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2015 ANNUAL REPORT


Throughout our history, St. John’s has managed to stay ahead of the curve. Over the years, we have strived to anticipate ways—either through the offering of new services and amenities or through the development of new physical spaces—to better meet the needs of the elders we are privileged to serve. We can look around today and see proof that our efforts have led to an improved quality of life for the hundreds of members of the St. John’s family. This is no small feat. We began in 2015 perhaps the greatest undertaking in the history of our organization. The creation of our first two small homes at 150 Highland Avenue delivered on a promise to provide the type of nursing home setting that allows both elders and staff to thrive. Our move to small homes is about much more than the physical renovation of each floor at St. John’s Home to reflect individual neighborhoods—it also involves a major shift in the way we develop partnerships to care for elders. While there are many unknowns that go along with a project of

this magnitude, the success of our two Green House Homes in Penfield has shown that a move to this neighborhood model of care results in an environment where both elders and staff can cultivate the type of life-affirming relationships we all deserve. This is no small achievement. Every day we are reminded of the impact of what is achieved within the walls of St. John’s by looking around us. We hear stories about the small things that staff and volunteers do to improve the lives of the people we serve. We also learn about countless small but meaningful acts of kindness that St. John's residents routinely perform without a second thought. We have grown accustomed to hearing about how these seemingly small gestures can bring foundational change. Many of these “small” achievements are chronicled in this year’s annual report because we take pride in the relationships that are built here at St. John’s. In many ways our success as an organization is measured by the strength of these relationships we have built.


contents You will find that despite the challenges of the past year, we at St. John’s have much to celebrate. Our accomplishments in 2015 are the result of the thousands of small contributions that St. John’s employees, volunteers, elders, family members, donors, and other stakeholders made throughout the year. If you are reading this annual report, we consider you—in no small way—to be one of the reasons for our success.

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SMALL CHANGES

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SMALL DEEDS

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SMALL GESTURES

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VOLUNTEERS

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ST. JOHN'S FOUNDATION Charlie Runyon President and CEO

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SMALL CHALLENGES

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SMALL TEAMS

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Ann Wood Chair, Board of Directors

FINANCIALS

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YEAR IN REVIEW

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SMALL GIFTS

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LEADERSHIP AND BOARD

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changes

Ashok takes pride in knowing that the unique brand of care he provides Gary and other elders at the Green House Homes makes a difference. “I feel good thinking about where he was and how far he has come.� 27


incredible outcomes

For Gary Foster and his family, the right type of care came at exactly the right time. Gary came to Whitman House—one of St. John’s two Green House Homes located in Penfield—on hospice. “He was not thriving,” remembers his daughter Julie. “He had lost a lot of weight.” Julie also noticed that her dad— a lifelong salesman who made a living conversing with others—had been making no attempt to engage with others prior to arriving at the Green House Home. Some very subtle changes to how the staff at the Whitman House approached Gary’s care started paying dividends almost immediately. “You need to take your time with him,” says Ashok Kumar, a St. John’s shahbaz who remembers how staff members helped Gary feel at home in his new surroundings.“You need to be patient with him.” Fortunately, the Green House model of care allows for the type of patience that was instrumental in drastically improving Gary’s quality of life. Instead of waking him up to have breakfast with everyone else, they turned on his favorite music and let him get up on his own time. When staff did direct him to the dining room for a meal, they didn’t just put a plate of food in front of him and expect him to eat; they let Gary go at his own pace. They even sat with him and joked around, which helped Gary’s personality begin to shine through again. It was January 2014 when Gary moved to the Whitman House. Soon after his arrival, he started regaining much of the weight he had lost. He was happier, more engaged. Julie knows that individualized care has made all of the difference for her dad. “For us as a family—we couldn’t be more pleased with the care he is receiving.”

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deeds

According to Sandy Maniloff, the enthusiasm for these budding relationships between students and their tutors works both ways. “I think we all do kind of think of them as grandchildren.�

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better communiqiem

On a Thursday morning in mid-February, the thermometer reads a frigid nine degrees. However, that does not stop a handful of Brickstone by St. John’s residents from taking the 15 minute bus ride on icy roads to reach Bloss Street, the temporary home of Rochester City School #12. The group of residents meets with individual kindergarten and first grade students who have been displaced while their permanent school undergoes major renovations. Among the volunteers, Jack and Sandy Maniloff spend two 45-minute sessions each week with the kids, coaching and encouraging them through their reading. Some students are better readers than others—and for some, English is not their first language. That obstacle has not tempered their determination. “They are very anxious to read,” says Jack about the students. “We’ve been surprised at how hard the kids are willing to work.” This new partnership has resulted in a mutually beneficial relationship between St. John’s and the school, which will re-open in Fall 2016 across the street from Highland Hospital. Susan Allen, the parent liaison for School #12, sees first-hand how the children have responded to this program in a positive way—and how they benefit from the extra support provided by the volunteers who bridge the generations. “The students are excited to read and look forward to seeing their new friends.”

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gesturem connectionm better

It took Valeriy Vysochanskiy a while to warm up to the idea of attending Skalny Day Break Adult Day Program. During his first few visits, he rarely participated in activities and seemed disinterested. That was when a simple idea changed Valeriy’s entire experience. Staff members created flash cards in Ukrainian—Valeriy’s native language—to help him better express his thoughts and preferences. At first, he would laugh when staff members mispronounced the words on the cards. This gesture, however, has been instrumental in Valeriy’s acclimation to this new environment and he seems to appreciate the effort. “It makes him realize that we’re trying as hard as he is,” explains St. John’s Nurse Christine Forbes. This technique helped staff learn that playing catch was always one of Valeriy’s favorite pastimes. Now they are always quick to bring out a ball to toss around. This simple act of connection has made Valeriy much more comfortable. He is now more involved in the craft and exercise activities he enjoys. He has even gone from coming two to three days to attending five days a week.

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ST. JOHN’S MEADOWS

6,723

Volunteer Hours

116

Resident Volunteers

BRICKSTONE BY ST. JOHN'S

Jean Loomis passes out gifts at the Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon.

Jean Loomis 6

making volunteering possible

Jean Loomis is modest about all of her contributions, but residents know better. They all agree that the longtime volunteer services manager at St. John’s Meadows (and later Brickstone by St. John’s) is instrumental in developing the relationships that open doors for the many opportunities they have to give back to the community. As one resident puts it, “she’s a real gem!” Another explains Jean’s impact on coordinating the reading program at Rochester City School #12 highlighted on page 4—“it simply would not have happened without all of Jean’s hard work.” Thank you Jean for your tireless hard work serving St. John's elders as well as the community at-large!

2,345

Volunteer Hours

63

Resident Volunteers

ST. JOHN’S HOME AND PENFIELD GREEN HOUSE HOMES

16,526

Volunteer Hours

225

*Active Volunteers*

25,924

Total Volunteer Hours

442

**Total Volunteers** *Includes 28 St. John’s Home elders **Includes 38 volunteers from the community contributing at St. John’s Meadows and Brickstone by St. John’s

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message from the Foundation

St. John’s is grateful to all who contributed to St. John’s Foundation in 2015. A list of donors can now be found in each issue of St. John’s Living.

We know that each gift made to the St. John’s Foundation—whether it is big or small—has a meaningful impact to the St. John’s community. The significant charitable gifts we receive for our small homes project has enabled us to move forward in transforming foyers and hallways throughout St. John’s Home into unique neighborhoods. Similarly, there are hundreds of smaller gifts made throughout the year that make a difference in the lives of St. John’s elders. As an example, the many $5 donations we receive during our annual Illumination of Love celebration makes it possible for Eileen, an elder living in our Sunflower Neighborhood, to regularly receive therapeutic massage services. The generosity of each and every one of our donors is a driving force behind the realization of St. John’s mission and vision. We would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your contributions over the past year. Please know that however large or small of a sum you give, it is put to good use to enhance the lives of the people we serve. Sincerely,

FINANCIALS FOR 2015

$8,410,895

Tamara Cohen CFRE, President

Total Assets

$69,242 Grants

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Nancy J. Adams Board Chair


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great

The Eastman-Rochester New Horizons program began 25 years ago with the goal of providing older adults with the opportunity to perform music in a formal group. Started by Roy Ernst from the Eastman School of Music, Rochester’s New Horizons Band is the first of over 100 such programs throughout North America. Of the 250 members here in Rochester, nearly a dozen are residents from St. John’s Meadows and Brickstone by St. John’s. The program includes several bands and ensembles comprised of a range of musicians—from first-timers to those who have been playing for decades and every skill level in between. One of those St. John’s participants is David Reynolds, who plays with one of the full bands and two smaller ensembles. He played trumpet throughout high school and in bands during his time at Colgate University during the 1950s. David continued to play throughout his adult life, but admits that this unique program has kept him playing music more regularly than he had expected. “It’s a challenge,” says David. “The other musicians rely on me to do my part.” While they are featured at Kodak Hall and the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival, the program’s motto speaks to the level of expectations for would-be participants. “Your best is good enough.”

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teams

Michelle, a nurse on the Lilac neighborhood, has noticed the progress made over the past year. “Elders see the difference too. They communicate better with staff and laugh with us more. It’s a more personal touch." 10 7


steady improvement

The core vision of St. John’s Home’s transition to small homes—aside from providing a home-like setting for happy, well-cared for elders—is developing cohesive, self-managed teams. The concept of small teams of versatile workers having greater responsibility for a smaller group of elders is a new one. In fact, it is a major departure from the way care has been provided at the Highland Avenue location for nearly six decades. As St. John’s shifts from one large skilled nursing home to this collection of small neighborhood homes, we are seeing the evolution of these teams take shape. One example of a group that has come a long way in a short period of time is the Lilac neighborhood team that is responsible for caring for elders on Reservoir 3 and South 3. Staff members feel more empowered and family members of elders living on the Lilac neighborhood appreciate the stronger relationships they have formed with those caring for their loved ones. Lilac’s Neighborhood Administrator Ashley Daggett is excited about what she sees. “I am really proud of this group. They are coming together as a team and supporting each other more and more each week. We’ve come a long way over the past year and we have definitely seen a positive impact on the lives of the elders.” The Small Homes Project is set for completion in early 2017, with all work teams transitioning to the versatile worker model. If early signs are telling, employees and elders alike have much to benefit from the transition.

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2015 Consolidated Financials

$63,553,643 TOTAL REVENUES

RESIDENT REVENUE : $48,981,757 RENTAL REVENUE : $13,121,925 OTHER REVENUE : $1,449,961

SALARIES AND BENEFITS : $38,214,428 OTHER DIRECT EXPENSES : $2,571,169 PHARMACY : $426,812

$61,829,918 TOTAL EXPENSES

PURCHASED AND CONTRACTED SERVICES : $3,852,334 SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS : $3,972,083 TAXES AND ASSESSMENTS : $2,984,010 BAD DEBT EXPENSE : $1,353,810 DEPRECIATION AND AMORIZATION : $4,071,197 INTEREST : $4,384,075

$1,723,725 OPERATING INCOME

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$497,325 CHANGES IN NET ASSETS


JANUARY Centenarian Celebration at St. John’s Home honors 14 elders 100 years old and older FEBRUARY

2015 8 in review

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren meets with St. John’s Home Resident Council MAY Former Buffalo Bills Head Coach Marv Levy headlines Inaugural Embrace Living event JUNE Joey B’s restaurant marks grand opening at Brickstone by St John’s JULY St. John’s Meadows hosts White House Conference on Aging viewing party SEPTEMBER St. John’s Skalny Day Break Adult Day Program celebrates 40th Anniversary Small Homes renovations begin on 6th floor Rose Neighborhood at St. John’s Home NOVEMBER St. John’s receives $437,000 dementia education grant from Greater Rochester Health Foundation

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gifts Staff members were genuinely moved by Enza’s thoughtfulness. “Getting a scarf from her is really meaningful. It is such a nice reminder of how important our work can be.”

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lasting memories

Recovering from an injury can be difficult at any age, but Vincenza Cassano—or “Enza” as she is now known by many members of the staff—worked to make the most of her time away from home. She decided to take a hobby she enjoys at home and use her talents to leave behind special gifts for staff members she says have been “very helpful” during her stay at Wolk Rehabilitation Center at St. John’s Home. As she puts it, “I’m appreciative that there are people like this, and I wanted to do a little something for them.” A prolific knitter, Vincenza has completed 15 scarves for employees during her short time at St. John’s. According to Vincenza, each scarf takes nearly five hours to complete. That is close to 75 hours of knitting gifts for people she has only just met! While nobody looks forward to spending a few weeks away from home while recovering from an injury, Vincenza admits her time at St. John’s has not been too bad. Now that she is at the tail end of her stay, she is back to her regular work— knitting baby blankets for parishioners at her church. That is not to say she is ruling out making one or two more scarves for staff members with whom she has yet to become acquainted. These gifts will stay with grateful employees for years— a reminder of one woman sharing her talents and kindness during a difficult time in her life.

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leadership team 9 Charlie Runyon

Tamara Cohen, CFRE

PRESIDENT AND CEO

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT PRESIDENT, ST. JOHN’S FOUNDATION

Paul Bartlett VICE PRESIDENT, SENIOR HOUSING

Joanne Braeunle CORPORATE STRATEGY OFFICER

Robert Earl VICE PRESIDENT AND CFO

Rebecca Priest ADMINISTRATOR OF SKILLED SERVICES

board of directors 9 St. John’s

St. John’s Meadows

Ann Wood, CHAIR Dominick Mancini, SECRETARY Robert Boehner, TREASURER James Dole James McBride William C. Wallace, Jr.

James Dole, CHAIR/TREASURER Dorothy Haelin, CHAIR ELECT Krista Vardabash, SECRETARY Paul L. Hammer, ThD Phil Litteer Mick McCue

St. John’s Home

Brickstone by St. John’s

Robert Boehner, CHAIR Nancy Zaenglein, SECRETARY Helen Halewski Anna E. Lynch Michelle Westrich

James McBride, CHAIR/SECRETARY Bridget Shumway, CHAIR ELECT Pietro Giovenco Suzanne Tunnell

Penfield Green House Homes Dominick Mancini, CHAIR/SECRETARY Carol Brink, CHAIR ELECT Nancy Adams, TREASURER Donna Maxwell

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St. John’s Foundation Nancy J. Adams, CHAIR Elisabeth P. Howard, CHAIR ELECT Robert Spindler, SECRETARY Charles A. Chada, TREASURER Anna E. Lynch, IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Dawn Aprile P. Miller Ashman, MD Scott Doescher Eliza Kozlowski Amy Mason, MD Thomas Spina David Steitz, PhD Ann Wood


Grear qhings are done by a series of lmall qhingm brought together.

- Vincent Van Gogh


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Rochester, NY Permit #87

150 Highland Avenue Rochester, NY 14620

St. John's

vision

St. John's will lead and inspire a shift in society's views of elderhood by embracing and celebrating life's experiences.

St. John's

mission

St. John's embraces life with vibrant, caring, and life-affirming relationships.

We embrace living by being‌ innovative

friendly compassionate respectful

responsive

fun

Connect with us! Read our blog at stjohnsliving.org and follow us on: @

EDITOR Tom Harner, Marketing Communications Manager tharner@stjohnsliving.org DESIGN Tanya Space PRINTING Canfield and Tack CONTRIBUTING WRITER Emily Biuso St. John's Annual Report is a publication of the Marketing Department. DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Jennifer Lesinski jlesinski@stjohnsliving.org 150 Highland Avenue Rochester, NY 14620 585-760-1300 info@stjohnsliving.org stjohnsliving.org

St. John's Annual Report- 2015  

A look back at a busy year across the St. John's spectrum of senior services.

St. John's Annual Report- 2015  

A look back at a busy year across the St. John's spectrum of senior services.