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SMU LOOK Spring 2018

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Spring/Summer 2018

Cover GIRL ON FIRE TAKING CHARGE, EMBRACING CHANGE AND SPEAKING UP

HILLTOP FASHION A ND ST Y LE


T H E O RY

O U R S TO R E S AKR IS . ALEX ANDER MCQUEEN . ALICE + OLIVIA . BALENCIAGA . BANDIER . BER ETTA GALLERY BLUEMERCURY . BRUNELLO CUCINELLI . CAROLINA HERR ER A . CARTIER . CÉLINE . CHANEL CHR ISTIAN LOUBOUTIN . CHR ISTOFLE . DIOR . DIOR BEAUTY . ER MENEGILDO ZEGNA . ESCADA . ETRO FENDI . FORTY FIVE TEN . FR AME . FR ÉDÉR IC FEKK A I . HADLEIGH’S . HARRY WINSTON . HERMÈS JAMES PERSE . JIMMY CHOO . K IEHL’S SINCE 1851 . LELA ROSE . LORO PIANA . MADISON . MARKET MIRON CROSBY . R AG & BONE . R ALPH LAUR EN . ROBERT TALBOTT . ROLLER R ABBIT . SA INT LAURENT ST. JOHN . ST. MICHAEL’S WOMAN’S EXCHANGE . STELLA MCCARTNEY . THE TOT . THEORY . TOM FOR D TORY BURCH . TR INA TURK . VALENTINO . VERONICA BEAR D . VINCE . WILLIAM NOBLE PA R T I A L L I S T I N G TaxFree Shopping Refund Location | Complimentary Valet Parking and Personal Shopping | Gift Cards Available At Mockingbird Lane and Preston Road | hpvillage.com


LLOOKL SMU

HILLTOP FASHION AND ST YLE SAMANTHA KLAASSEN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Creative Director JADE TAYLOR Managing Editor merrit stahle SENIOR Editor MOLLY SMITH Art DirectorS SANIHA AZIZ, JOLIE GUZ Assistant Art DirectorS GABBY GRUBB, MARY MONROY Photo Editor ALI MIKLES Assistant Photo Editor MORGANE BERNARD PHOTO Adviser ROBERT HART Staff Writers LILY ANDERSON, MADISON CANSLER, ANNA GRACE CAREY, EMMA CLAYTON, MADISON CUTTER, CORBETT DE GIACOMO, CLARE GRADY, KELSEY GWINN, PARIS HANNON, EMILY HASSELL, BROOKE HERIGON, TAMARA KARRAM, MIMI KELLY, EVELYN KENNEY, CAMERON KLAUS , CAMRYN LA SALA, MAYCE MARSHALL, JENNIFER MOTT, GEORGIA MULINDER, COURTNEY NOVAK, CHEYENNE TILFORD, NATE WILLIAMS SMULOOK.COM Digital Director CAMILLE ULAM Multimedia director CAMDEN MOORE ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR CAROLINE SHERIDAN SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER HANNA REFVIK WRITER MEREDITH WELBORN ADVERTISING MARKETING DIRECTOR ALEX KLAASSEN SALES & MARKETING manager EMILY MATTHEWS SALES ASSISTANTS CAROLINE KESTER, KATELYNN MORIARTY Contributors Photographers ABIGAIL SAvOPOULOS, KEAGAN SNIVELY Hair & Makeup Artists Corbett de giacomo, taran stahle, meredith welborn

EXECUTIVE EDITORIAL Adviser CAMILLE KRAEPLIN EXECUTIVE Director/EDITORIAL Adviser CANDACE BARNHILL Special thanks to Tony Pederson, Belo Distinguished Chair in Journalism SMU Look, a student-run magazine at Southern Methodist University, is published by Student Media Company, Inc. in collaboration with the Division of Journalism in Meadows School of the Arts. SMU Look is dedicated to providing a youthful take on Dallas fashion and living. We strive to inspire and cultivate the standard of style on campus and beyond. Hughes-Trigg Student Center 3140 Dyer Street, Suite 315 Dallas, TX 75275 ENTIRE CONTENTS © SMU LOOK

Spring/Summer 2018 • 1


Volume 2, Issue 2

On the Cover: Free People Ashland Cap, $58. Stanley Korshak Veronica Beard, $128. Left: Vintage Rare Chanel Gold Tone Red Black Leather ‘CC’ Square Clip On Earrings, $495 at Luxury Garage Sale. Stanley Korshak Alice & Olivia Top, $195. Elements Alexis Skirt, $625. Photographs by Abigail Savopoulos. Models Malanna Wheat, class of 2018, and Isabel Ensminger, class of 2021, for the Campbell Agency.

CONTENTS 12 Suit up

Miami Swim Week debuts swimwear trends for 2018.

18 Here comes the sun These five products will keep your skin glowing all summer long.

20 OFF TO THE RACES

Shifting gears with high-octane looks.

26 QUEEN BEE

Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe Herd is making power moves.

28 JUST FAUX WITH IT

A look into the fur industry’s complex relationship with fashion.

30 Summer Nights Serving up the season’s hottest styles at Bar Stellar. of androgyny.

contributors

Our contributors are ready to soak up the sun with their summer bucket lists.

corbett

keagan

Hair & Makeup Artist

Photographer

de giacomo

“I’m dying to get out of the house and go on a spontaneous road trip this summer. It sounds so fun to just hop in the car with some friends, blast music and go.”

2 • SMU LOOK

snively

“This May I will be graduating from SMU, so my bucket list for summer includes figuring out what I want to do with my career and hopefully landing a job I love. I also hope to continue building my photography business on the side.”


Photograph by Alex Klaassen.

editoR's letter

UNCHARTED TERRITORY

W

hat’s next? My class of 2018 peers and I — as well as anyone else facing a transition in their life — have been asked this question a few too many times as commencement gets closer. A popular opinion that I personally disagree with is the notion that change is scary. Stagnation is what we should really be afraid of because we are not and will never be perfect. There is always room for growth, and the only way we can accomplish anything is if we step outside of our comfort zone. To be frank, fitting in isn’t cool anymore, but shattering expectations has never been more in vogue. Just take a look at recent trends. Natural, dewy-faced beauty is having a prolonged moment (p. 15), and fashion is all about personalizing styles and standing out in a crowd (p. 6). But how we dress ourselves isn’t the only way fashion is changing. Retail as we know it is evolving due to the millennial preference for experience over material items (p. 13), and the hijab fashion market is expanding rapidly due to increased visibility and acceptance of Muslim culture (p. 34). Change occurs when someone decides to push a boundary. Today, women are leading the pack in terms of standing up and speaking out. One of the women spearheading this movement is none other than SMU alum and Bumble CEO Whitney Wolfe Herd (‘08), whose own experience with sexual harassment fueled her desire to foster gender equality (p. 26). Our cover says “Girl on Fire” because of the incredible women like her who are featured in this issue. Chandler Helms (‘16) saw potential for improvement in the buying industry, and she is now running her own company just two years out of college (p. 4). Texas-born designer Nicole Miller has been making strides in the fashion world since the ‘80s (p. 19). And last, but certainly not least, is Malanna Wheat, the first black model to grace the cover of SMU Look. The common thread between each of these women? They are on the brink of change. And that’s not scary — it’s exciting. To the class of 2018: The truth is that none of us know what’s next. You may have some preconceived notion of what your life will look like after graduation, but, come May, we’ll all be in uncharted territory.

Samantha Klaassen Editor-in-Chief

Spring/Summer 2018 • 3


style file Chandler Helms (‘16) is making waves in the fashion industry with the release of Buyer’s Marque. This revolutionary app allows fashion buyers to take notes on new merchandise, plan appointments, calculate budgets, preview orders and export all of the data. She’s organizing the chaos of a wholesale market. Here’s a look back at how Helms went from bachelor’s degree to business owner in just two years.

Senior Year: Research and Design Helms spent her senior year interviewing buyers in Dallas and Oklahoma City to see what tools they would want in an app. Around the same time, SMU adopted the clear bag policy for its stadiums. Helms designed and sold stadiumapproved purses to boulevarding enthusiasts. She was the first person in the SMU area to sell clear (but cute) handbags. Helms would eventually go on to invest the profits from the bag business in Buyer’s Marque. Spring 2016: Exciting Moments Helms graduated from SMU as a journalism and French double major with a business minor. After graduation, she decided to chase the dream and move to New York City. She spent the next six months in the corporate training program at Dior. 2017: Almost There It was a busy year for Helms. She worked a full-time job at Rebecca Taylor and developed Buyer’s Marque at the same time. New Year’s Day 2018: Two Weeks Notice Helms was nervous to quit her job, but her coworkers were supportive and encouraged her to pursue Buyer’s Marque full-time.

4 • SMU LOOK

CHANDLER HELMS Today Helms is finding her way as a small-business owner. She sets a top-three focus for the week to stay on track. This week? She’s prepping for a promotional event, focusing on her social media presence and working on hiring employees.

Up Next Over 1,200 people downloaded Buyer’s Marque in its debut weekend this February. Helms was ecstatic. Now? She is working on using customer feedback to update features, planning on traveling to different markets and looking into investment opportunities. After that, it’s time to keep growing. — Anna Grace Carey

Photgraph by Sidney Hollingsworth

Junior Year: Inspiration Strikes While working at the Fashion Industry Gallery in Dallas, Helms noticed that fashion buyers had a problem: inefficiency. Buyers spent their days taking notes on new collections by hand and their nights calculating budgets and planning orders. More often than not, it was a timeconsuming mess. Helms realized there had to be a way to make this purchasing process less painful.


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someone

LOOKING OUT

CROWD

Erdem Black Floral-jacquard Waist Belt

IN THE

Trends can be defined as enviable styles seen all over runways, social media feeds and your friends. But the biggest styles this year aren’t about fitting in. From bold patterns to modern silhouettes, fashion in 2018 is all about standing out.

on the

Fringe is this season’s most Insta-worthy style (seriously, no material has ever been more boomerang-ready). But this iteration of fringe isn’t Daisy Buchanan out for a night in East Egg — it’s longer and swishier than ever before. On the spring 2018 NYFW runways, Paco Rabanne and Rachel Comey featured fringe in the form of maxi-skirts while the trend came in a statement jacket at Ulla Johnson. Any way you wear it, you’ll be twirling around in this season’s flirtiest look. — Molly Smith

@pamhetlinger/Instagram.

plaid

6 • SMU LOOK

HABIT

Tailored pants can transform any outfit, but a plaid pair is a street-style staple. The print is here to stay — even Monse and Adeam are designing these patterned pants for everyday wear. The perk of tailored pants, similar to jeans, is the trend’s versatility. For a busy day at work, pairing plaid pants with a sweater, blazer and loafers will add some flair to the office. Clean sneakers and a denim jacket can dress down the look, or transition to a night out by throwing on some white patent booties with a button-down silk top and pair of hoop earrings. — Camille Ulam

Ulla Johnson Fringe Cardigan, Spring 2018

fringe


LOOKING OUT

Erdem Black Floral-jacquard Waist Belt

belt IT OUT

new

As the fashion industry embraces body positivity, belts are no longer solely meant to cinch a waistline or create an unrealistic hourglass frame. Instead, they embellish an already tailored outfit. Just look at the Spring 2018 runways: Kenzo paired a striped two-piece set with a long-tailed white belt, and Erdem accessorized high-neck midi dresses with brown leather obi belts. Your logo belt may still be trending, but the emphasis this season is on the midsection so you may want to ditch the belt loops and tie it around your waist. — Ali Mikles

americana

@camilacoelho/Instagram.

Ulla Johnson Fringe Cardigan, Spring 2018

Get ready for a star-spangled summer. Raf Simons cemented Americana as a wardrobe essential when patriotic fringe and Western button-downs were spotted in Calvin Klein’s Spring 2018 show. Philip Lim, Monse, Self-Portrait and Tracy Reese followed suit, presenting a surplus of stars and stripes. From redand-blue ensembles to star-shaped hoops, this style is as American as a Fourth of July barbecue. — Samantha Klaassen

PURPLE reign We’re calling it now: Lavender is the color of the summer. Taking a cue from the ever-popular millennial pink, the light purple evokes the same feminine feel with a trendy twist. The fresh take on Ultra Violet — Pantone’s 2018 color of the year — is an opportune change for the warmer months. Lavender was a standout color during New York Fashion Week, making appearances on the runways of Tom Ford, Valentino, Victoria Beckham and more. — Caroline Sheridan

Gucci Soho Disco Bag

Spring/Summer 2018 • 7


Pocket Guide to

ethical shopping

By Lily Anderson and Anna Grace Carey Ethical fashion means purchasing clothes that have a benign effect on people and the environment. It comes down to one thing: responsibility. Whether it’s employee care, production methods or quality materials, a company is ethical if they are being responsible. 1. Look for transparency. If a brand is truly doing good work, they will want to share. If you go on a company’s website and there is nothing but a vague reference to “ethics” or “social responsibility,” they probably aren’t doing everything they can to be a better business. 2. Buy less, buy better. Social responsibility and price point are not directly correlated. But think about that $7 dress you scored — the math just doesn’t add up. Garment workers make, on average, 2 percent of the wholesale cost of clothing, which in this case is only 14 cents. Think of your purchases as investments: quality clothes from quality companies. 3. Brand loyalty. We live in a period where sustainability is gaining popularity, and companies like Reformation and Patagonia are helping initiate this change. If a brand you know and love is doing ethical work, keep supporting them. Every time you make a purchase, you’re saying, “This matters to me.”

Photography by @smulook

4. Do your research. Be curious about what you’re buying and choosing to wear. If a new brand catches your eye, look it up. What’s their story? Don’t be afraid to ask where their products came from. Most sales associates at socially and environmentally conscious stores are more than happy to share the brand’s mission. 5. BYOB (Bring your own bag). Think about all the tissue paper and boxes placed into fancy bags for you to carry around the mall. By bringing your own bags, or asking for no gift-wrapping, you are saving a significant amount of paper and plastic.


Stanley Korshak Caroline Constas Top, $420. Free People Just Float on Flare, $78. Club Monaco Collared Tech Bomber Jacket, $249. Club Monaco CM Graphic Striped Tee, $49.50. Club Monaco Connor Essential Dress Pant, $119.50.

crazy in love From statement stripes to tartan mixes, enamor yourself with this season’s most charming styles.

Photographs by Abigail Savopoulos. Art direction and styling by Ali Mikles and Samantha Klaassen. Models Jade Taylor, class of 2018, and Jacob Speed, class of 2017. Hair and makeup by Taran Stahle.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 9


10 • SMU LOOK


SUMMER FLING

Club Monaco Pique Crew Tee, $79.50. Rebecca Taylor La Vie Dahlia Dot Twill Jumpsuit, $295.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 11


waves

making By Madison Cansler

Miami Swim Week sets the precedent for what to wear under the sun, and this season is all about making a statement. “The biggest trends for 2018 are going to have a lot of textured fabrics,” Bask owner Megan Smith says. “You’re going to have smocking and ribbing and just really detailed suits.” The high-cut bottoms reminiscent of the ‘90s continue their comeback, but 2018 swimwear is not just modernizing older looks — it is creating never before seen styles and cuts.

@kendalljenner/Instagram.

The bandeau top has always been a great option for minimal tan lines, and new styles feature skinny straps, making it easy to tan while still providing support. Many of these pieces will be seen in solid colors or with graphics such as peaches or lips.

12 • SMU LOOK

2018 swimwear is all about the statement coverup. New styles erupted on swim runways this year bringing plastic pants, cropped fringe ponchos and sheer skirts into stores. These new cover-up styles add edge and personality to any swimwear look.

one-piece This summer, one-pieces will debut plunging necklines, unique cuts and strappy designs. Monokinis are sweeping the one-piece competition, combining the looks of the onepiece with aspects of the bikini. The Baywatchstyle suit is also hot on the swim market, so you can still rock the high-cut bottom look.

Chanel Spring/Summer, Chanel Cruise 2017/2018 , Free People 2017/2018.

Skinny Bandeau Top STatement Cover-up


the new

FRONTIER

As you walk through the door of Reformation, crisp white walls create a serene environment that is a far cry from your run-of-the-mill retail shop. The store invites you to select merchandise on an iPad after browsing the minimal selections that hang on the racks. Gone are the days of carting around armfuls of clothing. Hidden away in the inventory room, an associate has access to each individual dressing room, providing you with carefully selected items. It’s just like magic: your selected pieces are waiting for you in the dressing room, which is equipped with an outlet to play your own music and adjustable lighting to envision different situations. Streamlining the shopping experience makes it a more relaxing and enjoyable task for the customer. Pop-up stores and brand collaborations are the culmination of an industry shift. Retail as you know it has completely changed. The days of visiting the mall multiple times to narrow down which brand of shoes to buy are over. Customers begin their search on social media platforms like Pinterest and Instagram and continuing by browsing e-commerce websites. Some people refer to malls as graveyards, but there are still 1,200 profitable malls throughout the country. It’s far too early to talk about the death of retail. Brick and mortar is still an important part of the consumer journey that is not to be overlooked. Eighty-five percent of retail sales are still taking place in the store, according to ABC news. “Brands are now focused on utilizing their physical locations for special experiences — experiences the shopper can’t get by ordering online,” says Shelby Foster, public relations manager at NorthPark Center. In a new Bumble & bumble and MAC collaboration at NorthPark Center, you can get your hair and makeup done at the same time. The two Estée Lauder-owned brands created a new customer experience that is more timely and efficient. With a shift in consumer behavior towards experiences rather than things, retail is changing for the better. The design of stores has become more of an experience for a consumer than it used to be. “Brick and mortar have to distinguish themselves from competitors and be a destination for the consumer,” says Cole Daugherty, senior vice president of marketing and communications for Dallas Market Center. Retail stores are now becoming a playground for stores to experiment with new concepts to draw in more customers.

Courtesy of Reformation

Photo courtesy of Reformation

Camille Ulam looks into how a preference of experience over material items is changing retail as we know it.

3424 Greenville Av. • 214-826-7 544 BUFFALOEXCHANGE.COM •


HIS look

PUMPED UP

KICKS In today’s culture, some men are willing to pay a hefty price tag to fill their sneaker shelves with designer logos. But that’s not to say that some of these sneakers aren’t worth lusting over. Here are three sneakers men shouldn’t be afraid to splurge on this spring. — Merrit Stahle

COMMON PROJECTS The Napa leather and rubber Margom soles of Common Projects’ Original Achilles Low-Top Sneakers make for an extremely durable shoe, which is necessary when the price of a pair is $415. Logo-free, it’s the perfect “chill” shoe — unless of course someone spots the classic gold numbers on the heel.

GIVENCHY Givenchy’s Urban Street Low-Top Sneakers come with a price tag of $495, but the pristine white leather makes for a tasteful spring shoe.The brand’s shoes are favorites among A-list celebrities including Leonardo DiCaprio, John Legend and Jay-Z.

ADIDAS

COMMON PROJECTS

The latest Adidas x Yeezy Powerphase is a take on the company’s Powerphase tennis shoe from the ‘80s. “Calabasas” is written in gold foil on the side of the sneaker. With a retail price of $120, it’s one of the most affordable Yeezy products.


good looks

necessities

bare

Meredith Welborn shares her secrets to achieving the ever-desired, no-makeup makeup look.

W

ith sun-kissed skin and unwavering heat, summer is the perfect time to go light on the makeup and let your natural beauty shine through. Whether you are exploring a new place, lying by the pool or just trying to switch up your makeup routine, here are three tips for achieving a natural look. 1. Ditch your powder blush I was afraid of cream blush for a long time — every time I tried to apply it, I would end up smearing it all over my face. This changed when I tried Glossier Cloud Paint. This product is extremely user-friendly and looks so natural on the skin. Dab a little bit of product onto the apples of your cheeks and blend outward towards your cheekbones. Cream blush creates a natural flush, and it pays homage to the days when women would rouge their cheeks. 2. Try using bronzer as an eyeshadow Using bronzer as a crease color is one of my favorite tricks. When applied correctly, bronzer deepens the hollows of your face in a natural-looking way, so think of this as contouring the crease of your eyelid. Put your favorite bronzer — mine is Laguna by NARS — on a blending brush and use windshield wiper motions to apply it into the crease of your eye socket. Then apply a light shimmery color to your lid to complement the crease color. This eye look will leave everyone wondering, “Is she even wearing makeup?” 3. Use a dewy setting spray When I use MAC Prep and Prime Fix+ on top of my makeup, it feels as though the layers of foundation, concealer, bronzer and blush all melt into one, leaving me with youthful-looking skin. A spritz of setting spray or rose water is a great way to rejuvenate your skin and makeup after sitting in the sun on a hot day. Photograph by Keagan Snively. Model Catherine McNaghten, class of 2021. Makeup by Meredith Welborn.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 15


good looks

By Corbett de Giacomo

Every beauty guru has dropped some serious cash on the latest innovations in skincare and wellness, each one promising to be some sort of magic potion. But these creams, serums and oils sometimes fall flat despite their insane price tags. The problem is that topical remedies can only go so far. Enter: vitamins and supplements. They’re effective and affordable, and there’s an option for everyone.

For the health nut.

For the party animal.

For the skincare junkie.

Looking for something to rev up those pre-summer break workouts? Ultraconcentrated green tea leaf extract supplements are the answer to your prayers. The green tea leaf spikes your metabolism while acting as a natural appetite suppressant. If carbs are your weakness, this information is pure gold. Drinking unsweetened green tea will do the same, but the supplement form packs more of a punch. Green tea leaf extract supplements are widely available online and even at Whole Foods so you can Amazon Prime these babies ASAP.

Activated charcoal capsules will be your newest Friday night (or Saturday morning) obsession. The capsules are completely tasteless and odorless, but they are loaded with detoxifying charcoal. “Activated charcoal is so good for detoxification because it acts like a magnet,” says Dallas registered dietician and vitamin expert Anna Gorges. “It helps eliminate anything bad you may have eaten along with excess metals in the body.” Detoxifying is not only good for a cleanse, but it also happens to make this supplement the perfect hangover Rx. Pop two or three of these little black pills before going to bed after a night out and you’ll wake up ready to take on the day, no Pedialyte required.

Often called a model’s secret weapon, gelatin supplements contain the building blocks of collagen, the body’s natural substance that keeps skin looking fresh and radiant. In your mid-20s, collagen production in the body slows down, leading to visible signs of aging (also known as wrinkles). The easiest way to up your collagen intake is to find the gelatin supplement in its dissolvable powdered form. This low-calorie, high-protein substance is the perfect addition to your morning smoothie or a cup of warm lemon water. Bottoms up! — Corbett de Giacomo

16 • SMU LOOK

Photograph courtesy of Rip Pixel

me

vitamin


good looks

POWER

products

Anything you put inside your body will affect the outside, and food is no exception. Incorporating these ingredients into your diet will have you radiating from the inside out.

An avocado? Thanks. Avocados are high in omega 9s, which help the top layer of your skin stay moisturized. They also contain biotin, an essential ingredient commonly used in hair, skin and nail vitamins. Avocado photograph courtesy of Thought Catalog. Lemon photograph courtesy of Lauren Mancke.

Olive me loves all of you. Naturally high in fatty acids, olive oil will keep your skin glowing and your hair shining. Spice, girls? Turmeric is a spice powerful enough to be included on this list. An incredible anti-inflammatory that alleviates redness and puffiness, its antioxidants help with antiaging and dark spots. Yes, chocolate. Dark chocolate is full of beneficial antioxidants that keep skin hydrated. Eating about an ounce a day will give you the benefits without the extra pounds. When life gives you lemons... Stock up on citrus: Vitamin C helps support heart health and digestion. — Mimi Kelly

Compartes Dark Chocolate Old Hollywood Chocolate Bar, $9.95

I tried it :

vampire facial

By Saniha Aziz

M

icroneedling is a minimally invasive procedure that reduces signs of aging and improves the appearance of acne scars. With controlled micro-injuries that stimulate the natural wound-healing process, the body is triggered to kick local collagen and elastin into full gear. An addition to this procedure is a PRP treatment, which is more commonly referred to as the vampire facial because the serum used is made of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) that comes from your own blood. After a quick consultation, a nurse came in and took 4 mL of my blood to be separated into red blood cells, white blood cells and plasma.

Meanwhile, my face was numbed with a gel for 30 minutes so that the microneedling would feel like nothing more than little, painless pricks as they spread the PRP on each small area, sending platelets and cells to speed up the healing of the tissues. After the procedure, I was as red as a sunburn for two days. I was peeling in the places that were most affected because my old skin was shedding and new skin was coming through. I stayed out of the sun for about a week because my skin was still raw, and began to see small results. Three weeks later, I noticed that my skin felt tighter and had an overall glow.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 17


SUN

here comes the

From your bikini to your beauty routine, warm weather calls for a less-is-more approach. Complement sun-kissed skin with a glimmer of highlight, pops of bright colors and —of course —SPF.

2

1

3

5

4

1. PRETTY IN PINK

3. RAY BAN

5. SMELLS LIKE SUMMER

This terracotta pink lip stain has a revolutionary lightweight formula for ultra-matte, high-impact color and a naked-lip feel. — Blair Kim

A sunscreen that fits in harmoniously with your skincare and makeup routine is hard to find, but this setting powder makes it easier than ever to reapply sunscreen throughout the day. — Clare Grady

Inspired by skin’s natural pheromones, this scent uses subtle notes of musk, ambrette and ambrox to give it a warm base while earthy iris root and spicy pink pepper give the fragrance an undeniable sparkle. —Brooke Herigon

Supergoop Invincible Setting Powder SPF 45 in Translucent, $30.

Glossier You Eau de Parfum, $60.

YSL Tatouage Couture Lip Stain in Nude Emblem, $36.

2. BUTTERFINGERS Start the summer on a stronger, brighter note with this joyful yellow. The shocking shade is the unexpected nail trend that will lighten up any day. — Cameron Klaus Chanel Le Vernis Longwear Nail Colour in Giallo Napoli, $28.

4. FULL COVERAGE A resident favorite of beauty professionals, this lightweight concealer is buildable and gives full coverage to all skin types, leaving you with a healthy, luminous shine. — Camryn LaSala NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer, $30.

18 • SMU LOOK


Nicole Miller

FASHION VETERAN Ali Mikles talks to the designer about life in the fashion industry.

Nicole Miller has reigned in the fashion world for 26 years. Her fiery red locks complement her fierce work ethic and passion for design. She takes a hands-on approach to her brand, and you can often find her drawing up sketches surrounded by reggae CDs, coffee table books and fabric swatches in her eclectic New York office. The Texas-born designer was a pioneer in crossing menswear into women’s couture during the ‘80s, and she continues to weave it into her current collections. She’s mastered the cool-girl look to a tee, with designs adorning the silhouettes of Beyoncé, Blake Lively and Angelina Jolie.

Where did you get your inspiration for your new collection? Nicole Miller: This season’s show has been a complete evolution. I started with a vintage travel and aviation theme for pre-fall —a little bit Amelia Earhart and retro. We moved on from any literal adaptation for fall, but I still had flight in my head so I came up with an eagle motif for the season and a menswear approach to women’s clothing.

How has the fashion industry changed from when you were in college? NM: It has always been a very crowded space but now it is more crowded than ever, and there is just too much stuff at every price. People used to always dress in the trend of the season. Now there are so many trends going on simultaneously and things do not go out of style as quickly as before. Anything goes and individuality is more important.

Do you have advice for students who want to pursue a career in fashion? NM: There are all kinds of different jobs from PR to merchandising to marketing and design. You have to find your passion and follow it.

You've been so successful for so long. What do you attribute your success to? NM: I think that I try to not get stuck in a rut and do only one thing. I have to always be open to change and be flexible. You can never sit back and rely on your previous success.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 19


Rayban General, $213. Bandier DLC Line Crop Tank, $125. Rayban Outdoorsman Craft, $243. Rayban Cats 5000 Classic, $168.

OFF TO THE RACES Shifting gears with high-octane looks.

20 • SMU LOOK


Photographs by Abigail Savopoulos. Art direction and styling by Jade Taylor, Ali Mikles and Samantha Klaassen. Models Hallie Fischer, class of 2021, for the Campbell Agency; Lydia Brooks, class of 2021; and Malanna Wheat, class of 2018. Hair and makeup by Corbett De Giacomo, Taran Stahle and Meredith Welborn.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 21


GREEN LIGHT Theory Ribbed Nylon Tank, $225. Red leather jacket, stylist’s own. Bandier Wesley Stanton Track Jogger, $135. Shoes, stylist’s own.

22 • SMU LOOK


AMAZING RACE Free People Wyth Leather Band Felt Hat, $58. Alice & Olivia Alvina Cropped Blouse with Bow, $330. Alice & Olivia Leather Bell Pant, $998.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 23


HOT WHEELS White top, stylist’s own. Elements Sandrine Rose, $245. Free People Reach For The Stars Ankle Boot, $458.

24 • SMU LOOK


NEED FOR SPEED Alice & Olivia Lonnie Embellished Silk Bomber Jacket, $795. Theory Gingham Classic Skinny Pant, $345.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 25


Queen Bee Whitney Wolfe Herd is revolutionizing dating, fostering gender equality and embracing change. By Samantha Klaassen

Photograph by Kristen Kilpatrick

O

n March 20, people across the country opened the New York Times to see a full-page ad taken out by Bumble, a location-based dating app that facilitates communication between interested users by having women send the first message. In response to the Match Group, Tinder’s parent company, suing Bumble for patent infringement, the ad read, “We — a woman-founded, womenled company — aren’t scared of aggressive corporate culture. That’s what we call bullying, and we swipe left on bullies.” This emphatic response prompts a look back at the history of Bumble and the company’s efforts to promote gender equality in the workplace. Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe Herd graduated from SMU in 2008 with a degree in international studies, and she returned to her alma mater in September 2012 to introduce a new app she helped create: Tinder. She was visiting sororities and fraternities at colleges across the country and asking students to download the dating app. In just one trip, she tripled Tinder’s users. Today, this initiative is credited with the initial rise of Tinder, a company that is now valued at $3 billion.

26 • SMU LOOK

But in the summer of 2014, Herd filed a lawsuit against Tinder, alleging sexual harassment and wrongful termination. Court documents reveal that Justin Mateen, the then-chief marketing officer of Tinder, berated Herd with inappropriate comments, emails and text messages. When she repeatedly went to Tinder CEO Sean Rad about the sexist treatment, he dismissed her complaints as “annoy ing ” and “dramatic” and told her that it would be her fault, not Mateen’s, if she was unable to “disengage.” Mateen and Rad then told Herd that they were taking away her co-founder title because having a “girl” co -founder devalued the company. Herd eventually offered to resign with severance, but Rad rejected the offer and fired her instead. After leaving Tinder, Herd experienced the online abuse that is not uncommon for women who have made public sexual harassment allegations.

“I started to believe what people had been saying about me online and it really had a detrimental effect on my self-worth,” she says. “It’s difficult to brush things off when people are saying such nasty things about you. I wish I had the resilience I have now then.” The circumstances, however appalling and unacceptable, presented Herd with a unique opportunity. “That situation ultimately fueled my innate desire to create something that would stop this from happening to other people,” she says. Herd never envisioned this desire as another dating app. The idea for Bumble came about in 2014 when she reconnected with her current business partner, Andrey Andreev. “I was working on developing a social network for young women where only positivity and compliments were allowed,” Herd says. Andreev loved the concept of her female-centric networking service, but encouraged her to apply it to dating.

“I hope I’ve been an example to any woman who has an idea or has found a problem in society that she’d like to change.”


“I was hesitant at first because I wasn’t keen on entering the world of dating apps,” Herd says. “But Andrey and I kept talking, and it wasn’t long before he convinced me to make the jump.” Leveraging Andreev’s technology and industry expertise, she created the brand and product vision that we all know today as Bumble. Since the app’s release in December 2014, it has amassed over 22 million users and has 70 percent year-over-year growth. The company’s projected sales for 2018 are $150 million. Forbes reported this past December that Bumble is valued at $1 billion. But its most important accolade? It’s the choice dating app for women who are tired of misogynistic comments and unsolicited sexual advances. Most online dating startups fail, but Herd accomplished what all entrepreneurs strive for: finding an underserved group of people and creating a product that fits their wants and needs. For Bumble, this audience is women. The app’s claim to fame is female users making the first move in order to promote gender equality and healthy relationships. The girl power mission at Bumble is reflected in its employees: The company boasts an impressive 85 percent female employee base. In December 2017, Herd was featured alongside Kendrick Lamar, Zedd and Karlie Kloss on one of Forbes 2018 30 Under 30 covers. The magazine hailed Herd as “the $1 Billion Queen Bee of Dating Apps.” Being a female CEO of a tech company is rare in the male-dominated industry, and Bumble knows that it is something worth celebrating. The company recently partnered with the Los Angeles Clippers: Each player will sport a Bumble patch on his jersey for the next few years. Referred to as an “empowerment badge,” it’s a symbol of the team’s pledge to promote gender equality. If the tech and sports industries have one thing in common, it’s that they are run primarily by men. “I think it’s so important to have female representation on both the CEO and executive level because we still live in a male-dominated world,” Herd says. It’s clear that her passion for equality in the workplace stems from her own experiences with harassment. “Women are still subjected to unsolicited advances in the workplace, inappropriate comments, and we are still, in many ways, expected to brush it off.” Bumble isn’t afraid to take a stance. On March 5, three weeks after the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., the company announced that the app would ban users from posting images of firearms and other weapons, the only exception being uniformed military and law enforcement officers. Bumble recognizes that it has users on every side of the gun violence conversation, but the decision ultimately came down to Bumble’s core value of safety. The company wants its users to feel protected and believes weapons don’t convey that message. Despite the potential alienation of some users with the decision, Bumble made a clear statement that their values are more important.

“I hope I’ve been an example to any woman who has an idea or has found a problem in society that she’d like to change,” Herd says. To any young female entrepreneurs out there, she urges them to immerse themselves in the world they love: “If you’re looking to start your own tech venture, find a gap. Never be intimidated by what you don’t know. If something excites you, go lose yourself in it and take confidence in knowing that it’s OK to make mistakes.” Herd’s business vision and personal values have a mutual component: respect. It’s the one thing that defines what she and the entire Bumble brand are working toward. “The reason I started Bumble was because I wanted to create a solution to an experience I went through and to create something that could change the narrative around relationships,” she says. The result is a brand that is built on a foundation of not only respect, but also empowerment. “Success means many things to me — it means finding a problem and creating a solution,” Herd says. “It means making the first move.”

Photograph by Laura Dominguez

Spring/Summer 2018 • 27


JUST WITH IT THE TRUTH BEHIND THE RISE AND FALL OF FUR. By Corbett De Giacomo

N

ative Foods Café, an L.A. hotspot known for its plant-based, vegan fare, was recently graced by the presence of Beyoncé herself. But Queen Bey’s wardrobe choice was discernably non-vegan: a Christopher Kane coat with an oversized and unmistakably fur collar. The irony is clear: Veganism is in vogue, but so is fur. With plant-based restaurants and meal services popping up left and right to accommodate some 2 million vegans in the United States, the rise of fur seems to have coincided with a new generation of food elitism. With an increasing urge toward sustainable fashion, fur is the one material that seems almost immune. Some say fur made its comeback when Anna Wintour freshened it up by putting it on the cover of Vogue in the ‘90s, sparking a new generation’s taste for fur. Wintour’s choice also inspired plenty of backlash, most memorably when a woman appeared at her table at the Four Seasons New York hotel, threw a dead raccoon onto her plate and loudly called her a “fur hag.” Carcasses and unflattering nicknames aside, fur continued on its upward trajectory. This wasn’t your aunt’s prized fur coat from the 1980s, it was fashion. Since then, fur has been making its way down runways, into the mainstream and even into the accessory of the season in the form of Fendi’s pom-pom keychains. However, this demand for fur was not purely driven by changing consumer preferences, but by fur suppliers and distributors across the globe. In the past few years, furriers have gifted pelts to designers, who in turn incorporate the free materials into their shows. Up-and-coming designers jumped at the chance to have someone fund their shows with such notoriously luxurious materials, sparking a reinvention of fur. In 2010, Saga Furs, a marketing company that represents thousands of breeders, flew then up-and-comer Alexander Wang to Copenhagen to learn how to incorporate furs (gratis, of course) into his line. Many designers like Wang do not intend to use fur in their collections before firms like Saga, a company reported to spend “hundreds of thousands” on marketing alone, approaches them with the opportunity. “We want to make sure fur is on the pages of magazines around the world,” says Steve Gold, Saga’s North American director told The New York Times. “The way to do that is to facilitate the use of fur by designers.” And facilitate, they have. Furs in rich, pop-art hues and ultra-wearable textures are making their way down runways and into the closets of consumers around the globe, the result of an aggressive marketing campaign rather than a trend.

Photo

30 LOOK 28 • SMU LOOK


Meryl Streep’s portrayal of Miranda Priestly in “The Devil Wears Prada” has become well-known (and frequently quoted) in popular culture, even outside of fashion circles. Priestly is the editor-in-chief of Runway, a fictional publication and persona eerily similar to that of Vogue and its aforementioned head honcho. When her “fashion-challenged” assistant giggles at the debate between two seemingly identical belts, Priestly details how Andy’s sweater is not just blue, but cerulean. “You think you made a choice that exempts you from the fashion industry when, in fact, you’re wearing a sweater that was selected for you by the people in this room,” she says, making her point that a trend’s trajectory ends with the mainstream. Though this is a hyperbolic example, the story is the same with fur. Come November at SMU, the boulevard is littered with fur vests in a plethora of colors and styles. This is the trickle-down effect in action. The fur begins on the runway of a couturier, a fantastical piece worth tens of thousands. The piece then inspires high-end ready-to-wear, eventually making it to department stores and finishing at less expensive retail outlets. While some are faux, the majority are real. Despite fur’s rise, some designers and retailers are going in a distinctively different direction, albeit with the right PR. High-end luxury companies such as Selfridge’s and Net-a-Porter don’t sell the stuff, and designers like Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren have nixed the material as well. These well-known retailers are praised for their dedication to luxury, not their aversion to fur. Gone are the days of redpaint flinging PETA campaigns and a mentality that detests any consumer with a piece of fur in his or her wardrobe. Instead, designers are innovating, changing and growing to find cruelty-free alternatives that don’t sacrifice quality or taste. Gucci will soon join the fur-free ranks. “Creativity can jump in many different directions instead of using furs,” says Gucci Chief Executive and President Marco Bizzarri told The Business of Fashion. “Fashion has always been about trends and emotions and anticipating the wishes and desires of consumers. Fashion and modernity go together.” Gucci’s fur ban goes far beyond the will to limit animal cruelty in fashion. Bizzarri is concerned that the brand may not get the best talent in its designers if the company fails to modernize, and he may be onto something. The fur industry is unique because of its ability to inspire change at any level. Choosing to wear clothes from designers who are pivoting away from furs in favor of more sustainable and modern materials takes a new kind of stand against a dated and unsustainable practice. That’s how to make a difference, no red paint required.

Photograph by Shomi Patwary

Spring/Summer 2018 • 31


Stanley Korshak Aje Top, $395. Stanley Korshak Aje Skirt, $395. Shoes, model’s own.

SU M M ER N IG HTS Casual glam radiates as the sun sets at Bar Stellar.

30 • SMU LOOK


Photographs by Abigail Savopoulos. Art direction and styling by Jade Taylor, Ali Mikles and Morgane Bernard. Model Isabel Ensminger, class of 2021, for The Campbell Agency. Hair and makeup by Meredith Welborn.


ROSÉ ALL DAY

White top, stylist’s own. Elements Tara Jarmon Skirt, $340. Alexander McQueen Multicolor Slick Leather 4 Finger “Knucklebox” Clutch Bag, $550 at Luxury Garage Sale. Shoes, model’s own.

32 • SMU LOOK


OCEAN BREEZE

Stanley Korshak Aje Dress, $395.

Spring/Summer 2018 • 33


Şampuan Reklamından Ayrıldı for Başörtülü

heads up Femininity is stronger than ever — even under wraps. SMU student Tamara Karram uncovers the retail presence of the traditional hijab.

34 • SMU LOOK

I

t’s a Tuesday here on the SMU campus. I am sitting in Fondren library, a building that is commonly recognized as the focal point of student life. In the wake of realizing my computer died and I forgot to bring the charger, a group of girls snickering at their phones at the next table catches my attention. They are wearing what some would consider a uniform for girls on campus: black workout leggings paired with sweatshirts that shamelessly showcase their Greek letters. The sound of the Starbucks barista mispronouncing my name reminds me why I am here: to meet Naaz Ahmed Karbhari. She is an SMU student majoring in psychology and religious studies with aspirations to work in the field of neuroscience. In her free time, she enjoys outdoor activities, visiting historical sites and trying new foods. When she approaches me, she is dressed in black pants and a plaid top she has accessorized with a Hermès belt and a dark blue beaded hijab — an outfit that mirrors her colorful personality and confident demeanor. “For me, fashion is using different elements to express yourself,” Karbhari says. “Initially, there is that stereotype or stigma when I walk through the door that I’m ‘the girl in the scarf’


Muslim societies, according to Gallup. There are many different viewpoints on exactly which cultural barriers facilitate these misconceptions about covered women and Islamophobia in general. While some may assume blame would be placed on Westerners alone, Karbhari believes people within her religion and culture are responsible as well. “Misconceptions do not just come from people outside of our background and their lack of knowledge on the subject,” she says. “They also are facilitated by people from our background who have all the information and choose to feed into the culture of oppression that, unfortunately, is normal in some countries.” Once again, I am not surprised by this answer: Americans have been tasked with separating Islam from culture in a noise-saturated environment where neither is clearly defined. According to Pew Research Center, 63 percent of Republicans and 26 percent of Democrats say that Islam is likelier than other religions to encourage violence among its believers. Many Westerners would be shocked to learn that Islam preaches the importance of education for women, or that peace and generosity are core values of the Koran. Despite existing stereotypes or misconceptions, intelligent and driven Muslim women like Karbhari are living for t hemselves, going a f ter what they want and taking the fashion world by storm. Scrolling through Instagram, it is not uncommon to come across fashion and beauty accounts belonging to hijab-wearing influencers. With some garnering seven-figure followings, hijab-wearing fashionistas are showing all women that their headscarves are by no definition a limitation. With over 248,000 followers, Maryam Asadullah is one of many digital influencers that women everywhere turn to for fashion inspiration. Asadullah accessorizes every outfit with jewelry, a handbag from her impressive designer collection and a beautiful headscarf. Her profile follows the routine influencer format: pictures of her wearing different outfits for various occasions with the occasional food or beauty post. While Asadullah receives praise from her loyal following, she is not blind to stereotypes that exist around Muslim women and fashion. “Many people think that wearing a headscarf limits Muslim women when it comes to dressing themselves,” Asadullah says. “I wear my hijab the same way I wear all accessories. I choose my headscarf based on the outfit I want to wear that

day or a new piece I want to complement.” While influencers like Asadullah provide a guiding hand when it comes to styling tips, hijabwearing women are also establishing themselves as a powerful consumer market —and designers are beginning to notice. “As part of my research, I have argued that modesty is becoming a revolution in the fashion industry,” Kavakci says. “Many mainstream brands have decided to tap into the hijab wear market because they see a huge potential and a very large profit to reach out to these customers. In addition, already existing smaller hijab wear labels have grown and grown. Now there are many labels around the world that manufacture modest wear.” Thanks to fashion houses like Max Mara and Alberta Ferretti, who featured hijab-wearing model Halima Aden on their catwalks at Milan Fashion Week in 2017, the modest fashion movement is on its way to mainstream status. Like other trends, the modest styles and head scarves that pave these exclusive runways have trickled down to fast fashion stores like H&M, Zara and Gap. Just like luxury brands, these stores are seeing the untapped potentia l in t he Muslim consumer ma rket a nd a re not hesitating to embrace the modest fashion movement with maxi dresses, wide-legged pants and tunics in addition to headscarves. “I was in Hermès the other day and as I was looking at their scarf collection the sales associate approached me and told me all of their scarves could be worn as hijabs,” Karbhari says. “I was pleasantly surprised that she even knew to suggest that to me. It was obvious she had catered to Muslim clients before, and it was nice to know she could accommodate me.” From athletic wear to runway ensembles, Muslim women are now more able than ever to find on-trend, stylish clothing that fits their needs at almost every price point. Hijab fashion continues to evolve with every new season. While distorted stereotypes and prejudice still exist, incredible women dispel these fallacies every day by living their lives free of judgment. They inspire all of us to voice our thoughts, opinions and concerns without hesitation. If there is one thing we all can learn from women who live this truth, it is that if we speak loud enough, others will have no choice but to listen.

“Most people think a woman would not choose to wear her hijab to serve God, but that a man forces it on to her”

and that, no matter how colorful my outfit is or how I have accessorized that day, I am going to be more subdued or quiet.” I was not surprised to hear this. Being Muslim myself, even I must admit that, on occasion, I find myself falling subject to these assumptions about covered women. In America, it is undeniable that our culture leads us to look to a person’s physical appearance when forming judgments about him or her. Due to this unfortunate reality, many hijab-wearing women living in this country can too easily feel that their hijab wrongfully defines them based on existing stereotypes surrounding Islam. “The most common misconception about Muslim women who wear hijab is the fact that they are oppressed, that if they had the option of not wearing hijab, they would,” says Elif Kavakci, SMU professor and creative director of the modest wear label Kavakci Couture. “Most people think a woman would not choose to wear her hijab to serve God, but that a man forces it on to her.” Islamophobia affects more than a small fringe group of Muslims. In fact, 52 percent of Americans say that the West does not respect

Spring/Summer 2018 • 35


look back

‘60s

WELCOME TO THE

A lot happened in 1968: Boeing introduced the first 747 “jumbo jet,” President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1968 and Apollo 8 orbited the moon. And what was it like to be a Mustang in the late ‘60s? Construction of Owen Arts Center finally finished, opening its doors for art lovers and students for years to come. In the world of sports, it was pre-death penalty. The football team only lost three games before trumping the University of Oklahoma in the Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl. Oh, and we beat TCU. Cultural excitement translated to fashion and the iconic designers of today were just getting started. Pierre Cardin’s designs were geometric and bold with a futuristic flavor — it was the Space Age, after all. Meanwhile, Yves Saint Laurent had recently released his iconic safari jacket. It was an exciting time to love style. These images from the DeGolyer Library show how SMU students were wearing trends of the late 60s. From shift dresses with drop waists to matching coordinates like this brown leather ensemble, fashion was all about breaking tradition. — Anna Grace Carey and Kelsey Gwinn

36 • SMU LOOK


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SMU Look is dedicated to providing a youthful take on Dallas fashion and living. We strive to inspire and cultivate the standard of style on campus and beyond.


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