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HILLTOP FASHION AND S T YLE


ALICE + OLIVIA

O U R S TO R E S AKR IS . ALEX ANDER Mc QUEEN . ALICE + OLIVIA . BALENCIAGA . BANDIER . BERETTA GALLERY BLUEMERCURY . BRUNELLO CUCINELLI . CAROLINA HERRER A . CARTIER . CELINE . CHANEL CHR ISTIAN LOUBOUTIN . CHR ISTOFLE . DIOR . ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA . ESCADA . ETRO FENDI . FORTY FIVE TEN . FR AME . FRÉDÉR IC FEKK AI . HADLEIGH’S . HARRY WINSTON . HERMÈS JAMES PERSE . JIMMY CHOO . K IEHL’S SINCE 1851 . LE LABO . LELA ROSE . LORO PIANA MADISON . MARKET . MIRON CROSBY . R AG & BONE . R ALPH LAUREN . ROLLER R ABBIT ST. JOHN . ST. MICHAEL’S WOMAN’S EXCHANGE . THE TOT . THEORY . TOM FORD . TORY BURCH TR INA TURK . VALENTINO . VERONICA BEARD . VINCE . WILLIAM NOBLE PA R T I A L L I S T I N G TaxFree Shopping Refund Location | Complimentary Valet Parking and Personal Shopping Gift Cards Available | Courtesy Car Service to and from Highland Park Village At Mockingbird Lane and Preston Road | hpvillage.com


Dallas is 1,127 miles from the heart of Mexico City, but only minutes away from Gourmet Mexicano cuisine. Setting the bar for Continental Mexico City Cuisine for the last 40 years, Javier’s is not your typical Tex-Mex Restaurant. You will not find tacos or enchiladas here, but you will find some delicios dishes of tenderloin beef, fresh seafood, shrimp, chicken and quail dishes seasoned with traditional spices of Mexico, and influenced by its Spanish heritage. Javier’s will change the way you think of Mexican food. We surround you with a classic colonial sophistication that you will not want to leave behind. And why should you? After dinner enjoy the wonderful ambiance of the famous cigar bar, and select from the large selection of premium cigars, ports, and handcrafted drinks in a sophisticated ambiance that you won’t find anywhere else in Dallas.

4912 Cole Avenue Dallas, Texas 75205

214-521-4211 Spring/Summer 2019 • 1


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SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

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Board certified physicians for major and minor emergencies- No wait time!

PARK CITIES 5201 W. Lovers Lane 214.238.6440

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GALLERIA AREA 12338 Inwood Road 214.238.6270

AdvanceER.com


ALI MIKLES EDITOR-IN-CHIEF EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR ANNA GRACE CAREY SENIOR EDITOR MEREDITH WELBORN ASSISTANT EDITOR MARY GRACE METHENY CREATIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR MAGGIE KLIMUSZKO FASHION EDITOR TERRELL KIKIS STYLE EDITOR HAILEY HAASE ASSISTANT STYLE EDITOR ISABEL ENSMINGER ASSISTANT CREATIVE PRODUCTION ABIGAIL SAVOPOULOS ART ART DIRECTORS GABBY GRUBB, DYALA ASHFOUR ASSISTANT ART DIRECTORS GILLIAN BRESSIE, EMILY MATTHEWS DIGITAL DIGITAL DIRECTOR BROOKE HERIGON ASSISTANT DIGITAL DIRECTOR EMMA CASTNER WRITERS LIZZIE LOFTUS, MADELEINE FENNELL, CAROLINE LIDL PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR HANNA REFVIK SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER JULES FOX VIDEO EDITOR DOREEN QIN MARKETING MARKETING DIRECTOR EMILY MATTHEWS SALES & MARKETING MANAGER KENDALL FREE SALES ASSISTANTS CAILLIE HORNER, PAULINA LEIVA EVENT & DISTRIBUTION MANAGER EMMA SIEGEL WRITERS SYDNEY BEAL, BIANCA BONADELLE, MAGGIE BORDERS, CAROLINE CORLEY, PAHNO GEORGETON, GIOVANNA HNATH, RYAN MIKLES, CATHERINE NEILSON, JOHN RUSSELL NIEDERER, ELIZABETH NIELSEN, DYLAN PATTERSON, CHRISTINA PHILLIPS, ABIGAIL SAVOPOULOS, MALAYAH STEWART CONTRIBUTORS PHOTOGRAPHERS REID GUERRIERO, CHASE HALL MAKEUP RACHAEL SEIDL ADVISING EDITORS JAYNE SUHLER, CAMILLE KRAEPLIN, CANDACE BARNHILL, LISA GOODSON PHOTO ADVISOR ROBERT HART EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TONY PEDERSON SMU Look, a student-run magazine at Southern Methodist University, is published by the Division of Journalism in Meadows School of the Arts. SMU Look is dedicated to providing a youthful take on Dallas fashion and living. We strive to inspire and cultivate the standard of style on campus and beyond. Umphrey Lee Center 6225 Hillcrest Avenue Dallas, TX 75275

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VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2

CONTENTS

8 tap tap tap ASMR: A new technique for an age-old problem.

12 burnin’ up Don’t be a basic beach. Make a splash this summer with bold and boujee accessories.

16 off the beaten boulevard From activists to business owners, these students prove there’s more to college than just classes and coffee breaks.

28 banned for the better Chanel says exotic skins are out, but many people aren’t buying the new ban.

32 from smoo to krewe How Stirling Barrett went from the boulevard to running a multimillion dollar eyewear company.

35 more than merch Merch madness is in full swing thanks to Saint Pablo and trips to Astroworld.

Contributors

Photographer “I’m looking forward to shooting more– particularly abroad and getting into video!” – Ried Guerriero, Class of 2019

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Cover Picture Model: Jules Fox, 2021 Missoni Full Piece, Stylist’s Own, $560 Loeffler and Randall, Celeste Heel $395 White Blouse, les Coyotes de Paris, $250

We asked our contributors what they’re up to this summer

Photographer “I want to shoot more and go on adventures to cool places to get inspiration!” – Chase Hall, Class of 2021

Makeup Artist “I’m getting my yoga instructor’s license, doing lots of wedding makeup, and preparing for law school in the fall!” – Rachael Sidel, Class of 2019


SPRING INTO

EDITOR’S LETTER

Self Care

College can be overwhelming — homework assignments, exams, meetings, parties, and everything in between consume our daily lives. We are still trying to figure it all out while attempting to appear as though we have it all together. I’m here to tell you we don’t, and quite frankly no one really does. This limbo stage between “adulting” and still living out our final teen years is a part of life that we should relish in rather than trying to ignore. Part of balancing our busy lifestyles is learning to give ourselves permission to take care of our minds, bodies, and environments. Stressors can be especially prevalent as a college student but there are trendy methods like ASMR (pg. 8) and music therapy (pg. 30) that can help us cope and overcome tumultuous times. Self-care isn’t just a buzzword and it stems from having a healthy mind. Simplified and organized environments can promote mental clarity and spark joy in our lives which is emphasized through the Marie Kondo movement (pg. 5). We must also educate ourselves on the consequences of not taking care of our physical health — our skin (pg. 16) and our bodies (pg. 18). I find inspiration to seek balance while striving to be the best version of myself through the remarkable achievements of my peers. Current and former mustangs like Dana Giles with I Want The Real and Francois Reihani with La La Land Kind Cafe (pg. 12) are making an impact beyond the boulevard through their unconventional and entrepreneurial ventures, just as SMU alum and Forbes 30 under 30 recipient Stirling Barrett did through his eyewear company, Krewe (pg. 28). Life moves fast but college moves faster. Enjoy it, don’t sweat the small things, and while you’re at it spend some downtime hanging out with giraffes and zebras (pg. 20).

Ali Mikles Editor-in-Chief

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tap-tap-tap ASMR: A New Technique for an Age-old Problem By Madison Jenos A knife cuts through a bar of soap in an Instagram video, perfectly dividing it into halves. Can you see it? Or, the tap-tap-tap of Zoe Kravitz’s fingernails on a bottle in Michelob Ultra’s Superbowl commercial. Can you hear it? All of these experiences are related to ASMR. ASMR stands for “Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response,” and it refers to a tingling, often-pleasurable sensation that people can receive from sounds or visuals that please the brain. ASMR University is an ASMR resource and news center founded by Dr. Craig Richard, a professor of Biopharmaceutical Sciences at The Shenandoah University, School of Pharmacy. “Not everyone has a deeply relaxing response to ASMR triggers. My guess is that 20 percent of the population can have a strong ASMR response, and maybe 40 percent can have some type of relaxing response,” Dr. Richard says. Some commonly produced triggers include: eating honeycomb, cracking an egg shell, crinkling of paper, making slime, or popping pimples. While ASMR is not recognized as a valid therapy treatment tool, individuals suffering with stress and sleeplessness may benefit from watching ASMR videos. These videos are free, easy to access and able to aid relaxation; however, the causes of stress and sleeplessness can be the result of severe, life-threatening conditions. So, these videos may not be a viable way to resolve these problems. Dr. Stephen Smith, of the University of

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Winnipeg, is one of the first psychologists to research ASMR by studying the brain’s response to these triggers using an EMRF brain scan. He first learned of the ASMR in October 2013 after being introduced to it by a student in his introductory psychology course. He anticipated only doing a quick case study, but his curiosity morphed into something much greater after realizing the immensity of this phenomenon. Smith is unable to speak on the use of ASMR as a therapeutic technique due to the lack of clinical studies; however, he believes it can be beneficial to both physical and mental health. “People with ASMR sometimes use the videos to help them relax and/or go to sleep. Relaxation and sleep are important to both physical and mental health, so this use of the videos is almost certainly beneficial,” Dr. Smith says. Sensory studios are beginning to pop-up in major cities such as Los Angeles and New York City. Among these, Whisperlodge is the first in-person immersive ASMR studio. Leah Ableson, director at Whisperlodge in New York City, has noticed that over the year’s clients have become more attuned to the concept of ASMR prior to visiting the studio due to its growing mainstream popularity and use as a helpful supplemental tool. “I think it is really important to make the distinction that ASMR is not a replacement for therapy, but rather a helpful supplemental tool… ASMR should be viewed more akin to yoga or meditation,” Ableson says.


TIDYING

UP

people.com

Spring marks the time of year that Americans haul carloads of storage bins to Goodwill in hopes of decluttering and embracing minimalism. We repeat the mantra “out with the old and in with the new” as we color-code, sort, and perfect our wardrobes, medicine cabinets and kitchen drawers. By Brooke Herigon Marie Kondo, who is known for her decluttering technique, the “KonMari” method, has sold more than 7 million copies of her book, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing.” The “KonMari” method follows general feng shui principles, like cleaning little by little everyday, storing items according to the seasons, and discarding one item every time you accumulate another. The “KonMari” method offers steps to alleviate the pressures of America’s consumerist culture by creating a space filled only with items that “spark joy.” There’s no question that millennials are embracing this new wave of decluttering and minimalism. A recent survey from Harris Poll and Eventbrite found that 78 percent of millennials - versus 59 percent of baby boomers — “would rather pay for an experience than

material goods.” This shift has made organizing and designing your space to be curated and clean-cut trendy. Feng shui specialist William LeStrange says the biggest goal of feng shui is to create balance. LeStrange doesn’t advise clients to read a book about feng shui, but to experience it on their own. “Cultivate awareness by sitting in your room and becoming aware of your surroundings,” LeStrange recommends. “Ask yourself: how do I feel when I’m sitting here?” “The basic law of feng shui is being in harmony with natural forces, bringing ourselves as close to nature as we can, and creating harmony through balance,” LeStrange says. “What may be a great design for one person may not be a great design for another. There’s no one size fits all, everything must be

considered.” LeStrange compares feng shui to the feeling of rearranging your bedroom furniture as a kid, creating a new space that is your very own. Feng shui is often criticized for being a placebo with no significant impact; LeStrange agrees but says that it is not necessarily a bad thing. “A placebo effect is better than a nocebo effect,” LeStrange says. “I would rather not take the drug and still get the benefits.” Sure the minimalism movement could be deemed as just a trend with a Netflix series and Instagram influencers like @thehomeedit going viral, but the comforting feeling of walking into your home will never be out of style. If decluttering and cultivating our space can help enforce smart habits, leading to a healthier life, why not try it?

Spring/Summer 2019 • 9


Looking out

SPRING TONES

AND TRENDS

thezoereport.com

The one element of fashion that will never go out of style is color. A pop of color can transcend an outfit from drab to fab. This season, designers and influencers have embraced tonal dressing for spring. This expression is perfect for creatives who view fashion as art or the gal who can’t seem to buy pieces out of her preferred color scheme. Use a variety of hues from the same color to add charisma to any outfit. – Malayah Stewart

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Looking out

TO DYE FOR Florals for spring? Groundbreaking. Take a break from dull f lorals and meet this season’s more fun twin, tiedye. This throwback trend has been seen on celebrities like Selena Gomez and Beyonce and can be sported on the streets or beach. – Brooke Herigon

OLD SCHOOL BABY

ALL FEATHERED UP

Blair Waldorf is that you? You heard it here first...headbands are back! This time they have reappeared as your middle school staple’s more chic cousin. Move over Claire’s; brands such as Gucci, Prada, Simone Rocha, and Lele Sadoughi have all revamped the old school classic in a bigger and better way. Velvet, embellishments, and prints have claimed their rightful place as the it-girls of headwear. Talk about a way to complete an outfit. – Lizzie Loftus

The feathered fashion trend is everywhere, ha ndba g s, d resses, ha i r accessories, it can add some va-va-voom to any simple outfit. This season, step into feathered sandals for the perfect finish to any formal ensemble. – Brooke Herigon

GET SCULPTURED

BEAD THE COMPETITION

BIG HOOP LITTLE HOOP Sculptural heels are the stylish statement to make this summer season. This luxurious novelty has spread from the runway to the city streets, and retailers are providing artsy footwear suitable for all budgets. From stacked logos and shapes to metallic orbs, step up your #shoefie game stat. – Caroline Lidl

A pair of delicate and everyday-wear hoops remain a must-have jewelry piece to maximize and accessorize even the most minimal or elaborate outfits. You can layer each pair with more huggie hoops, intricate studs or some Mignonne Gavigan statement earrings or keep it simple and sport them on their own. Regardless of how you wear these earrings, go grab some before they’re gone! – Madeleine Fennell

Instagram influencers and any of their avid followers know there is a new bag in town. Beaded mini bags are this year’s go-to accessory for everything from LBDs to light-wash jeans and a graphic tee. This ’90s comeback has taken on a multitude of directions — vibrant bead color, drawstring pouches, and fruity decals. Make any look chic, shiny, and beaded! – Caroline Lidl

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burnin' up

Don’t be a basic beach. Make a splash this summer with bold and boujee accessories.

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Shaken Not Stirred Model: Jules Fox, Class of 2021 Photography: Reid Guerriero Stylists: Terrell Kikis, Maggie Klimuszko Alice and Olivia, Jodiey Wedge, $350 Le Spec, Nero-Black Smoke Mono, $119 Sachin and Babi Earrings, Dupio Tassel-Gojiberry, $250 Marlboro Bag , Mua Mua Dolls, $435 Black Bathing Suit, Free People, Stylist’s Own Vintage Chanel Belt, Stylist’s Own

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With a Twist Ellis Hill Women’s Hooded Terry Robe $295.00 Blue sunglass, Urban Outfitters $24 Kate Spade Earrings, Stylist’s Own

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On the Rocks L Space One-piece $180 Hermes Twilly, $170 Rachel Zoe Claudette Crystal Platform Sandal, $398 Ellis Hill Wine Bucket $325 Pink Jean Jacket, Stylist’s Own Vintage Chanel Bag, Stylist’s Own

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Off the Beaten Boulevard

News flash: we go to school with some really cool people. From activists to business owners, these mustangs prove there’s more to college than just classes and coffee breaks. Niiko X SWAE By Ali Mikles Mark Manchester, aka SWAE, and Nikolaus Becker, aka Niiko, and their manager, Marks twin Kevin, make up Niiko X SWAE. Since their start as SMU sophomores, the DJ pair have already hit milestones many artists may never achieve in their career. The duo went from sitting through business classes in Cox to preparing for one of their biggest performances to date -- performing both weekends of Coachella. SMU Look: Why did you decide to start Niiko X SWAE while still at SMU? Niiko X SWAE: The time was right and the opportunities were present for us. We were more or less competing against each other for mini gigs at the fraternity parties before we decided to link up and put our abilities together. We both were solid DJ’s, but after forming the duo, our production really started to take off to the next level. SL: In what ways did taking on school and a career challenge you? NXS: The hardest part was attendance. By our senior year, we were gone every Thursday to Sunday to the point where if we got to stay home for a weekend in Dallas it was a treat. When you’re always gone, it makes rescheduling tests and class work tough, but thankfully our teachers were almost all on board with what we were doing and the administration at SMU was fully supportive of our careers. SL: What advice do you have for someone who wants to start a career while in college? NXS: Never give up. There will be times when you have so much school work that you don’t want to continue your career or visa versa, but you’ve got to just push through. I’m sure there were plenty of times where we were so overwhelmed with work that we didn’t know if we would be able to study for a test, but you have to be able to balance both. At the end of the day you are still a student and have to do whatever it takes to graduate and get that degree. SL: How did balancing school and music prepare you for the “real world?” NXS: The work ethic and mindset we developed at SMU will always be with us. As independent artists, we have to wear many hats. Beside producing music, we host our own radio show (NXS Radio), travel for shows, promote/ market our music, and more. Each day is totally different -- not spent only in the studio. Being organized and planning each week out in advance along with our release timeline saves us a ton of stress. SL: What are you guys up to now? NXS: Currently, we are working on the biggest show of our careers. We are playing both weekends of Coachella at the Heineken House for our first time, so we are working hard to create our dream set. This is actually the first time we’ve physically announced we’re playing at Coachella so shoutout to SMU Look! Besides Coachella, we’re constantly in the studio making and releasing new music. If you’re in Southern California, we just announced our first headline show in San Diego at Omnia Nightclub on May 18th! Follow Niiko X SWAE on instagram and spotify (@niikoxswae) for updates on their performances and music.

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Dana Giles | I Want the Real | Class of 2019 By Ali Mikles

Dana Giles may look like the average SMU student but there’s much more than meets the eye. Her passion project turned popular media platform, I Want the Real, discusses topics that are normally swept under the rug. SMU Look: Why did you start I Want the Real? Dana Giles: I felt like there was a problem in our society regarding mental health and other taboo topics. Problems like addiction, depression, anxiety, eating disorders weren’t talked about openly, and if they were there was a huge stigma around them. I saw my peers struggling with these issues and feeling alone in what they were going through. I, myself, have also struggled with many issues discussed on IWTR, but felt a constant pressure to seem as if I was “perfect.” I feel like we are constantly concerned with appearing that we have no flaws or problems. In reality, however, this is far from the truth. I knew I wanted to make a difference. I initially released it just thinking “let’s see how it goes,” but the response was remarkable. SL: What is the most rewarding part of your job? DG: The DMs and messages I get from people who I don’t even know saying how much I Want the Real has helped them. I also get a lot of people telling me their personal stories through social media and now after reading IWTR – how it inspired them to seek help. It makes all the hard work worth it. SL: Congrats on winning a $5,000 grant through SMU’s Big Ideas business plan! What’s next? DG: Thank you! Yes, it was super nerve wracking but exciting. My goals are to really invest a lot of my time and energy into it, especially after graduation. I know the impact it has made and I want to grow it as much as I can to help as many people as possible.

Francois Reihani | La La Land Kind Cafe

By Gillian Bressie

After co-founding Pok the Raw Bar as an SMU student, Francois Reihani opened La La Land Kind Café which employs foster kids who are “aging out of the system.” SMU Look: What inspired you to create La La Land Kind Café? Francois Reihani: I started out in the restaurant and bar industry. I quickly learned that I hated the industry’s values. I quit everything to focus on my passion with my non profit, We Are One Project which helps foster youth transition out of the system. The youth couldn’t get or maintain jobs and didn’t have money for food, housing, or a living. La La Land allowed us to create a place where not only we could hire and mentor youth, but make a statement that business’ can value people over profits. SL: What was it like starting a business while you were an SMU student? FR: It was fun and challenging. You have to get really good at scheduling and time management. SL: What are your hopes for La La Land Kind Café going forward? FR: I hope that La La Land creates a movement in which people start to demand more from businesses around the world. Our society should only support businesses that support us. Even if we open 1,000 La La Lands, we won’t solve the entire problem. It’s a team effort.

Milan Brahney | Dallas Cowboys Cheerleader | Class of 2019

By Emma Castner

In her freshman year, Milan Brahney became a member of the famous and highly competitive Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders. But being a DCC is much more than crop tops, white cowboy boots, and pom poms. SMU Look: How did you balance school work and DCC? Milan Brahney: We practiced every week night from 7 p.m. until whenever we finished and had to be at the stadium six to eight hours before the game to rehearse and prepare every other week. We were also required to appear at various Cowboys events. I would go through flashcards for a finance exam while sitting in traffic on the way to practice. Before games, I would whip out my textbook to squeeze in a few pages of reading. SL: What is your greatest accomplishment from your time as a DCC? MB: Getting a month spread in the annual DCC calendar, especially as a rookie. SL: How do you feel now that you are not a part of DCC? MB: I am so glad that I was a Dallas Cowboys Cheerleader, but now, I don’t have to balance both worlds of college and DCC. I can live in my sorority house, take more time for myself, and have an overall more balanced lifestyle.

Spring/Summer 2019 • 17


Glow Up

Effortless and effervescent – minimal beauty products create maximum effects.

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Fountain of Youth Models: Elizabeth Kelley, Class of 2020; Alana Franklin, Class of 2021, Alex Rosellini, 2020 Photography: Abigail Savopoulous Alice and Olivia, Matira Strapless Mini Dress, $295 Stylists: Isabel Ensminger, Terrell Kikis, Hailey Haase

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GOOD LOOKS

forever young

It’s not just the title of the iconic Rod Stewart tune, but a goal that most everyone wishes to achieve. Many women have a fixation on an everlasting appearance of youthfulness and as the obsession grows, so do the number of young women adding anti-aging treatments to their beauty regime. By Ali Mikles One in five women stress about wrinkles before reaching their mid-twenties, according to a study conducted by Dermstore (one of the worlds largest skin care company). The study also found that the average millennial user taking action against aging is age 26, thanks to the help of trendy treatments and serums. SMU senior, 22-year-old Mimi Kelly recently started implementing aging prevention treatments in her skin care routine. Kelly believes it is the price she must pay now to avoid permanent effects later. Among other treatments, she started receiving preventative Botox procedures every six months. Preventative Botox In the past, Botox was considered to be a procedure for older women. Now, preventative Botox for women in their 20s and 30s is all the rage. Botox procedures have increased 28 percent since 2010 amongst 20- to 29-year-olds, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons,. First things first… what is Botox? Botox is FDA-approved to temporarily make moderate to severe frown lines, crow’s feet, and forehead lines look better in adults. Botox blocks signals from the nerves to the muscles. The injected muscle can no longer contract, which causes the wrinkles to relax and soften. Kelly uses preventative Botox to help with

20 • SMU LOOK

a deep line in her forehead that bothered her for years. “I realized it was a really easy fix and would help me in the long run,” Kelly says. “I’m so happy with my results from Botox; I couldn’t recommend it enough.” Dallas-based Dermatologist Dr. Flora Kim raves about the procedure for its ease and effectiveness, but it comes with warnings. “The most important thing to emphasize is that Botox is really an art in addition to being a science,” Kim says. “You will find injectors who do the exact same cookie cutter formula on every single patient, which I think is completely wrong because everyone’s face is different.” The ideal starting age is subjective for a similar reason. Some women age quicker due to the amount of facial expressions they use or other factors like sun exposure, but Kim recommends her patients to start treatment in their mid- to late-20s, and definitely by their early 30s. Retin-based Products The Vitamin A derived topical treatment is not only for preventing wrinkles, but can help brighten skin, treat acne, and fade dark spots. There are two common retin-based products: retinols (over-the-counter serums) and Retin-A (prescription serum). Skincare fanatic, 21-year-old Hanna Refvik says she uses retinol to take advantage of its anti-aging benefits and for the impact it has on

the overall quality of her complexion. “I have little red bumps that appear all over my skin and I’ve found retinol to be the only thing that works to subside them,” she says. “For me it’s just a plus that they happen to have properties that also help avoid wrinkles.” If your skin is extra sensitive and prone to irritation, use Retin-A/retinol cautiously. “The most important thing is tolerability, so start slow,” Kim says. “I usually have my patients start at a tiny pea size amount once a week and build from there. It’s a marathon not a sprint.” She adds that there are different strengths and formulas so it’s really important to find the right type for your skin and lifestyle. SPF No matter what anti-aging interventions you’re comfortable with, on a basic level, Kim says anti-aging measures can start from the day you are born. “Something as simple as wearing sunscreen every single day is one of the best and most budget friendly things you can do to prevent aging,” Kim says. “Most of the things you see when you get older are a result from UV exposure over decades. The earlier you can start in terms of preventing that damage from taking place in your skin the better — and that starts as a kid.”


GOOD LOOKS

out of the

BAG The quintessential straw bag comes in a variety of colors, shapes and sizes to appeal to all customers with a varixety of tastes. From the small wine bag to the massive slouchy straw tote, this season’s “it” bag will be the only thing you need either lounging on the beach or out for dinner. – Madeleine Fennell

speed dealers sunglasses Previously reserved for middle-aged dads wearing Harley Davidson, speed dealers sunglasses are back. Travel at the speed of light back to the 90s in these retro sunglasses which trendsetter Kim K brought back. You can find a pair at your local gas station or invest in a pair from Acne, Stella McCartney, or ASOS.

– Brooke Herigon

swimsuits Long sleeves aren’t the first thing that come to mind when you think about the beach, but sleeved swimsuits are the hot new thing. They provide protection from the sun and sporty functionality. Ditch your bikinis and jump on this new trend. – Emma Caster

SALT SPRAY Beach hair, don’t care! Use salt spray to get effortlessly tousled surfer girl waves this summer without setting foot in the sand. Formulated with extracted salts, this product will soak up grease, give a little lift, and add unbeatable texture. Just spritz it on damp or dry hair for perfect mussed tendrils all season long. – Caroline Lidl

SUNSCREEN Sunscreen is the product to have in your beauty arsenal. All sun shielding beauty products should have broad spectrum UVA and UVB protection finding products with an SPF of 30 or higherthat includes zinc oxide or titanium dioxide says Dermatologist Jill Feetham of Dallas Center for Dermatology and Aesthetics. . – Dylan Patterson

KOPARI DEODERANT Kopari’s point of difference comes from one ingredient: coconut oil. Aluminum is one of the leading ingredients in deodorant, and is often used for its sweat stopping properties. Kopari and other natural deodorants ditched the rumored carcinogen in hopes of creating a healthy alternative for the wellness-obsessed. Kopari natural deodorant works just as well as your average deodorant, but it does away with any suspected harmful ingredients.

– Madeline Fennel

Good Read No beach trip is complete without a beach read. Not sure which book to grab on your way to the California coast? Reese Witherspoon dishes out recommendations through Reese’s Book Club by Hello Sunshine. Hello Sunshine publishes and promotes stories written by women. Past picks include: “Where the Crawdads Sing,” “Next Year in Havana,” and “Little Fires Everywhere.”

– Dylan Patterson

Spring/Summer 2019 • 21


SHOCK

FACTOR

Toxic Shock Syndrome: Advocates argue #ItsNotRareItsReal but doctors may say otherwise. By Christina Phillips During your routine trip to the store for menstrual products, have you ever found a box of Kotex super plus tampons in your cart? If so, you’ve just met model Lauren Wasser’s gateway to toxic shock syndrome (TSS). One tampon later, a healthy, young, and active 24-year-old Wasser would have her life turned upside down. Three years after the attack, Wasser opened up to Vice News about the morning police found her “face-down in [her] bedroom, 10 minutes from death” after her unresponsiveness prompted her mother to call for a welfare check. Before Wasser arrived at the hospital in an ambulance, she had already developed a 107-degree fever, suffered two heart attacks, and was experiencing organ failure. Upon arrival, Wasser was diagnosed with TSS, pumped with 80 pounds of fluid, put on life-support, and drugged into a medically induced coma with a 1 percent chance of survival. A week and a half after Wasser was rushed to the hospital, she awoke dazed and confused, and in excruciating pain from her decaying purple feet and legs. She recalls listening to a

22 • SMU LOOK

nurse say, “I have a 24-year-old girl who’s going to need a right leg below the knee amputation.” When Wasser left the hospital she was 200 pounds, without a right leg, and missing her hair. After her near-death experience, and a period of isolation and healing, Wasser stepped back into the modeling industry. In 2015, she debuted her golden prosthetic leg in a Nordstrom’s campaign and a year later walked in Chromat’s Fall/ Winter show during New York Fashion Week. In 2012, Wasser, per doctor’s orders, lost her other leg. The Activist Today, Wasser is using her platform and social media presence to advocate for, and bring awareness and transparency to TSS. She is working with Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney of New York to pass the Robin Danielson Feminine Hygiene Product Safety Act. The bill is named after a woman who lost her life to TSS, and demands that the FDA perform independent testing of all feminine

hygiene products, collect data on TSS, and for brands to disclose their ingredients. Some of the harmful ingredients found in tampons include rayon, dioxin, synthetic fibers, chemical fragrances, and dyes. The Doctor A lt hou g h Wa s s e r u s e s t he h a s ht a g #itsnotrareitsreal, most articles describe TSS as “an incredibly rare but serious and potentially fatal condition.” Dr. Bruce Roberts, an obstetrician-gynecologist, says that he hasn’t seen a case of TSS in 30 years, but admits that he hears about it occasionally. When it comes to super absorbent tampons, Roberts tells his patients to steer clear. “Nobody had problems with cotton tampons, but when companies started making tampons out of synthetic fibers to make the tampons super absorbent, problems started to arise,” Roberts says. “The theory is that if bacteria gets in a wound, that’s when TSS can act up.” Micro cuts can have macro consequences.


CAMP It’s not what you think.

By Anna Grace Carey The Met Gala always showcases daring fashion. Each May, designers face an immense amount of pressure to create a perfect moment: the right celebrity, the right hair and make-up, the right dress. It’s about the moment Blake Lively looked over her shoulder and the world saw the effortless train of her ruby Versace dress cascade down the steps of the red carpet. It’s about Rihanna looking more regal than the Queen of England in Guo Pai’s yellow, fur-lined masterpiece. This year is about celebrating a different sort of moment: the imperfect moment. The 2019 theme “Camp: Notes on Fashion” is a reference to Susan Sontag’s “Notes On Camp” essay, published in 1964. Defining Camp style, she wrote, “it’s good because it’s awful.” That’s Camp. It’s loud, unconventional and unapologetic. It’s a little black dress with the phrase “Little Black Dress” stamped on the side, as seen in Off-White’s pre-Fall 2018 collection. The Jonas Brothers’ reunion music video “Sucker” has its own Camp aesthetic. The ostentatious, colorful costumes set against the backdrop of an opulent mansion is very Camp. Sophie Turner’s ruffled pink dress and colorful feather headpiece, for example, could be considered a fashion faux pas, but for 2019 it’s in vogue. “Camp taste is, above all, a mode of enjoyment, of appreciation — not judgment,” Sontag says. “What it does is to find the success in certain passionate failures.” It’s Christian Francis Roth’s navy shift dress punctuated with a fuchsia Crayola crayon sleeve The Jonas Brothers’ reunion music video “Sucker” has its own Camp aesthetic. The ostentatious, colorful costumes set against the backdrop of an opulent mansion is very Camp. Sophie Turner’s ruffled pink dress and colorful feather headpiece, for example, could be considered a fashion faux pas, but for 2019 it’s in vogue. “Camp taste is, above all, a mode of enjoyment, of appreciation— not judgment,” Sontag says. “What it does is to find the success in certain passionate failures.”

LOGOMANIA By Sydney Beal

From the iconic Chanel CC of the late 1990s to the low-rise Juicy Couture tracksuits of the 2000s, designers have embraced the logo trend for decades. Today Gucci belts and Louis Vuitton Neverfulls flood SMU classrooms and Instagram feeds demanding the attention of influencers and fashion fanatics alike. This is the essence of “logomania:” chic-yet-ironic logos plastered on our favorite designer products. Karl Lagerfeld made Chanel — an internationally recognized symbol of luxury — provocative, youthful and energetic. How? Through the logo. It only takes one runway show or a peak at the most recent issue of Vogue to realize that, fashionable or not, logomania is in. Only time will tell for how long. What do you think? We asked our readers to vote. Here are the results:

44% are into logos, 56% would rather keep it low-key Where can these logos be located? 31% say SMU only, 69% say everywhere 48% say this trend is here to stay, 52% can’t wait for it to go away

Photo by Sydney Beal

Spring/Summer 2019 • 23


Out of the Woods Models: Ella Rose Arnold, Class of 2022; Makoa Vincent Riso, Class of 2022 Photographer: Chase Hall Location: Fossil Rim Wildlife Center Zimmerman Corsage Cropped Crochet-Trimmed Linen Top $595, Courtesy of Market Zimmerman Corsage crochet-trimmed linen skirt $1,350, Courtesy of Market Stylists: Terrell Kikis, Maggie Klimuszko

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HEAR ME ROAR BREAK AWAY FROM ROUTINE AND TAKE A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE.

Spring/Summer 2019 • 25


Welcome to the Jungle Les Coyotes de Paris, White Cropped Top, $295 Materiel Tbilisi, Yellow Leather Pants, $438, Courtesy of Market

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Can’t be Tamed Maria la Rosa Bag, $375 Courtesy of Market

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Banned for the Better? It’s official: PETA can cross Chanel off their hit list. On December 3, the Parisian fashion house became the first large luxury brand to implement a ban on the use of exotic skins for their future collections. Animal rights activists have counted this as a victory. But what about the unintended consequences of a seemingly fashion forward and animal friendly move?

28 • SMU LOOK


By Katie Heikkinen and Anna Grace Carey People are calling B.S. on Chanel’s S.B. (skin ban). Some analysts suggest that this decision was purely a business strategy. In an Op-Ed published by Business of Fashion, members of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (ICUN) brought attention to the fact that these types of blanket bans can be harmful to the environment and take jobs away from people who legally source and trade exotic skins. Other activists point to the environmentally unfriendly nature of faux fur, and other synthetic materials. Bottom line? No good deed goes unpunished, and it looks like Chanel’s exotic skin ban is no exception. The business of the ban High-end brands such as Gucci, Versace, and Burberry have recently made the switch to stop using fur, but Chanel took it a step further by adding snake, crocodile, lizard, and stingray skins to their no-go list. Chanel will “no longer use exotic skins in our future creations,” says Bruno Pavlovsky, president of Chanel SAS, in a statement to WWD. The reason? The difficulty of ethically sourcing the skin, Pavlovsky cited in Chanel’s 2018 Report to Society. The report outlines Chanel’s responsible-sourcing policy and sets the “expectation and requirements regarding issues related to labor and human rights, the environment, and anticorruption.” Defining standards for the supply chain is no small feat. According to the report, Chanel’s fashion activity alone has over 1,400 supply chain partners. But how many of these partners deal with exotic skins? Exotic skins make up sales shares in the “high single digits,” meaning this decision is unlikely to have a major impact on Chanel’s bottom line, says analyst John Guy in an interview with Business of Fashion. In a separate interview, Pavlovsky said products with exotic skins were “not that important” to Chanel’s overall business. Fashion designer and business owner Blaine Bowen agrees with the ban. “I’m a huge advocate for animals, and with our technology now and use of vegan leathers, I don’t feel exotic

skins are necessary to achieve couture status,” Bowen says. “I think it’s a smart move because it aligns with more of our generation’s beliefs.” Julia McGillicuddy, a Parsons School of Design student, says, “It is a designer’s responsibility to understand the impact of their piece.” Fashion makes a statement about our character, our values, and our belief systems. Ethically sourced, sustainable choices are popular ways for people to show that they care. 66 percent of global consumers say they would rather pay more for sustainable brands, according to a Nielsen poll. A sustainability balancing act The real question is, how do we define sustainable? In the ICUN Op-Ed, members of the group called these bans “the lazy option.” They wrote that “the luxury goods companies sourcing wild skins have empowered people to engage in excellent conservation programs.” Conservation projects exist where different species a re “being used susta inably, supporting indigenous and local livelihoods, and motivating people to protect and conserve species and their habitats.” Hellen Reynolds, an SMU economics and ethics professor, believes Chanel could have done more to fully understand the consequences before simply banning the skins. “I cannot believe that they couldn’t get people, being so high-end, to buy into the ethics of what happens to indigenous people,” Reynolds says. Reynolds believes that the local communities are the stop gap for extinction. If they can make money off of the skins through fair trade, they will protect the animals because it affects their well-being. Bolivia, Australia, Indonesia, and Kenya are among the countries with CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) approved sustainability plans for exporting lizard, crocodile, and python skins. CITES, ICUN, and others argue that when people are able to generate income from local animals, they are better equipped to effectively manage and protect the species and their surrounding environment. Without

limitations, these animals could be killed and sold illegally, a practice that can quickly derail any existing conservation efforts. Faux or no? Another concern is the lasting impact synthetic animal skins and faux furs can have on the environment. Refinery 29 found that “real fur, since it’s organic in nature, will eventually biodegrade.” It is unknown how long it will take to break down faux fur. Polyester, a common material for synthetic fur, is “ essentially just plastic spun into a thread, and plastic could take anywhere from 500 years to more than 1,000 years to biodegrade.” “I remember when Gucci announced that they would no longer be using fur in their pieces and I thought about how great that was,” McGillicuddy says. “This made me like the brand more and I respected them for standing up for something. However, once I learned the harms of faux fur, I felt as though this was all an illusion.” Additionally, small polyester and acrylic microfibers get into the waterstream on a daily basis. Everytime a pair of jeans, or a favorite t-shirt is thrown in the wash, tiny bits of the clothing end up being rinsed away. These bits are small enough to go undetected by filters, but are big enough to have a major impact on fish and water samples. Informed consumers do it better Today, a faux jacket can look identical to a vintage coyote coat. The biggest difference between the two is the impact they leave behind. There is no clear and simple solution when it comes to sourcing faux or real animal skins. The best thing to do is to read up on the product before swiping your credit card. Look for the company’s social responsibility policy and find out what, if anything, they’re doing to ensure ethical sourcing. If you’re confident about the purchase, you’re going to rock that snakeskin bag — real or faux.

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Bear Necessities Scarf, Jane Carr, $215 Sun Hat, Benoti Missolin, $500 Black Cropped Jacket , Lisa Marie Fernandez, $195 Courtesy of Market

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From SMOO to KREWE How Stirling Barrett went from the Hilltop to running a multimillion dollar eyewear company. By Dylan Patterson As an SMU senior graduating in 2011, Stirling Barrett pursued photography and developed his design aesthetic. Little did he know he would be a Forbes’ 30 under 30 recipient, run a multi-million dollar company, and start a fashion phenomenon. Barrett is the founder and creative director of KREWE, an eyewear company that creates colorful, unique specticals and sunglasses inspired by his hometown of New Orleans. In just six years, the New Orleans-based brand was the runner up in the 2016 Vogue Fashion Fund, one of the fashion

32 • SMU LOOK

industry’s most prestigious awards, and celebrities like Beyoncé, Serena Williams, and Kendall Jenner are often seen sport the bold shades. Did you know you wanted to start Krewe while you were a student at SMU? “At SMU, I was focused on creating art through photography, but I always knew that I wanted to give back to the city of New Orleans and to start something that was bigger than myself.”


in them. It was at that point I thought, “Why not?” and went for it.” Did you have previous experience in the eyeglasses industry? “Besides being an avid collector and having an interest in it throughout my life, I had no previous experience the eyeglasses industry. I firmly believe that if you foster a creative passion that you believe in and can commit to, then you can thrive in any industry by constantly learning, along with good mentors.”

Were there any classes and/or professors that helped or inspired you to start KREWE? “I actually thought of KREWE during a summer program at SMU when I was in Taos. While there wasn’t a professor that helped me start the company, the SMU experience nurtured my creativity and helped give me the tools that I still utilize as a founder, CEO and creative director.” How and when did you know you wanted to start KREWE? “I won a cash prize for Best in Show at Jazz Fest and was going to use the proceeds to put a down-payment on a house, when I felt an urge to use the money for something greater. I toyed with the idea of starting an eyewear brand because — especially being a photographer — I wanted to finally make something tangible, and because I’d had an interest in it for quite a while. My grandfather had an extensive collection of frames, and growing up I was always interested

How has your vision of KREWE evolved from when you originally started it? “In only six years, we’ve grown from literally selling frames out of a small bicycle cart to our own stores in New Orleans, New York, traveling retail Tiny Houses, as well as more than 500 boutiques across the country and around the world. We’re focused on concerted, strategic growth, while improving our processes, culture and the way we work together as a team to make optical eyewear and sunglasses that we all love and feel proud about.” What is your favorite part of working with KREWE? “The brand has come so far in the past five years — I don’t know if I could pick a favorite. Our team is fantastic; they’re collaborative, smart creatives who really drive the brand forward. It’s remarkable working with our KREWE.” Do you have any advice for aspiring entrepreneurs? “You have to know when to push. If you’re going to start something, you’re choosing to do one of the hardest things we can do. You have to know when to say you’re wrong, know when to say you’re right, and move forward.” Do you have a favorite pair of KREWE glasses? “I can’t choose. It would be like choosing a favorite child.”

Spring/Summer 2019 • 33


Find your

rhythm

By Pahno Georgeton

Music is a focal point in most people’s lives. It is impossible to go an hour in the day without hearing the jingles in television commercials or elevator music. Streaming services make listening to all types of music easier than ever before. With music existence in almost every facet of life, it is not always depicted as a way of self-care or meditation. But it is, and it’s called music therapy.

First off, what is music therapy?

What does a typical session look like?

Music therapy is the use of music to achieve individual goals through a relationship with a professional music therapist. Music therapists are very similar to normal therapists; however instead of just talking to find resolution, music therapists will use different sessions involving music to help achieve certain goals. These sessions could involve song writing, playing an instrument, and receptive music listening.

Just like traditional therapy, each person has their own goals to achieve. For a college student suffering anxiety, a music therapist might have a session involving receptive music listening. For a patient suffering from Alzheimer’s, the method might look a little different. “One memory not affected by this disease is music. Music we listen to during identity forming years is deeply ingrained in our brain,” says Janice Lindstrom, a music therapy professor at SMU and clinical music therapist of 20 years. “So if a patient sings with me, or their loved one sings with me, for a moment there is clarity.”

How long has music therapy been around? The history of music therapy is a long one. Beginning in the 1800s, Doctors Edwin Atlee and Samuel Mathews wrote two medical dissertations describing the therapeutic qualities music can offer. Both Atlee and Mathews were students of Dr. Benjamin Rush, a physician that was a large proponent of using music to treat diseases. Around the same time, Blackwell’s Island mental hospital in New York saw the first recorded experiment of music therapy. Michigan State University was the first to offer a degree in music therapy in 1944. Other universities followed suit, and now five universities in Texas, including SMU, offer music therapy as a major.

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How can the average college student use this? While not technically music therapy, people can “self-prescribe” music for self-care purposes. Identifying what type of music is the most beneficial for a certain individual is crucial. “Determine, how the music you listen to the most, is helping or hindering your life goals? Is it perpetuating the negative self-talk or mitigating it? Sometimes we might think that if we listen to music that has anger or sadness, it

will make those things bigger.” says Lindstrom. “[There’s a] term ‘Name it to Tame it.’ We can feel validated. I’m not crazy because I feel this way. You feel not so alone.” Music can affect an individual’s mood or energy throughout the day, along with their interactions and overall lifestyle. “Look at your energy level, and you are feeling lethargic. You want energy to get to class. You probably want to start with some music that matches your lethargy, it sounds the way you feel,” says Lindstrom. “Switch to a song that neutralizes that. Something that is a little more energetic… Then slowly shift. And it does the reverse too.” “I’ve found music to have a really powerful effect on my mood,” says Jordan Tenpas, a senior majoring in music therapy major at SMU. “I have different songs and playlists picked based on how I’m feeling and how I want to feel. Sometimes it takes me a while to find the exact music I’m in the mood for, but when I do it can really make my day better.” When people imagine self-care, they imagine face masks, massages, and luxurious baths. Sometimes all it takes is turning on “Year 3000” by the Jonas Brothers to help ease the anxiety.


Merch madness is in full swing thanks to Saint Pablo and trips to Astroworld. By Ryan Mikles Just like posting a picture on social media, wearing concert apparel captures a memory and allows us to relive a moment. In the world of so called “hype-beasts” (a person who follows a trend), concert merchandise captures an experience even if the purchaser never actually attended the show. The graphics that pop off a simple cotton tee remind us of a time we once had or a time we wish we had. The “merch” industry is not new, yet artists like Travis Scott take their concert merch to the next level; making the apparel, arguably, more recognizable than their songs. “Astroworld,” the name of Scott’s recent album and worldwide tour, is colorfully written in a funky font across a plain black t-shirt. Similarly, Kanye West’s “Saint Pablo” tour merch simply features scribed text on a plain cotton t-shirt. As simple as the designs may seem, the trendy tees fly off the shelves. Walking around the SMU campus you may be able to spot a greek life t-shirt inspired by artists’ designs. “SMU isn’t like other schools in that students usually make an effort to look decent and even trendy for class,” Katherine Jones, former apparel chair of SMU Kappa Kappa Gamma, says. With that in mind, Jones created concert merch inspired shirts for the sorority. “Band and musician shirts have always been one of my favorite wardrobe staples, but artists like Kanye and Travis Scott really changed the merchandise world, making t-shirts fashionable and chic,” she says. “I wanted to channel how trendy and recognizable their merchandise is — especially to college students — with the Kappa merchandise I made.” Yet this trend is nothing new. Nearly 40 years ago, in the age of Rock and Roll, groups like the Rolling Stones and Guns N’ Roses took over the world with their distinct voices and memorable songs. Today, however, millennials may be more likely to associate oldies bands with a graphic tee, not their music. Without even liking, let

alone knowing, an artist’s or group’s music, consumers buy their merch to achieve a certain look or style-- whether it be edgy with a Rolling Stones t-shirt or california cool look with Beach Boys apparel. Concert merch represents much more than the artists or their concerts. Through the success of concert merch, artist’s are able to create a community of like minded individuals who either share a common interest in their music or resonate with their style or aesthetic. With a large outreach comes huge economic upsides. According to the Financial Times, during West ’s concert at Madison Square Garden in New York City, the merchandise alone racked up around $780,000. Yet the economic upsides are for the artists and consumers alike. There is an emerging market of re-selling merchandise along with many other rare items. “The resale market is unique because the companies create the limited supply on purpose to drive up the overall hype of the brand,” Ian Cahr, an SMU freshman who resells rare fashion items, says. “Artists took notice of this hype and used it to market their concerts through selling merch.” Thanks to the many artists who have created concert merch, it has become a staple in any fashionable wardrobe.

Spring/Summer 2019 • 35


LOOk Back

Stylish Men’s University By Caroline Lidl They say that a little goes a long way. This is true for sunscreen, spices, and—yep, you guessed it—men’s fashion. Small detail changes drive menswear forward. Popular men’s clothing and accessories today go handin-hand with popular men’s clothing in the early 1980s. Spirits were high during the 1982-1983 academic year at SMU as the Mustangs led an undefeated football season and the university was rising in rank on numerous lists of the “nation’s best party schools.” Michael Jackson’s newly released “Thriller” blasted from the stereos in dorm rooms and TV comedy series “M*A*S*H” ran its last season. Even with the slew of new pop culture, men’s fashion leaned toward the traditional.

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36 • SMU LOOK

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Men’s style in the early eighties was minimalistic. The preppy look of crewnecks and boat shoes were practically uniform among SMU men. Lightweight, white sneakers were also increasingly popular. Tom Cruise’s performance in Risky Business made Ray-Ban sunglasses one of the most sought-after accessories. Hawaiian prints and puppies served as the perfect complements to many early ‘80s looks. Trade the analog watch for the newest Apple one and the hacky sack for a frisbee, and these SMU studs would look like any guy out on Dallas Hall lawn today.


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Volume 3, Issue 2  

Spring/Summer 2019. Sixth issue of SMU Look: Hilltop Fashion and Style.

Volume 3, Issue 2  

Spring/Summer 2019. Sixth issue of SMU Look: Hilltop Fashion and Style.

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