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Fall/Winter 2018

power play BOLD. BEAUTIFUL. BRAVE. HILLTOP FASHION AND STYLE


FRAME

O U R S TO R E S AKR IS . ALEX ANDER Mc QUEEN . ALICE + OLIVIA . BALENCIAGA . BANDIER . BERETTA GALLERY BLUEMERCURY . BRUNELLO CUCINELLI . CAROLINA HERRER A . CARTIER . CELINE . CHANEL CHR ISTIAN LOUBOUTIN . CHR ISTOFLE . DIOR . DIOR BEAUTY . ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA . ESCADA . ETRO FENDI . FORTY FIVE TEN . FR AME . FRÉDÉR IC FEKK AI . GOOP . HADLEIGH’S . HARRY WINSTON . HERMÈS JAMES PERSE . JIMMY CHOO . K IEHL’S SINCE 1851 . LELA ROSE . LORO PIANA . MADISON . MARKET MIRON CROSBY . R AG & BONE . R ALPH LAUREN . ROBERT TALBOTT . ROLLER R ABBIT SAINT LAURENT . ST. JOHN . ST. MICHAEL’S WOMAN’S EXCHANGE . THE TOT . THEORY . TOM FORD TORY BURCH . TR INA TURK . VALENTINO . VERONICA BEARD . VINCE . WILLIAM NOBLE PA R T I A L L I S T I N G TaxFree Shopping Refund Location | Complimentary Valet Parking and Personal Shopping | Gift Cards Available At Mockingbird Lane and Preston Road | hpvillage.com


Dallas is 1,127 miles from the heart of Mexico City, but only minutes away from Gourmet Mexicano cuisine. Setting the bar for Continental Mexico City Cuisine for the last 40 years, Javier’s is not your typical Tex-Mex Restaurant. You will not find tacos or enchiladas here, but you will find some delicios dishes of tenderloin beef, fresh seafood, shrimp, chicken and quail dishes seasoned with traditional spices of Mexico, and influenced by its Spanish heritage. Javier’s will change the way you think of Mexican food. We surround you with a classic colonial sophistication that you will not want to leave behind. And why should you? After dinner enjoy the wonderful ambiance of the famous cigar bar, and select from the large selection of premium cigars, ports, and handcrafted drinks in a sophisticated ambiance that you won’t find anywhere else in Dallas.

4912 Cole Avenue Dallas, Texas 75205

214-521-4211


HILLTOP FASHION AND ST YLE ALI MIKLES EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CREATIVE DIRECTOR SANIHA AZIZ MANAGING EDITOR MERRIT STAHLE SENIOR EDITOR MEREDITH WELBORN ASSISTANT EDITOR ANNA GRACE CAREY FASHION EDITOR JENNIFER MOTT ART DIRECTOR GABBY GRUBB ASSISTANT ART DIRECTORS ANNA GRACE GODOY, ALLIE HARTMAN, MARY MONROY STYLE EDITOR MORGANE BERNARD ASSISTANT STYLE EDITOR CAROLINE KESTER SMULOOK.COM DIGITAL DIRECTOR CAROLINE SHERIDAN ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR BROOKE HERIGON SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER HANNA REFVIK FASHION WRITER MAGGIE KLIMUSZKO BEAUTY WRITER MCKENNA DERSAM CULTURE WRITER EMMA CASTNER ADVERTISING MARKETING DIRECTOR EMILY MATTHEWS SALES ASSISTANTS EMMA SIEGEL, KENDALL FREE WRITERS ISABEL ARCELLANA, MARLOWE BARNETT, YVENA CHOWDHURY, MADDIE CHURCH, CARLEE DINICOLA, COLLEEN ELLIOTT, MADELEINE FENNELL, CHARLOTTE FERRELL, EMMA KATE FEW, CAROLINE HOGAN, MADISON JENOS, ANN JOULLIAN, MERYN KENNEDY, ELLIE KING, CAROLINE LIDL, RYAN MIKLES, KELLY KOLFF VAN OOSTERWYK, CHRISTINA PAULUS, COURTNEY PROSNIEWSKI, FATIMA REYNA, EMILY RULE, MARY-BENNETT SIGAL, MERRIT STAHLE, GRACE VALENTINE, ANNIE WERDIGER CONTRIBUTORS Photographers ABIGAIL SAVOPOULOS, LAYNE TENENBAUM Advising Editor ETHAN LASCITY Photo Advisor ROBERT HART Hair/Makeup TARAN STAHLE, MEREDITH WELBORN EXECUTIVE EDITORIAL ADVISER CAMILLE KRAEPLIN EXCECUTIVE DIRECTOR TONY PEDERSON SMU Look, a student-run magazine at Southern Methodist University, is published by the Division of Journalism in Meadows School of the Arts. SMU Look is dedicated to providing a youthful take on Dallas fashion and living. We strive to inspire and cultivate the standard of style on campus and beyond. Umphrey Lee Center 6225 Hillcrest Avenue Dallas, TX 75275 ENTIRE CONTENTS © SMU LOOK

Fall/Winter 2018 • 3


Volume 3, Issue 1

CONTENTS 10 Not Your Grandma’s Gucci Decade old trends make a comeback.

12 SIDELINE STYLE

Athletes are taking a front row seat in the fashion industry.

22 SKIN DEEP

Tips and tricks to de-puff your face after a night out.

24 High Praise The wellness industry is high on CBD oil.

26

YEAR OF THE WOMAN

Women are making waves in male-dominated fields like never before.

34 LET’S GET REAL

The 21st century model turning heads.

Photograph by Layne Tenenbaum Model Jules Blanks, Class of 2021 Styled by Saniha Aziz and Jennifer Mott IRO Women’s Sport Jacket $695 Off White Logo Belt $225 Jeffery Campbell Lo Fi Silver Sneaker $145

4 • SMU LOOK


editoR's letter

RUN THE WORLD A

s the air conditioning blasts into the cracked black leather car seats, I turn up the radio. Beyoncé’s voice blares: “Who run the world? Girls!” While it’s an outdated hit from 2011, it couldn’t be more applicable today. Instead of mindlessly singing along to arguably one of the catchiest songs of our generation, do we ever stop to think about what Queen Bey is actually trying to tell us? Confidence is key, and attitude is everything-- lessons I’ve learned as I took on the role of editor-in-chief of this magazine as only a junior. Leading a team of 38, including those who have more mileage at SMU than me, was honestly a bit daunting at first. I found my power through empowering my staff, and in turn they empowered me. When we support each other, that’s when real change happens. In this issue, you’ll find women who do just that. Trailblazers Brittany Merrill Underwood (pg. 6), Theresa Peters (pg. 7), and Moll Anderson (pg. 32) are pushing back against societal standards in their respective careers in entertainment, retail, and interior design. Women are succeeding in male-dominated fields in record-breaking numbers (pg. 26). A common misconception in the era of #MeToo is that men are our enemies. This could not be further from the truth. Men are our allies and we must include them in our fight for equality. I wanted to make sure that this magazine included their voice, too (pg. 12). With progress, change is inevitable and almost always comes with skepticism. The wellness industry is high on CBD products (pg. 24). However trendy the marijuana extract may be, some are reluctant to hop on the bandwagon. “It” girls with millions of followers on Instagram are nothing new to us, but we can’t say the same for digitally produced influencers (pg. 34). Can we really trust an influencer we have no chance of seeing IRL? Moving forward with change can be difficult, but it’s necessary to reach our full potential. By supporting and lifting each other we are able to accomplish anything. Girls may not run the world just yet, but we are one step closer.

Ali Mikles Editor-in-Chief

Fall/Winter 2018 • 5


Q A

Theresa Peters

&

Meet Theresa Peters, a small town girl from Solon, Iowa who became one of the most successful women in Hollywood. Theresa is a partner and co-head of talent at United Talent Agency. She represents a number of the most recognizable actors and actresses in the business, including James McAvoy, Alicia Vikander, Aaron Paul and Kirsten Dunst. She’s also a married mother of two teenagers who remains in close contact her with high school friends and other busy moms in the entertainment business. By Merrit Stahle What do you believe are your greatest strengths in achieving and maintaining success in a male dominated industry? Just owning it. Confidence about what I have to say, how I say it, never backing down. Let’s face it, there are great men and great women everywhere, in every job. It is up to me who I want to spend my time with and how I spend it. In light of the Times Up and Me Too movements how do you see women moving forward in Hollywood? The Times Up movement is about equality, 50/50 gender in positions from creative to executives which would also be reflected in pay for all jobs. I think of this as a mindful girls club where most companies are taking a beat and truly thinking about how they can shift some old thinking and putting this movement into action. The Me Too movement is about abuse and being taking advantage of. And it is not just in Hollywood. Hollywood is where the dam broke with the Harvey Weinstein scandal. With #MeToo, I also think it is going to create environments where things that used to be common are no longer tolerated. What is your best advice to college women for reaching their goals? I am a firm believer in listen to your gut and just go for it! It’s all about being truthful to yourself and as long as you’re doing something that excites you and you have that next ring to go after, then you’re on the right path. Everybody has a story, everybody comes from somewhere. Surround yourself with people that are passionate and excited. There is no clear path to success. It is about passion and hard work. And a little luck sometimes.

Fall/Winter • 6


STYLE FILE A trip to Uganda inspired SMU alum Brittany Merrill Underwood to create the Akola Project, a non-profit jewelry brand that empowers women through fair wages, education and community. Today, Akola is sold in over 350 boutiques and in Neiman Marcus stores.

The Trip of a Lifetime In the summer of 2004, a 19-year-old SMU student was thrown out of her comfort zone when she walked into a slum outside of Uganda’s capital city, Kampala. Here, 24 children called a closet-sized building, with walls covered in old newspaper, dirt floors and bamboo mat beds, home. Sarah, the young woman awho had taken these children in, said her greatest source of pride was that none of the children had died of starvation since they wandered into her home. “There I was...a girl who had been given everything, standing before a woman who had nothing, but still shared her food so others could live. I was shaken out of my complacency,” Underwood says. Back on the Hilltop With help from her professors, Underwood planned to build an orphanage for the children she met in Uganda. After one fundraiser, Underwood raised close to $1 million. Then, the orphanage project grew into a sustainable business model allowing women to earn an income and care for their children. Making Akola Work The word Akola, meaning “she works” in a local Ugandan dialect, represents the brand perfectly. From rolling karatasi paper beads to assembling the products, each piece of jewelry is handcrafted by women, for women. “I attribute Akola’s success to our women. They are our stakeholders; they are our bottom line,” Underwood says.

Akola invests 100 percent of its profits to support work opportunities, training, social programs and construction in impoverished communities throughout the globe. Most importantly, Akola inspires women to create a better life for themselves and their families. Growing the Business After 10 years, the Dallas Women’s Foundation approached Underwood to bring the Akola Project to Dallas. “The idea translated perfectly,” Underwood says. “There are so many women in Dallas who are trapped in the cycle of urban poverty and the non-

profit ecosystem, unable to find a dependable and dignifying work opportunity.” In 2016, Akola became the first non-profit jewelry company to retail in Neiman Marcus stores. Because of the Neiman Marcus retail account and partnerships with other nonprofits, Akola has provided income opportunities to over 150 women in Dallas. “Every day I go to work and know my decisions have the potential to impact the lives of thousands of women and children,” Underwood says. “Outside of my own children and my family, it gives my day purpose and meaning.” — Emma Castner

Fall/Winter 2018 • 7


looking out

can’t be Tamed

Adventure is the name of the game this season. Inspired by the wild outdoors, it’s time to be bold and daring. Get ready to thrill and thrive with autumn’s best trends.

wild side @artafacts/Instgram

Although cheetah print has been a stylish staple for years, brands like Realisation Par, Frame and Gucci have made it a statement this season. Traditionally, cheetah is an alternative to traditional neutrals because its black, tan and warm brown tones go with just about anything, and it looks great paired with other patterns. But don’t be fooled--even though it works as a neutral, this print is anything but boring. Spice up an all black look with a pair of printed loafers or stand out from the crowd with a faux fur coat or tailored blazer. – Caroline Sheridan

@blaireadiebee/Instgram

RISKY BUSINESS 8 • SMU LOOK

This isn’t just another wrap dress. For a fun twist on the classic blazer, consider your most classic outerwear staple trendy. Blazer dresses are the epitome of a transitional piece and can be dressed up or down in warm or cool weather. Pair it with heels for the office or with a sneaker for a casual, model off-duty look. Now that’s a power dress. – Brooke Herigon


looking out

Made for Walking

Cowboy boots are in. Yep, you read that right. Gone are the days when cowboy boots only served as an expression of American pride or the wild wild west, and welcome to a new era that uses them as a form of self-expression. From Dior to Dolce Vita, all designers have put their individual twist on this hot trend. With such different stylings across dozens of designers, a cowboyinspired boot has been created for just about any outfit you can imagine (and any budget). – Carlee DiNicola

In the

Bag

If you’re in the market for a new bag to enhance your fall wardrobe, look no further than the bucket bag. Bucket bags are incredibly versatile and have the perfect wear-with-anything shape. Coming in all shapes and sizes, the bag can be dressed up for a night out or used as an everyday go-to. – Ann Joullian

@happilygrey/ Instagram

Cold shoulder

on the

Puffer jackets aren’t just for hitting the ski slopes. Brands like Balenciaga have incorporated the sporty coat into their collections causing them to move from the mountains to the streets. Go up a few sizes for an oversized look and pair one with booties and a skinny jean. As temperatures drop, this piece is equally as practical as it is fashionable. – Ali Mikles

Go-Go Who says you can’t wear white after Labor Day? While it comes as no surprise that boots are a fall staple, the color white may be a little more shocking. Not only is it the perfect way to add a bright pop to your outfit, but these boots will undeniably go with any look. – Carlee DiNicola

Photog

raph b

y Jonath

an Dan

iel Pryc

e MANGO Nashville Ankle Boot $149


Pre-AW 2016 Gucci Playful Heritage Campaign


not your grandma’s

By Mary-Bennet Sigal

L

et it be known: this is not your grandmother’s Gucci. The 97-year-old luxe brand is aiming to be more accessible than ever with its fresh, sometimes edgy new look that even millennials can love. Vivid color combinations and juxtaposed prints are the name of Gucci’s new game. Embroidered tigers, snakes, and bumblebees grace the backs of bomber jackets and the tops of loafers. Intricately painted and beaded flower designs give life to the everyday handbag. The mastermind behind the fresh styles? Gucci’s newest creative director, Alessandro Michele, who was appointed in 2015 to shake up the brand. According to parent company Kerring’s 2018 First-Half Report, Gucci kicked off the year with a 49 percent sales increase and sits at number 36 on Forbes’ list of the World’s Most Valuable Brands. Gucci has been an esteemed designer label for nearly a century, famous for its double G logo and classic canvas print. The company’s iconic black loafer is a timeless staple. But the driving force behind the Gucci craze are the brightly colored loafers and those accented with fur and embroidery. Cory Potter is the Gucci store manager in Aspen, one of the brand’s most prominent locations. Potter says he’s seen “astonishing” growth over the years, watching the brand’s popularity increase, as well as the diversity of customers who visit the store. “Just last week I had a lady on the phone buying her first pair of Gucci shoes at the age of 75,” says Potter. “She said she has been watching her grandchildren wear them for a year and now it was her turn.” Michele has been described as romantic, optimistic, chaotic and individualistic, credited with making the brand more relevant and progressive. His gender-blending fall/winter 2018/2019 fashion show featured a model adorned in an intricate crystal body piece, layered with a cotton candy pink and sea green velvet dress, lace tights, sneakers and a ski mask. Most of the models who walked in the show were androgynous. Some even took down the runway holding sculpted replicas of their own heads. “He’s not trying to take over the fashion industry,” Potter says, “he’s just being himself.”

Fall/Winter 2018 • 3


SIDELINE style Male athletes flex fashion sense in their off-duty uniforms.

12 • SMU LOOK


6 By Ryan Mikles

- f e e t - 5 - i n c h ( p l u s) muscular men decked out in clean sneakers are seated in a row. Lebron James, Odell Beckham Jr., and Russell Westbrook are on the sidelines waiting for the show to start. Not game, show. Fashion weeks across the globe are filled with designers, influencers, “it” girls, and now, athletes. They are no longer only on the sidelines of a basketball court or football field, but are also on the sidelines of some of fashion’s biggest catwalks. Athletes interest and participation in fashion have not only influenced their fans, but also inspired designers. Having the ability to reach a completely different consumer, some designers have partnered with professional athletes to promote their brand. Rhuigi Villaseñor, the founder and creative director of RHUDE, a men’s street-style brand, was one of the first to jump onto the growing trend. Basketball players Lebron James and Kobe Bryant are often seen in the brand’s pieces, which in turn has caused RHUDE to grow internationally. While still emerging, RHUDE has the ability to reach potential customers, now more than ever, due to the exposure it has gained through prominent athletes. An athletes influence doesn’t just stop at their fanbase. They have become a source of inspiration for designers as well. Traditionally,

designer Ralph Lauren has created classic and preppy collections. However, with athletes’ designer street-style making waves in the fashion industry, the brand plans to adapt to their influence by collaborating with popular contemporary brands. For instance, Ralph Lauren and the London skate brand, Palace collaborated in a groundbreaking collection for the brands respectively. There is no question that street-style has taken over the men’s fashion world. While athletes play a significant role in influencing and growing this trend, these trendy brands aren’t as accessible to the average fan as they may seem. As a 19-year-old college student, spending $400 to $600 on a t-shirt sounds a little ridiculous. In response, designers have created affordable lines that are more accessible to the average young male looking to replicate that of their favorite athletes. For instance, celebrity and style icon, Scott Disick created the street-style brand, Talentless, early this year. Similar to the designs in luxury street-style brands John Elliott or Yeezy, Talentless uses the same heavy cotton in their shirts sans the high price point. Yeezy sells its classic t-shirt for $120, while Talentless markets its practically identical piece for $42. At these prices, we are able to emulate the trends and style our favorite athletes have adopted.

LACE UP

Heron Preston Sweatshirt $498 Rick Owens Casual Pant $1080 Heron Preston

Fall/Winter 2018 • 13


LEVEL UP

LIFTING CONTEMPORARY STREET-STYLE TO NEW HEIGHTS

Photography by Layne Tenenbaum Styling by Saniha Aziz and Jennifer Mott Models Zach Wilson, Class of 2020; Jules Blanks, Class of 2021 Clothes courtesey of Traffic Los Angeles


LACE UP

Heron Preston Sweatshirt $498 Rick Owens Casual Pant $1,080 Heron Preston Padded Fanny Pack $298 Adidas Yeezy 350 Boost $220


WINDOW SHOPPING

Palm Angels Cropped Black Logo Crystal Shirt $307 Off-White Equestrian Pant Black $1105 Jeffrey Campbell Silver Lo-Fi Sneakers $145


SERVING

LOOKS

Gender inequalities create an uneven playing field in professional sports.

By Meryn Kennedy

S

ilence is deafening in California’s Rose Bowl arena as Brandi Chastain steps back for a penalty kick during the 1999 Women’s World Cup Final. USA has the lead, and if she lands the kick she will clinch the victory against China in the most important game of her career. Chastain takes a deep breath and focuses on everything she has learned and practiced for years leading up to this moment. She lunges forward and with a dauntless kick, the ball flies past the goalie. In an instant, Chastain wins the game for her team and her country. The silence is interrupted with roars of celebration as her team rushes the field. Chastain pulls off her jersey, clenches it between her fists, and emotionally kneels to the ground. Her sports bra is fully exposed. Chastain’s sports bra made front page news the next day, not her performance. Critics were quick to call the Olympic player’s sports bra reveal inappropriate and a tasteless distraction from the game at hand. The negative feedback heightened the need to address the way society values female athletes’ clothing choices more than their performance. Countless male athletes take off their shirts after wins, yet Chastain’s adrenaline-spiked action is still talked about today, 19 years later.

18 • SMU LOOK

It can be argued that for women in the sports industry her looks come first and her talent second. A male athlete is rarely discredited because of his appearance. His value is determined by his performance and he is only ridiculed on those terms. Women, however, are scrutinized for their appearance and not as athletes dedicated to their craft. Serena Williams recently dealt with similar backlash toward the Nike ‘catsuit’, a form fitting black top and pant, she wore at the French Open. It was later determined that the outfit be banned from being worn at the tennis tournament. As a highly decorated athlete, it would be expected that Williams would only be in the spotlight due to her notable performances, but when Bernard Giudicelli, French Tennis Federation President, labeled the ensemble as “go[ing] too far,” her clothing stole the spotlight once again. “Instantly people's reactions to William's cat suit was about the fashion statement or the attention she was trying to obtain,” says SMU athlete Olivia Mars. “It was for health reasons but this was overlooked. ” Mars is referring to William’s choice to swap the traditional tennis skirt for pants in order to improve blood circulation in her legs and avoid blood clots. Prominent

people and athletes like, American tennis player Billie Jean King took to twitter in response to the ‘catsuit’ ban commenting on how criticizing what women wear in sports is a discredit to their work and accomplishments. "The policing of women's bodies must end," tweeted King. "The 'respect' that's needed is for the exceptional talent [ Williams] brings to the game. Criticizing what she wears to work is where the true disrespect lies." In order to be profitable, companies rely on a female athlete’s sex appeal to bring attention to their brand. Brands rarely focus on the accomplishments of female athletes, but


GOD IS A WOMAN

Off-White Logo Woman Sweatshirt $620 Off-White Equestrian Pant Black $1105 Jeffrey Campbell Silver Lo-Fi Sneakers $145

rather their ability to look good while playing sports. “The common sentiment is that women who are considered pretty will have an easier time landing these deals,” USC athlete Megan McCashland says. “This is important as society’s value of a woman’s appearance could play a role in who can make a living playing the sport.” The pay gap between male and female athletes is enormous and forces many female athletes to rely on endorsements to receive notable salaries. Endorsements on average make up 50 percent of female athletes’ salaries while endorsements only account for 10 percent of male athletes overall pay.

BBC Sports reports that “the highest-paid player in the WNBA (the Women’s National Basketball Association) makes roughly one-fifth that of the lowest player” in the NBA. The prize money for the FIFA Women’s World Cup is $15 million compared to the whopping $576 million awarded to the men’s winning team. Many blame this stark contrast to the lack of visibility of women’s sports. Forbes reports that “top male athletes are more popular with corporate America because the sports in which they compete yield greater interest, ratings and visibility. Most women who compete in team sports have little chance to

monetize their brand unless they are one of the best in their sport and sexy.” As female athletes are rewarded more for their appearance or commercial appeal rather than their hard earned victories, society re-establishes the glass ceiling, limiting and devaluing the achievements of women.

Fall/Winter 2018 • 19


STEP UP IRO Women’s Sport Jacket $695 Off White Logo Belt $225


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good looks

SKIN DEEP Recovering from a night of partying doesn’t have to take a toll on your skin. Emma Castner uncovers tricks to freeze your best look.

It can be hard to recognize yourself the morning after a night out. Who is that balloon face in the mirror with puffed up cheeks and swollen eyes? Not cute. No one wants to step outside with their “I had too much fun last night face.” But why does it even happen? Culinary nutritionist Pamela Salzman offers insight. “The skin on the face is susceptible to puffiness because this is where it is loose and has room to expand with excess fluid. Puffiness in the face can occur from the expansion of blood vessels which can occur after drinking. Excess alcohol is dehydrating,” she says.

Drop Dead Goregous

The Gel-Face Cold Pack is the perfect way to gently reduce swollen muscles in the face. Wearing the custom-fit mask for 10 minutes in the morning works wonders. It works best if stored in the freezer, but it can also be used as a hot mask by putting it in the microwave. It also helps calm acne-prone skin and can reduce the appearance of pores. Amazon, $19.99

Ice, Ice, Baby

As a college student, it’s often hard to stay hydrated, and especially hard to refuse late-night ZaLat pizza. But unfortunately, those habits show up in the morning. “Dehydration forces the body to hold onto fluids. When you go to sleep, the practice of lying down pushesgravity in the direction of your face,” says Salzman. It’s important to rehydrate the body at the start of every day. Water may help in the long-run with the puffiness and overall hydration, but sometimes there isn’t time to play the waiting game. Here are some ways to deflate the situation.

The Ice Roller is a more intense way to de-puff the face. It is easy to focus on specific areas such as under-eye bags. As the frozen roller massages the skin, the muscles contract,causing the face to appear less swollen. The ice roller is also great for headaches by targeting temples. Amazon, $11.99

No More Baggage After either using the Gel-Face Cold Pack or Ice Roller, swipe a dollop of Dr. Brandt’s Needles No More No More Baggage gel under the eyes. The advanced technology of the gel reduces the appearance of under-eye baggage and dark circles. It truly is a miracle gel that will trick people into thinking you had a full night’s rest. Ulta Beauty, $42

Fall/Winter 2018 • 21


good looks TGIF Summer Fridays is the “it” brand of the season. The brand, created by Instagram influencers Marianna Hewitt and Lauren Gores Ireland, has flooded social media. So what’s the hype? The mask can be left on or washed off and is packed with vitamins and antioxidants that brighten and smooth the skin’s texture. It can even be used as a primer before applying makeup. With a creamy consistency and ultra moisturizing properties, the mask gives dehydrated skin a breath of life. –Brooke Herigon Jet Lag Mask, $48 on sephora.com

UNDER the

influence Celebrites and social media influencers are entering the beauty world, creating lines each with their own spin based on their signature looks

Sparkling or Still? The Queen of Instagram, Kim Kardashian, released seven jewel tone loose powder pigments to add some flash to the face. Use them wet, dry, or mixed on your eyes, lips, cheekbones, or all over your body. Theseversatile products can be applied with brushes or fingers for the ultimate party vibe. –McKenna Dersam Flashing Lights Loose Powders, $17 on kkwbeauty.com

Love the Way you Lie Fenty Beauty, created by Rihanna, is an inclusive makeup brand designed for all skin tones.The line features everything from foundation, primer, highlighter, and lipstick to makeup tools such as brushes and blotting papers. Fenty’s Match Stix Trio works for all skin tones and can be applied to create a coveted contour. Fenty Beauty is 100 percent cruelty free. –Emma Castner Match Stix Trio, $54 on seophora.com

Busy Bee Instagram influencer-turned-business woman Negin Mirsalehi created Gisou --a bee-based hair products company. Beekeeping has been in her family for six generations, which prompted her to incorporate honey’s natural ingredients in her beauty product.The honey from the family’s comb is rich in minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants. The Honey Infused Hair Oil is their best-selling product and is credited with strengthening and protecting hair from heat damage. –Ali Mikles Gisou Honey Infused Hair Oil, $84 on gisou.com

Fall/Winter 2018 • 23


highpraise CBD oil is the new “it” ingredient, but comes with warnings By Caroline Hogan

24 • SMU LOOK


e

s

G

lass cases of creams, oils and brownies crowd one side of the store and have an ingredient that most other products don’t: cannabidiol, or CBD oil. “It tranquilizes you,” says Doris Camargo, an employee at CBD Kratom, a hip Dallas boutique on Knox Street. The oil is extracted from marijuana, but without THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol), the psychoactive part of the plant. It is the sole cannabinoid that is able to induce therapeutic and medicinal benefits. As pot has become decriminalized around the country, the oil has quickly become a popular, but sometimes controversial, ingredient in many health products, from body lotions to headache remedies. “It helps to eliminate the pain and inflammation in your body and with anxiety and stress,” says Camargo. But not so fast. While the oil doesn’t get you high, it is unregulated by the Food and Drug Administration, so products can vary in quality. While the FDA supports research of marijuanaderived products, there is currently little scientific evidence for many of their touted benefits. Camargo and other users, however, swear by CBD oil. CBD enthusiasts harness the oil for lotions, balms and waxes that proponents say conquer aches, pains and cramps. The oil can help with digestion when a few drops are added to a smoothie, and a drop under your tongue at night will provide better sleep. In addition, scientists and doctors have confirmed through tests and in collaboration with the American Cancer Society that the use of CBD, THC and marijuana can help treat certain symptoms of cancer. For example, studies have found that smoking marijuana can decrease nausea after chemotherapy while also treating pain caused by nerve damage. Trendy shopping spots such as Royal Blue Grocery in Highland Park Village are jumping on the bandwagon, adding Austin-based Mineral’s Robyn CBD oil to its lineup of holistic, all-natural products. Even Brandon Cohanim, the founder

of Dallas’ Pok the Raw Bar and sister restaurant Namo, has started selling CBD-infused drinks, Vybes, at his restaurants. “To be honest, I wasn’t sure we could sell it here in Dallas because I didn’t know anything about CBD. I didn’t realize that this was something that came from hemp and all of the health benefits this has for you,” says Cohanim. “As soon as I realized… I ordered a few cases of it, and we sold, like, four cases in a day and a half.” While Vybes may be flying off the shelves, it’s important to note that CBD is not addictive. Gabby Davé, a senior at Southern Methodist University, discovered CBD-infused products through her mother, who loves natural remedies. She says her mother referred her to Miss Grass, an online CBD shop, after Davé wouldn’t stop complaining about her stressful homework load. Davé says she started to feel more relaxed and balanced, especially on days when she would put a few drops of CBD oil in her coffee. She also likes to take it the night before a big exam to fall into a more restful sleep and wake up feeling refreshed. “I feel much better taking a droplet of something plantbased than taking a Tylenol at times I feel less than fab,” says Davé. She uses CBD as a replacement to most over-the-counter drugs when it comes to anxiety, pains, and sleep. CBD oil products aren’t cheap. One 1.7-ounce jar of CBD cream for cramps and aches costs $89.99. That, compared to a $4.79 bottle of Advil, is a hefty price to pay for anyone on a budget. Camargo, says she smokes CBD and lights a hemp candle on the daily to combat her intense anxiety. She was even able to quit anti-anxiety medication two months after she started using the the herb as a natural supplement. She has not had a panic attack since. “I just got such a clarity of thoughts,” says Camargo, who was thrilled to get

off her prescription medication. “It just allows me to calm down and not be so anxious, but still be me at the same time.” Another SMU senior says her doctor recommended “Pro Sport Pain Stick” to help with chronic neck and back pain. She says the pain causes horrible headaches, forcing weekly visits to a doctor for adjustments and physical therapy. The pain stick, which is infused with CBD oil, is used between sessions. Though it is a short-term fix, the student, a former SMU athlete, says it immediately relieved her pain. “People think because it is considered cannabis that you would have crazy side effects, but you don’t,” she says. The difference between CBD and THC can cause confusion and lead consumers to believe that CBD is the same as marijuana. It is not. The psychoactive aspect of marijuana, THC, which causes the euphoric “high,” is strained out of CBD. Still, traces of THC can be found in some CBD products. The max amount of THC that can be sold in Texas is 0.3 percent, a tiny helping compared to that found in recreational joints or cannabis products. Studies are ongoing into other uses of CBD and marijuana-based products. The drug Epidiolex, for instance, is now an FDA-approved purified form of cannabidiol, used specifically to treat seizures in two rare forms of epilepsy. The consistent stream of marijuana-based research indicates that we still have a lot to learn about the at-times-taboo plant, but the cure-all reputation of CBD products seems to say that this trend won’t fade out fast.

“I just got such clarity of thoughts. It allows me to calm down and not be so anxious but still be me at the same time.”

Fall/Winter 2018 • 25


By Carlee DiNicola and Caroline Sheridan photography ABIGAIL SOVOPOLOUS | styling SANIHA AZIZ and JENNIFER MOTT

year of the

WOMAN The phrase “The United States of Women” graced the cover of Vogue this October, putting a spotlight on young women entering tech fields. If 2018 is indeed the Year of the Woman, this declaration goes far beyond one industry. There was a time when women struggled to obtain jobs in professional fields such as law or business, but current empowerment movements such as #MeToo are stimulating a new confidence within women who are pursuing careers in the most notoriously male-dominated fields in record-breaking numbers. 26 • SMU LOOK


POLITICS hile the political climate leading up to the 2018 midtermelections was full of division and negativity, it sparked at least one positive trend: More women than ever before ran for national political office. According to The Washington Post, 277 womenwere on the Nov. 6 ballot vying for their spot in the House of Representatives, U.S. Senate or governor’s mansions across the country. More than 120 of them won. Dr. Stephanie Martin, a political communication professor at SMU, believes that women were motivated to run by the groundbreaking campaign of Hillary Clinton, as well as social movements like #MeToo. “There is real momentum among women to be heard and taken seriously,” Martin says. “Women are saying: enough is enough. We have voices and we are tired of men speaking while we listen. You listen up. We are ready to be heard.”A report from the Congressional Research Services states that females made up 20.7 percent of the total membership of the 115thCongress. Per 2016 Census estimates, 50.8 percent of the United States population is female. More and more womenare looking for equality of representation in our government.Will 2018 be remembered as the year of the woman? In this traditionally male-dominated field, Martin says to keep an eye on what happens beyond this election cycle. “We also had the so-called year of the woman in 1992 and it didn’t mean much,” she says. “A few more women were elected and things re-set. The question will be what comes after 2018.”

W

ENGINEERING & STEM

BUSINESS

LAW

SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering boasts an obove average women’s enrollment. Compared to the national average of 20 percent, 37.4 percent of 2017 Lyle graduates were women and current enrollment is 32.8 percent. But they still face challenges in retaining women through graduation. According to the Society of Women Engineers, in the first year, women typically account for 35 to 40 percent of engineering students; however, only 20 percent will graduate with an engineering degree. 2013 SMU Lyle graduate Madeline Adler began her career at Texas Instruments and spent more than three years there before returning to SMU as an associate director in Lyle’s Office of Recruitment and Retention. Looking back, she has fond memories of her time at TI, but cannot deny the separation she felt as a woman in the office every day. “Being in the minority, sometimes I felt like I was looked at differently,” she says. “I would have to remind myself that I am meant to be here and was hired for a reason, and I had confidence in knowing that.” A Harvard study identified this conglomeration of worklife factors as The Athena Factor. The study’s namesake pays tribute to the Greek goddess of wisdom and carefully analyzed the career paths of women in STEM. As a result of belittling from male counterparts at work, women develop deep feelings of isolation in their companies and choose to leave. “It’s not necessarily that you have to prove yourself, but if you’re the only girl in a boardroom, you need to know how to present yourself and communicate your ideas in order to be heard,” says Adler.

Over 50 percent of undergraduate students applying to SMU identify the Cox School of Business astheir desired school. More and more women are pursuing careers in business, but they are choosing to focus on specific business degrees such as accounting and marketing instead of finance.“Accounting has more flexibility than finance. Can you work from home so that you can raise a family and still work as an accountant? Absolutely. But you can’t do investment banking from home,” says Assistant Dean of the Cox Executive MBA Program and Adjunct Professor Tom Perkowski.The flexibility of acareer is incredibly appealing to women, and combined with technology, both men and women have more options in how/where they choose to work than ever. This is what has allowed more women to balance a career and raising a family—two things that did not always go together.It has often been suggested that women struggle to reach executive-and management-level positions due to their desire to raise a family at home and feeling they had to pick between career or family. In the past decade, a general demographics shift has made this less of an issue. “Millennials and women are getting married later in life,” says Perkowski. “When they decide to have children, they’re in their 30s, have established their careers more, and some may have already reached executive levels.”

Legal news source Above the Law reported that as of 2017, women accounted for 51 percent of law school enrollment. Just one year prior, in 2016, history had been made when women’s enrollment exceeded men’s for the first time. “We enrolled 55 percent women in fall 2018 and have consistently had 50 percent or more female students each year,” says SMU Dedman School of Law Dean Jennifer Collins. Despite this, the ratio of men to women in practice is more uneven. The American Bar Association’s annual review of Women in the Law revealed that as of 2018, women represent only 35 percent of all practicing attorneys in the U.S and only account for 26.4 percent of the general counsels in Fortune 500 companies. But this is not discouraging women from entering the field.“I am not intimidated by the imbalance, as I think women can stand out in their own ways by offering new perspectives,” says first-year student at SMU’s Dedman School of Law Ashley Jo Zaccagnini. While women may represent only 20 percent of partners at firms across the U.S., according to Law Practice Today, this statistic is changing. From the largest and most prestigious firms to smaller niche firms, placing women on the partner track has become an important development strategy due to client pressures for more diverse representation, specifically with women.

Fall/Winter 2018 • 27


MODELS/ Grace Inthathirath, Sofia Marin, Adelaide Adams, all Class of 2022 HAIR/ Meredith Welborn MAKEUP/ Taran Stahle Clothing Courtesy of Forty Five Ten and Ten Over Six


SHINE BRIGHT Rachel Comey Pink Idle Bodysuit $380 Simon Miller Morgo Crinkle Leather Shearling Coat $1590 Eckhaus Latta Purple Gather Sleeve Blouse $380 Sies Marjan Iridescent Trench Coat $1695


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onward & upward Moll Anderson is an interior designer, New York Times bestselling author and former national iHeart Radio host on The Moll Anderson Show. Aside from her lifestyle brand and appearances on shows like Good Morning America and The Today Show and in magazines like InStyle and Cosmopolitan, she is a philanthropist and style icon.

By Ali Mikles

O

n a muggy Dallas morning in October, Moll Anderson is anything but sluggish. She’s nestled behind the corner table of her living room, perched under a fur throw on a black velvet couch, in between two crying King Charles and a Shih Tzu, she enthusiastically discusses details for a gala she is arranging for one of her many causes, UNICEF. One of her two iPhone Xs is on speaker, balanced on three mini candles by stacks of interior design magazines including Florida Design, D Weddings, and Modern Luxury, as she negotiates media plans for the event, honoring stars like Brad Paisley, with her PR team in Dallas and UNICEF’s PR team in New York on a threeway call. Her newly hired assistant of a couple of weeks, Vicky Velez, ferociously writes notes on her colorcoordinated outline of Anderson’s itinerary for the day. Her previous assistant of 13 years is recently engaged. “I’m planning a blow-out shower for her in Nashville,” Anderson says. Nashville is one of the many places where Anderson and her husband reside. “She didn’t want to move to Dallas. She’s a small-town girl—Ooh, that reminds me of the song,” she says as she breaks into Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’.” The song title couldn’t be more fitting for Anderson, who says that hope was her motivator despite her many hardships. “I think when my spirit was under the possibility of being squelched for good and living in what I call a dark space, somehow my faith in God and my belief in the fact that there had to be something bigger out there helped me get out of that place,” says Anderson Raised in Scottsdale, Arizona, Anderson dreamed of a career in entertainment. College was never in the cards, and she didn’t even finish high school in the traditional way. “I didn’t love school,” she says. “After my junior year I went to night school and worked at Saks, and that’s when I got into fashion and started modeling.” After high school, she got married and gave birth at 20 to her son Michael, a norm for someone like her growing

32 • SMU LOOK


up in a religious community. She says that growing up as a born again Christian, that’s just the way it was--you got your diploma, got married and had a baby. She knows the value of a college education, though. Years later she would go on to create a scholarship program at the University of Tennessee for single mothers. “Do I wish I’d gone? Yeah. Some people say ‘you can go now,’ but I’m kind of busy,” she says with a chuckle as she looks around her purple-accented living room at her various employees, roaming in and out. “But I can make sure other people do, which I think is part of my legacy.” Realizing she wanted more in life, she divorced her husband and moved. As a single mother and working at ABC15 Arizona, Anderson won her first Emmy for a story on sexual abuse. This cause, too, hits home for Anderson, who was an ambassador for Child Help USA after surviving child sex abuse at the hands of a family friend. “When that happens to you, you go through this period of shock, and the shock is what God gives us to protect us,” she says. Anderson checks the time, jumps up, and says, “I have to slip into something else to run errands.” Velez prepares paleo snacks for the road. “Moll is energetic,” Velez says. “She’s passionate, creative, a visionary, oh, and did I say energetic?” Anderson quickly reappears sporting kneehigh red and black leather boots, a red paisley blouse with a black midi skirt, adorned by several diamond bracelets, a drop necklace with a stone pendent, and a studded black Saffiano Prada bag. This is what Anderson slipped into to run errands. She hops into her car and turns up Ed Sheeran’s “Thinking Out Loud.” Singing is a must while driving with her. Her first stop is Allen Knight in the Dallas Design District, she is greeted with hugs and compliments. “Those are cute boots” says sales executive Suzanne. “Don’t you loooove? I’m all Dior-ed out today... which is fun,” says Anderson striking a pose. Suzanne leads Anderson to a storage room where she immediately digs through cardboard boxes, trying to be the first to get her hands on new pieces... literally. A FedEx truck arrives with more boxes. Moll grabs them to unbox. “I got it, but only you would actually do it,” Suzanne says taking the box from Anderson’s arms. As Anderson rips open boxes exclaiming, “It’s so good!” it’s hard to believe that she didn’t find her passion for design until later in life when she says she hit her lowest. “I just thought what am I supposed to do? I really, really prayed ‘cause I thought I really don’t understand what I’m

supposed to be doing. Why am I working this hard?” As clichéd as it sounds, she took Oprah’s advice on an episode of her show to find your passions and began looking through old photos. “I mean instinctually we should know what it is we are good at,” Anderson says with a sigh. For her, the signs of her innate eye for design, like rearranging her living room at 5-years old, were not as apparent to her family, because of the “dark place” she went to due to her abuse. She believes her experience with sex abuse caused her to only live half a life until she found her voice. She noticed various before-and-after photos of the small living spaces she had redone for herself and her son. “One time I ended up renting a room, that ended up being the master, and turned the walk-in closet into a bedroom for Mike,” Anderson recalls. From there, Anderson worked at a furniture store before stumbling into a major home design job and a book deal, which led to seven New York Times bestsellers. “I was working from $10 an hour to six figures, and then I was doubling that within a year,” Anderson says. Now, Anderson is plunging into the fashion industry as an investor for Burnett New York, a ready-to-wear cocktail dress and eveningwear line. The company’s values align with Anderson’s in that they plan to support organizations that benefit women, specifically women’s education. Aside from this new venture, Anderson is looking for a new challenge. “I love speaking. I want to remind people that they have the power to change their lives and they’re not defined by who they were but who they are today, and that today is the beginning—always—and to live in the moment.” On her way to an appointment, she veers off to an eclectic outdoor furniture shop. Anderson says to wait in the car—that she’ll only be a few seconds.

“Moll is energetic. She’s passionate, creative, a visionary, oh, and did I say energetic?”

“When she sees something, she just goes there,” Velez says. “Her brain goes faster than this car probably.” A few seconds, turned a few minutes, turned into 30, led to an iPhone’s “bing” blaring into the silence of her air-conditioned car. “Jackpot!” the text from Moll reads. Velez gets out of the car to see Anderson bouncing up and down over a stone pedestal that’s “just what I’ve been looking for.” “It’s so good! Isn’t that good? Wow. It’s so good!” Anderson shrieks. However, she isn’t completely satisfied with her visit, since a wooden sculpture she’s “fallen in love with” is sold. The store owner reassures her that her name is on the list for similar art pieces. “But could you bump me to the top of the list?” Anderson begs in a joking manner, as she looks down at Modern Luxury Interiors Texas Magazine on the coffee table near her knees. “I’m in this!” She wasn’t joking. Anderson flips to the center fold to reveal her two-page spread. “Oh well,” she says with a shrug. “Onward and upward.”

Fall/Winter 2018 • 33


look FORWARD

let’s get

real

Ellie King discusses the new generation of model including ‘LIL MIQUELA’. Some 21st Century influencers are limited to the bounds of virtual reality.

M

iquela Sousa, 19, also known as Lil Miquela, is living the Instagram life that most people can only dream of. The Brazilian-American influencer splits her time between New York City and Los Angeles. She wears brands like Supreme and Chanel, is photographed at the trendiest restaurants, and just released her third single on Spotify called “Hate Me.” She loves engaging with her audience and posts on Instagram almost daily so her million-plus followers can see what she’s up to. “I’ve made so many meaningful relationships through Instagram,” Miquela said in an April 2018 email interview with Financial Times. “I’ve had such positive responses and comments to my posts and stories. I have been able to work with some of my fashion idols and travel to new exciting places all because of those interactions.” But Lil Miquela’s most alluring quality? She’s not real. Lil Miquela is a robot created by a Los Angeles-based startup company called Brud, who also created her lesser-known accomplices @Blawko22 and @BermudaisBae. Since Miquela’s creation, other robotic and digital models have entered the scene, including Shudu Gram, Lightning, and Noonoouri. These models are the new faces of the fashion industry. They are able to collaborate with brands, generate buzz, and build a following just like any human model or influencer. Designer and fashion theorist Elif Kavakci covers the digital model trend in her SMU Fashion Media class. “When we look at these computer-generated models, it’s a reflection of how technology has

basically taken over our lives,” she said. “So in that sense, there’s constant changes that we see with new developments of technology and cultural impacts that change our understanding of what beauty is and what a body should look like.” “I think it’s creepy because they’re not real people, yet they have a huge following and it makes me scared for the future. I don’t want our world to be run by AI,” says Karley Kampf, an SMU fashion media major. Like it or not, the fashion industry is now forced to confront the reality of human models competing with robots, w h ic h a r e phy s ica l machines, and computergenerated models, which are solely digital-based. “This trend now impacts our daily life,” Kavakci said. “Instead of using supermodels or models, whose job is to promote clothes and make money, someone who is tech-savvy can put together an image and collaborate with a brand. That person is shifting the role that models play in this industry and it impacts their profession.” Unlike human models, digital models work for free and can be on 24/7. By using digital models, brands don’t have to spend money hiring models, renting spaces for photo shoots, and paying hair and makeup artists. Virtual models can be any shape, size, or color and can be manipulated to

“Her most alluring quality? She’s not real.”

34 • SMU LOOK

do whatever, wear whatever, and be wherever a brand imagines. “It’s cool, it’s different, it’s new, it’s something that’s never been done before, and consumers and the general public are always looking for the new thing in fashion,” she says. Beauty brands have also utilized digital models instead of human models to promote their makeup products. Most famously, Rihanna posted a picture of the virtual model, Shudu, wearing her company’s Fenty Beauty lipstick. Because of her digital nature, the dark-skinned model was easily able to penetrate the beauty industry by representing a skin tone that is often not otherwise shown. Alexandra Davis, a senior at SMU, started following Shudu on Instagram this summer. “I found her account on the Fenty Beauty Instagram page and honestly, I thought she was real for the longest time,” said Davis. “I just thought she was like any other model. I follow a bunch because I like to see what products they’re using and what they’re wearing.” Digital models are also perfect candidates for brands looking for influencers. According to a study by Collective Bias, 30 percent of consumers are more likely to buy a product recommended by a non-celebrity influencer. Brands that collaborate with digital models are able to reach and persuade their audience through a new medium. In 2018, brands like Prada and Dior are utilizing the digital models Noonoouri and Lil


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Miquela instead of human ones. Louis Vuitton used the Japanese video game character, Lightning, for its campaign to promote its 2016 Spring/Summer collection. In September, Balmain revealed a line-up of virtual models for its latest campaign. The so-called “virtual army,” consists of three models: Shudu, the world’s first digital supermodel, Margot and Zhi. Even with all the disruption from digital models, however, employment of human models is not projected to change from 2016 to 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics . Olivia Whittaker, a model signed with Wilhelmina LA and the Dallas-based Kim Dawson Agency, works with big and small brands and believes that there is still a market for human models. “Balmain is an established, edgy brand so it makes sense to their audience for them to do something new and innovative to stay relevant. But for something like Birdie Beauty, who I work with a lot, the audience would be weirded out,” says Whittaker. A main reason of how the modeling industry emerged was so that clothes could be shown in movement. With digitized models Kavacki says, “there won’t be movement, there won’t be performance. It’s impossible to change the whole fashion industry.”

Fall/Winter 2018 • 35


look back

The

age The dining hall wasn’t the first thought that came to mind when SMU students talked about Umphrey Lee in the 1930s. Despite the economic downturn experienced around the world, SMU expanded in its third decade by building up the engineering school, fraternity row, and naming Umphrey Lee university president in just three years. On the fashion front, the Golden Age of Hollywood inspired glamorous gowns and showgirl-style drama. Exaggerated shoulders were in vogue, as were red lips, full lashes and suntans. Nancy B. Hamon, philanthropist in the Dallas area, sketched these trends from the 1930s. Before moving to Dallas, Hamon worked as a dancer and actress in Hollywood. Later in her life, Hamon was known for her elaborate theme parties (including a silent movies party with guest Louis Armstrong) and generous support of SMU. I mean, have you heard of the Hamon Arts Library?

36 • SMU LOOK

Courtesy of Jake and Nancy Hamon Papers, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

By Anna Grace Carey


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