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PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID BURLINGTON, VT PERMIT NO. 19


Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur


PUBLISHER SKI VERMONT Kelly Pawlak, Chair Parker Riehle, President Sarah Wojcik, Director of Marketing & Communications

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EDITOR Sarah Wojcik

Families That Ski Together, Stay Together

DESIGN Methodikal, Inc.

By SARAH WOJCIK AND THE ALL MOUNTAIN MAMAS

Ski and snowboard wisdom for your whole clan.

Say Cheese Vermont

Reliving an epic winter in Vermont with some equally epic photography.

PRINTER Lane Press COVER ART Methodikal, Inc. Visit skivermont.com/store to purchase a Ski Vermont Poster!

CONTACT INFO Ski Vermont P.O. Box 368 Montpelier, VT 05601 T: 802.223.2439 F: 802.229.6917 E: info@skivermont.com www.SkiVermont.com /SkiVermont & /RideVermont

29 Scrappy, Frugal, Tenacious

How a member of Vermont’s most famous ski racing family is carving his own way to Olympic glory.

38 Wander Off the Beaten Path

Explore historical treasures right around the corner from your favorite Vermont resorts. By HILARY DELROSS

By EDIE THYS MORGAN

@Ski_Vermont & @RideVermont Ski_VT & RideVermont SkiRideVT

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Gear Guide

The Ski Vermont team shows off this year’s best winter goods. Photos by JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

ALSO

02 Intro Letter

Runnin’ Down a Dream.

How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count the Turns.

Love letters to skiing and snowboarding. By CHLOE ELLIOTT AND HILARY DELROSS

raveling to 53 TVermont Resorts

Planes, trains and automobiles.

lpine and Cross 04 Mountain Happenings 56 ACountry Facts and Stats Where to go and when to be there.

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Have You Ever . . .

Get the details on Vermont’s diverse array of skiing and riding destinations.

One-of-a-kind adventures awaiting you in Vermont. SkiVermont.com

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Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

FRESH TRACKS

RUNNIN’ DOWN A DREAM It’s mid-August and I’ve just woken up from a ski dream. I’m sweating from the heat, but I swear I can see my breath, a puff of chilly air crossing over from a dreamy dimension. The feel of sliding on snow clings to my subconscious, but begins to wane as I rub my eyes and come back to reality. The ski dreams start coming frequently around now winter’s pull getting stronger by the day. I get excited by the buzz in the office. “100 days till we ski!” “The countdown is on!” “Winter is coming!” It’s a busy time for us, as we plan fall events leading up to the season and start preparing for our winter travels and snowy adventures. Fresh gear starts rolling into the office in October and we’re full-fledged snow addicts come November – celebrating Thanksgiving slopeside with the best female skiers in the world at Killington Resort. I know the coming of winter isn’t dream-inducing and buzzworthy for everyone, and some folks would even wish it away if they could, but we at Ski Vermont challenge you to embrace the season of snow this year. We have a motto here: Friends don’t let friends sit inside all winter. How could you when there are boundless opportunities for fun and adventure? There is no better way to embrace the winter season than learning to ski or snowboard and Vermont resorts have award-winning learning facilities to get you confident on snow. For those that need the motivation to get back to the 2 SkiVermont.com

slopes, Vermont boasts the best snow in the East and the best “skiers’ insurance” with the most powerful snowmaking arsenal in the world. Off slope and between times on the mountain, the state of Vermont offers everything a traveler could want from famous local brews, ciders, spirits and socially conscious farm-to-table dining, to sweeping views of mountains and farmland with historical icons nestled amongst them. Add resorts’ expanded entertainment options – everything from a beer-serving movie theatre to kid zones featuring arcades, pools, laser tag and indoor rock climbing to romantic yurt dinners complete with sleigh and snowcat rides – and there is something, scratch that, many things for everyone. So, if you’re wondering how to break out of the winter funk this year, give us a shout and we’ll help you out. Our excitement for the ski and snowboard season is so abundant that we are happy to share it, along with our endless list of fun things to do at the best Vermont resort for you. See you on the slopes, at the table or in the arcade this winter!

Sarah Wojcik Director of Marketing & Communications


our color stacked.

Four color horizontal.

KILLIN

AUDI FIS SK

KILLINGTON AUDI FIS SKI WORLD CUP

AUDI FIS SKI WORLD CUP Killington, Vermont November 25-26, 2017 killington.com/worldcup


FRESH TRACKS

2017-2018 MOUNTAIN HAPPENINGS NOVEMBER Courtesy of Stratton/Hubert Schriebl

November 25-26, 2017 KILLINGTON RESORT: AUDI FIS SKI WORLD CUP Mark your calendars for more World Cup racing on Thanksgiving weekend at Killington Resort, including women’s giant slalom and slalom races, and a weekend full of events. Killington.com

DECEMBER December 9, 2017 SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT: 23RD ANNUAL BREWFEST Celebrate the finest beers and ciders Vermont offers at the 23rd annual BrewFest. Eat, drink and dance the night away while sampling a broad spectrum of tasty beers and ciders. Entry is $20 and includes munchies, eight samples and a souvenir glass. Smugglersnotch.com December 17, 2017 BOLTON VALLEY: SANTA SUNDAY Dress up as Santa to get a free day of skiing or riding at Bolton Valley. Boltonvalley.com

Courtesy of Okemo

December 31, 2017 OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT: OKEMO’S FAMILY NEW YEAR’S EVE Midnight arrives early for friends and family enjoying activities like ice skating, snow tubing, mountain coaster rides, horse-drawn wagon rides, a pizza party, trivia tournament, DJ dance party and more. Okemo.com

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JANUARY

FEBRUARY

January 6-7, 2018 STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT: THE 24 HOURS OF STRATTON Skiers and snowboarders of all ages take to the slopes for 24 hours as individuals and teams vie for the most vertical feet skied while supporting the Stratton Foundation’s campaign to help children in need and youth to succeed. Stratton.com

February 2, 2018 BROMLEY MOUNTAIN: MOM’S DAY OFF Join Bromley for the 15th Annual Mom's Day Off Event. Simply show a picture of your kid(s) and ski or ride all day for a $20 donation to the Southwestern Vermont Regional Cancer Center. Bromley.com

January 20-22, 2018 SUICIDE SIX: 2018 FIS TELEMARK WORLD CUP This event will showcase the world’s best telemark ski racers. Navigating courses complete with Giant Slalom gates, distance jumps, banked turns and a skate section, over 70 athletes from more than 11 countries are expected to attend. Spectator entry is free. Suicide6.com January 30, 2018 MAD RIVER GLEN: ROLL BACK THE CLOCK DAY To celebrate Mad River Glen’s anniversary, lift ticket prices roll back to the 1949 rate of $3.50! Madriverglen.com

February 14, 2018 BURKE MOUNTAIN: LOVE ON THE MOUNTAIN Love on the mountain is an annual affair which includes an exclusive dinner in the beautiful setting of Willoughby’s Restaurant in the Burke Mountain Hotel & Conference Center. Skiburke.com February 16-25, 2018 MOUNT SNOW RESORT: PRESIDENTS' WEEK WINTERFEST Enjoy a week packed full of fun events and great deals, including an on-hill scavenger hunt, outdoor concerts, après shows at The Snow Barn, a torchlight parade, fireworks and more. Mountsnow.com February 23-24, 2018 MIDDLEBURY SNOW BOWL: MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE WINTER CARNIVAL & EASTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE SKI ASSOCIATION CHAMPIONSHIP This event brings together the best NCAA Division 1 alpine and Nordic skiers in the East to compete in slalom and giant slalom at the Snow Bowl with classic and freestyle Nordic races at Rikert Nordic Center. Middleburysnowbowl.com


FRESH TRACKS

March 9-11, 2018 STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT: THE VERMONT OPEN This event invites snowboarders of all ages to compete in Vermont’s only open snowboarding competition, set to challenge athletes in retro pipe, slopestyle and rail jam. Pros from the early days of snowboarding compete in the Washed Up Cup. Stratton.com March 17, 2018 MAGIC MOUNTAIN: GET YOUR IRISH UP! BIG AIR CONTEST AND RAIL JAM St Patrick's Day at Magic means spring-time competition viewing right from the deck of the new lodge, a Sunshine Corner bar on the slopes with majestic views, Irish-inspired costumes and live bands. Magicmtn.com March 17-18, 2018 JAY PEAK RESORT: SKI THE EAST EXTREME COMPETITION The Extreme Competition is open to anyone who thinks they can ski the fabled Face Chutes and throw down enough style to win all the cash and schwag that’s up for grabs. Jaypeakresort.com March 23-25, 2018 SUGARBUSH RESORT: ISLAND WEEKEND Have your beach and your mountain, too! Spring fever takes over Sugarbush with reggae music, island cuisine, drink specials and fun-in-the-sun beach activities. Sugarbush.com

APRIL

Courtesy of Dave Young/Killington Resort

MARCH

April 7, 2018 KILLINGTON RESORT: BEAR MOUNTAIN MOGUL CHALLENGE The highly anticipated competition and onsnow party returns to Killington as amateur bumpers take to the slopes of Outer Limits to battle for a place in the finals. Killington.com April 7-8, 2018 STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT: SUGAR SLALOM Originating as a celebration of the arrival of Spring and the tapping of maple trees, the Sugar Slalom is held in a Mardi Gras atmosphere complete with music, barbecue on the hill, fantastic ski racing and festive costumes. Stowe.com

Join the Ski Vermont Specialty Food Day Tour as we visit Vermont resorts with delicious treats in tow. Cabot cheese, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and samples from Long Trail, Woodchuck Cider, and our spirit sponsors, Barr Hill Gin, Mad River Distillers and SILO Distillery will be waiting for you!

o Jay Peak Resort.......................... 1/26/18 o Burke Mountain...........................1/27/18 o Mad River Glen.......................1/30/2018 o Killington Resort.................... 2/10/2018 o Pico Mountain........................ 2/11/2018 o Smugglers’ Notch Resort.........2/20/2018 o Okemo Mountain Resort..........2/23/2018 o Bromley Mountain.................. 2/24/2018 o Middlebury Snow Bowl............. 3/3/2018 o Magic Mountain....................... 3/4/2018 o Quechee Ski Area................... 3/10/2018 o Sugarbush Resort...................3/17/2018 o Bolton Valley.......................... 3/18/2018 o Stratton Mountain Resort...... 3/24/2018 o Stowe Mountain Resort.......... 3/31/2018 EV E N T

.C O M / E RM ON T

ORE FIN D M

S AT

V E N TS

Courtesy of Sugarbush

S KIV E

LI T T L E HAPP Y

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FRIENDS DON’T LET FRIENDS SIT INSIDE ALL WINTER.


4 WAYS TO SHARE THE LOVE F ROM SK I V ER MON T.

FIFTH GRADE PASSPORT

TAKE 3 BEGINNER PACK AGE

Fifth graders ski and ride for FREE in Vermont with the Fifth Grade Passport. This passport to fun contains coupons for free alpine lift tickets and cross country trail passes all over Vermont*.

For just , new skiers and snowboarders receive three professional beginner lessons at participating resorts including equipment rentals and beginner lift tickets. Packages are valid all season*.

For more information and to apply for the passport, please visit skivermont.com/FGP

For more information and to purchase a Take Three Beginner Package, please visit skivermont.com/Take-3

*Restrictions and blackout dates apply. A processing fee of $10 is included.

*Non-holiday, dependent on open terrain. Limited availability.

TO

$129

BRING

A FRIEND

SKI & SNOWBOARD MONTH BR

JANUARY LEARN TO SKI & SNOWBOARD MONTH $49

IN G

A F RIE N D.O

RG

BRING-A-FRIEND VERMONT

For just , beginner skiers and snowboarders get a special package including a professional beginner lesson, lift ticket and equipment rentals. Ski Vermont’s resorts offer this incredible beginners-only deal in January*.

Folks who introduce friends and family to skiing and snowboarding with Ski Vermont’s Take 3 Beginner Package can receive two free lift tickets to one of Vermont’s resorts and be entered to WIN a two-night ski and stay package for two*!

For resort-specific details, please visit: skivermont.com/Learn

For more information, please visit skivermont.com/Bring-a-Friend-VT

*Non-holiday. Limited availability.

*Limited availability.

SkiVermont.com

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Courtesy of Gina Vercesi

families that ski together, stay together

How to trick your teen into talking, and other wisdom from the All Mountain Mamas sarah wojcik and the all mountain mamas 8 SkiVermont.com


P

arenthood will surprise even the most prepared of us. It’s full of ups and downs and all-arounds, and sometimes the simplest things like going to the grocery store can feel like a big deal with the family in tow. So it’s no surprise that for some of us, getting the family out skiing or snowboarding can feel like a herculean feat. Even as a die-hard skier, I face the world of family skiing with a bit of trepidation. My son, Oliver, was born in January of 2017, right smack in the middle of the ski season, and while he certainly isn’t ready to hit the slopes yet, I’m already planning for the day he puts on his first pair of skis, the day he links his first turns and the day he ultimately surpasses me in skill, speed and grace. To get a peek into my future, and some needed motivation, I reached out to my very own collection of mentors, the All Mountain Mamas, to help me navigate the many milestones of family ski travel. I’ve come to realize that children grow and change far too quickly and as soon as you think you’ve figured out the family dynamic, it’s bound to change. The All Mountain Mamas – Erica, Gina, Mara and Dana – all have children of different ages and each age group comes with their own unique challenges and celebrations. I asked them to share with me their favorite moments, greatest hurdles and top tips when skiing and snowboarding with the family.

cherished moments on the hill One of the greatest benefits of skiing and snowboarding as a family is time spent together, unplugged and enjoying nature and each other’s company. This is true at all ages and something the Mamas truly cherish, along with seeing their children grow in confidence and overcome obstacles.

Erica’s daughter, 6-year-old Phoebe, started her snow journey just two winters ago and is growing leaps and bounds year-to-year. “I love that my daughter is building confidence by learning to ski and that it’s something she can do on her own in her group lesson but also with her family. Even on those tough days where she feels frustrated, scared or cold, she is able to persevere and find joy in skiing.” On the other side of the age spectrum, Dana’s

teenagers, 18-year-old Flynn and 15-year-old Callahan, exude confidence on the hill and can handle just about any terrain they come across. Quality time with teenagers, however, can be challenging. “My favorite part of a ski day is the one-on-one time we get on the chairlift. They are trapped and have to talk to me.” Mara agrees. Her boys, Tommy and Teddy, 15 and 12 years old respectively, open up on the chairlift in a more engaging way. “We have always had great conversations on the chairlift, and I find as they get older it’s even more of an opportunity to chat about what’s happening at school in ways that we don’t always do at home.” Gina and her three daughters - 11 year-old Nola, 13 yearold Bianca, and 15 year-old Stella – are relatively new to the ski scene. “We kicked off our family’s ski tradition at Stowe in February 2014 when they were 11, 9 and 7, and though my husband had been skiing since he was very young, that trip marked my first time on skis as well as theirs. I loved learning alongside our girls and will never forget skiing Stowe Mountain’s classic Toll Road trail as a family at the end of our second day of lessons.” Both Gina and her husband have enjoyed growing with the girls. “I get a huge thrill watching the way our girls have found their groove as skiers, navigating their way down the mountain with dynamism and confidence. Though we learned to ski together, they now zip past me, ducking into the glades, hitting the jumps and catching fresh powder on the edges of the trails.”

challenges change… and are overcome

Different families face different challenges and rewards at home, on the road and on the mountain. The challenges are an ever-changing landscape, but the Mamas drive home that overcoming them is always worth the return and a little patience and determination can pave the way to great days on snow together. For Erica and her daughter, routine is key and consistency is king, but keeping things slow at new places also gives them options to explore. “Being in a new place can result in a lot of overstimulation and overtiredness. We ski nearly every weekend at Bolton Valley, which is where my daughter takes season-long lessons. But when we go somewhere new and ski at a

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place typically outside of our routine, we stick close together, take our time to get to the mountain and take lots of breaks.” And it gets easier, or so they tell me! As kids grow in maturity and stature, they can take on more of the responsibilities of travel, like packing and carrying their own gear. Gina says, “I really feel like the tweenteen years are some of the best to travel as a family. Compared to when they were younger, there is simply far less drudgery involved. For the most part, our girls pack for themselves; they’re responsible for rounding up their own gear, they schlep their own skis, they buckle their own boots. So logistically speaking, getting ready for a ski trip is not nearly as laborious for us as parents as it once was.” Dana and Mara agree. With teenagers, you can let go of the reins and let them explore, while also giving yourself a little break.

“I realized with a deep satisfaction that I had given him a gift - a gift of physical confidence, of natural beauty and of a love of mountains and the outdoors.” Mara: “I have always loved traveling with my children and have done so since they were infants. But I’ll admit that it is so much easier to travel with older kids. They don’t require constant attention or monitoring, they are more flexible in terms of eating and sleeping and they carry their own gear.” Dana loves that her teens can keep up. ”They are on an adult schedule, so there is no need to be conscientious of nap time or eating schedules. Plus, they carry all of their own stuff and I no longer feel like a Sherpa.” However, teen independence can bring its own challenges and require a different sort of patience.

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Dana: “They sleep late and are often hard to get up and out the door. Sometimes I long for the days when programs started at 9:00 sharp. It forced us to get to the mountain early and enjoy a full day of skiing.” Gina: “It’s the nature of the beast. Teens and tweens, at times, exude an attitude of apathy about much of what happens in their lives and their blasé, or even negative attitudes about an upcoming trip can be a real rub. One tactic I take is to try not to trivialize their frustrations— there have been times when they’ve had to miss events with friends at home or had to spend a good portion of a trip working on a school project. There can be disappointment and stress involved and I can empathize with that. Still, there are ways to express that frustration without appearing to forget what a privilege it is to get to travel and ski. I think it’s important that they learn to find that balance.” Mara finds her biggest challenge these days is keeping up with her young boys while balancing safety and fun. “They ski very fast and never stop. But in addition, my boys think of themselves as invincible as only kids that age can. I have to work hard to give them the freedom to explore the mountain and their own abilities and instill in them respect for the conditions and for their own limitations.”

parental pride

When I asked the Mamas about their favorite family memories from last season, they were quick to share the special moments that really stuck with them and how thrilled they were about their kids growing independence on snow and love of the outdoors. No matter the age, kids are full of pride-inducing surprises. While Mara’s boys are beginning to exceed her in speed and skill, she won’t let that get her down. Instead she relishes the fact that they love the sport as much as she does. “I had what I consider ‘the’ parent-who-skis moment with Tommy this past season - I realized that his skiing abilities surpassed my own. This moment came as we attacked the tremendously steep and technical Fall Line trail at Mad River Glen not once, but twice in a row. Both times he had to wait for me at the bottom. I called to him to stop at one point and snapped a photo of him looking up the hill at me, the Green Mountains spread out in the distance behind him, and I realized with a deep satisfaction that I had given him a gift - a gift of physical confidence, of natural beauty and


Courtesy of Mara Gorman

Mara's son Tommy pauses for an instant at Mad River glen so mom can document this moment.

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she was having. I took a video of that race that I will treasure forever.” Courtesy of Gina Vercesi

Bolton Valley teens. of a love of mountains and the outdoors.” Gina: “Our eldest daughter went to Killington solo with her school ski club. I was apprehensive at first—we’d skied Killington only once as a family and there’s a reason it’s called the Beast of the East. With a bit of eye rolling from her, I offered a detailed 411 on the resort—what to expect at the different peaks, how to navigate from one area to another, trails I thought she should probably avoid—a few days before she left. As it turned out, she had an absolute ball with her friends, skiing all six peaks, spending a good portion of her time over at Bear Mountain, which I wouldn’t have expected, and just generally enjoying her total freedom. It was a rite of passage that she embraced wholeheartedly, and, as it turned out, so did I.” Phoebe is the youngest child in the group and still in seasonal lessons, honing her skills. Mama Erica is constantly in awe of her growth. “On the final day of Phoebe’s program at Bolton, she did a little race course with gates. She was fearless! She had some ups and downs this season, and it was incredible to see how much confidence she developed and how much fun

why vermont?

I told my parents when I was just 8 years old that one day I would move to Vermont forever. Even as a child I was drawn to the sense of community and love of the outdoors that is so present in Vermont. The skiing was just the icing on the cake and the calling that has kept me here for the past 18 years. The Mamas, two residing in Vermont, and two tenacious tourists, share my passion for the state and enjoy exploring new corners of it every year. Gina and family are from New York, but have fallen deeply in love with Vermont over the past few years. “Whether we’re dipping our toes into the Ottauquechee River on a wildflower filled hike at Quechee Gorge or snowshoeing along winding forest trails at Trapp Family Lodge, there’s no end to the wealth of outdoor adventures to be had in Vermont. The entire Green Mountain State is a celebration of nature and we love that being a ski family means that we spend a good portion of the winter out in the fresh air. Each of the Vermont ski resorts has its own unique flavor and no matter what a family is looking for in a ski getaway, they’ll find it in Vermont.” Vermonters Erica and Dana agree with me about the sense of community being a strong tie that binds. Erica: “Vermont is not only a beautiful place, but its sense of community is really strong. I love that you see the same familiar faces at the ski area every weekend, make new friends, and you always feel welcome.” Dana: “I grew up skiing in the Northeast. When I was younger my family spent weekends skiing at Windham in the Catskill Mountains of New York. I loved the tight knit community that skied there and seeing familiar faces on the lift and in the lodge each week. When I moved to Vermont and had children of my own, I was hopeful that they would grow up with the same type of ski experience. When the kids were younger and learning to ski, I found it comforting to know that that there would be watchful eyes on them even if I weren’t skiing with them at that moment. The same is true today when they go off on their own with friends. Simply put, skiing in Vermont is a community experience and one that I want for my family.” Mara has the unique perspective of having roots in (CONTINUED on PAGE 15)

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-SKI Magazine Reader Survey 2018

KID-DRIVEN VACATIONS

BEYOND YOUR WILDEST IMAGINATION! BE A SMUGGLER THIS WINTER. SAVE 20% when you stay 5 nights or more — Call today! 1.855.746.0541 •smuggs.com/skivt


(CONTINUED from PAGE 12)

Vermont, as well as the longest drive to get here of all the Mamas. Residing in Delaware, she is the queen of family car travel. Her family’s love of Vermont is what lures them here time after time. “We’ve been visiting the Mad River Valley since Tommy was a small baby and both boys grew up swimming in the river and hiking and skiing the surrounding mountains. I learned to ski at Mad River Glen as a child and so did both my children. “Over the past few years we’ve had a chance to expand our skiing horizons to many other areas in the state, including southern Vermont, and all of us love how friendly people are everywhere we go and how much physical beauty there is to be found whether it’s the views of the Adirondacks at the Middlebury Snow Bowl or the deep glades of evergreens at Magic Mountain. And I won’t lie - the craft beer is a draw for my husband and me, while the boys, budding foodies both, enjoy trying new farm-to-table food everywhere we go.”

let the adventure begin

The Mamas have given me a lot to look forward to and motivation to get my growing family to the slopes. While I can’t wait to enjoy powder days with my little boy, the Mamas have taught me great lessons: Be patient. Relish every moment, every hurdle and every accomplishment, because they are all unique. And, when you’re feeling like it is too hard or too complicated, buck up and put forth the extra effort. A lifetime of memories and a wonderful connection to the outdoors is waiting for every family that gets to the mountains.

mama gina and family

mama dana and family

For more stories, tips and to-do’s from the All Mountain Mamas, visit allmountainmamas.com. ❄ mama mara and family

Author Sarah and her son Oliver at Stowe

mama erica and phoebe

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Looking for something unexpected and oh-so Instagrammable to add to your Vermont ski getaway? Maybe an off-the-beaten-path romantic dining experience? Or something special to entertain the kids? Vermont ski and snowboard resorts are each unique in character and terrain, but they also each offer something special for their guests that you won’t find elsewhere. Check out some of our favorite on and off slope surprises and enjoy one of these distinct experiences when you are in Vermont this winter. KILLINGTON RESORT

Courtesy of Stowe

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT

Smugglers’ offers a unique family experience with the brand new FunZone 2.0 Family Fun Complex with Smuggsthemed action packed features like Mountain Rally Slot Car Races, Smuggs Warrior courses, 3,500 square foot Laser Tag arena, transparent indoor climbing tower, inflatable obstacle courses and so much more. FunZone 2.0 even offers food, beer and wine at the ReFuel Café (so parents can après while kids play), as well as two private party rooms with available party packages.

Courtesy of Killington

Killington’s Ledgewood Yurt may resemble a structure used by nomadic tribes in Mongolia over 2000 years ago, but the experience, service and cuisine exceed today’s highest standards. This one-of-a-kind dining spot hosts snowcatescorted private dinner excursions on mid-winter Saturday nights, featuring a farm-to-table menu, friendly greetings from staff, a toasty wood burning stove and a relaxing mountain atmosphere.

STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT

JAY PEAK RESORT

OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT

MOUNT SNOW RESORT

Stowe Rocks Climbing Center, a state-of-the-art facility located in the Adventure Center in the heart of Stowe Mountain Resort, features climbing challenges for adventure seekers young and old. Climbing equipment and instruction is provided for groups of all sizes. Professional American Mountain Guide Association (AMGA)– certified Climbing Wall Instructors are available for group and private lessons.

Double Bubble – no toil or trouble. Enjoy the only North American resort with double bubbles. Okemo’s two domed, high-speed lifts (a six-pack and a quad - one even has heated seats), means more time on the snow and fewer hotchocolate breaks to recover from the winter chill. Okemo has received top honors in the category of Lifts (in the East) in SKI magazine’s annual Resort Guide for three years running.

Jay Peak’s new entertainment center features a 142-seat cinema draught house where you can catch a movie while sipping a beverage from the movie theater’s full bar. And if the flick isn’t “kid friendly,” you can drop your mini-me’s at the Clip-N-Climb ropes course down on the first floor where they’ll be challenged by 20 different vertical climbing routes, or can scramble across the horizontal elements. A new arcade waits for them once they’re exhausted.

No one does parks like Mount Snow, and Carinthia is more than just a park. With 100 acres spanning an entire mountain face, its own base lodge, 150+ features, and playing home to slew of past, present, and future Olympians, Carinthia Parks is the premier terrain park on the East Coast.

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STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT

Courtesy of Stratton

Explore the very spot that inspired the Appalachian and Long Trails with a snowshoe adventure at Stratton. “Moonlight in Vermont” is a guided full moon snowshoe hike through the tree lined trails of the Nordic Center to a big bonfire where you are rewarded with s’mores.

SUGARBUSH RESORT

Sugarbush’s Lincoln Limo cabin cat is fitted with a twelve-passenger luxury cabin equipped with a flat screen TV and cushy seats. Sugarbush was the first resort in the eastern U.S. to offer Cabin Cat adventures like First Tracks early morning terrain access, Sunset Groomer Rides with a scenic ride to the top of Lincoln Peak, and Allyn’s Lodge Dinners, where guests enjoy a ride to the top of Gadd Peak for a candle-lit gourmet feat followed by a moonlit ski down to dessert.

MAGIC MOUNTAIN

Looking for an on-mountain surprise with a local vibe? Ski or snowboard up to Magic’s Sunshine Corner Snow Bar on a spring weekend and enjoy beautiful views of southern Vermont with your beverage of choice.

BROMLEY MOUNTAIN

Lifts stop spinning at 4pm at Bromley, but that doesn’t mean the fun stops. Ski boots on or off, the Kids Lounge guarantees the shorter half of the family stay active while parents après with video games, movies, Vew-Do balance boards and more.

BOLTON VALLEY

Courtesy of Bolton Valley

Most backyard activities stop once the sun goes down. At Bolton Valley, they light up the night and offer night skiing and riding until 10pm every Tuesday through Saturday.

MOUNTAIN TOP INN & RESORT

Take a guided 30-minute snowmobile tour through the meadows at Mountain Top or hit the maintained trails on and around the property. Stop by the Inn for a bite to eat (or overnight stay) as you journey along the VAST Trail System.

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MAD RIVER GLEN

Let Mad River Glen’s Naturalists take you on a guided snowshoe trek tailored to your interest in the ecology and wildlife of Stark Mountain. Learn about the hardwood forests of the Green Mountains as well as Mad River Glen’s resident moose, bear, deer, coyote, red fox and more.


SA CHE S E Y ë Sugarbush Resort; photo by Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

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Storm Stella hits Smuggs photo by Bryce Mullin

EVER O M NT The winter of 2016-17 delivered massive amounts of snow to Vermont’s mountains, with Ski Vermont sending out a record-breaking 21 powder alerts. Go back in time to perfect pow, snowy smiles and winter delights, all while getting revved up for an epic 2017-18 season on the slopes. SkiVermont.com

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ABOVE: Face full of pow at Jay Peak photo by Eric Fitzgerald RIGHT: Family photo time at Stowe photo by Jennifer Langille

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ABOVE LEFT: Groomers at night on Magic Mountain photo by Jacob Kravitz ABOVE: Bolton Valley powder photo by Chip Allen LEFT: Laying it down in Killington photo by Justin Cash

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Any gear will do, really. photo by Justin Cash

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ABOVE LEFT: All along the watchtower at Okemo photo by Josh Campbell ABOVE: Watching the light go down at Sugarbush photo by Bryce Mullin LEFT: A pair take air at Mount Snow photo by Josh Campbell

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Scrappy, Frugal, Tenacious:

ONE VERMONTER’S UNIQUE PAT H TO P Y E O N G C H A N G By Edie Thys Morgan Photos by Penni Rand Photography

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Robby Kelley and Tucker Marshall embrace the hills of home in Vermont.

B

eing a Vermonter means being tough, humble and no-nonsense. It means doing what you were born to do, and getting it done by whatever means necessary, with whatever means you have, without complaining. If anyone epitomizes the Vermont way of getting things done, it is the Cochran ski clan. The Cochran family boasts a rich history of top ranked US ski racers, and a humble yet cozy community ski hill in Richmond, Vermont that has been the center of their training for three generations. Today’s podium topping Cochran is of a different name, but cut from the same scrappy cloth. Robby Kelley is the third ranked American slalom skier for the United States and a top prospect for the 2018 Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. He is the youngest of the three kids born to and coached by Olympian and World Cup racer, Lindy Cochran Kelley, and the grandson of Mickey Cochran, the man behind the Cochran family legend who built a rope tow on the hill behind his house and trained his kids to become world class athletes. Mickey’s four children, Lindy, Marilyn, Barbara Ann and Bobby all raced with the US Ski Team and became Olympians in the late 1960’s and early 70’s. Of the following generation of grandchildren, six of ten competed on the US Ski Team. Robby, one of the most promising of the grandchildren, forged down another path adding to the unique Cochran’s family ski history. It all started in the spring of 2014, when after 3 years on the US Ski Team, Robby didn’t qualify for a fourth. He and his brother Tim found themselves in their primes but not on the National Team, so along with friends Andrew McNealus and Tucker Marshall, they started Redneck Racing, an all-Vermont, self-funded, self-coached independent team with a clear mission: “Our goal as a group is to compete at the highest level of our sport and advocate for the pursuit of athletic achievements in a viable and effective way.” When asked what makes a Redneck racer, Robby replies: “A Redneck would be an independent free thinker who doesn’t let anyone tell them what they are or are not capable of…or something along those lines,” and later adds, “I definitely like the word scrappy, too.” 30 SkiVermont.com

From the start, the Redneck Racing “uniforms” came in two colorways denim/plaid and camo/blaze - and the Redneck ethos reflected the same Vermonter sensibilities synonymous with the Cochran name. “We had modest means, and did with what we had,” says Lindy, Robby’s mother, who explains how the backyard tow allowed her father to utilize his expertise in both engineering and coaching. “We were never into the glamour.” Robby, Tim and the other Redneck racers emulated the Cochran sensibilities and eventually, the Redneck way of maximizing limited resources, traveling on a shoestring budget, coaching each other and documenting adventures in a humorous way earned the respect and recognition of the ski racing community. After a successful ski season as independents, both Robby and Tim were nominated to the US Ski Team. Tim accepted the offer. Robby, in a highly unusual move, turned his spot down and committed to pursuing the ski racing dream the Vermont way - independently. The following season, after earning a World Cup starting position as a Redneck Racer, Robby once again turned down the US Ski Team nomination - and the coaching, and technical and logistical support that comes with it - to stick to his Redneck ways. “This year I wasn’t asked and I assume it’s because they know I like being independent,” says Robby. “I was with the US Ski Team three years and have done it on my own three years. I like this better. I have more freedom for sure, and I spend less money.” Along the way, he’s re-scripted the life of a World Class professional athlete. “I’ve gotten pretty good at the art of traveling as cheap as possible over the last couple years,” said Robby. “I always get the smallest rental car (even if it means a convertible in the


dead of winter), never bring a duffle bag and carry my clothes around in a rain jacket.” His favorite shoestring travel story is when Tim’s carry-on bag exceeded size limits at the Auckland, New Zealand airport. Rather than paying to check it, Tim took out and put on his GS suit and helmet. “He was about to put his boots on before they finally let him go through security,” recalls Robby.

VSAA Winter Ad FINAL 2017 design 1.qxp_Layout 1 8/9/17 10:21 AM Page 1

All in the family. Robby and cousin Ryan Cochran-Seigle are all smiles with Robby’s mom and coach, Lindy.

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Celebrate Winter

CK INN & TO

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The Redneck way is as tenacious as it is frugal, which Robby proved last season at the World Cup night slalom in Schladming, Austria. Under the lights, in front of 60,000 roaring fans, a

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“You need to be a unique person to do it that way,” says Robby’s mother, Lindy, with a note of wonderment. “Robby is unique.” In addition to being adamant about his needs, she describes him as “entrepreneurial, artistic and able to go on the fly.” Reflecting on her own time as a ski racer Lindy, admits, “I totally relied on the ski team. I couldn’t do it the way he does.”

WOOD S

I like being in Vermont as much as possible and setting up my own camps.

C CEN

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Robby high fives the future of Cochran’s skiing, second cousin Charlie Brown.

mere four gates from the best result of his life, disaster struck. In an eye-blink Robby was upended, skidding past the final gates to the side of the finish. The collective gasp—of a crowd primed for the triumph of the underdog—was followed by silence. And then, as Robby reflexively sprinted back up the hill to finish his run (a college ski racer move all but unheard of amongst the World Cup elite) the crowd erupted with approval. In Schladming as elsewhere, the scrappy Vermonter way bridged national and team borders and Robby became a crowd favorite amongst a nationally diverse audience. Part of what drives Robby’s independence and tenacity is his appreciation of his home state. “I like being in Vermont as much as possible and setting up my own camps.” To prove how much he could do right at home, Robby closed out his 2017 season with an all Vermont spring training tour. The tour kicked off in early April with an annual rite of spring, the all-ages Sugar Slalom at Stowe Mountain Resort. Robby is an ambassador for Stowe’s Mount Mansfield Ski Club (MMSC), training with them in the off-season and during breaks in the World Cup schedule. It’s not unusual for him to show up at Stowe midseason, in his Patriots jersey, and thrill junior racers by forerunning their race. The Cochran clan turns out in force for the Sugar Slalom, helping on the hill and boiling up Cochran’s own Slopeside Maple Syrup to pour over troughs of snow for a Vermont delicacy, Sugar on Snow. Meanwhile Robby and his cousin Ryan Cochran-Siegle, 34 SkiVermont.com

a current US Ski Team member, sign autographs between ripping some fast race runs. Through mid-April Robby kept his slalom legs fresh on the 350 vertical-foot “Cochran’s Glacier.” The Cochran Ski Area of today boasts a total of four trails served by a T-bar and a rope tow, state of the art snowmaking and lights. Its mission is to “provide affordable skiing and race training to kids and families” and continue to act as a training ground for the elite Cochran family racers. On any given winter day, you might find Robby, four-year-old Charlie Brown, a college kid and a Masters racer all training…together. Robby rounded out his Cochran’s training at the annual spring TGFS (Thank God For Snowmaking) races and celebration in April. Looking to add variety in his practice, Robby continued his spring tour by hiking to enticing snow patches throughout Vermont and setting up unlikely and insanely challenging slalom courses. His fun, fast company for these adventures included cousin Ryan Cochran-Siegle, former Redneck teammate Andrew McNealus and current Redneck teammate Tucker Marshall. To wrap it up, Robby and Tucker headed south and took full advantage of the longest season in the East at Killington Resort and the free lift tickets on Closing Day, June 1. After ripping off slalom turns through the spring bumps Robby gave his assessment of the race hill: “A little bumpy, a little dirty but I think it


The unmistakable style of Redneck Racing.

Making friends since 1936.

bromley.com

Family, Friends and Fun.

should be good to go for the girls by November,” referencing the Women’s FIS World Cup races scheduled at Killington November 25 - 26, 2017. When the last of Vermont’s snow had melted, the Redneck Racers appealed to the global ski racing community, offering coaching and high-level pace in exchange for summer training. For Robby that included a trip to France with Stowe’s MMSC in June and a trip to Norway in July with a group of British ski racers. As one of the world’s top slalom skiers, Robby’s challenge is to find pace with faster skiers and for that, nothing beats race training with them. Every August he treks to Australia or New Zealand for international races and to see where

Vermont’s Sun Mountain 3984 Route 11, Peru, VT, 6 miles from Manchester 802-824-5522 SkiVermont.com

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VE R M O N T AT H L E T E S TO WATC H FO R I N PYEO N G C H A N G

ATHELETE

VERMONT TRAINING GROUNDS

US SKI/SNOWBOARD TEAM DESIGNATION

Ryan Cochran-Siegle

Mount Mansfield Ski & Snowboard Club

US Ski Team - Alpine

Drew Duffy

Green Mountain Valley School

US Ski Team - Alpine

Nolan Kasper

Burke Mountain Academy

US Ski Team - Alpine

Robby Kelly

Redneck Racing, Cochran’s Ski Area

US Ski Team - Alpine

Nicholas Krause

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Alpine

Alice Merryweather

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Alpine

Nina O’Brien

Burke Mountain Academy

US Ski Team - Alpine

Mikaela Shiffrin

Burke Mountain Academy

US Ski Team - Alpine

George Steffy

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Alpine

Devin Logan

Mount Snow Academy

US Freeskiing Team

Kelly Clark

Mount Snow Academy

US Snowboard Team

Ty Walker

Mount Mansfield Ski & Snowboard Club

US Snowboard Team

Alex Deibold

Stratton Mountain School

US Snowboardcross Team

Lindsey Jacobellis

Stratton Mountain School

US Snowboardcross Team

Patrick Caldwell

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Nordic

Sophie Caldwell

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Nordic

Jessie Diggins

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Nordic

Simi Hamilton

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Nordic

Julia Kern

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Nordic

Andy Newell

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Nordic

Katharine Ogden

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Nordic

Ida Sargent

Craftsbury Green Racing Project

US Ski Team - Nordic

Liz Stephen

Burke Mountain Academy

US Ski Team - Nordic

Hannah Dreissigacker

Craftsbury Green Racing Project

US Biathlon Team

Mac Bohonnon

Stratton Mountain School

US Ski Team - Aerials

Megan Nick

Hometown: Shelburne, VT

US Ski Team - Aerials

Susan Dunklee

Craftsbury Green Racing Project

US Biathlon Team

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he stands on the world stage. In between travel to race train, Robby pumps iron and sweats it out at Cochran’s lush “Field of Excellence” (a playful nod at the US Ski Team’s $24 million Center of Excellence training facility). Robby may embrace his fierce independence, but he is also extremely grateful and quick to say that he is not alone, even as an independent racer. In addition to the financial, logistical and emotional support of friends, fans, sponsors and MMSC, he is also welcomed by Vermont’s nearby premier ski academies Green Mountain Valley School (Sugarbush) and Burke Mountain Academy. “Everyone has been very supportive of me since I’ve been racing for Redneck Racing, even the US Ski Team,” said Robby. “They’ve been very helpful and supportive during the World Cup season.” Once the World Cup season starts in the fall, Robby folds back in with the US Ski Team on the World Cup circuit. Then it’s pedal to the medals, and the race to Pyeongchang. “It’s always an honor to make the World Championships or Olympic team,” said Robby’s mom, Lindy. Robby will be aiming for one of the two top spots for his event which would

All the right angles. Robby tops the field at the Annual TGFS Race.

guarantee a start at the games “That’s how you want to make it,” said Lindy. We’ll be watching for his signature style— complete with red flannel, camo and serious scrap— to get him there. Follow Robby and Redneck Racing’s journey on social media @snooprobbyrobby, @redneckracingskiteam and wherever else you see fast, scrappy skiers dressed in flannel and driving cheap rental cars. ❄

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DISCOVERING HISTORICAL ICONS NESTLED BETWEEN VERMONT'S SLOPES By Hilary DelRoss & Illustrations by Josh Highter

The routes that connect Vermont’s ski areas are rich with fascinating history and captivating culture. As you drive through the Green Mountain State during a winter ski trip, we invite your crew to put down the tech and weave some of Vermont’s local lore into your family vacation with this guide to historical landmarks and cultural pit stops waiting just outside your car windows. See how many you can find on your next road trip — we’ll even provide snacks. 38 SkiVermont.com


As the No. 1 ski and snowboard state in the East, you know you’re in for an epic alpine adventure when you arrive at Vermont’s ski and snowboard resorts, but what you may not realize is the picturesque steeples, covered bridges and pastoral landscapes you whiz by on your way to the slopes are more than mile markers; they are the icons that give us a peek into the past. Vermont’s local culture is steeped in rich history, beautiful architecture and diverse arts found throughout its mountain communities, many of which are located along the scenic routes leading to and from ski and snowboard resorts. Here are a few favorite landmarks that link the local vibe and nearby slopes, revealing hints of what life was like for some of the state’s earliest skiers. When planning your upcoming Vermont ski trip, we invite you to explore these and other treasures lying just off the beaten path.

NORTHERN VERMONT Popping up where country roads cross over winding waterways, covered bridges are quintessentially Vermont,

as our state boasts the highest concentration of these structures in New England. Bridges were designed with covers to protect the bridge from damage caused by winter elements because the covers could be more easily repaired or replaced than the bridges themselves. They get their charming appeal from the many types of construction and architectural features used to build them, and two different examples can be found on a short detour in Lyndonville, on your way to Burke Mountain and Jay Peak Resort. The Old Schoolhouse Covered Bridge (South Wheelock Road) was built in 1879 and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. The road has since been rerouted around the bridge so you can’t drive through it, but you can park nearby to get a closer look. This bridge is very photogenic with arched covered walkways on either side protected by an extended roofline — unique features for its time, and the only bridge of its kind still standing in Vermont. Imagine early model cars puttering past kids dressed in bundles of wool outer layers shuffling through the snow on their way to school. Then, buckle up and SkiVermont.com

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continue your covered bridge tour by looping back over the South Wheelock Branch of the Passumpsic River, a small tributary of the Connecticut River, via the Chamberlin Mill Covered Bridge. Before you continue north, make a halfmile loop to the west and drive your car through this bridge, which was built in 1881 and is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

from Olympic athletes with Vermont ties. Bring home a retro ski poster to adorn the walls of your home and don’t miss the Nordic-inspired sculpture just outside the museum’s front doors, made of a collection of crosscountry skis from the past.

In communities where skiing families came to settle down, their ski kids needed a place to learn during the school year. Sometimes one-room, and sometimes larger, schoolhouses historically served as community gathering spaces when class was not in session. While driving through historic districts en route to ski areas like Smugglers’ Notch Resort or Bolton Valley keep your eyes peeled for these utilitarian structures. Today, three historic schoolhouses in Stowe (School Street) are open to the public and showcase artifacts, art and literature, much of it related to the community’s history. Currently home to the Stowe Historical Society, the Helen Day Art Center and Stowe Library, each of these former schools, offer a look at what local life was like at the base of nearby Stowe Mountain Resort. View decades-old photos and postcards featuring citizens, buildings and the landscape — the plow trucks didn’t quite look the same back then. See how local artists interpret the world through a rotating selection of indoor and outdoor exhibits; or create your own works of art — classes are available for any abilities and all ages, even art birthday parties.

Stowe also boasts some of the country’s oldest ski history, which includes its claim as the 1938 birthplace of the National Ski Patrol. The Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum (South Main Street) collects, preserves and displays pieces that you can envision yourself riding, wearing and training in: retro ski equipment and lift technology, ski fashion throughout the last century, memorabilia recognizing the 10th Mountain Division’s on-snow contributions in World War II and mementos

CENTRAL VERMONT Vermont Route 100 was built in 1940 following the valleys of the Green Mountains and is now often referred to as the Skiers Highway because it connects most resorts in the state. From Stowe, cruise south to the stretch of this road in Moretown and Waitsfield that takes you to Mad River Glen and Sugarbush Resort, and you’ll see an expanse of fertile farmland along the banks of the Mad River. Ask every passenger in the car to look out their window, and they’ll each get a different view of the collection of farmsteads that make up the Mad River Valley Rural Historic District. Imagine life on these properties, which have been around since the 1700s, and what it was like to work in the barns and live in the homesteads that sprawled from the base of the Green Mountains to the west and the Northfield Mountains to the east. The valley has a rich agricultural history and relics here demonstrate an evolution in farming traditions and technology over time. Notice the Gothic Revival–style farmhouses among large multipurpose barns that replaced small, task-oriented workspaces; silos were made of wood, then cement, then metal; maple sugarhouses with woodfired evaporators wait for sap to flow from sugarbushes laced with plastic tubing; and mills processed wood, grain and fiber as local needs fluctuated. Farms here still produce wool, meat, dairy and maple syrup — try to identify just how many different agricultural products are available the next time you drive this route. Toward the southern end of the Mad River Valley in Waitsfield, the Inn at Lareau Farm (Lareau Road) is on the National Register of Historic Places. Settled in 1795, Lareau Farm was the home of the valley’s first physician. It contains a classic farmhouse, now a country inn; a rustic, yet recently (CONTINUED on PAGE 42)

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restored 18th-century barn; and former dairy barn, which is now home of the original American Flatbread. Tuck into this cozy eatery after a day on the slopes and join the celebration of farm-to-table cuisine. Many ingredients come from the surrounding fields and farms, including the greens and cheese in the Evolution salad. Flatbread pizzas are baked in an earthen, wood-fired oven in the middle of the casual, post-and-beam dining room. While you wait for your table (and it’s well worth the wait), visit the bartender for a local favorite, like Lawson’s Sip of Sunshine or family-friendly Rookie’s root beer, let the glow of the outdoor fire pit warm you, and take in the views of the surrounding meadows, woods and river. From Route 100, motor west, up and over Middlebury Gap (Vermont Route 125) to Middlebury Snow Bowl and Hubbard Cabin. This log cabin dates back to 1938, when it was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (a work program established by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during the Great Depression) alongside local residents. The Hubbard Cabin was constructed with trees cut from the Snow Bowl’s first ski trails and became one of the earliest base lodges in the country. It’s now one of the oldest base lodges still in use, and you can find it at the back of the ski area parking 42 SkiVermont.com

lot. When the current base lodge was completed in 1962, the cabin transitioned to a caretaker’s residence before falling into disrepair. A local ski club renovated the cabin and began using it as their warming hut after ceremoniously naming it for the college’s first ski coach and Snow Bowl advocate, Richard “Dick” Hubbard. Continue west to Middlebury College’s Bread Loaf campus in Ripton. Bread Loaf is home to more than 55 kilometers of groomed trails where you can cross-country ski, fat bike or snowshoe at Rikert Nordic Center. You’ll immediately notice the centerpiece of this campus, the Bread Loaf Inn, where Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Robert Frost first attended Middlebury’s annual writers conference in 1938. Frost fell in love with the location, bought some property and returned each year until his death in 1963. The Robert Frost Cabin and Farm is a National Historic Site maintained by the college, and Rikert’s ski trails will take you right past his retreat in the Green Mountain National Forest. While some of Vermont’s earliest transplants retreated into the quiet of the woods, other residents sought a more social atmosphere. General stores have been a hub of social exchange and commerce in Vermont towns for


more than a century, and their doors are open to townies and tourists alike. All walks of life duck into general stores, leading to some interesting opportunities for eavesdropping and people-watching. Step inside and find just about anything you could possibly need: grab a sandwich and fishing bait, or pick up some penny candy and a freshly baked pie, don’t forget new work gloves and a coffee — the possibilities are endless.

oath office in an impromptu inauguration performed by his father who was a notary public. The ceremony took place by the light of a kerosene lamp because his father refused to incorporate modern conveniences such as electricity. President Coolidge’s father started the Plymouth Artisan Cheese company on site in 1890, making it the secondoldest cheesemaking operation in the country. The cheese factory follows the same standards and process today as it did under the direction of the Coolidge family, which ran the factory until 1998. It’s open year-round, so be sure to stop in and taste their rich cow’s milk cheeses.

SOUTHERN VERMONT

If you’re heading to Killington Resort, Pico Mountain, Okemo Mountain Resort, Suicide Six or Quechee Ski Area, you’re in luck because you’ll be surrounded by some of Vermont’s longest standing, family-owned general stores. The Original General Store in Pittsfield (Vermont Route 100) is a great stop for pre-ski breakfast. F.H. Gilingham & Sons General Store has remained in its location in the center of historic Woodstock (Elm Street) since 1886. Vermont’s oldest, the Barnard General Store (Vermont Route 12), was saved by local fundraising efforts to keep it from closing. Singleton’s General Store in Proctorsville (Main Street) carries so much more than the “whiskey guns ammo” sign at its entrance would lead you to believe. In Norwich, the motto at Dan & Whit’s General Store (Main Street) speaks for them all: “If we don’t have it, you don’t need it.”

For more presidential ties in Vermont, albeit far more lavish, take a self-guided driving tour of the historic mansions in Manchester. The designs of these houses offer a sneak peek into the lives of their past residents. Architectural styles were chosen based on distinct uses, desired aesthetics and materials available at the time of construction. Abraham Lincoln’s son, Robert, built a Georgian Revival–style mansion here after falling in love with the area during family vacations with his mom to the nearby Equinox Resort. He called his estate Hildene (Hildene Road), and it later became home to three generations of the president’s descendants. Robert also served as president of the Pullman Company and, at that time, employed the largest number of African Americans in the county as Pullman porters. Tour the property from its cross-country ski and snowshoe trails, and don’t miss the restored Pullman train car to learn about the porters’ work and how it influenced their lives. Head next door to one of the oldest standing buildings in Manchester, the Inn at Ormsby Hill (Vermont Route 7A). The 1764 structure still contains one of the earliest jail cells in town, which was constructed almost entirely of locally available white marble, as was the inn’s oversized threshold. This was once the home of Robert Isham, a friend and colleague of Robert Todd Lincoln, who later bought the adjacent property where he built Hildene.

Speaking of families, a short detour while you’re in the area will provide you with a glimpse into what could arguably be one of the most closely-knit communities in Vermont. Head to the top of Plymouth Notch (Vermont Route 100A) where almost every structure in the village is incorporated into the President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site. This is the birthplace of the 13th U.S. president and Coolidgefamily homestead. Take a walk through the 19th-century village during any time of year, and you’ll see the clapboard homes, schoolhouse, general store, church, barns and cheese factory primarily occupied by President Coolidge and seven generations of his family. It was in the parlor of his boyhood home, after news arrived of the death of the 29th U.S. president, Warren G. Harding, that Coolidge took the

The mansions of Manchester stand at the foothills of the Taconic Mountains, located west of the area known as “The Golden Triangle.” The triangle is anchored by Bromley Mountain, Magic Mountain and Stratton Mountain Resort SkiVermont.com

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at the corners, and from any one mountain summit, you can see spectacular views of the others. While the ski areas are only a short drive apart, the area between them includes eight towns and villages that have also retained much of their historical flavor, albeit less opulent than those found in Manchester Village. At the heart of Manchester, the lavish Equinox Resort (Union Street) was named after the tallest peak in the Taconic range and is on the National Register of Historic Places, where it is identified as “one of Vermont’s last great 19th-century resort hotels still standing.” Since the Revolutionary War, it has seen numerous changes, including the addition of its trademark fluted columns spanning 285 feet across the façade, which, in conjunction with its neighboring structures, stunningly frames the town square. See another example of this region’s affluent design just 20 miles south in Bennington’s 35-room Park-McCullough House (Park Street). One of the most well preserved Victorian mansions in the Northeast, this European-style “country house” was built in 1864 using French Second Empire architectural design and Romantic Revival–style details, both of which were on trend for those wealthy enough to build a mansion during the end of the 19th 44 SkiVermont.com

century — in this case, the family’s cash came from the gold rush. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has remained true to its original ornate design while being family occupied for 100 years. One of the family descendants did make renovations to the dining room in anticipation of entertaining the 23rd U.S. president, Benjamin Harrison, who visited for the dedication of the Bennington Battle Monument in 1891. If you’re then heading to Mount Snow Resort from the west, you can’t miss the towering Bennington Battle Monument (Monument Circle). The monument is Vermont’s tallest structure at 306 feet and was erected to commemorate the 1777 Battle of Bennington, which became a turning point in the Revolutionary War. This popular state historic site was constructed with locally quarried stone and serves as the unofficial gateway to Vermont’s marble-rich region. The elevator to the top of the monument is closed through the winter, but if you visit for spring skiing at the end of April or beginning of May, you’ll be able to catch a lift and take in views of the underlying landscape in Vermont, Massachusetts and New York.


EXPLORE FURTHER After reading about all the types of icons and landmarks located across Vermont, and the people who built and used them throughout the state’s history, you might feel like you’ve been on a whirlwind sightseeing tour. While a wealth of sights certainly are out there for you to see, and most are managed by groups of history buffs who are happy to share their knowledge if you stop in to visit, many can be appreciated from the comfort of your car as you dart across the state in search of fresh tracks. Explore a different route the next time you head to the slopes or just try to look at your normal route in a new light. However you get there, be sure to keep your eyes open because sometimes that’s all the effort it takes to discover something new in between base areas. It’s these little discoveries that help make Vermont such a special place to visit. Special thanks to Vermont’s Department of Tourism & Marketing and Division for Historic Preservation for these suggestions. To discover even more artistic, cultural and historic attractions while traveling to and from the slopes, visit www.vermontvacation.com and www.historicsites.vermont.gov. ❄

SkiVermont.com

45


photo Š Blake Jorgenson

#anotherbestday

SOUL7 HD

SOUL7 HD W

THE BEST GETS BETTER

Resort-based or backcountry bound, freeride is about pushing boundaries and leaving your mark. Effortless floatation, playful maneuverability, and lightweight design allow you to confidently up your game and enjoy Another Best Day – no matter where the snow takes you.


GEAR GUIDE Ph ot os b y Jeb Wal l ace - Br od eur

Y

z Burton Talent

anon WM1 goggles

z

Scout

SkiVermont.com

47


Skida Women ’ s Alpine Hat

z

ADAM

SARAH

PARKER

APRÈS DRINKS:

APRÈS DRINKS:

APRÈS DRINKS:

Coleman Brook’s Lobby Bar at Okemo

Blackline Tavern at Magic Mountain or General Stark’s Pub at Mad River Glen

von Trapp Brewing Bierhall

ON MOUNTAIN TREATS:

Waffle Cabin LUNCH WITH FRIENDS:

Stowe’s Spruce Camp cafeteria DRINK IN HAND:

Woodchuck Semi-Dry Hard Cider

48 SkiVermont.com

ON-MOUNTAIN LUNCH:

Hearth & Candle at Smugglers’ Notch

Peak Lodge at Killington or The Bullwheel at Mount Snow

DRINK IN HAND:

DRINK OF CHOICE:

Long Trail Green Blaze IPA

Maple Manhattan with Mad River Distillers Bourbon

ROMANTIC DINNER:


Skida

Alpine

Headband

z

SKI VERMONT STAFF… WHERE YOU’LL FIND THEM OFF-SLOPE

ALICIA

CHLOE

APRÈS DRINKS:

APRÈS DRINKS:

James Moore Tavern at Bolton Valley, or the Bear Den at Burke Mountain

Wild Boar Tavern at Bromley

DINNER WITH FRIENDS:

Fit to be Thai’d at Sugarbush TWIST ON A FAVORITE:

SILO Vodka White Russian with Kimball Brook flavored milk

LUNCH ON-THE-GO:

Miso Hungry at Jay Peak DINNER WITH FRIENDS:

Fire Tower Restaurant and Tavern at Stratton DRINK OF CHOICE:

Barr Hill Gin Gin Rickey SkiVermont.com

49


Burton Hearth Fleece Anorak

z

Burton Anouk

Fleece Anorak

z y DARN

TOUGH SOCKS

y Dale of Norway

Olympic Passion sweater

z z

Dale of Norway Geilo sweater

50 SkiVermont.com


z

Rossignol

Soul 7 HDs

z

Rossignol

Temptation 80s

SkiVermont.com

51


Mount Snow skiers are unique. Just like all the you’ll ďŹ nd here, no two are alike. If you like hanging out with great friends and the best making system in the East, join in at MountSnow.com


TRAVEL

IT’S TIME TO HEAD FOR THE MOUNTAINS. 12 8

10

6

21 22

Burlington

5

20

11

26

3 Montpelier

13

17 2

19

23

1 15

18

14 29

Rutland 

White River Jct.

16

28

7

27

24

9

25

4

Brattleboro 

CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS 1. Blueberry Hill Ski Center 2. Blueberry Lake XC 3. Bolton Valley Nordic Center 4. Brattleboro Outing Club 5. Catamount Outdoor Family Center 6. Craftsbury Outdoor Center 7. Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center 8. Hazen’s Notch Association 9. The Hermitage Inn 10. Jay Peak Nordic Center 11. Kingdom Trails Nordic Adventure Center

12. Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation 13. Morse Farm Ski Touring Center 14. M  ountain Meadows XC Ski & Snowshoe Center 15. Mountain Top Inn & Resort 16. Okemo Valley Nordic Center 17. Ole’s Cross Country Center 18. Quechee Ski Area 19. Rikert Nordic Center 20. Sleepy Hollow Inn Ski & Bike Center 21. Smugglers’ Notch Nordic Center

22. S  towe Mountain Resort XC Ski Center 23. Strafford Nordic Center 24. Stratton Mountain Nordic Center 25. Timber Creek XC Ski Area 26. Trapp Family Lodge XC Ski Center 27. Viking Nordic Center 28. Wild Wings Ski Touring Center 29. Woodstock Inn & Resort Nordic Center Catamount Trail Association Amtrak Stations SkiVermont.com

53


You know you’re headed to Vermont this winter, but how are you getting here? We at Ski Vermont know the ins and outs, and do’s and don’ts when traveling to and around the Green Mountain State. We are here to help you get to Vermont in just 3 easy steps.

Take Amtrak and save 20% to your favorite Vermont ski destination.* Find out more at Amtrak.com. ®

*Restrictions apply.

STEP 1:

POP OF THE

PEAK PROUD PARTNER OF

SKI VERMONT

Choose your perfect Vermont ski or snowboard destination. Not sure what resort is best for you? Check out our Resort Finder at skivermont.com which allows you to sort Vermont’s resorts by type, region and amenities.

STEP 2: Decide how you want to travel. Vermont is very accessible with plenty of options to suit the needs of everyone from every destination. Check out the best ways to access the Green Mountains of Vermont with some insider tips.

STEP 3: Grab your skis and boards, pack your bags and get ready for an amazing time in the Green Mountains. PEPSI and the Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc.

54 SkiVermont.com


TRAVEL

BY AIR

Most of Vermont is accessed by four major Interstate Highways. Interstates 87, 89, 91 and 93 all provide easy access to Vermont. Don’t stress about the journey, there are plenty of Citgo stations across New England to help fuel your trip.

There are many ways to fly to Vermont and the Northeast. If you are visiting a northern or central resort, Burlington International Airport (BTV) is a great option. Direct service is available to BTV from Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Newark, New York City, Philadelphia, Toronto and Washington, DC.

In addition to the Interstate system, Vermont features a well-maintained network of local roads and State Highways. US Routes 2, 4 and 7 provide convenient access points east to west and north to south. The state works tirelessly in the winter months to ensure ease of passage through the many networks of roads.

BY RAIL

Vermont ski resorts can also be accessed from Montreal, Canada (YUL), Albany, NY (ALB), Manchester, NH (MHT), Hartford, CT (BDL), Boston, MA (BOS) and New York City (JFK & LGA) airports via a rental car, bus, rail or shuttle service.

SKI VERMONT PRO TIPS:

AIRPORTS

✈ If you do not have a car, you can also get to Vermont by Megabus, Greyhound or even the Jitney. Check with the resort you are visiting to see if they have any specific bus offerings or tour groups. Make sure to check your drive time online and seasonal directions as some roads close for the winter season and we don’t want you to end up in the wrong spot!

Vermont’s ski and snowboard resorts are closer than you may think. You can be at a Vermont resort in 2 hours from Montreal, 3 hours from Boston and 4 hours from New York City.

Amtrak offers two routes with daily service to Vermont. The Ethan Allen Express provides daily service between New York Penn Station and Rutland, VT. This train provides great access to southern and central Vermont. The Vermonter provides daily service between Washington, DC and St. Albans, VT via Philadelphia, PA and New York City and then heads through Connecticut and Western Massachusetts completing its journey through scenic Vermont all the way to St. Albans near the Canadian border. The Vermonter provides access to almost every resort area in Vermont.

If you are looking for a scenic route, make sure to check out the network of Vermont Byways. Route 100, which runs along the valleys of the Green Mountains, is often referred to as the Skiers Highway since many Vermont resorts lie along the famous route.

Courtesy of Killington

BY CAR OR BUS

In addition to major airports, Vermont has several smaller airports near resorts for a more personalized experience. SKI VERMONT PRO TIP:

If you are flying internationally, spend a day or two in Boston, Montreal or New York City. Vermont skiing and snowboarding is an easy drive from these locations.

SKI VERMONT PRO TIP:

Call your resort ahead of time to find out the best way to get to and from the train stations. Resorts provide shuttle services or can recommend transportation.

BY FERRY We bet you never even knew that you could get to Vermont by water! Vermont’s Lake Champlain Ferries have been providing safe passage across Lake Champlain since 1826. SKI VERMONT PRO TIP:

If you are traveling on I-87, the ferries are a unique way to get across the lake into the Green Mountains, just make sure the ferry you want to use operates in the winter and at the time you plan to cross.

NEED SOME ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE? Give us a ring at 802-223-2439 and we’ll help steer you in the right direction. SkiVermont.com

55


Courtesy of Bryce Mullin

ALPINE

BOLTON VALLEY

BROMLEY MOUNTAIN

BURKE MOUNTAIN

JAY PEAK RESORT

Bolton Valley, VT 05477 www.boltonvalley.com

Peru, VT 05152 www.bromley.com

East Burke, VT 05832 www.skiburke.com

Jay, VT 05859 www.jaypeakresort.com

General Info:.........802-434-3444 Snow Conditions:..802-434-SNOW Reservations:.........877-9BOLTON

General Info:......... 802-824-5522 Snow Conditions:... 802-856-2216 Reservations:....... 800-865-4786

General Info:......... 802-626-7300 Snow Conditions:... 866-626-7308 Reservations:.......866-966-4820

General Info:......... 802-988-2611 Snow Conditions:... 802-988-9601 Reservations:....... 800-451-4449

Vertical:.............................1,704' Trails:......................................71 Trail Acreage:....................... 300 Lifts:..........................................6 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 40%

Vertical:............................ 1,334' Trails:......................................47 Trail Acreage:........................178 Lifts:..........................................9 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 86%

Vertical:.............................2,011' Trails:..................................... 50 Trail Acreage:........................270 Lifts:..........................................5 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 70%

Vertical:............................ 2,153' Trails:......................................78 Trail Acreage:....................... 385 Lifts:..........................................9 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 80%

KILLINGTON RESORT

MAD RIVER GLEN

MAGIC MOUNTAIN

MIDDLEBURY SNOW BOWL

Killington, VT 05751 www.killington.com

Waitsfield, VT 05673 www.madriverglen.com

Londonderry, VT 05148 www.magicmtn.com

Hancock, VT 05748 www.middleburysnowbowl.com

General Info:......... 802-422-6201 Snow Conditions:......................— Reservations:...... 800-621-MTNS

General Info:......... 802-496-3551 Snow Conditions:... 802-496-3551 Reservations:...........................—

General Info:......... 802-824-5645 Snow Conditions:... 802-824-5645 Reservations:....... 802-824-5645

General Info:......... 802-443-7669 Snow Conditions:... 802-443-7669 Reservations:...........................—

Vertical:............................ 3,050' Trails:................................... 155 Trail Acreage:.................... 1,509 Lifts:....................................... 21 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 80%

Vertical:............................ 2,037' Trails:..................................... 45 Trail Acreage:....................... 120 Lifts:..........................................5 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 15%

Vertical:............................ 1,600' Trails:..................................... 43 Trail Acreage:....................... 195 Lifts:..........................................6 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 50%

Vertical:............................ 1,000' Trails:......................................17 Trail Acreage:....................... 120 Lifts:..........................................4 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 45%

56 SkiVermont.com


ALPINE COMMUNIT Y SKI AREAS

MOUNT SNOW RESORT

OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT

PICO MOUNTAIN

COCHRAN’S SKI AREA

West Dover, VT 05356 www.mountsnow.com

Ludlow, VT 05149 www.okemo.com

Killington, VT 05751 www.picomountain.com

Richmond, VT 05477 www.cochranskiarea.com

General Info:........800-245-SNOW Snow Conditions:... 802-464-2151 Reservations:....... 800-451-4211

General Info:........ 800-78-OKEMO Snow Conditions:... 802-228-5222 Reservations:....... 802-228-1600

General Info:......... 802-422-6200 Snow Conditions:......................— Reservations:........ 866-667-PICO

General Info:......... 802-434-2479 Snow Conditions:... 802-434-2479 Reservations:...........................—

Vertical:.............................1,700' Trails:..................................... 86 Trail Acreage:....................... 589 Lifts:....................................... 20 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 80%

Vertical:............................ 2,200' Trails:................................... 121 Trail Acreage:....................... 667 Lifts:....................................... 20 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 98%

Vertical:............................ 1,967' Trails:......................................57 Trail Acreage:....................... 468 Lifts:..........................................7 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 75%

Vertical:............................... 350' Trails:........................................8 Trail Acreage:......................... 15 Lifts:..........................................3 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 66%

QUECHEE SKI AREA

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT

STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT

LYNDON OUTING CLUB

Quechee, VT 05059 www.quecheeclub.com

Smugglers’ Notch, VT 05464 www.smuggs.com

Stowe, VT 05672 www.stowe.com

Lyndonville, VT 05851 www.skilyndon.com

General Info:......... 802-295-9356 Snow Conditions:... 802-295-9356 Reservations:....... 802-295-9356

General Info:......... 802-332-6841 Snow Conditions:... 802-644-1111 Reservations:....... 855-746-0541

General Info:......... 802-253-3000 Snow Conditions:... 802-253-3600 Reservations:........800-253-4SKI

General Info:.........802-626-8465 Snow Conditions:.......................— Reservations:...........................—

Vertical:............................... 650' Trails:..................................... 13 Trail Acreage:....................... 100 Lifts:..........................................3 Snowmaking Coverage:....... 100%

Vertical:.............................2,610' Trails:......................................78 Trail Acreage:........................310 Lifts:..........................................8 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 62%

Vertical:............................ 2,360' Trails:................................... 116 Trail Acreage:....................... 485 Lifts:....................................... 13 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 83%

Vertical:................................ 433 Trails:......................................10 Trail Acreage:......................... 32 Lifts:..........................................2 Snowmaking Coverage:.............—

STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT

SUGARBUSH RESORT

SUICIDE SIX SKI AREA

NORTHEAST SLOPES

Stratton Mountain, VT 05155 www.stratton.com

Warren, VT 05674 www.sugarbush.com

Woodstock, VT 05091 www.suicide6.com

East Corinth, VT 05086 www.northeastslopes.org

General Info:......... 802-297-4000 Snow Conditions:....802-297-4211 Reservations:...... 800-STRATTON

General Info:.........802-583-6300 Snow Conditions:..802-583-SNOW Reservations:....... 800-537-8427

General Info:......... 802-457-6661 Snow Conditions:... 802-457-6666 Reservations:....... 888-338-2745

General Info:......... 802-439-5789 Snow Conditions:... 802-439-5789 Reservations:...........................—

Vertical:............................ 2,003' Trails:......................................97 Trail Acreage:........................670 Lifts:....................................... 11 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 95%

Vertical:............................ 2,600' Trails:................................... 111 Trail Acreage:....................... 581 Lifts:........................................16 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 70%

Vertical:............................... 650' Trails:......................................24 Trail Acreage:....................... 100 Lifts:..........................................3 Snowmaking Coverage:......... 50%

Vertical:............................... 360' Trails:..................................... 12 Trail Acreage:......................... 35 Lifts:..........................................3 Snowmaking Coverage:.............—

SkiVermont.com

57


CROSS COUNTRY

RESORT

LOCATION

EMAIL WEBSITE

PHONE/ TOLL-FREE

Blueberry Hill Ski Center

Goshen, VT 05733

info@blueberryhillinn.com www.blueberryhillinn.com

Blueberry Lake X-C

Warren, VT 05674

Bolton Valley Nordic Center

SNOWMAKING

TRAILS

MACHINE TRACKED/ SKATING TERRAIN

INSTRUCTION/ RENTAL

802-247-6735 -

50km

0km/0km

N/Y

www.blueberrylakeskivt.com

802-496-6687 -

30km

21km/21km

Y/Y

Bolton Valley, VT 05477

info@boltonvalley.com www.boltonvalley.com

802-434-6876 877-9BOLTON

100km

15km/15km

Y/Y

Brattleboro Outing Club

Brattleboro, VT 05302

xc@brattleborooutingclub.com www.brattleborooutingclub.com

802-254-4081 -

33km

25km/18km

Y/Y

Catamount Outdoor Family Center

Williston, VT 05495

mail@catamountoutdoor.com www.catamountoutdoorfamilycenter.com

802-879-6001 -

35km

20km/20km

Y/Y

Catamount Trail Association

Burlington, VT 05401

info@catamounttrail.org www.catamounttrail.org

802-864-5794 -

500km

50km/50km

Y/Y

Craftsbury Outdoor Center

Craftsbury Common, VT 05827

stay@craftsbury.com www.craftsbury.com

802-586-7767 -

105km

105km/105km

Y/Y

Grafton Ponds Nordic Center

Grafton, VT 05146

info@graftonponds.com www.graftonponds.com

802-843-2400 -

30km

15km/15km

Y/Y

Hazen’s Notch Association

Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471

info@hazensnotch.org www.hazensnotch.org

802-326-4799 -

60km

40km/0km

Y/Y

The Hermitage Inn

West Dover, VT 05356

802-464-7734 -

14km

14km/14km

Y/Y

www.hermitageclub.com

Jay Peak Nordic Center

Jay, VT 05859

info@jaypeakresort.com www.jaypeakresort.com

802-988-4693 800-451-4449

20km

10km/10km

Y/Y

Kingdom Trails Nordic Adventure Center

Lyndonville, VT 05851

info@kingdomtrails.org www.kingdomtrails.org

802-626-6005 -

60km

12km/12km

N/N

Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation

Derby, VT 05830

PLHarris969@comcast.net www.mstf.net

802-334-7676 -

30km

30km/30km

N/N

Morse Farm Ski Touring Center

Montpelier, VT 05602

info@skimorsefarm.com www.skimorsefarm.com

802-223-0560 -

25km

25km/20km

Y/Y

Mountain Meadows XC Ski & Snowshoe Center

Killington, VT 05751

basecamp1@mac.com www.xcskiing.net

802-775-7077 802-775-0166

57km

57km/57km

Y/Y

Mountain Top Inn & Resort

Chittenden, VT 05737

stay@mountaintopinn.com www.mountaintopinn.com

802-483-6089 -

60km

40km/40km

Y/Y

Okemo Valley Nordic Center

Ludlow, VT 05149

info@okemo.com www.okemo.com

802-228-1396 800-78-OKEMO

22km

0km/0km

Y/Y

Ole’s Cross Country Center

Warren, VT 05674

ski@olesxc.com www.olesxc.com

802-496-3430 -

45km

45km/40km

Y/Y

Quechee Ski Area

Quechee, VT 05059

info@quecheeclub.com www.quecheeclub.com

802-295-9356 -

25km

25km/12km

Y/Y

Rikert Nordic Center

Ripton, VT 05766

rikertnordiccenter@middlebury.edu www.rikertnordic.com

802-443-2744 -

55km

45km/45km

Y/Y

Sleepy Hollow Inn Ski & Bike Center

Huntington, VT 05462

info@skisleepyhollow.com www.skisleepyhollow.com

802-434-2283 866-254-1524

35km

30km/25km

Y/Y

Smugglers’ Notch Nordic Center

Smugglers’ Notch, VT 05464

ski_ride@smuggs.com www.smuggs.com

802-644-1173 800-451-8752

30km

18km/26km

Y/Y

Stowe Mountain Resort XC Ski Center

Stowe, VT 05672

info@stowe.com www.stowe.com

802-253-3688 800-253-4SKI

75km

45km/30km

Y/Y

Strafford Nordic Center

Strafford, VT 05072

info@straffordnordicskiing.com www.straffordnordicskiing.com

802-765-4309 -

30km

10km/30km

Y/Y

Stratton Mountain Nordic Center

Stratton Mountain, VT 05155

feedback@stratton.com www.stratton.com

802-297-4567 800-STRATTON

12km

12km/12km

Y/Y

Timber Creek XC Ski Area

West Dover, VT 05356

timbercreekxc@gmail.com www.timbercreekxc.com

802-464-0999 -

14km

14km/14km

Y/Y

Trapp Family Lodge XC Ski Center

Stowe, VT 05672

info@trappfamily.com www.trappfamily.com

802-253-5755 800-826-7000

160km

60km/60km

Y/Y

Viking Nordic Center

Londonderry, VT 05148

skiandstay@vikingnordic.com www.vikingnordic.com

802-824-3933 -

39km

35km/30km

Y/Y

Wild Wings Ski Touring Center

Peru, VT 05152

wwxcski@sover.net www.wildwingsski.com

802-824-6793 -

28km

28km/0km

Y/Y

Woodstock Inn & Resort Nordic Center

Woodstock, VT 05091

nvm@woodstockinn.com www.woodstockinn.com

802-457-6674

50km

30km/20km

Y/Y

SkiVermont.com

59


sugarbush.com

Adventure Awaits There’s something more to the Sugarbush experience than the legendary terrain variety, the meticulous snowmaking and grooming, the fabled history, and the authentic Vermont mountain setting. Come discover what makes Sugarbush different. For the best deals on season passes, discount tickets, lodging and more, visit sugarbush.com.

800.53.SUGAR

#SUGARBUSH


FRESH TRACKS

DO YOUR WALLS NEED A LIFT? Give your favorite shredder the gift of powder. Purchase Ski Vermont posters by November 20th to be delivered in time for the holidays. Place your order at SkiVermont.com/store.

ED IT ON M TI LI DI E

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VERMONT’S HIDDEN GEM.

East Burke, Vermont’s ski-in/ski-out Hotel featuring a heated outdoor pool, The View Pub, Vertical Drop retail store, fitness center and Edmund’s Coffee Shop has a view from every room. Discover the natural beauty and infinite opportunity for adventure at the slope side Burke Mountain Hotel & Conference Center at Burke Mountain.

SKI/ STAY

- In a studio suite -

FROM

/NIGHT

BOOK NOW: skiburke.com I (866) 966-4820 SkiVermont.com

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elementary knew that an . ho W . w no rs a ye long t this for 18 has lasted so a t a en h be t e p v hi e’ w ns io believe that utiful relat child It is hard to would turn into such a bea my life as a in y on it y iv rl ct a ea school d to you so n with ski ve been expose yself, season after seaso hill. a h o t y ck lu ys on the value of m lucky. I a m ught me the antly, solo da You see, I a m rt ta po ou im Y t t. os on m m Ver and growing up in eekend trips with friends reason now w s, on and you’re the r and it ss t le on m er V school o t ck olde ose to come ba stronger as I have gotten rom you. ch I n so a re gotten learned f u were the Ultimately, yo ed here. Your pull has only the lessons that I have in on a that I’ve rem le to sit here and reflect bombing ib ed cr in my green years he world . en of h uc m has be t en a care in t istence. I sp tience and pers way at Jay Peak without tient as I honed my pa e m ht ug ta Queens High ys on. I grew pa Early on you terstate and ny spills, I learned my less rned persistence on the da l In ke li s il ra t a a ro m le I nt oo down co s. t or of ew ct after a f i school instru t like life was spinning out trails, then sk y m of Nevertheless, e ic el ed the a dv y favorite y time I f skills and heed I wanted to give up. Ever houghts as I raced down m ain. t ht off the mount gh my nd ou a hr t on that I thoug ce e, ra ov m o my mind t ing my next althy I would allow slow, determin it ke ta o develop a he t t nd n a ga ck be ba I , ll rl I’ d pu As a young gi that I thought I would n’ me my fears. co er times ov o t w each wid e, me ho ere countless w ht re ug he ta T I could. With . o in t ls a a a h nt quiet t ou e You m m he ed t helped me to u you show orld and yo e, w n im he t ur t t y er of by ev r fea turn yet o the my strength; the slope and e I ma de it t make it down wn the trail you revealed uldn’t do it and each tim rful, I push myself co do m fea swooping turn my hea d telling me that I Now, when I a t it doesn’ t matter d. he is pl om cc de arned tha . the voice insi ief of what I ha d just a ough it. I’ve le push off and begin turning hr el t sb k di or w in nd om a t I e m t bot a h ng t ri a r what is sc but rathe wing to drop into t through it (or down it) his world . G ro life t ge I of y y kl it ic ic pl qu m how through my uty in the si e to find bea as I’ve grown and matured m ht find ug ta e v , but around you. I you ha ed ld g, nt or iin a w sk gr he y, t or ll f a Fin y of oment you ntains I took ion for you and the beaut he chair lift, a solitary m r. By ou m he t in up t at a deep appreci hings like bluebird days on ll by me as I drive in my ca ed ed t I have found ro of t a t h t sitivity ne s he simples y of the place his life of mine with the po ut a happiness in t be he t , a d in t and even in the trees, all around me, I forge a he for that. y finding beaut and I have you to thank y, to live happil

Dear Skiing,

skiing. So, thank you, hloe All my love, C 62 SkiVermont.com


My Dea r Since est Snowbo arding, you ca m challe nge, f e into my l ocus a ife, yo season nd u’v , like wit you keep me entertainme e introduce d me t o nt, and h n o u my t t yo senses o and kee u in it. I wa oes (and hee you continue new levels nt to l p me c of enr s), and to sur sh oming ic Sight back fo are with you I can’t imag prise me. Sea hment, in s r s on e o more. m e of w My van my fav hat my life after tage p orite w w summit, oint el ays yo ould be u tickl they’v I notice the evates when e my e tracks jumped from snow pillow I’m with you. in W a panora nd wonder w the pages o g on tree hilst being mic vie b w f ws and ho’s hiding ou a Dr. Seuss oughs, frost hisked up a c , on cl in t s Sound ear day side my fiel tory. When g and bendin hairlift to t he I d s, admir g You tu e surr of vision. Wh slow down, branches lik ne me I o e e unding n s into th I’m co ranges I reach the pot wildlife m e . peak, I on the forted by t mountains’ take in h f Goret trail. Our qu e peaceful s requencies. ex as I W il ie it e t nce h th is g and wh oops o dust flakes leefully in that greets e bustle of f joy. the bas terrup from m me as te e y oute I Smell rwear d first by t discover I’m area behind a me, h n e the d s prepar A whiff e to de wish of Gore only one o f t your u scend, leathe niq then b ex brushing r y gigg outside mittens and ue bouquet les t , lungs. the smell o wool confir ransports m m e f friends Wafts of pin fresh snow that I’m pr to my happ y e stir e and fam up war and wisp of pared to fac place. Eart ily wit hy a m c et ol h whom m Taste I’ll re emories of w d smoke sting he weather. W romas of in unite a h You no gain on ter holidays my nose and en I step urish m s fil t p he hill waking ent ce y so u l . . I eat lebrat l my u p e a r buffet ing wit ly to up eve s h the drink in of goods in pend as much ry opportun it the wo t refres y ime on to in o hing m ountain ds, fresh tra the snow as dulge in a de Feel cks ca d air like po it’s a t in open snow ssible. I tre ent powder You are day at a f ll gla ss of ields and sof myself to t , the sid my favorite s t pring h e water. cupcake bu e my ridin of a snow- dance partn m e c ps. I r g o . v P s e tyl u re red snow s pray t e according slope. I fe pleasure pr l hat kic e ks up in y so I can l the snow evails when I focus You’ve to my on the conditions un float in rh face w ythm d with ol become the f w er it in h each turn. d blowing th my board and down You ce d friends, an oundation on rough n my hair adjust Single ter my mind d face and o which I trav and the v e . Time. a e l, expl nd body rcome deeper I every ’m lucky to l and connec challenges ore, make ne w day. t t ive a s nowboa me with nat o enjoy mor friends, rec ure. Yo rding l e Your p artner u give of your co onnect ifestyl m m in pow e pan e and my b der, H gratit utterflies. E y. ilary ude fo r you very. grows

SkiVermont.com

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Our Farmers

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Thank You Since 1919, the farm families of Cabot Co-op have been passionate about making the world's best dairy products. We use only the purest ingredients to cra our creamy, delicious classics. Just maybe, that's why we've won every major award for taste. Learn more at cabotcheese.coop

Individual Chili-Cheddar Meatloves Serves 2 Cooking spray ½ small onion, chopped ¼ green bell pepper, chopped 1 small garlic clove, minced ¼ cup chili sauce or ketchup, divided 6 oz. Cabot Pepper Jack, grated (about 1½ cups) 6 oz. raw extra-lean ground beef

1 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 tsp. chili powder 6 crushed saltine crackers a dash of salt ¼ tsp. black pepper Dash of Worcestershire sauce Dash of red pepper flakes 1 large egg, lightly beaten

PREHEAT oven to 350°F. COAT a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray; place over medium heat. Add onion, bell pepper, and garlic; sauté 3 to 5 min. or until tender. Combine onion mixture, 2 Tbsp. chili sauce, ½ cup cheese and remaining ingredients in a medium bowl. SPOON meat mixture into 4 muffin cups coated with cooking spray. Top evenly with remaining cheese. Bake at 350°F for 12 min.; top with remaining 2 Tbsp. chili sauce. Bake an additional 10 min. or until a thermometer registers 160°F. Let stand for 5 min. before serving.

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Ski Vermont 2018 Magazine  

Ski Vermont's 2018 Magazine features articles on everything from Vermont's famous racing family to our ultimate gear guide. Find out more ab...

Ski Vermont 2018 Magazine  

Ski Vermont's 2018 Magazine features articles on everything from Vermont's famous racing family to our ultimate gear guide. Find out more ab...

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