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LLOOK

Fall/Winter 2016

SMU

REQUIRED READING LUXE FABRICS, RICH HUES AND ANCIENT TEXTS MINGLE BETWEEN THE SHELVES

HILLTOP FASHION A ND ST Y LE


Fall/Winter 2016 VOL. I ISSUE I

6 Style File 7 Brunch Beat 8 Neighborhood Spotlight 10 One Look, Three Ways 11 On the Boulevard HIS LOOK: MEN’S

12 Football Flashback 13 Guy’s Guide GOOD LOOKS: BEAUTY

30

A NOVEL AFFAIR

14 Made in Texas 16 Winterizing Your Routine 18 Beauty Inspiration

Cover look: Sacai jacket, $1,520. Maison Kitsuné skirt, $485. Available at TTH FORTY FIVE TEN. Shirt, tights and shoes, stylist’s own. Model provided by Wallflower Management.

LOOKING OUT: FASHION & LIFESTYLE

#acloserlook


A Model for Inclusivity

24

Snap That

Why it’s becoming the fashion set’s app of choice.

Hitting Refresh

SMU alumna makes waves in Dallas’ editorial world.

28

26

Village Upon a Hill Storied shopping center sets its sights on SMU.

A Novel Affair

Luxe, seasonal trends set in SMU’s libraries.

36

22

30

Ink, Inc.

Behind the needle with Dallas’ female tattoo artists.

Look Back: Dallas Hall Darling

38

@smulook Photographs by Addison Anthony.


LLOOKL SMU

HILLTOP FASHION AND ST YLE INDIA POUGHER Editor-in-Chief

Creative Director SARA WORTH MULLALLY Managing Editor ADDISON ANTHONY Faculty Advisor CAMILLE KRAEPLIN Editorial Assistant LEXI ORTIZ Features Fashion Editor ARIA KOPP Health & Beauty Editor SHUNTAVIA HEARNE Market Editor MADELEINE AUFFENBERG Creative Art Directors SABRINA ABBAS, KRISTIN WERTZ Photo Editor ADRIANA BREMER Associate Photo Editor AMANDA SILVERA Digital Digital Editor KATIE BUTLER SMULook.com Site Director JESSIKA ROUDE Advertising Advertising Directors MACKENZIE HARPER, KELSEY KITCHENS, KASEY RUTH, ISABELLE CARLIN, CLAYTON COMISKEY, KEELY KRITZ Advertisement Designer TATE DEWEY Marketing Marketing Manager MADDIE ADAMS Contributors Writers EMILY SHARP, DAMIEN ZUNIGA Editor MARK VAMOS Photographers KATE BARNES, ROBERT HART Makeup Artists LINDSEY ARMSTRONG, KAYLA PURKEY Hairstylist KINNON FINERTY Men’s Stylist PRESTON PATRIDGE Special thanks to Tony Pederson, Belo Distinguished Chair in Journalism SMU Look, a student-run magazine at Southern Methodist University, is published by Student Media Company, Inc. in collaboration with the Division of Journalism in Meadows School of the Arts. Hughes-Trigg Student Center 3140 Dyer Street, Suite 315, Dallas, TX 75275 ENTIRE CONTENTS © SMU LOOK

4 • SMU LOOK


Letter from the editor

W

Photograph by Sara Worth Mullally.

  hile in New York this past summer, someone said to me “Oh, I hear Dallas is really up and coming.” My response? “Haha, no girl, it already came.” I chose SMU four years ago for the combination of its emerging fashion media program and its thriving surrounding city. A city that fatefully welcomed Karl Lagerfeld and his Métiers d’Art show that same year, and a city that is home to beautiful glossy titles like PaperCity, Modern Luxury and formerly FD. This magazine, something I’ve always thought SMU was missing, is an extension of that journey. That’s what I looked back on as I wrote this letter – a love letter to SMU, to Dallas, and to fashion. If that’s not how you’ve always seen this school, then I invite you to take a deeper look, starting with these pages. Last semester, Harry Winston in Highland Park Village invited SMU Retail Club to a private party to try on some of the high-end jeweler’s latest pieces. My first question: what could Harry Winston possibly see in a group of young, single college women – we certainly aren’t their usual demographic. But we went and we had a blast. Lately, all of the stores in the Village have been making strides to get to know our students, and we explore that relationship in this inaugural issue (page 28). We also journey to Deep Ellum (page 8) and share with you our discoveries for the best fashion and food on the other side of highway 75, take a peek into the world of Dallas’ female tattoo artists (page 36) and introduce you to a host of stylish alumni. It is our hope that from these stories you will learn a little something new about our community. That’s what we’re trying to do – what I think every quality magazine tries to do – examine our surroundings through a new lens. It’s exciting to showcase the work of SMU students and watch our relationships with the Dallas fashion industry grow through the use of models and contributors. We’re thrilled to join SMU Campus Weekly and Rotunda yearbook as a new brand within the Student Media Company’s portfolio and as a part of the Division of Journalism family. But most importantly, we are excited for you, our readers, to fall in love with this semesterly addition to your reading lists.

India Pougher Editor-in-Chief

Fall/Winter 2016 • 5


Photograph courtesy of Leigh Anne Sinacola.

LOOKING LOOKINGOUT OUT

STYLE FILE:

Leigh Anne Sinacola

SHE’S GONE FROM WALKING THE BOULEVARD TO WORKING AS ONE OF THE TOP STYLISTS IN TOWN. SEE LEIGH ANNE SINACOLA’S GUIDE TO DALLAS. Leigh Anne Sinacola, known as “LA” to friends, is a born-and-

raised Texas girl with a Parisian eye for style. She graduated from SMU in 2011 with a degree in psychology. Soon after leaving the Hilltop, Sinacola became a women’s ready-to-wear specialist at FORTY FIVE TEN. “I shook hands with Linda Rodin and Iris Apfel, which are difficult highlights to beat,” she says of her time at Brian Bolke’s concept boutique. Recently, she departed the retail world and began working as a personal stylist. “Whether I’m styling a client for a weekend work retreat or for DIFFA’s red carpet, it’s all fashion and I love it,” says Sinacola. – Aria Kopp

HER PICKS:

2. “I come from a large Italian family so to say that I’m a foodie is an understatement. Nonna, Rise and Grange Hall (lunch only) are a few of my top restaurants in Dallas.”

3. “The Joule Hotel is another favorite; they have it all! Grab a coffee at Weekend, read a book at Taschen, waste hours in the stores Presents and Ten Over Six, and if you’re over 21, grab a cocktail at Midnight Rambler!”

4. “On the weekends, Bishop Arts District is ideal. Start with

brunch at Boulevardier and spend time popping in the small antique and furniture stores. Whatever you do, don’t leave without dessert from Emporium Pies!”

1. “Shopping! Dallas has some of the best boutiques in the 5. “I’m fortunate enough to have my family live close by so I country for womenswear. My favorite designer finds are from FORTY FIVE TEN, Carla Martinengo and V.O.D. Boutique.” 6 • SMU LOOK

head to Frisco every Sunday. I encourage students to explore the suburbs and other areas of Dallas. The Shops at Legacy in Plano is a great place to start.”


Brunch Beat Br unch is one of the most popular weekend

activ ities in Dallas, which means Sunday mor ning might just be t he new Fr iday night. Ever yone wants to sample new food and show of f a favor ite out f it, r ig ht? S o where should you go for t he best bites and a mbie n c e a r o u n d D a l l a s? We ’ v e r o u n d e d u p s o m e f a s h i o n - f r i e n d l y f i n d s . – Amanda Silvera

« SAINT ANN RESTAURANT & BAR, 2501 N. HARWOOD ST. WHAT TO WEAR People tend to dress up for the expe-

rience. In the fall and winter months, brunch-goers don cashmere sweaters, wool coats and thigh-high suede or leather boots. WHAT TO ORDER One of the restaurant’s twists on a classic eggs Benedict. LOOK TIP Hit up the nearby Perot Museum for a postbrunch activity.

SO & SO’S, 3309 MCKINNEY AVE. »

WHAT TO WEAR This winter is all about

Photographs by Amanda Silvera. Models: Yana Erkeeva and Christiane Klinker, class of 2017.

velvet and suede. Work this trend into your wardrobe via shoes, a skirt or even a clutch. And don’t be afraid to mix and match materials. WHAT TO ORDER Blueberry pancakes or biscuits and gravy. LOOK TIP Walk down to West Village for some retail therapy.

« THE CAPITOL PUB, 2401 N. HENDERSON AVE.

WHAT TO WEAR Casual. For a trendy look, try pairing

a graphic sweatshirt with distressed jeans and Converse. WHAT TO ORDER The banana bread french toast. LOOK TIP Call ahead and ask about the mimosa specials.

Fall/Winter 2016 • 7


LOOKING OUT

the

DEEP END SMU LOOK DIGITAL EDITOR KATIE BUTLER EXPLORES THE FASHION AND LIFESTYLE OF AN OFFBEAT, LAID-BACK NEIGHBORHOOD WITHIN THE HARD-CHARGING CITY OF DALLAS. “I’m on my way to California,” says Eboni Gray, but you can

call her Firefly. She travels anywhere and everywhere, picking up the medallions that hang from her chunky necklace along the way. Her outfit flawlessly matches her bright-orange margarita. Known for its funky vibe, innovative art and music scene, and quirky social sphere, Deep Ellum has become a hub for the eccentric in the city of Dallas. Between the tattoo parlors dotting the neighborhood, murals framing the walls of the buildings, and metal sculptures that welcome those passing through, Deep Ellum establishes its own quirky sense of style. That style comes directly from one source: the people. The people who create the art, own the parlors, drink the beer and roam the streets with unapologetic style. “They’re handmade. You’ll see a lot of these around here,” Johnny Hardy says of the metal bracelets adorning his wrists. Thick and chunky, the silver jewelry looks heavy, yet delicate. They were crafted for him by his father. Deep Ellum is one of the most historically significant neighborhoods in Dallas, complete with the city’s largest collection of commercial storefronts from the 20th century. In the 1920s, African-American blues musician “Blind Lemon,” otherwise known as “The Father of the Texas Blues,” dazzled the streets of the neighborhood with his soulful tunes. In 1924, the current Adam’s Hat’s Loft building was a startup hat company, selling fedoras in the winter and straw hats in the summer. In the 1980s, Deep Ellum was the birthplace of the alternative rock jam band, Edie Brickell & New Bohemians. 8 • SMU LOOK


Nowadays, the area is bustling with nightlife that extends from rooftop bars and speakeasies like High & Tight and Truth & Alibi (tip: check the venue’s Facebook page for the password of the evening), to live shows at Dada, Trees and The Bomb Factory.

Above: Johnny Hardy shows off his bracelets, which were handmade by his father. Opposite: Eboni Gray color coordinates with her luminous libation.

“DEEP ELLUM HAS BECOME A HUB FOR THE ECCENTRIC IN THE CITY OF DALLAS.” At the end of the night ­— or maybe early morning ­— Deep Ellum is more than a sum of its colorful murals, old-fashioned storefronts and an electric social scene. It’s more than tattoos, piercings, breweries and bars. The warm and alluring people are the magnetic force energizing the neighborhood.

Bartender Candy Gaines keeps things “High & Tight” at the barbershop speakeasy.

Photographs by Katie Butler.

Fall/Winter 2016 • 9


13

LOOKING OUT

K O LO WAYS

A RED LEATHER JACKET IS A VERSATILE PIECE THAT CAN WORK FOR A VARIETY OF OCCASIONS.

Here we make it casual-cool for class, sassy for brunch and sophisticated for a night out on the town. Since you can dress it down with jeans or up with a skirt and heels this statement piece will become an instant staple in your closet this season. - Madeleine Auffenberg

CLASS

Jeans: DL 1961 - $198 Sweater: BP Nordstrom - $49 Shoes: Sam Edelman - $100 Backpack: Forever 21 - $34

NIGHT

ra Jacket: Za

- $249

BRUNCH Skirt: Madewell - $78 Sweater: Hemline - $85 Shoes: Forever 21 - $34 Purse: H&M - $15 10 • SMU LOOK

Photographs by Madeleine Auffenberg.

Dress: Free People - $117 Shoes: Sam Edelman - $160 Purse: Zara - $39.90


SWEET SIXTEEN SMU’S ICONIC 16-YEAR-OLD BOULEVARD SETS ITSELF APART FROM OTHER COLLEGE TAILGATES IN ONE SPECIFIC WAY: THE FASHION. “From the beginning, ‘The

Photographs by Amanda Silvera, Sara Worth Mullally and India Pougher.

Grove’ at Ole Miss was a strong model for tailgating at SMU. A big party, mixture of all generations [young and old alumni], more upscale, lots of music and food,” says Jim Johnston, class of 1969 and chairman of the Traditions Committee, which developed the concept of the Boulevard in 2000. Although the Boulevard hasn’t been around as long as some infamous college tailgates, the stylish atmosphere has always been an innate characteristic of the school. “When I was at SMU, Neiman Marcus chose a group of girls to be Mam’selles…we modeled Neiman’s clothes for them at various events,” says Mary Hardin, class of 1970. Aside from style, modesty and class have always historically been important factors for students as they carefully plan the season’s outfits. “The girls at SMU in the 1966 to 1970

era always dressed up...for class, for games, for any occasion. For example, I was a Pi Phi and we were not allowed to wear slacks downstairs, and no one even had jeans! We really did not go out unless we were well-dressed,” Hardin says. Although some say what was once described as “Sunday best” has transformed into much more casual apparel, a classic white sundress and cowboy boots is still the status quo for the first game of every season. After that, people dare to break the “rules.” Of course, every generation has gone through its own similar phases. “By my senior year in 1971, the hippie look with bell bottoms, long vests and going braless for the daring were in, even at SMU,” says Suzanne Johnston, class of 1971. So we’ll just call today our rebellious teenage phase. - Emily Sharp

Fall/Winter 2016 • 11


HIS LOOK

SMU’s football program has seen its highs and lows since

the school was dealt the death penalty in 1987. Yet for over a century, SMU’s team and its uniforms have continued to evolve. From the 1920s to the mid-1940s, SMU’s football uniforms were simple designs consisting of wool jerseys and pants with leather under-padding. Shoes and helmets at the time were also composed entirely of leather although helmets were considered optional. SMU’s earliest football uniforms featured the school’s official colors: Harvard crimson and Yale blue, SMU Heritage Hall curator Gerry York says. Dr. Robert S. Hyer, president of the school from 1911 to 1920, chose the pairing “because he was a great admirer of early French military uniforms that used those colors,” York says. From the late 1930s to the late 1940s, SMU’s uniforms remained fairly unchanged – still composed of solid red and blue. Then they started adding stripes just below the shoulders, which served only to “jazz up the uniforms,” York says.

It wasn’t until the 1950s and 1960s that college football teams began to implement additional safety features, such as using more durable materials in helmets and paddings and making helmets mandatory for all players. Helmets during the 1940s and 1950s also improved with the adoption of plastic, according to the Smithsonianmag.com. This development helped drastically lower the number of major concussions during games. Since then, almost every part of football uniforms, has been managed in some way by the NCAA. SMU’s football coaching staff and administration are always updating and orchestrating changes to the team’s uniforms, says Brad Sutton, senior associate of SMUs athletic department. “Every uniform designed has only a two-year life cycle until the next major design,” he says. This year the uniforms feature blue trim around the letters and stripes of the jersey and the Peruna logo on the helmet – details that officials say harken back to an earlier era. — Damien Zuniga

This photo: 1920s SMU football team. Above: 1923 SMU football uniform.

12 • SMU LOOK

Photographs courtesy of SMU DeGolyer Library and SMU Heritage Hall.

Touchback

PLAYERS COME AND GO, BUT HARVARD CRIMSON AND YALE BLUE HAVE REMAINED STEADFAST FOR 100 YEARS.


GUYS’guide SMU LOOK PHOTO EDITOR ADRIANA BREMER Photograph by Adriana Bremer. Product photographs courtesy of FORTY FIVE TEN.

PAYS A VISIT TO FORTY FIVE TEN’S ZACK SHUMWAY. Zack Shumway is not your average Cox School of Business

alumnus. After graduating in 2014 with a degree in finance, he broke free from the business world and headed straight to FORTY FIVE TEN. An associate menswear buyer for the world-renowned concept boutique, Shumway travels the globe to find the innovative pieces the store is known for. We checked in with him about his career and favorite current trends. When exactly did you realize you wanted to work in the fashion industry? Zack Shumway: I was studying abroad in Paris with SMU. Fashion is impossible to escape living there. When I came back to Dallas I walked into FORTY FIVE TEN and asked for a job. The rest is history. What are the perks of having your job? ZS: I love to travel and a large part of my job involves travel for market. It’s a constant source of inspiration and culture, and I am really lucky to get to do it as often as I do. What is the best advice you’ve received about working in fashion? What is the best advice you could give? ZS: We aren’t curing cancer – fashion should be fun and creative and collaborative. Who do you look to for guidance, or inspiration, when talking fashion? ZS: Nick Wooster and I started working together in January when he came on as FORTY FIVE TEN’s men’s fashion director. His experience is inspiring and aspirational; I am grateful for all that I have learned from him this past year. I am also lucky enough to call him a friend. What do you consider to be a sophisticated, yet cool, outfit for a guy to wear out? ZS: Leather jacket. Gray shirt. Dark denim. Smart shoes. What is your style pet peeve? ZS: Trying too hard – I’ve been guilty of it, too. You learn as you go. Lastly, tell us a little about your favorite places to shop in Dallas? ZS: Obviously FORTY FIVE TEN. But I am 24 years old – you can also find me at H&M.

HIS PICKS:

Available at FORTY FIVE TEN.

OAMC Bomber, $860

Common Projects Sneakers, $411

TRAVEL SMART

1. Ditch the plastic bag! Always have a dopp kit on hand to organize your toiletries; you can never go wrong with a waxed canvas design. 2. Save Space! When packing shoes, stick them in the corners of your luggage to maximize space. Don’t forget to use shoe and dust bags to keep dirt away from clothing. 3. Suit Up! If you’re flying and need to bring a suit, wear it on the plane. This will save space in your bag and keep wrinkles to a minimum. If you have to pack your suit instead, put it in last to have the least amount of weight sitting on top of it. – Kristin Wertz­

Fall/Winter 2016 • 13


GOOD LOOKS

Made in Texas TEXAS IS KNOWN FOR MORE THAN JUST DAISY DUKES AND COWBOY BOOTS. AS THE HOME TO GLOBALLY RECOGNIZED BRANDS LIKE MARY KAY INC., BEAUTICONTROL AND BED HEAD BY TIGI, TEXAS IS FERTILE GROUND FOR HEALTH AND BEAUTY PRODUCTS. FROM SKINCARE TO HAIRCARE, WE ROUNDED UP A FEW OF OUR FAVORITES. — Shuntavia Hearne 1. Dear Clark – Dallas

If you’re tired of losing battles with dry, damaged hair, this brand is the answer for you. Dear Clark is an Uptown hair salon that offers handcrafted haircare and styling products made with natural ingredients. Dear Clark’s Resurrecting Hair Wash Shampoo is guaranteed to bring your damaged hair back to life with active ingredients like aloe vera and sunflower seed oil. It’s certain to leave your hair feeling and smelling amazing. Resurrecting Hair Wash Shampoo, DearClark. com, $24.

2. Fave4 – Dallas

If there’s one hair trend Texas is known for, it’s volume. But with big hair comes lots of heat styling, and too much heat can lead to damage. Fave4’s Up for Air Dry Cream offers a reprieve from your blow dryers and flat irons and allows you to style your hair sans heat. This product helps you embrace your natural hair texture with more volume and less frizz. Up for Air Dry Cream, Fave4.com, $16.

3. Billy Jealousy – Dallas

Gentlemen, keep your beard under control with Billy Jealousy Beard Envy Kit. It contains everything you need to keep your beard clean, manageable and well-groomed. It includes a 3-ounce moisturizing beard wash with aloe and soy protein, a firm bristle brush and an 88-millilter beard control styling cream with jojoba oil. Beard Envy Kit, BillyJealousy.com, $25.

4. Farmhouse Fresh – McKinney

Don’t we all want soft, radiant skin? With FarmHouse Fresh’s Sundae Best Chocolate Softening Mask with CoQ10, healthier skin is so close you can taste it. This natural mud mask softens and revitalizes the skin and defends against wrinkles. It’s formulated with natural products like coconut milk, cocoa and honey. Plus, it looks like pudding and smells like chocolate! Sundae Best Chocolate Mask, Farmhousefreshgoods.com, $22.

5. W3LL PEOPLE – Austin

If you’re into the “no-makeup” makeup trend, you will love this earthy cosmetic line. W3LL PEOPLE is an organic makeup company that produces premium quality cosmetics without harmful and artificial

14 • SMU LOOK

2.


6.

1.

4. 5.

3.

Photograph by Sabrina Abbas and Kristin Wertz.

chemicals. The Bio Brightener Invisible Powder gives your skin a natural glow and helps diminish the appearance of imperfections, while the Bio Correct Multi-Action Concealer is an all-natural, full-coverage concealer that leaves your skin feeling soft and radiant. Bio Brightener Invisible Powder, $21.99, Bio Correct Multi-Action Concealer, $22.99, W3llpeople.com.

6. Kale Naturals – Dallas

‘Tis the season for dry, flaky and dehydrated skin. Before grabbing just any moisturizer, give your skin the relief it craves with Kale Naturals’ Body Repair Cream. This hydrating lotion was created to address the needs of super dry skin and it is made right here in Dallas. Body Repair Cream, Kalenaturals. com, $24.

Fall/Winter 2016 • 15


GOOD LOOKS

Chill Out

1

2

3

AS THE TEMPERATURES FINALLY COOL DOWN IN D-TOWN, WE’RE CHANGING OUR BEAUTY ROUTINES TO FIT THE SEASON. WE ASKED THREE LOCAL EXPERTS FOR THEIR FAVORITE HELPFUL TIPS TO WINTERIZE YOUR REGIMEN. - Addison Anthony

1

Cordelia Garza, health and lifestyle blogger Instagram @healthycorde

“During the winter season I tend to drink green tea with a couple drops of lime. This, aside from giving me energy and helping me flush out the toxins from my body, gives me excellent results for my skin. For breakfast, I drink my personal blended green juice, which contains spinach, kale, celery and some fruit with vitamin C to help prevent a cold. One of my favorite snacks is a warm mug of almond milk with cacao, stevia and cinnamon – I call it my ‘Healthy Hot Chocolate Mug.’”

2

Joanna Czech, founder and facialist at Joanna Czech Dallas Instagram @jgczech

“I recommend lubricating your skin much more than normal. During the daytime, try to use oil-based creams and avoid water-based products. Save lighter-weight creams for nighttime use at home. Another important tip is to drink water. If you use a serum, it is very repairing for the skin during the cold temperatures. It is super oxygenating. I also really love sheet masks – my personal favorites are the Hydrating Facial Mask by La Mer and the Deep Hydration Lifting Mask by Tatcha. Having a lip and hand treatment during the winter is also very important since those parts of your body can feel extra dehydrated. Among my favorite traveling lip balms is La Mer’s The Lip Balm. Among my top traveling hand creams would be Tatcha Indigo Silk Hand Cream.”

3

Tony Salle, stylist at Frederic Fekkai in Highland Park Village Instagram @tonysalle

Book today! 3818 Cedar Springs Suite 106

Dallas, Tx 75219

214-716-0810

www.tan@tanbarstudios.com

“In the winter, the hair feels really different. It can be dry, flat, dull and have static, so it’s very important to respect the winter protocol, which is not a lot different than the other seasons, but if the steps are not well respected you will see it right away, making it a long and not fun winter. Water needs to be warm rather than hot because even if it’s cold weather, you can burn the scalp, which can be bad and cause dandruff as well. Don’t over-shampoo the hair — one shampoo is enough. A good conditioning treatment will help add shine, strength and protection, and also help reduce or eliminate the static effect that happens in the winter months. Apply a styling product that will keep the volume while adding bounce and shine, like a spray mousse, serum, etc. In the winter, long hair can look really flat and have static from using high-collar coats. A great ponytail can eliminate this effect and give a cute and fresh style!”

Photographs courtesy of Instagram.

Your skin deserves �e best. Treat yourself to a custom air�ush spray tan from �e Tan Bar. A� natural and �ganic certified solutions, beautiful results and professional staff.


WestVillageDallas.com

Uptown’s Downtown


FUSCHIA FIGHT Makeup: Bobbi Brown CC Cream, $46. MAC Pro Longwear Concealer, $22. MAC Blot Powder, $27. Tom Ford Lip Color in Bruised Plum, $53. Clothing: Alala jacket, $175. Available at Bandier. Model : Jules Pouch, class Makeup L i n d s ey

of

2 018 . ar tist:

A r m st ro n g.

POWDER PUNCH

THE SYNTHESIS OF YOUTH AND COLOR THROUGH THE COSMETIC ILLUSTRATION OF and Photographs by Kate Barnes SPORT. Robert Hart 18 • SMU LOOK


SHADE, SET, MATCH! Makeup: Mophe Eye Palette, $19.99. Laura Mercier

Longwear

Eyeliner in Violet, $25. Clothing: SAM. New York vest, $395. Bra (worn underneath), stylist’s own. Prabal Gurung Sport bra (worn over), $118, leggings, $148. Available at Bandier.

Fall/Winter 2016 • 19


RAIN AROUND THE ROSY

Makeup: Ben Nye Master Designer Eyeshadow & Blush Palette, $75. Clothing: Jacket, stylist’s own. Splits 59 bra, $62, sweatshirt, $88. Prabal Gurung Sport leggings, $148. Available at Bandier.

POUNDS OF SILVER

M akeup: Make Up Forever Aqua Cream in Silver, $23. Clothing: Bra (worn underneath), stylist’s own. The Upside bra, $56. Adidas by Stella McCartney jacket, $240. Available at Bandier.


GOLD MEDAL ROUND

Makeup: Gold pigment, makeup artist’s own. Clothing: Prismsport top, $68. Falke bra, $105. Available at Bandier.

Fall/Winter 2016 • 21


A MODEL FOR

Inclusivity Photograph courtesy of FTL Moda.

FROM SMU TO NYFW, ORGANIZATIONS ARE WIDENING THE RUNWAY. During New York Fashion Week this year, designers made

headlines for featuring models with disabilities in their September shows. At FTL Moda, 19-year-old acid burn victim Reshma Qureshi opened the show wearing a print dress and silver tiara. Male model and amputee Jack Eyers also walked in the show. They were among several models bringing the look of inclusivity to the runway. It makes sense for designers to become more inclusive in order to reach a diverse customer base, which includes persons with disabilities. The fashion industry in Dallas is also opening up to people of all abilities and backgrounds. Best Buddies is a national organization that provides oneon-one friendships between people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and those without. This year, SMU’s Best Buddies chapter hosted a fashion show on Nov. 10, in collaboration with SMU Retail Club. SMU Best Buddies president Addie White says the goal

Online clothing boutique: www.shophelloharper.com

@shophelloharper

22 • SMU LOOK

Above: Reshma Qureshi walks in FTL Moda at NYFW.

of the show is to help make the buddies feel incorporated into the community and highlight their individuality and “Fashion-Ability.” “We thought this would be an event that would specifically allow us to showcase the buddies, in a sense that the buddies will get to walk the runway with their peer buddies [SMU students],” White says. Madeline Braley has Down syndrome and has been involved with the SMU chapter of Best Buddies since she graduated from high school. Braley loves style and fashion shows, and grew up shopping with her sister, Mary, in Plano. Her favorite runway look is an Alice and Olivia dress that she wore at the Best Buddies Texas Fashion Show in Highland Park Village last year. “I am so excited to be in the Best Buddies fashion show with my buddy,” she said before the SMU show. “I have even been practicing my walk for the runway.” Best Buddies and Retail Club aren’t the only organizations in Dallas encouraging inclusion in the fashion industry. Tish Cox, a local womenswear designer, has teamed up with the Dallas Lighthouse School for the Blind to collaborate with students in working on her designs. “When we first partnered with Cox, she told us it was important to her to keep her brand manufactured in Texas,” says Melissa Hildabrand director of human resources at the Lighthouse School. “And when she reached out to us to get our kids involved, we could not be more thrilled.” Mary Braley says she is happy to see these opportunities for her sister and other people with special needs who love fashion. “I have seen how Madeline is confident and sassy when she puts on a great outfit, and I can always count on her to steal the show.” ­— Lexi Ortiz


Fall/Winter 2016 • 23


SNAP THAT!

24 • SMU LOOK


SNAPCHAT: FASHION’S NEW FAVORITE APP By Sara Worth Mullally

G

one are the days when Snapchat was used exclusively to send disappearing ugly selfies to your BFF. Snapchat is officially the fashion industry’s new darling. Without a doubt, it dominated the social media arena during the NYFW shows in September. Instagram has long been the preferred platform for the fashion set, but our trusty filtered favorite will have to step up if it wants to compete with the rise of the Snapchatters. Who are these Snapchatters you ask? Teens, mostly. Investment bank Piper Jaffray conducted a study published by the WSJ.com that found Snapchat is more popular than Instagram among teens, which makes it even more imperative for fashion brands, bloggers, websites and publications to jump on the bandwagon. The Bloglovin Awards now include a prize for “Best Snapchat.” Fashion blogger Jacey Dupre of “Damsel in Dior” has spoken about how her Snapchat following is now stronger than her Instagram’s. Women’s Wear Daily Editor Rachel Strugatz recently cited an incident where Arielle Charnas of “Something Navy” featured a Peter Thomas Roth face mask in her Snapchat story. Within 24 hours, “the post was responsible for the sale of 502 masks, or $17,565 worth of product,” Strugatz says. That’s a heck of an impact from a singular selfie. SMU grad Shannon Russo is the director of operations for “KERRently,” a blog by Dallasite and former reality TV star Courtney Kerr. “Each platform has a totally different audience. We have discovered that Courtney’s Snapchat audience follows along because they enjoy her personality,” Russo says. The “KERRently” team has found that Kerr’s Instagram followers are more concerned about seeing well-curated photos, and like to shop what she is wearing. The Snapchat followers want to be entertained and get a peek into her everyday life. Snapchat’s Discover feature initially helped catapult the app into the fashion arena. Advertisting agency MediaKix

described the change as one from a “messaging app to publishing platform,” taking the app’s reach beyond just social media. Snapchat Discover has the ability to reach an entire new audience for fashion publications. Because all Snapchat users can see Discover stories, they constantly bring publications new viewers and followers. These are people seeing publishers’ content who wouldn’t typically add them on Snapchat, buy their magazine, or visit their site. Snapchat Discover amped up its coverage of fashion month this past season, targeting avid fashion followers and making it easier for them to stay up to date on the shows. “Street Style New York,” “Accessories New York” and “Fashion Week New York” were constantly updated streams during New York Fashion Week, which were then customized for each fashion week destination. A Vogue article by Steff Yotka touted Snapchat as a way to get “closer to the Fashion Week action from the comfort of your couch,” and the brand launched its Snapchat Discover just in time for New York Fashion Week. Vogue was crucial in creating Condé Nast’s Style. com app over six years ago, which was a groundbreaking way to keep up with Fashion Week at the time. But soon apps like Style.com weren’t quick enough. Just think about it: a photographer had to take those photos, edit them, upload them. . . the list goes on. Now, Snapchat users can watch runway shows in real time via attendees’ Snap stories, straight from the front row. And it doesn’t stop there: models and insiders are taking us backstage as well. This immediate, up-close-and-personal coverage is what is allowing Snapchat to thrive among the fashion set. In the past, designers used a presentation format to showcase their work when they lacked the funds to put a full collection on the runway. Now, major designers like Diane Von Furstenburg are eschewing shows and favoring presentations instead because they

believe the static formats garner better social media coverage. New York designer Misha Nonoo took it to another level, debuting her Spring 2017 Collection exclusively on Snapchat. Nonoo is also embracing the new see-now-buy-now concept, enabling users to view and instantly buy the looks from her show all on their mobile devices. Burberry also created a Snapchat frenzy by presenting their collection to fashion insiders a day before the looks hit the runway, calling it the “Snapchat Show.” Beyond Fashion Week, brands are increasing their presence on the app to connect with customers like never before. Everlane, a New York label with a strong social media presence, is one of the brands that uses Snapchat to advertise sales, share outfit inspiration and ask followers for feedback on items. Instagram stories will pose tough competition for Snapchat, however. Following bloggers and brands on both platforms can feel overwhelming to users. Fashionista.com examined this issue, comparing it to when Instagram debuted video content, which undoubtedly contributed to the demise of the video app Vine. While it is highly unlikely teens will abandon Snapchat, the competition from Instagram could sidetrack adults who are not yet invested in the app. Regardless, Snapchat has an uncanny ability to make users feel like they are friends with the Hadid sisters, have eaten one of Karlie’s Kookies, and sat front row at the last Chanel show between Diane Kruger and Alexa Chung. “Snapchat has allowed everyone to feel even more connected,” Russo says. But don’t worry, selfies are still in style, too. n

Fall/Winter 2016 • 25


Hitting Refresh AFTER A RAPID RISE THROUGH THE RANKS OF THE COMPETITVE MAGAZINE INDUSTRY, CHRISTINA GEYER IS STAKING HER CLAIM AT PAPERCITY WITH A REVAMPED LAYOUT AND UPSCALE DESIGN. By Addison Anthony

O

26 • SMU LOOK

h my god. Where did you get that?” Christina Geyer

says as I walk into her office in Oak Lawn on a sleepy Friday morning. Her eyes are glued to my Unfortunate Portrait T-shirt depicting a high-fiving Anna Wintour and Oprah Winfrey entitled “Win-Win.” “Stop right there. I have to Instagram that.” We sit and chat for an hour or so across her desk while steady, warm light filters in through the full wall of window behind her. Geyer is dressed comfortably in a monochromatic sweater, jeans, and walkable flats. Her walnut brown hair is pin straight and swept cleanly into place behind her ears, brushing down just past her collarbone. She has a liberal sprinkling of freckles


Photograph by Steven Visneau.

that add youth to her firm gaze. The office is small and quiet, with dark ochre woods, vaguely gray-carpeted floors, and a strong 1970s ambience, interrupted only by the steady tap of fingers across keyboards in adjoining rooms. Not exactly the Vogue-esque house of madness one imagines when envisioning the inner workings of Dallas’ pre-eminent luxury magazine, PaperCity. Yet somehow the office space matches its captain — unassuming, but commandingly in control. At 28, Geyer is certainly younger than most in her current position as editor-in-chief. Growing up in California, she always knew where she wanted to be: on top of the world as the next Anna Wintour. While still in her senior year studying journalism at Southern Methodist University, she was hired full time as the assistant editor for PaperCity at the ripe old age of 20. After three years in that position, she followed a co-worker to FD Luxe as managing editor for about three more, spent another year on a project that eventually fell through, and ended up at the top of the list for the head position at PaperCity one year ago. And she hasn’t slowed down a beat since. PaperCity has been in Dallas for 18 years after expanding from Houston in 1998 and has a storied tradition around town as the go-to society source with high-end lifestyle content on the side. Geyer was brought in to shake that tradition to its roots. Under her guidance, the magazine has made the transition from a glossy broadsheet newspaper layout to the perfectbound, bookish appearance of its competitors. “It’s kind of, PaperCity grows up a little bit,” Geyer says. A shift in readership from the prerecession world to an audience of more price-conscious (though not price-conservative) buyers meant a need for a refreshing layout and fresh leadership. Over the past year, Geyer has spearheaded the effort to move the publication into the modern magazine world, with a new look, new content and new style. Her vision for the magazine keeps the spotlight squarely on D. “So many eyes are on Texas now, and Dallas now, more than ever. It’s about really paralleling our city and presenting a product that says Dallas is a very smart, cosmopolitan, global city,” Geyer says. Geyer never takes a break from working toward that vision, either. Whether it’s marking up other magazines for story inspiration, screenshotting Instagrams or attending an event every other night, she is never one to leave work at the office door. Her understanding of the work and passion it takes to do her job and do it well is evident when she talks about the finished product. “That’s the thing about a magazine, you have to have a good mix. It’s like a dinner party; you have to put the right cast of characters together so that the reader remains interested,” Geyer says. The most rewarding part of her job, she says, is

the tangibility of the product of her hard work. “At the end of the month, I have a magazine that my team and I created from nothing. It began as a bunch of ideas on a piece of paper, a bunch of ideas that were talked about in edit meetings. It goes from totally intangible, to super tangible.” On a whiteboard on the right-hand side of her office, Geyer keeps a list of words that she feels describes the identity of the magazine. “Witty, esoteric, offbeat, intelligent, elegant, smart, fun, and I think I would add luxurious,” she says. The same list could be applied to the head honcho herself. But she’s only human. “Because I’m younger, and that could just be my own insecurities, I feel that I have to work so hard to gain people’s respect.” Her co-workers, however, don’t feel that her age is much of an issue. “She brings a passion and enthusiasm, I think that’s everything that PaperCity stands for,” says Briana Buxbaum, an associate publisher for PaperCity. “Age doesn’t seem to be huge; it’s sort of just a nonfactor.” Linden Wilson, the assistant editor at PaperCity, thinks Geyer has achieved a stature well beyond her years. “She has created and maintained a brand for herself, one that distinguishes her as one of the city’s most well-respected editors and determined leaders.” Geyer can still feel the pressure that comes with such a high-profile position, especially when making such a seismic shift in the magazine’s identity. “When September came out, in my mind, I felt this pressure of everybody’s going to be looking at this new format, this new issue, and it’s my magazine, and they’re gonna say two things,” she says. “They’re either going to say, ‘Wow I can’t believe she did this and she’s only 28 years old,’ or they’re going to say ‘Well it’s not that great but it’s because she’s only 28 years old.’” Geyer is still dreaming faintly of a fastpaced life in Manhattan as the next Anna Wintour, but she seems much more popular with her co-workers than the current queen of Vogue. “Working with Christina is wonderful because she has a fantastic editorial background and is easy to get along with. As a boss, she is straightforward in her direction and also takes the time to explain why she would change or tweak something,” Wilson says. So where does Geyer see herself in the next five years? “That’s a really hard question for me to answer [. . .] This is really the first time in my life that I haven’t had a plan.” If her career path stays on its meteoric rise, she may soon have Anna Wintour shaking in her Chanel boots. n

“SO MANY EYES ARE ON TEXAS NOW, AND DALLAS NOW, MORE THAN EVER.”

Fall/Winter 2016 • 27


Village UPON A HILL HIGHLAND PARK’S FLAGSHIP SHOPPING CENTER LIKE YOU’VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE. By India Pougher

W

     hen a Rag & Bone employee visited SMU fraternity and sorority houses several years ago during Family Weekend, the Highland Park Village store subsequently had some of its biggest sales days ever, says leasing/ managing director Stephen Summers. “It was kind of an eye opener to me,” Summers says. “I was like, gosh, our outreach with SMU needs to get stronger and stronger. I think the college student is going to become the future shopper of the shopping center, and current for that matter.” Referring to SMU students as “the future fashionistas of the world” Summers, who bought the property with his brotherin-law, Ray W. Washburne (an SMU alumnus), in 2009, sees working with the SMU market as a natural partnership. “We’re huge fans obviously,” Summers says.

28 • SMU LOOK

Just down the road from SMU, Highland Park Village boasts some impressive historic bragging rights – it was the first selfcontained, outdoor shopping center of its kind in America, and has subsequently set the standard for many like it in the U.S., according to the center’s website. The Village opened in 1931, 16 years after Southern Methodist University, and since then the two Dallas institutions have evolved together. The property, which celebrated its 85th anniversary this year on the heels of SMU’s centennial, was designated a national historic landmark in 2000. One of its biggest draws is its architecture, with its Mediterranean Spanish-style serving as a contrast to SMU’s East Coast collegiate feel. Early on, the Village included a grocery store and what is still the Village Theater. Later, SMU legend and football heartthrob Doak Walker had a sporting goods store in the center. Now, it is home to some of the best luxury shopping in Texas – Chanel, Dior, Harry Winston, Céline, Tom Ford, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga and Hermès to name a few. In January 2016, as part of a new marketing initiative, the shopping center started its very first yearlong ambassador program as a way to integrate further with SMU life. While campus ambassadors are no new concept (SMU has had


Photographs courtesy of Highland Park Village.

ambassadors for everything from Rent the Runway to Skinny Pop), what they all have in common is the natural ability to introduce young consumers to products and services on a peerto-peer level. Many brand ambassadors at SMU make the most headway by marketing to their close friends, roommates and Greek organizations. The group of five trendy SMU students is mainly responsible for posting about the shopping center on social media twice a month. Highland Park Village ambassador Mary Camille Savoie typically posts promotional news on her personal Pinterest and Facebook accounts. Over Family Weekend she posted Theory’s advertisement for “New Semester, New You.” In recent years, the Village also has introduced more retailers that are less designer-based such as Anthropologie, Royal Blue Grocery, Bandier, and in October, actress Reese Witherspoon’s Southern-chic boutique, Draper James. In a September 2016 article for Vogue.com, Dallas native and former W editor Taylor Tomasi Hill discussed her new Village store, TTH FORTY FIVE TEN, and the need to introduce more approachable brands to a younger audience, including SMU students. Many SMU students can look back fondly at memories of birthday dinners at Bistro 31 or Family Weekends at Mi Cocina. However, with the convenience of online shopping, and the ability to walk to the nearest Urban Outfitters and American Apparel from campus, the Village hasn’t always been students’ first choice when shopping for college staples. “I never really shop in here, mostly because I can’t spend $2,000,” says SMU sophomore Meg Bergstrom, who has found a favorite study spot at Royal Blue Grocery. “At first it can come off as kind of hard because it is seen as the more expensive higher-end stores,” Savoie says. “But the whole point of creating the SMU ambassador program is so that they can cooperate with SMU students.” The careful introduction of less exclusively-priced retailers has not been at the loss of major luxury brands – a new Fendi store is slated to open in February. “We want the best brands in each price point across the spectrum,” Summers says. The higher-end brands that do the best with college students?

Ralph Lauren, of course, and a slew of luxury leather goods, handbags and shoe retailers. One only needs to look around at the number of Céline luggage totes doubling as book bags on the Boulevard to understand that. HP Village ambassador Marisol Leiva believes the main draw for students in the past was the food. “When they interviewed me [in January], they were like why do you think SMU students come or don’t come,” Leiva says. “And I was like I think they do come to the restaurants but they don’t come for the shopping because there’s nothing really on a college budget.” November 2016 brings two new dining openings in the Village – sure to be SMU favorites, Honor Bar, which already has locations in Beverly Hills and Montecito, and the San Antonio-based dessert shop, Bird Bakery. While the new restaurant options are sure to draw crowds, one of last year’s most talked-about new venues is still somewhat of a hidden gem to SMU students. “I like this place a lot, but nobody should know about it,” Bergstrom says of Royal Blue Grocery. The supermarket and coffee shop, which has six locations in Austin and one in Dallas, features charming indoor and outdoor seating spaces (perfect for a Sunday homework spot), delicious food and drinks, and the appeal of getting away from campus. “I like that it’s just removed,” says Bergstrom’s study-mate Kat Allen. “We’re really focused on design and creating kind of a sense of place that has a friendly neighborhood feel,” says Royal Blue Grocery owner and proprietor Zac Porter. Although Allen and Bergstrom wouldn’t consider themselves Village regulars, except for maybe at Mi Cocina and Royal Blue Grocery, they do appreciate the area for its unwavering beauty. And both agree that the holiday season, during which roughly 1.7 million Christmas lights adorn the tree-lined avenues throughout the Village, is one of the best times to visit. “You realize what a beautiful place it is to walk around and experience,” Summers says. “It’s a great place to be outdoors. So we’re trying to merchandise it accordingly.” The marketing initiatives don’t stop with the ambassador program. In September 2016, the Village began hosting “Local,” a monthly open-air market featuring food, shopping and outdoor entertainment. At SMU, the Village also hosted a Boulevard tent during the fall 2016 football season, and during the 2016-2017 basketball season, it will place branded coasters and copies of its seasonal magazine in all of the Moody Coliseum suites. “As our neighbor, we want SMU students and parents to feel welcome here and enjoy the many stores, restaurants and services we have to offer just a mile down the road from campus,” Mia Meachem, the Village’s chief marketing officer, said in a statement. “We’re both kind of community assets, so to speak,” Summers says. “And I think that it’s important that we really work well together.” That relationship is what speaks so strongly to Savoie and what makes the Village stand out against the backdrop of Dallas’ other major shopping centers. “I feel like Highland Park Village has a better sense of community,” she says. “You don’t think, oh, I’m going to Theory, or I’m going to Vince, I’m going to Bandier – like I’m going to Highland Park Village.” n

Fall/Winter 2016 • 29


A NOVEL

affair A romantic entanglement between the demure and salacious in the depths of academia. 30 • SMU LOOK

Photographs by K ate Barnes and Rober t Har t


HEELS OVER HEAD

This page: On Melani: Glamourpuss vest, $1,095. Available at Elements. Protagonist dress, $970. 3.1 Phillip Lim socks, $325. Available at TTH FORTY FIVE TEN. Shoes, stylist’s own. Opposite: On Melani: LOVE Binetti dress, $645. Talitha cape, $1,925. Available at Elements. Alice and Olivia sweater, $275. Available at Tootsie’s. Tights and shoes, stylist’s own. On Connor and Javier: Clothing and accessories available at Suitsupply.


32 • SMU LOOK

On Melani: Thom Browne jacket, $4,900. MSGM skirt, $320. Both available at TTH FORTY FIVE TEN. 3x1 jeans, $255. Available at Elements. Sweater and shoes, stylist’s own.

YOU KNOW YOU LOVE ME


CROSSING LINES

On Melani: sass & bide sweater, $390. Available at Elements. Jacquemus pants, $625. Available at TTH FORTY FIVE TEN.

Fall/Winter 2016 • 33


On Connor and Javier: Clothing and accessories available at Suitsupply.

ET TU, BRUTE?


LOVE YOU FOR 100 YEARS

On Melani: Cinq à Sept vest, $1,595. Available at Tootsie’s. Nicholas dress, $595. Available at Elements. Jacket, stylist’s own. Models provided by Wallflower Management. Special thanks to Tammy Theis.

Fall/Winter 2016 • 35


ink, inc. DON’T CALL THEM DOLLS; DALLAS ARTISTS WORK TO SHATTER STEREOTYPES ON THE DAILY. By Aria Kopp

A

sharp electric needle continuously pricks a man’s brawny bicep, piercing his epidermis and permanently marking him with ink. Depending on how fast tattoo artist Jay Joree works, the rotary tattoo machine can penetrate the skin anywhere from 50 to 3,000 times a minute. She holds the needle steady and freehands a figure that looks like Marvin the Martian from the “Looney Tunes”. Despite the pain he says he’s enduring, her customer doesn’t flinch for the hour it takes to complete the custom tattoo. Just from looking at his well-decorated arms, it’s evident that this isn’t his first time at a tattoo shop. It also isn’t his first time getting inked by tattoo artist Joree, whom he continues to come back to because of her light touch. Her petite frame is covered up in black skinny jeans and a loose black and white baseball T-shirt, but her sleeve of ink becomes visible as she pushes up her shirt to reveal her forearms. Though the industry is still largely male-dominated, female tattooers are beginning to make their mark in Dallas. Although entering the business was much more difficult as a woman, Joree comes from a family of successful female artists, as one of her grandmothers was an animator for Disney and the other was an oil painter. “Art is in my blood,” she says. “I know no other way of life.” Typically, artists have a one-year apprenticeship and then graduate to become licensed tattoo artists. It took Joree four apprenticeships to land a full-time job. “Each time it either didn’t work out or they were f**king assholes,” Joree says. Her luck changed when she worked under Gerald Garcia, owner of Last Angels 36 • SMU LOOK

Tattoos on Lower Greenville avenue. Despite her ink-covered body, ragged dark hair and silver-ball piercings in her cheeks, some customers still assume the 26-year-old Joree is a receptionist. “People think that I’m too young or that I don’t look like a real tattooer,” she says. But what does a “real tattooer” even look like? A man, historically. Just before World War I began, tattoo artists started using electric machines derived from one of Thomas Edison’s inventions, the “Electric Pen.” It was designed to be a duplicating device that could allow ink to penetrate through multiple sheets of paper, but was later modified by tattoo artist Samuel O’Reilly to allow artists to work with more speed and precision. Charles Wagner, an apprentice to O’Reilly, used this tool to ink soldiers and sailors with symbols of patriotic eagles, American flags and pin-up girls before they shipped off to war. Then came prison tattooing. Although the practice is illegal, inmates still use objects like paper clips, staples, and ballpoint pens to ink each other. Tattooing became a widely accepted part of pop culture in 2005, with the premiere of the television show “Miami Ink” on TLC. The series was so successful that it launched spin-off shows including “LA Ink,” “NY Ink” and “Ink Master.” The show busted longstanding stereotypes of the industry. The shops were not dark dingy spaces in back alleys, but rather airy, sanitary workplaces on main streets. The cast even defied conventional images of tattoo artists as they were charismatic, normal citizens, just with a little extra ink. Cast member Kat Von D gained

fame on the show for her intricate ink work and her pin-up good looks. Today she is widely considered the world’s most famous female tattoo artist. After the show ended in 2011, Von D wrote a book which reached No. 6 on The New York Times Best Seller List, collaborated on a makeup line with Sephora, opened an art gallery in Los Angeles and launched her own

“YOU CAN MAKE IT WITHOUT HAVING TO DRESS LIKE A HOOKER OR GIVE FAVORS.” clothing line. In part thanks to Von D, Americans were beginning to change their perceptions of both female tattoo artists and females with tattoos. Later that year, Mattel released the “Tokidoki Barbie” which sported a bright pink bob and colorful tattoos on her chest and shoulders. In 2012, the Harris Poll released a report that showed that American women, for the first time in history, were more likely to be tattooed than men. In the poll of 2,016 adults, 23 percent of women had tattoos versus 19 percent of men. Char McGaughy, the owner of Gold


Photograph by Aria Kopp.

Dust Tattoos & Fine Arts in Dallas, shop on Lower Greenville Avenue has grown her business by strength- just a tenth of a mile away from Last ening the ties between tattoos and art. Angels Tattoos. Naturally, competiThough she has no professional art tion increased between the two shops. background, McGaughy credits her To avoid any rivalry, McGaughy began skills to a longtime doodling habit. hosting Art Nights once a month at her After realizing as a teenager that shop for local artists. The night is open drawing and tattooing went hand- to all artists, but typically consists of in-hand, she dreamed of working in tattoo artists who discuss the indusa tattoo shop. She looked into apprenticeships, but no one wanted to hire a young woman. Instead, she joined the Army and served as a mechanic. Working in another maledominated area prepared McGaughy for her tattoo career in which her skills would continue to be questioned. “The industry is hard to get into because we’re closed off,” she says. “It’s typically a trade that’s passed down from father to son, not daughter.” Luckily, she knew the owner of a local tattoo shop and brought him her drawings until he hired her. She describes her apprenticeship as a “what not to do course” that educated her on how not to cross-contaminate needles and how not to hurt people. McGaughy had a natural knack for tattooing and began inking clients a mere three months after she started her apprenticeship. She ascribes this quick rise to her mentor, who pushed her to start painting to help her better understand and appreciate the art form. Char McGaughy inks a client at her Lower Greenville shop. McGaughy believes by developing her art skills on canvas, try, techniques and new equipment. she refined her tattooing techniques “It’s hard to talk crap about the guys faster than she would have otherwise. up the street if you’re friends, so I’m Though her mentor stimulated her trying to bring everyone together,” growth as a tattoo artist, others at she says. “It’s still competitive—it still the shop weren’t as supportive; the happens, but I’m trying my hardest.” cutthroat environment and competiMcGaughy notes that tattoo shows tive nature of the shop didn’t appeal like “Miami Ink” helped elevate the to her. “I decided that I wanted to do image of tattoos. “It was cool to see it on my own and change the busi- this seedy culture that used to be ness model,” she says. “I hope that I’ve tattoo shops become art in people’s geared it more towards art with a level eyes,” she says. playing field.” However, she believes the rise of In 2014, McGaughy opened her Kat Von D both helped and harmed

the reputation of female tattoo artists. While the show increased awareness of the trade, it also created a stereotype of what female tattoo artists should look like. “I don’t know how many female tattooers you’ve seen, but most of them are super hot, pin-up style, scantily clad women,” she says. “New tattooers think you have to look like that in order to move up. But obviously, I don’t believe in that—look at me.” McGaughy’s uniform consists of long, baggy cargo shorts that reveal her leg sleeves. Though most of her tattoos were done by friends, she inked many of the designs on her leg herself as an apprentice. She has lost count of how many tattoos cover her body. She wears beatup sneakers that once were white, but are now a dark brown. Her short buzz cut shows off her multiple face piercings and the temporary black eye patch that covers a scratched cornea. But her no-bullshit attitude starts at her door, where a sign reads, “Welcome, are you… Drunk? On drugs? Under 18? Obnoxious? Selling something? Please come back when you are not.” McGaughy’s charisma and talent have attracted a legion of diverse clients, both male and female. One of her frequent clients is a cardiologist who came to her for his first tattoo. Now, many of her designs cover his body. With the recent success of female tattoo artists in Dallas, McGaughy hopes that one day she will receive equal recognition among her male counterparts in the industry. One way to do so is encouraging more women to learn the trade. But McGaughy has some advice for females wanting to become tattoo artists. “Don’t take any shit,” she says. “You can make it without having to dress like a hooker or give favors. You can do it, but you’ll have to work a lot harder.” n Fall/Winter 2016 • 37


LOOK BACK

IN EACH ISSUE, WE TAKE A TURN THROUGH THE SMU ARCHIVES TO DIG UP HISTORY’S MOST FASHIONABLE HIDDEN GEMS.

In 1976, Brenda Brosch was named one of SMU’s “Rotunda Beauties.” Administrators, staff and

students chose 15 young women as the most beautiful out of 122 entrants. This was the first year that SMU allowed both men and women to enter the competition after protests against sexism, but no male students chose to participate. Here is a glimpse of the 1970s style on the Hilltop that year. – Maddie Adams 38 • SMU LOOK

Photograph courtesy of Rotunda Yearbook. Opposite page photograph by India Pougher. Taylor Hinze and Adam Lewis, class of 2018.

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Fall/Winter 2016  

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