncology, pulmonary and sleep disorders, tele-health services and rehabilitation. Morrisville. (802) 888-8888, copleyvt.org.

LAMOILLE HEALTH FAMILY MEDICINE, STOWE

Providing routine and urgent medical care for all ages. Walk-ins welcome and Saturday hours for your convenience. (802) 253-4853. lamoillehealthpartners.org.

MANSFIELD ORTHOPAEDICS

Orthopaedic surgeons and podiatrists. Comprehensive orthopedic care, sports medicine and foot care. Nicholas Antell, MD; Brian Aros, MD; Ciara Hollister, DPM; John Macy, MD; Joseph McLaughlin, MD; Kevin McNamara, DPM and Bryan Monier, MD. Morrisville and Waterbury. (802) 888-8405, mansfieldorthopaedics.com.

MAYO HEALTHCARE

Caring for life in the heart of Central Vermont. Offering residential care services, expert rehabilitation, and skilled nursing. Robust activity program and family support. Community oriented nonprofit. Northfield. (802) 485-3161, mayohc.org.

SANA AT STOWE

Sana guides individuals with substance use disorders through the process of recovery using evidence-based practices combined with impeccable service and compassionate care in a beautiful, serene environment. Call (866) 575-9958 today. sanastowe.health.

HEALTH & FITNESS CLUBS

ELEVATE MOVEMENT COLLECTIVE

Multi-sport training facility promoting health and wellness through physical education and community engagement. Camps, classes, and open gyms for kids and adults to train parkour, trampoline, climbing, ninja warrior, and much more. Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 585-0579, elevatemovementcollective.com.

THE SWIMMING HOLE

Nonprofit community pool and fitness center. Beautiful 25meter, eight-lane lap pool, kiddie pool with water features. Spacious, well ventilated fitness areas. Aqua Fitness Classes, masters swim workouts, lessons, and personal training. Memberships and day fees available. (802) 253-9229, theswimmingholestowe.com.

HEATING/AC & PLUMBING

FRED’S ENERGY

Experienced, licensed professionals. Plumbing, heating, AC installation/service; water heaters/softeners; sewer pumps; generators; bathroom remodels; 24/7 emergency service. Morrisville: (802) 888-3827, Derby: (802) 766-4949, Lyndonville: (802) 626-4588, Richford: (802) 848-3164. callfreds.com.

INNS & RESORTS

THE LODGE AT SPRUCE PEAK

Stowe’s only slopeside lodging destination. Featuring over 250 newly refurbished guestrooms and suites, luxury residences, and penthouses. A stay at the Lodge includes access to gourmet dining, world-class events, and yearround curated recreation. sprucepeak.com.

TOPNOTCH RESORT

Stowe’s only luxury boutique resort wows with contemporary rooms, suites, one-to-three-bedroom resort homes, an airy bar and restaurant, world-class spa and tennis center, and indoor/outdoor pools. topnotchresort.com.

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE

Mountain resort in the European tradition. 96 rooms and suites, panoramic mountain views and over 28 miles of biking/hiking trails. European-style cuisine, fitness center, shops, climbing wall, yoga, von Trapp family history tours. (800) 826-7000. trappfamily.com.

INSURANCE

HICKOK & BOARDMAN, INC.

Providing superior service and innovative solutions for all your insurance needs. Since 1821. Our history helps to protect your future. 618 S. Main St., Stowe. (802) 253-9707.

STOWE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC.

Stowe’s premier multi-line insurance agency since 1955. Our pricing and service is second to none. Glenn Mink, Teela Leach, Robert Mink, and Renee Davis. (802) 253-4855.

INTERIOR DESIGN

AMBER HODGINS DESIGN

Full-service interior architecture and design. Specializing in décor, renovations and new construction for residential and commercial projects. (802) 585-5544. amberhodgins.com.

BRENNA B INTERIORS

Our mission is to help transform your space into one you can’t wait to get home to. Bringing client inspirations into functional, comfortable, and beautiful interior design. Monday to Saturday, 10-5, Sunday, 12-5. 132 Mountain Road, Stowe. brennabinteriors.com. (802) 760-6499.

DESIGN STUDIO OF STOWE

Creating beautiful interiors from classic to modern with respect to client’s taste, property, budget, deadline. New construction, renovations, and updates to existing spaces. Residential to light commercial projects. Allied Member ASID. 626 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 253-9600. designstudiovt.com.

STOWE LIVING

Complementary interior decorating services offering unique, affordable, hand-curated furniture and décor for your home. Specializing in take-home furniture, bedding, rugs, lighting, cookware. In-home consultations, delivery. 1813 Mountain Rd., Stowe. Book a meeting at design@stoweliving.net. (802) 253-8050.

JEWELRY

FERRO ESTATE & CUSTOM JEWELERS

Stowe’s premier full-service jeweler since 2006. We specialize in estate jewelry, fine diamonds, custom design, jewelry repair, and appraisals. In-house repair studio. American Gem Society. 91 Main St. (802) 253-3033. ferrojewelers.com/stowe. @ferro_jewelers_stowe.

VON BARGEN’S JEWELRY

A second-generation family business with five locations in Vermont and New Hampshire, including a jewelry making studio. Specializing in ideal cut diamonds, fine handmade artisan jewelry, and custom jewelry creation. (802) 253-2942. vonbargens.com.

KITCHENS & BATHS

CLOSE TO HOME

Specializing in the finest plumbing fixtures for your bath and kitchen, and architectural hardware for your entire home. Proudly working with architects, designers, contractors, and homeowners since 1999. A culture of customer service. 257 Pine St., Burlington. (802) 861-3200, closetohomevt.com.

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

KNAUF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

We transform landscapes into beautiful outdoor living spaces that ignite the senses and seamlessly connect inside and outside with balance and harmony. Member ASLA. (802) 522-0676. cynthiaknauf.com.

LANDSHAPES

Serving Vermont’s residential and commercial landscapes with design, installations, and property maintenance. Projects include unlimited varieties of stonework, gardens, water features, and installation of San Juan pools and spas. (802) 434-3500. landshapes.net.

SITEFORM STUDIO

Landscape architect who combines an understanding of people, place, and the environment to craft resilient, sitespecific landscapes for projects throughout New England that blend the user, site, architecture, and ecology. Member ASLA. (617) 458-9915, siteformstudio.com.

WAGNER HODGSON LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

The process of uniting program, context, form and materials provides the basis for our work, crafting modern sculptural landscapes expressing the essential inherent beauty of natural materials. (802) 864-0010. wagnerhodgson.com.

LAWYERS

BARR LAW GROUP

Complex litigation and commercial transactions, including class actions, securities litigation, EB-5 fraud, arbitrations, trials, appeals, criminal defense, corporate mergers/acquisitions, Native American/tribal matters, real estate, aviation, personal injury/wrongful death. Licensed in Vermont, New York, and Massachusetts. Offices at 125 Mountain Road, Stowe, (802) 253-6272; 100 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y., (212) 486-3910. barrlaw.com.

LAJOIE GOLDFINE, LLC

General practice including family law, civil litigation, personal injury, real estate, corporate, estate planning/estate and trust administration. Located in Stowe’s lower village, 638 S. Main St. (802) 760-6480. lglawvt.com.

OLSON & SEABOLT, PLC

General law practice: commercial and residential real estate, business representation (formation, maintenance, and asset purchases/sales), estate planning and LGBTQ matters. 188 S. Main St., Stowe. (802) 253-7810, olsonplc.net.

STACKPOLE AND FRENCH

Litigation: plaintiff and defendant representation, real estate, timeshares, corporate, utility, trust and estate planning and administration, probate, and general counsel services. Offices in Stowe, Jeffersonville, Waterbury, and Shelburne. (802) 253-7339. stackpolefrench.com.

STEVENS LAW OFFICE

Full service: We provide over 30-plus years of experience and in-depth representation in real estate, estate planning, family and criminal law, and business formation. Stowe, Derby offices. (802) 253-8547 or (866) 786-9530. stowelawyers.com.

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ZONING & DRB PERMITTING SEPTIC DESIGN & PERMITTING SITE PLANS & SUBDIVISIONS STORMWATER MANAGEMENT WATER & WASTEWATER SYSTEMS & STATE PERMITTING ACT 250 PERMITTING CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION 46 HUTCHINS STREET MORRISVILLE, VT 05661 802.851.8882 tyler@mumleyinc.com www.mumleyengineering.com Daniel Marshall • 802-582-8669 prospectcontracting.com prospectcontractingvt@gmail.com

MARKETS

THE BUTCHERY

Butcher shop, fishmonger, fromagerie, sourcing prime beef, all-natural pork, free-range chicken and game, domestic and international sauces and spices. Artisan sandwiches, housemade soups, prepared foods. Catering, concierge services. 504 Mountain Rd., Stowe. (802) 253-1444. butcheryvt.com.

COMMODITIES NATURAL MARKET

Best market 2015-2019. One-stop grocery shopping featuring organic produce, groceries, artisanal cheeses, bread, local meats, craft beer and wine, bulk, gluten-free, wellness, CBD products. Open daily. (802) 253-4464. commoditiesnaturalmarket.com.

MASSAGE & BODYWORK

BRAD HIGHBERGER, LMT, RCST

Specializing in chronic pain and injuries. Twenty-five plus years of experience working with neuromuscular therapy, myofascial release, and biodynamic cranio-sacral therapy in Stowe. vtpaintreatment.com. (802) 730-4955.

KATE GRAVES, CMT, BHS

Relaxation, deep tissue, moist heat, facilitated stretching, IASTM, crystal singing bowls, Thai, energy work (Brennan Healing Science graduate 2000). In practice over 35 years. Competitive rates. Stowe Yoga Center, 515 Moscow Rd. kgravesmt@gmail.com, stoweyoga.com. (802) 2538427.

TOPNOTCH RESORT

Relax. Rejuvenate. Renew. Your Topnotch spa experience begins upon arrival and lasts long after you leave. Our experienced spa therapists draw from an intriguing spectrum of services to respond to your needs. Mountain Road, Stowe. topnotchresort.com.

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE FITNESS CENTER

Massage therapists use a blend of techniques including Swedish, deep tissue, acupressure, and Shiatsu. Other treatments include reflexology, salt glows, and hot stone therapy. Appointments available daily. trappfamily.com.

MULTI-SPECIALTY CLINIC

ADAM KUNIN, MD AND MICHAEL HAYES, MD, CARDIOLOGISTS

Personalized cardiac care. Board-certified in cardiology, nuclear cardiology and internal medicine. Providing general cardiology, advanced cardiac tests, and imaging. Morrisville, (802) 888-8344. copleyvt.org.

DONALD DUPUIS, MD, COURTNEY OLMSTED, MD, AND SARAH WATERMAN MANNING, MD, GENERAL SURGEONS

Board-certified general surgeons. Specializing in advanced laparoscopic procedures. Providing a wide spectrum of inpatient and outpatient surgical care with a special interest in breast health. Morrisville, (802) 888-8372. copleyvt.org.

JEANMARIE PRUNTY, MD, NEUROLOGY

Board certified through the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Prunty offers comprehensive, compassionate care for patients with neurological disorders and diseases. Morrisville., (802) 888-8260.

THE WOMEN’S CENTER (OB/GYN)

Board-certified specialist William Ellis, MD, and certified nurse midwives Kipp Bovey, Erinn Mandeville, and April Vanderveer. Specialists in women’s health. Comprehensive gynecological care and obstetrics. Morrisville, (802) 888-8100, copleyvt.org.

NATURAL FOODS

ROGUE HERBALIST

Bringing back the local apothecary. Handcrafted herbal teas, tinctures, supplements, and CBD products from organic, local, or wildcrafted ingredients. Follow us on Instagram @rogue_herbalist for news and upcoming events. (904) 327-4317, therogueherbalist@gmail.com, 34 Pleasant St., Morrisville.

PERSONAL CHEF

CHEF NADAU LLC

Personal chef with over 20 years of experience ready to create your dream dining experience. Always local, always fresh. Private dinners. Cooking classes, events, and parties. (802) 586-0098, chefnadau.com.

SWEET & SAVORY PERSONAL CHEF SERVICES

Sweet & Savory’s goal is to prepare and deliver high-quality, healthy, and delicious meals to locals and visiting out-oftowners. Personal chef services, weekly meals, catering for all occasions. Easier than takeout. (802) 730-2792, sweetsavorystowe.com.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

COPLEY REHABILITATION SERVICES

Therapies include physical, occupational, hand, speech, aquatic, pediatric, cardiac, and pulmonary, work conditioning, brain injury program and other comprehensive rehab services. Clinics in Hardwick and Morrisville (Tamarack Family Medicine and Copley Hospital). (802) 888-8303, copleyvt.org.

PINNACLE PHYSICAL THERAPY

Skilled physical therapy for orthopedic and neuromuscular conditions, sports, family wellness, pre- and post-surgery. Personal, professional care. 1878 Mountain Road, Stowe. Appointment within 24 hours. Monday to Friday. (802) 253-2273. info@pinnacleptvermont.com or pinnacleptvermont.com.

PHYSICIANS

VERMONT REGENERATIVE MEDICINE

Only Regenexx clinic in New England, offering non-surgical procedures using a patient’s own cells for treatment of joint, tendon, and ligament problems, instead of surgery. Jonathan E. Fenton DO. Winooski, Vt. (802) 859-0000, vermontregenerativemedicine.com.

PICTURE FRAMING

AXEL’S FRAME SHOP & GALLERY

Offering art sourcing services and custom picture framing for 40 years within a contemporary art gallery in the heart of downtown Waterbury. Free design advice coupled with incredible customer service. (802) 244-7801. axelsgallery.com.

PRINTING

THE UPS STORE

From blueprints and banners to business cards and brochures, we print it. Shipping, scanning, and every other business service you can think of, we are your locally owned business partner. 998 S. Main St., Stowe. (802) 253-2233. store2614@theupsstore.com.

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

RURAL RESOURCES

Comprehensive property and household management services. Full-service professional management team specializing in the details of preserving your investment.

Concierge/housekeeping, vendor management, design/remodels, much more. (802) 253-9496, admin@ruralresourcesvt.com.

STOWE COUNTRY HOMES

Complete property management services for short-term vacation rentals—indoor/outdoor maintenance, repair, and renovations specialists. Quality work guaranteed and single local point of contact. stowecountryhomes.com, (802) 253-8132, or heather@stowecountryhomes.com.

STOWE RESORT HOMES

Personalized management for Stowe’s vacation homes. Home checks, personal shopping, remodeling project management, maintenance coordination, more. We also offer marketing and rental agent services for select vacation homes. (802) 760-1157. stoweresorthomes.com.

PUBS

BURT’S IRISH PUB

Stowe’s local Irish pub for over 45 years. Come enjoy our popular brunch specials out on the lawn every Sunday or stop in any time for a cold drink and a quick bite to eat. Luce Hill Road, Stowe. (802) 253-6071.

REAL ESTATE & RENTALS

COLDWELL BANKER CARLSON REAL ESTATE

Real estate services representing Stowe and surrounding communities. Our talented team leads the industry in technology, innovation, and expertise. Located at 91 Main St., Stowe (802) 253-7358, and 74 Portland St., Morrisville, (802) 521-7962. cbcarlsonrealestate.com.

ELEMENT REAL ESTATE

Element Real Estate is a boutique firm out to transform the real estate experience from one of sales to one of service, one transaction at a time. Visit us at 254 Mountain Road, Stowe, or at realestatevt.com. (802) 253-1553.

FOUR SEASONS SOTHEBY’S INT’L REALTY

Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty strives every day to exceed our clients’ expectations. To learn how we can put the power of our brand to work for you, visit us at fourseasonssir.com or (802) 253-7267.

LANDVEST

LandVest, an exclusive Christie’s International Real Estate affiliate, is a leading provider of real estate services to clients in Vermont and beyond. Discover the LandVest difference: (802) 318-6034, mkauffman@landvest.com.

LOVE2LIVEINVT TEAM

Award-winning Realtors passionate about Vermont. The Love2LiveInVT team helps buyers open doors to the Vermont lifestyle and guides sellers every step of the way. We Love2LiveInVT and can’t wait to share it with you. love2liveinvt.com. Brooke, (802) 696-2251 and Karen, (802) 793-2454.

RED BARN REALTY OF VERMONT

An office of dynamic professionals, each with a unique love of Vermont. We look forward to helping you fulfill your real estate sales and rental needs. 394 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 253-4994. redbarnvt.com.

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STOWE COUNTRY HOMES

A curated collection of rental homes to suit every interest— from one-bedroom condos to large estates ideal for small group gatherings. Locally owned and operated, we guarantee quality service with a personal touch. stowecountryhomes.com, info@stowecountryhomes.com, or (802) 253-8132.

STOWE RESORT HOMES

Luxury vacation homes for the savvy traveler. Book some of Stowe’s best resort homes—online. Well-appointed, tastefully decorated homes at Topnotch, Spruce Peak, and throughout Stowe. (802) 760-1157. stoweresorthomes.com.

WILLIAM RAVEIS STOWE REALTY

We combine the marketing and technology of one of the largest brokerages in the U.S. with the local knowledge and community focus of a Vermont family business. You can count on our family to be there for yours. (802) 253-8484, raveisnewengland.com.

RESTAURANTS

& SPORTS BARS

ALFIE’S WILD RIDE

Full bar. 24 taps. Authentic Mexican street food. Live music. 150-foot projection screen. 22-foot shuffle puck. Darts. Cornhole. Arcade. Indoor-outdoor. 8,200 square feet. Après every day. 942 Mountain Rd., Stowe.

ALADDIN

A taste of the Middle East. Sourcing traditional and original recipes to create the most diverse and authentic vegetarian dishes. A cuisine Stowe has been longing for. 1880 Mountain Road. aladdinstowevt.com, (802) 760-6383.

ALPINE HALL

At Alpine Hall we celebrate Vermont mountain culture by bringing the work of our region’s best growers, farmers, makers, and artisans to our family tables and grand bar. sprucepeak.com.

BENCH

Unique to Stowe, wood-fired comfort food including pizza. Local ingredients in a relaxed, rustic modern Vermont atmosphere. Enjoy après ski or dinner with family and friends. 28 taps, craft beer, cocktails, and extensive wine list. Daily. 492 Mountain Rd., Stowe. benchvt.com or (802) 253-5100.

BLACKBIRD BISTRO

Hidden inside a 19th-century farmhouse in the Northeast Kingdom is a modern American bistro slingin’ craft cocktails and finger-lickin’ favorites, Thursday to Sunday, 5-9 p.m. blackbirdbistro.com, (802) 586-2400.

BLACK CAP COFFEE & BAKERY OF VERMONT

Serving breakfast and lunch. Breakfast burritos and sandwiches, quiches, lunch sandwiches. Gluten-free/vegan options. A fun place to work, meet, or hang out. Open daily. Stowe and Morrisville downtowns, Waterbury Train Station. blackcapvermont.com.

BLACK DIAMOND BARBEQUE

Craft cocktails, Vermont beers, award-winning barbecue, local ingredients, soups, salads, fresh fish, and seafood, just 5 miles from Stowe. Two floors, reservations for groups of five or more. Where the locals go. (802) 888-2275. blackdiamondbarbeque.com.

BLUE DONKEY BAR

Kick ass burgers, brews, and booze. Enjoy light pub fare, fully stocked bar, and local beers on tap. The pool table is waiting for you as well. 2160 Mountain Road, Stowe. Right next to Darkside Snowboards.

HARRISON’S RESTAURANT

Located in historic Stowe Village serving elevated takes on American dishes with wine, craft beers ,and cocktails in a unique, parlor-like space. Patio dining in summer and fall. Reservations accepted. (802) 253-7773, harrisonsstowe.com.

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY

Small-batch craft lagers and ales. Lunch and dinner daily from 11:30 a.m. Innovative cocktails, extensive wine list, family friendly, fireplace dining. Outdoor patio. Perfect for special events. Beer to go. 1859 Mountain Road, Stowe. (802) 253-4765, idletymebrewing.com.

MICHAEL’S ON THE HILL

Enjoy the ultimate Vermont dining experience in a relaxed, warm atmosphere with spectacular views from our 1820 farmhouse. Award-winning, Swiss chef-owned, events. Wine spectator award. Dinner from 5-9 p.m. Closed Tuesdays. 5 minutes from Stowe. Route 100, Waterbury Center. (802) 244-7476. michaelsonthehill.com.

PIECASSO PIZZERIA & LOUNGE

Traditional, hand-tossed New York style pizza with modern style, eclectic music, and great vibes. A local favorite, voted a “Top 11 Slice in the Country” by travelandleisure.com. Creative entrees, craft beer, gluten-free menu, online ordering, takeout, delivery. (802) 253-4411, piecasso.com.

THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT

In the heart of downtown Waterbury. We specialize in local Vermont based comfort food and some of the best beers available. Private second floor events space for up to 50 people. Dinner daily, lunch Saturday and Sunday. (802) 244-7827, waterburyreservoir.com.

RIMROCK’S MOUNTAIN TAVERN

Stowe’s premier sports bar and restaurant. Join us for great homestyle cooking. Reservations recommended. Bar is first come, first served. 394 Mountain Road. (802) 253-9593, rimrocksmountaintavern.com.

THE ROOST AT TOPNOTCH RESORT

The Roost has long been one of Stowe’s best tables— whether inside or fireside—where the local food and drinks are as inspiring as our views of Mt. Mansfield. topnotchresort.com.

ROUND HEARTH CAFÉ & MARKETPLACE

Breakfast and lunch daily, with shopping while you wait. Check seasonal hours at roundhearth.com. Located at 39 Edson Hill Road, Stowe. (802) 253-7223.

SALUTE

Chef owned and operated. Authentic Italian cuisine. Homemade pasta, wood-fired Napoletana pizza, prime steak, lasagna, and fresh baked bread. Daily specials, gluten free vegetarian options. Catering available. 18 Edson Hill Road, Stowe. (802) 253-5677, salutevt.com.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE

Locally sourced sweet and savory crepes, coffee and espresso, burgers, beer and wine. Takeout and dine-in. 454 Mountain Road, Stowe. skinnypancake.com.

10 RAILROAD STREET

Food, drink for the hungry traveler. Fresh seasonal menu, innovative specials, cozy atmo and friendly service. Enjoy a table with family and friends or grab a seat at the poolsized, fully stocked bar. Reservations appreciated but not required. 10 Railroad St., Morrisville. (802) 888-2277.

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430 Mountain Road, Stowe 253-7205 Mon-Sat 8-4 • Sun 9-3:30 •Housewares •Cabot stains •Painting supplies •Electrical supplies •Ice and snow removal •Cleaning supplies •Minwax stains •Best selection of fasteners

TIPSY TROUT

At Tipsy Trout we combine the region’s premium seafood with an unmistakably Vermont culinary approach. Our energetic, cocktail-forward, and seafood-rich experience features Vermont’s best raw bar, shareable apps, coastalinspired entrees, and a distinctive wine program. sprucepeak.com.

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE KAFFEEHAUS

Offering a variety of European pastries, soups, salads, sandwiches, wine, and our von Trapp lagers. Open daily. For hours call (800) 826-7000. trappfamily.com.

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE—LOUNGE & DINING ROOM

Our dining room offers seasonal menus for breakfast and dinner reflecting both Austrian and Vermont traditions, featuring farm-to-table cuisine. Lounge has great seasonal lunch offerings. Daily. Reservations: (802) 253-5733. trappfamily.com.

TWO SONS BAKEHOUSE

Our Hyde Park location offers a carefully crafted breakfast and brunch menu from local farms and ingredients. Fresh bread and pastries available daily, specialty orders welcome upon request. 246 Main St., Hyde Park. (802) 851-8414, twosonsbakehouse.com.

WHIP BAR & GRILL

Friendly, casual atmosphere with open grill and fireplace dining. Fresh seafood, hand-cut steaks, vegetarian specialties, children’s menu. Serving dinner daily, takeout available. Located at the Green Mountain Inn. Order online, make reservations at thewhip.com or call (802) 253-6554.

THE WHISTLEPIG PAVILION

Treat yourself to some authentic Vermont après-ski dining. WhistlePig Pavilion brings all the old favorites again this year, including fire-baked raclette cheese and inspired WhistlePig rye whiskey cocktails. sprucepeak.com.

RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

COPLEY WOODLANDS

Come home to Stowe, where retirement living is easy. Spacious condos, fine dining, activities. Available for adults 55+. Copley Woodlands, 125 Thomas Lane, Stowe. (802) 253-7200, copleywoodlands.com.

WAKE ROBIN

A vibrant non-profit life-care community located on 136 acres just south of Burlington in Shelburne. Residents enjoy independent living in cottages and apartments and comprehensive, on-site health care for life. wakerobin.com, (802) 264-5100.

SHOE STORES

WELL HEELED

Unique collection of shoes, boots, handbags, belts, clothing, and jewelry in a chicly updated Vermont farmhouse halfway up Stowe’s Mountain Road. Shoes are our specialty and effortlessly chic our motto. Daily 11 to 5 and private appointments. Insta: wellheeledstowe. (802) 253-6077, wellheeledstowe.com.

SKI RESORTS

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT, VERMONT

America’s Family Resort. Mountainside lodging. Award-winning kids’ programs. Three interconnected mountains, 2,610’ vertical. FunZone 2.0 entertainment complex. Summer: 8 pools, 4 waterslides, disc golf, mountain bike park. (888) 256-7623, smuggs.com/sg.

SKI & SNOWBOARD SHOPS—Retail

MOUNTAINOPS

Mountainops is a full-service ski shop specializing in sales and rental of Alpine, AT, telemark, backcountry, and Nordic gear. Best clothing in town tucked in a cozy 1895 barn. 4081 Mountain Rd., Stowe. (802) 253-4531. mountainopsvt.com.

ONION RIVER OUTDOORS

Gear, clothing, and expert advice for all your outdoor adventures. Friendly, knowledgeable sales and service of bikes, skis, and car racks. Visit onionriver.com for our fun events and clinics. Langdon Street, Montpelier. Open daily.

PINNACLE SKI & SPORTS

Voted No.1 in customer service. All new rental and demo skis and snowboards. All major brands. Clothing from Marmot, Obermyer, Fly Low, Helly Hansen, others. Accessories, tuning services. Open nightly till 8 p.m., 10 p.m. Fri., Sat. and holidays. (802) 253-7222. pinnacleskisports.com.

SKIING—Backcountry

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE OUTDOOR CENTER

Nearly 2,600 acres to explore with 26 miles of perfect territory for laying tracks on ungroomed snow. Backcountry gear rentals with 24-hour notice. Call (802) 253-5755 for pricing and information on passes, rentals, and lessons. Rentals: trappfamily.com/equipment-rentals.htm.

SKIING–Cross Country

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE OUTDOOR CENTER

Over 37 miles of groomed trails and 62 miles of backcountry trails for all ages and abilities. Equipment available to rent/purchase at the Nordic Center, which includes a retail shop. Call (802) 253-5755 for pricing and information on passes, rentals, and lessons. Rentals: trappfamily.com/ equipment-rentals.htm.

SNOWSHOEING

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE OUTDOOR CENTER

Trapp Family Lodge offers ample terrain where you can snowshoe on your own or with a scheduled group tour. Whether with a group or out on your own, we’ll help you plan a route that suits your experience and confidence. trappfamily.com.

SPA

THE SPA AT SPRUCE PEAK

By nature, we all aspire to be healthy. Experience a complete wellness journey included with every spa treatment— including access to our outdoor pool, healing lodges, and more. sprucepeak.com.

TOPNOTCH RESORT

Bring mind, body, and soul into better balance. Enjoy fitness classes, a selection of over 100 treatments, indoor/outdoor pools with a cascading waterfall, and men’s and women’s lounges. Memberships. Mountain Road, Stowe. topnotchresort.com.

SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS

CHURCH STREET MARKETPLACE

“America’s No. 1 Best Public Square,” USA Today 2022. Explore 100-plus local shops and restaurants. Feel the magic of the Marketplace—the heart of Vermont’s Queen City. churchstmarketplace.com.

LITTLE RIVER HOTGLASS STUDIO

Walk into the studio and experience the art of glassblowing up close. Adjacent gallery features work of resident artist Michael Trimpol. Thursday to Monday 10-5. (802) 253-0889. littleriverhotglass.com.

MONTPELIER ALIVE

American’s No. 1 small town for shopping is just a half an hour’s drive from Stowe village. Visit downtown Montpelier and experience the joy of shopping again. Exit 8 off Interstate 89.

SPRUCE PEAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

The Stowe region’s premier, year-round presenter of music, theater, dance, film, education, and family programs on stage, on screen, and across the community. (802) 760-4634. Visit sprucepeakarts.org for more information.

THE SPRUCE PEAK VILLAGE ICE RINK

A classic winter activity, right at the heart of the Spruce Peak Village. This beautiful, outdoor skating rink sits surrounded by magical views of the ski slopes. sprucepeak.com.

STOWE HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM

Preserving Stowe’s rich history. Museum at the West Branch and Bloody Brook Schoolhouses, next to Stowe Library. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 1-4 p.m., and when the flags are out. (802) 253-1518. stowehistoricalsociety.org, info@stowehistoricalsociety.org.

VERMONT TEDDY BEAR RETAIL STORE & FACTORY TOURS

Go behind the scenes, create your own bear, and find the perfect gift for any occasion during this interactive experience the family will treasure forever. 6655 Shelburne Road, 7 miles south of Burlington. (802) 985-1319, vermontteddybear.com.

SPECIALTY FOODS

LAKE CHAMPLAIN CHOCOLATES

What the New York Times calls “some of the best chocolate in the country.” Made from fair-trade certified chocolate, using Vermont cream, honey, and maple syrup. Caramels, truffles, clusters, ice cream, factory seconds. (802) 241-4150. lakechamplainchocolates.com.

SPORTING GOODS

ONION RIVER OUTDOORS

Gear, clothing, and expert advice for all your outdoor adventures. Friendly, knowledgeable sales and service of bikes, skis, and car racks. Visit onionriver.com or find us on Langdon Street in beautiful, downtown Montpelier.

UMIAK OUTDOOR OUTFITTERS

Let the adventure begin with Umiak. Offering kayaks, canoes, and SUPs for purchase or rent. If you’ve never paddled before, join our staff for a lesson or demo boats at our store. 849 S. Main St., Stowe. (802) 253-2317, umiak.com.

TATTOOS

HELLBROOK INK

Hellbrook Ink is a sister-owned tattoo shop located in Jeffersonville offering permanent makeup and tattoos. 16 Iris Lane, Jeffersonville. hellbrookink@squarespace.com, @hellbrookink.

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S TOWE GUIDE & MAGAZINE BUSINESS DIRECTORY

TENNIS

TOPNOTCH RESORT

Vermont’s premier tennis resort featuring over 30 tennis and pickleball programs perfect for aficionados, beginners, the young and young at heart. Six seasonal outdoor and four indoor hard courts, as well as a USPTA-certified international staff. Mountain Road, Stowe. topnotchresort.com.

TOYS & GAMES

ONCE UPON A TIME TOYS

Make every day a play day with our amazing Airfort®. Test your agility on a ninjaline. Traditional toys like Lego® to eclectic ones like loveable monsters. Vermont’s most exciting store for 46 years. Birthday? Get a free balloon. (802) 253-8319, fun@stowetoys.com, stowetoys.com.

TRANSPORTATION & TAXIS

GREEN MOUNTAIN TRANSIT MOUNTAIN

ROAD SHUTTLE

GMT offers year-round service in Lamoille County and free seasonal service between Stowe Village and Stowe Mountain Resort and many points in between. For schedule information, ridegmt.com or (802) 223-7287.

TRANSPORTATION —Golf Carts

JOHN THOMPSON’S GOLF CARTS

Sales, rentals, parts and service. New and pre-owned golf carts. Street legal, gas, electric, utility. 2041 Williston Road, South Burlington. (802) 863-9138, johnthompsonsgolfcarsofvermont.com.

TRAVEL & TOURS

4 POINTS TOURS

Let 4 Points help you enjoy our local attractions. Brewery, artisan, scenic, or custom tours. Perfect for bachelor or bachelorette parties, reunions, corporate outings. Call Rick at (802) 793-9246, 4pointsvt.com.

SAVOR VERMONT

Savor Vermont brings guests around to taste the region’s best beers, hard ciders, and foods. Leave the driving to us and enjoy as we take you from one tasting to another. info@savorvermonttours.com, (802) 917-6656.

WEDDING FACILITIES

EDSON HILL

Edson Hill offers you an exclusive, quintessential Vermont private estate with picturesque views, 22 luxurious guestrooms, and a talented culinary team to help create the wedding of your dreams. edsonhill.com, (802) 253-7371.

JEWISH COMMUNITY OF GREATER STOWE

Host your next event in our indoor/outdoor event space in center of Stowe. Weddings, mitzvahs, conferences, fundraisers, dinners, celebrations, classes. Member and non-member pricing. All welcome. Friday services online and in-person, 6 p.m. 1189 Cape Cod Road. events@jcogs.org, (802) 253-1800.

STOWE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Worship with us Sundays, 9:30 a.m. at 137 Main St., or online at stowecommunitychurch.org. All welcome. Getting married in Stowe? Tie the knot in a cherished ceremony at the historic, interfaith-based Stowe Community Church. (802) 253-7257, info@stowechurch.org.

STOWE MOUNTAIN CHAPEL

The perfect location for you intimate wedding, memorial, or vow renewal. Winter lift service provides a ski or ride inand-out ceremony site. For Sunday service or other information, go to stowemountainchapel.org.

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE

From intimate ceremonies in our lodge to grand receptions under a tent with spectacular mountain views, we tailor to individual tastes and budgets. European-style cuisine and accommodations. (800) 826-7000. trappfamily.com.

WINE, BEER, & SPIRITS

BLACK CAP COFFEE & BAKERY OF VERMONT

Craft beer store and selection of wines, within Stowe’s favorite coffee shop and bakery. A fun place to work, meet, or hang out. Open daily. Stowe and Morrisville downtowns, Waterbury Train Station. blackcapvermont.com.

DEDALUS

Dedalus is an intimate collection of perspectives and stories we can’t wait to pour into your glass. We’re here to inspire great drinking and bring communities together around the table. 1031 Mountain Road, Stowe. dedaluswine.com.

FINE WINE CELLARS

Fantastic wine selections from around the world. Great prices. From the rare to the exceptional value. Under $10$100-plus. We’re nuts about wine. Please see our ad on page 2. (802) 253-2630. finewinecellars.us.

STOWE BEVERAGE

Full-service wine, beer, liquor, mixers, snacks. Stowe’s best wine and beer selection. Best price in town on Vermont maple syrup. Cigars. Free local paper with wine purchases. Monday through Saturday 10-7; Sunday 11-6. (802) 253-4525.

STOWE PUBLIC HOUSE

Over 700 craft beers, cider, mead, and wine. Mix and match in any quantity. Curated selection of Vermont cheeses and specialty foods. Bar open daily. 109 Main St., Stowe. (802) 585-5785, stowepublichouse.com.

YARN

YARN

Yarn offers a wide selection of yarns from near and far as well as needles, accessories, gifts, inspiration, classes, and a friendly fiber community. 80 S. Main St., Suite 3, Waterbury. (802) 241-2244. yarnvt.com.

YOGA

PEAK YOGA

Peak Yoga classes help to build strength in body and mind. We provide grounding and uplifting classes for all levels in our beautiful and bright Stowe studio. Located in The Swimming Hole, 75 Weeks Hill Road, Stowe. Book a class at peakyogastowe.com. Follow us on Instagram: @peakyogastowe

STOWE YOGA CENTER

Practice yoga in a beautiful space. Carpeted studio with windows and high ceilings. Beginner friendly, weekly schedule online. Special series: chakra yoga, prenatal, chair yoga, meditation. Privates available. Kate Graves, 515 Moscow Rd. kgravesmt@gmail.com, (802) 253-8427, stoweyoga.com.

HOUSES OF WORSHIP

Cambridge Christian Fellowship, Main St., (802) 335-2084

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Johnson, 635-2009

Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, 635-2988

Elmore United Methodist Church, Elmore, 888-7890

First Congregational Church of Christ, Morrisville, 888-2225

Grace Bible Church, Stowe, 585-3343

Grace Brethren, Morrisville, 888-3339

Jehovah’s Witnesses, Jeffersonville, 644-5322; Morrisville, 888-5610

Living Hope Wesleyan Church, Waterbury Center, 244-6345

Morrisville Baptist Church, 888-5276

Most Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church, Morrisville, 888-3318

New Beginning Miracle Fellowship, Morrisville, 888-4730

United Community Church of Morrisville, 888-2225

Second Congregational Church, Hyde Park, 888-3636; Jeffersonville, 644-5533

Seventh-Day Adventist, Morrisville, 888-7884

St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Cambridge, 644-1909

Trinity Assembly of God, Hyde Park, 888-7326

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Stowe, (617) 835-5425

United Church of Johnson, 635-7249

Waterbury Alliance Church, 244-6463

Wesley United Methodist Church, Waterbury, 244-6677

Wolcott Mennonite Church, 888-5774

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more, page 216

ALADDIN 105

ALCHEMIST BREWERY 134

ALFIE’S WILD RIDE 149

ALPINE HALL 147

ARCHERY CLOSE 123

ARTISANS’ GALLERY 100

AXEL’S FRAME SHOP & GALLERY 109

BAGEL, THE 166

BENCH 143

BITTNER ANTIQUES 131

BLACK CAP COFFEE 9

BLACKBIRD BISTRO 25

BLACK DIAMOND BARBECUE 157

BLUE DONKEY BAR 141

BODY LOUNGE 117

BOUTIQUE 99

BRENNA B INTERIORS INSIDE BACK

BURLINGTON FURNITURE & MATTRESS 97

BURT’S PUB 148

BUTCHERY, THE 13

BUTTERNUT MOUNTAIN FARM 57

CAMARA SLATE PRODUCTS 212

CHURCH STREET MARKETPLACE 31

CLOSE TO HOME 177

COLDWELL BANKER CARLSON RE INSIDE FRONT, 5

COMMODITIES NATURAL MARKET 165

COPLEY WOODLANDS 49

COUNTRY STORE ON MAIN 118

CUSHMAN DESIGN GROUP 179

DEDALUS WINE SHOP & MARKET 153

DESIGN STUDIO OF STOWE 199

DONALD P BLAKE JR BUILDER 183

DOWNTOWN MONTPELIER 125

ECK MACNEELY ARCHITECTS 189

EDELWEISS DELI 3

EDSON HILL MANOR 145

ELD ARCHITECTURE 181

ELEVATE MOVEMENT COLLECTIVE 30

ELEMENT REAL ESTATE VERMONT 17

ELIZABETH HERRMANN ARCHITECTURE/DESIGN 207

FERRO ESTATE & CUSTOM JEWELERS 29

FINE WINE CELLARS 2

FLOORING AMERICA 185

FLY ROD SHOP 59

FORGET-ME-NOT-SHOP 131

FOUR POINTS VERMONT 57

FOUR SEASONS SOTHEBY’S RE 175

FRED’S ENERGY 211

FRONT SEAT COFFEE 167

FURNITURE SHOP, THE 199

GIRAKOFI 105

GORDON DIXON CONSTRUCTION 199

GREEN ENVY BOUTIQUE 95

GREEN MOUNTAIN DISTILLERS 155

GREEN MOUNTAIN DRY GOODS 129

GYLLENBORG CONSTRUCTION 203

HARRISON’S RESTAURANT 155

HARRY HUNT ARCHITECTS 201

HELLBROOK INK 112, 213

HELLY HANSEN 107

HITCHHIKER BIKE SHOP 47

IDLETYME BREWING CO. 163

IN COMPANY CLOTHING 39

J. GRAHAM GOLDSMITH ARCHITECTS 187

JESS BOUTIQUE BACK COVER

JEWISH COMMUNITY OF GREATER STOWE 44

JOHN THOMPSON’S GOLF CARTS 211

JOHNSON WOOLEN MILLS 217

KNAUF LANDSCAPE DESIGN 187

LAKE CHAMPLAIN CHOCOLATES 12

LAKE CHAMPLAIN CLOSETS 205

LAMOILLE COUNTY CANNABIS 61

LAMOILLE HEALTH PARTNERS 2

LANDSHAPES 209

LANDVEST / CHRISTIE’S INT’L REAL ESTATE 173

LAUGHING MOON CHOCOLATES 165

LAWSON’S FINEST LIQUIDS 167

LITTLE RIVER HOTGLASS STUDIO & GALLERY 125 LOEWEN WINDOW CENTER OF VT & NH 197

LOVE2LIVEINVT REAL ESTATE 5

MAD MOOSE ARCHITECTURE 205 MARRIAGE QUEST 167

MARVIN’S COUNTRY STORE 57 MAYO HEALTH CARE 212

METHOD ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 170 MICHAEL’S ON THE HILL 137

MOSS BOUTIQUE 121

MOUNTAIN LOGWORKS 207

MOUNTAINOPS OUTDOOR GEAR 7

MOUNTAIN ROAD OUTFITTERS 11

MOUNTAIN ROAD SHUTTLE 21

MUMLEY ENGINEERING 219

NORTHWOOD GALLERY 103

NOVELLO FURNITURE 169

ONCE UPON A TIME TOYS 127

ONION RIVER OUTDOORS 49

OTTER CREEK AWNINGS 210

PASTELLA BURNS 34,25

PATTERSON & SMITH CONSTRUCTION 195 PEAK YOGA 55

PIECASSO PIZZERIA & LOUNGE 134

PINNACLE SKI & SPORTS 1

PROSPECT CONTRACTING 219

RED BARN REALTY OF VERMONT 211

RED HOUSE FINE HOMEBUILDING 181

RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAPROOM 143

RIMROCK’S MOUNTAIN TAVERN 166

RK MILES 213

ROAM 118

ROBERT PAUL GALLERIES 113

ROCK ART BREWERY 159

ROGUE HERBALIST APOTHECARY 121

ROUND HEARTH CARE & MARKETPLACE 139

RURAL RESOURCES 210

SALUTE 161

SANA AT STOWE 16

SAVOR VERMONT TOURS 45

SISLER BUILDERS 209

SITEFORM STUDIO 183

SKINNY PANCAKE 163

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH DISTILLERY 165

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT 53

SPA AT SPRUCE PEAK 23

SPORTIVE 33

SPRUCE PEAK ARTS 111

SPRUCE PEAK ICE RINK 12

STEVENS LAW OFFICE 215

STOWE BEVERAGE & LIQUOR STORE 165

STOWE CIDER 157

STOWE COMMUNITY CHURCH 44

STOWE COUNTRY HOMES 179

STOWE FAMILY DENTISTRY 112

STOWE HARDWARE & DRY GOODS 221

STOWE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 127

STOWE LIVING 107, 203

STOWE MERCANTILE 101

STOWE MOUNTAIN CHAPEL 44

STOWE PUBLIC HOUSE 149

STOWE RESORT HOMES 15

STOWE STREET CAFE 23

SWEET & SAVORY PERSONAL CHEF 164

SWIMMING HOLE 27

TANGERINE & OLIVE 117

10 RAILROAD STREET 141

THE CURRENT 123

TIPSY TROUT 147

TOPNOTCH RESORT & SPA 51

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE 19

TWIN GOATS CLOTHING 105

TWO SONS BAKEHOUSE 159

UMIAK OUTDOOR OUTFITTERS 45

VERMONT ARTISAN COFFEE 167

VERMONT REGENERATIVE MEDICINE 30

VERMONT STATE UNIVERSITY 133

VERMONT TEDDY BEAR 108

VISIT MONTPELIER 125

VOLANSKY ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING 168

VON BARGEN’S JEWELRY 43

WAGNER HODGSON LANDSCAPE ARCH 189

WAKE ROBIN 132

WELL HEELED 41

WHIP BAR & GRILL 161

WHISTLEPIG PAVILION 153

WILLIAM RAVEIS REAL ESTATE 201

WILLEY’S STORE, THE 127

WINTERWOOD TIMBER FRAMES 213

YANKEE BARN HOMES 197

YARN 129

YELLOW TURTLE 105

224
INDEX TO ADVERTISERS
brennabinteriors.com 132 mountain road, stowe vt 802.760.6499 @brennabinteriors tuesday - friday 10am - 5pm sunday 12pm - 5pm