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PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID BURLINGTON, VT PERMIT NO. 19

W I R I S O I N T A

N N R A T

T E I T I G L S E !


Courtesy of Justin Cash


Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

SkiRideVT

Ski_VT & RideVermont

@Ski_Vermont & @RideVermont

/SkiVermont & /RideVermont

www.SkiVermont.com

COVER PHOTO Jeb Wallace-Brodeur Aidan Casner & Maddie Khamnei enjoy early season love on Sugarbush’s Jester trail.

Discover something new this winter.

4 MOUNTAIN HAPPENINGS

ASSISTANT EDITOR Hilary DelRoss

Where to go and when to be there.

EDITOR Kyle Opuszynski

PRINTER Lane Press

CONTACT INFO Ski Vermont P.O. Box 368 Montpelier, VT 05601 T: 802.223.2439 F: 802.229.6917 E: info@skivermont.com DESIGN Methodikal, Inc.

PUBLISHER SKI VERMONT Kelly Pawlak, Chair Parker Riehle, President Kyle Opuszynski, Dir. of Marketing

2 FRESH TRACKS

8 THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF READY FREDDY Story by Hilary DelRoss Seven steps for getting the most out of your next day on the slopes.

16 SKI LIKE A GIRL Story by Kyle Opuszynski How women’s-only clinics helped one skier make the leap.

27 CHILDREN OF WINTER Story by Peter Oliver Vermonters are turning the U.S. women’s cross-country ski team into an Olympic contender.

37 ONE BOURBON, ONE CIDER, ONE BEER Story by Mike Hannigan One man’s grueling search for the perfect après-ski beverage.

46 APRÈS-SKI COCKTAIL RECIPES Eight delicious ways to unwind from a day in the Green Mountains.

48 FARM TO TABLE & BEYOND Story by Sky Barsch Vermont’s finest resort restaurants put their best fare forward.

60 ALPINE AND NORDIC SKIING FACTS AND STATS Get the details on Vermont’s diverse array of skiing and riding destinations.

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THE EDITOR HONING HER SKILLS

FINDING SOMETHING NEW Coming off a record-breaking year with nearly 4.7 million skier and rider visits for the 2014–15 season, Vermont truly shines as a premier winter vacation destination. Vermont resorts boast a variety of terrain, powerful snowmaking capabilities, world-class dining, ski-in / ski-out accommodations, and a high level of guest services that leave every visitor with a smile on his or her face. We invite you to continually explore our Green Mountains, and we hope to offer some guidance along the way. In the pages that follow, find stories of Olympic athletes groomed in Vermont, learn how expert skiers can improve their level of skiing, explore a guide to introducing a friend or family member to the sport, join in the search for the perfect après-ski beverage, and discover how Vermont chefs use local resources in their kitchens. We will also tell you about Ski Vermont programs that introduce people to skiing and riding, including how fifth grade students can try a variety of Vermont resorts at no cost and how to win a free snowboard or pair of skis by visiting all the mountains in our fine state. The stories in this magazine aim to help you uncover what makes Vermont a wonderful place to visit. Each region hosts a variety of unique experiences to discover, and you will never tire of searching out new and exciting aspects of the winter vacation. Vermont serves as a playground for those looking to explore. They say that learning something new exercises your brain, and Vermont offers many ways to do so. I tried a couple of new things myself this past winter. Read all about my personal 2

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ski clinic adventures, which prove that skiing and riding are lifelong sports that can always be improved upon. After taking these clinics, I had more fun on the slopes because I gained the confidence and skills to master more difficult terrain. I also took a snowboarding lesson to tackle a new sport on snow and learn something new with my husband. We both felt invigorated with a passion for a new sport. I was instantly hooked and bought snowboard equipment so that I can both ski and ride this season.

Vermont truly shines as a premier winter vacation I hope that the stories in the pages ahead inspire you to get to Vermont this winter and ignite or rekindle your love for the mountains. Uncover one-of-a-kind experiences in Vermont— both on the snow and off—while spending time with the ones closest to you. A winter vacation in Vermont creates new memories for you and your loved ones. It is those shared activities that bring us closer together.

Kyle Opuszynski, Director of Marketing

Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

FRESH TRACKS


Cabot Creamery is fully owned and operated by 1,200 farm families in New England and New York. Our farmers get 100% of the profit and do all they must to ensure you get the best, all-natural dairy foods. From our families to yours - taste the commitment to quality in every bite of the World’s Best Cheddar. CONANT FAMILY, Richmond, VT One of the 1,200 farm families who own Cabot Creamery Cooperative.

BAKED MACARONI & CABOT CHEDDAR INGREDIENTS

Butter or nonstick cooking spray 2 1⁄4

cups uncooked small elbow macaroni

3

cups milk

5

tablespoons Cabot Salted Butter

3

slices firm white or whole wheat bread, pulsed into crumbs in processor or blender

3

tablespoons King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour

⁄4

teaspoon salt

3

⁄4

teaspoon ground black pepper

⁄8

teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1 1

Several dashes Tabasco Sauce 16

ounces Cabot Sharp Cheddar, Cabot Extra Sharp Cheddar or Cabot Smoky Bacon Cheddar, grated (about 4 cups), divided

MAKES 8 SERVINGS

DIRECTIONS 1 Preheat oven to 375°F. Butter 9-by-13-inch or other shallow baking dish or coat with nonstick cooking spray and set aside. 2 Stir macaroni into large pot of boiling salted water; cook for 5 minutes after water returns to boil, or until outside is cooked but center is still firm. Immediately drain in colander and rinse under cold water; set aside. 3 In saucepan over medium-high heat or in microwave on high power for 20 second intervals, heat milk to just below simmer. 4 In pot you used for pasta, melt butter over medium-low heat. Pour 2 tablespoons of butter into bowl, add breadcrumbs and blend together thoroughly; set aside. 5 Reduce heat to low, add flour to butter remaining in saucepan and whisk over heat for 2 minutes, being careful not to let it color. Add milk in small amounts at first, whisking until smooth after each addition; continue stirring until sauce thickens and comes to simmer. Cook, stirring often, for about 3 minutes. 6 Remove from heat and whisk in salt, pepper, nutmeg, Tabasco and half of cheese. Stir in drained pasta. 7 Spread one-third of pasta mixture over bottom of prepared baking dish. Scatter one-third of remaining cheese on top. Spoon another one-third of pasta on top and add another one-third of cheese. Top with remaining pasta. Mix remaining cheese into breadcrumbs and scatter evenly over top. 8 Bake uncovered for 25 to 30 minutes, or until golden on top and bubbling throughout. Let stand for 5 minutes before serving.

NUTRITION ANALYSIS: Calories 474, Total Fat 27g, Saturated Fat 15.5g, Sodium 732mg, Carbohydrates 37g, Dietary Fiber 1.5g, Protein 22.5g, Calcium 542mg

For more recipes, visit: cabotcheese.coop


FRESH TRACKS

2015–2016 MOUNTAIN HAPPENINGS JANUARY

FEBRUARY

Courtesy of Justin Cash

DECEMBER

TO

SKI & SNOWBOARD MONTH

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KILLINGTON RESORT: RAILS 2 RICHES The East’s most lucrative rail jam, Rails 2 Riches officially kicks off the shred season for pro and amateur skiers and riders from across the U.S. and Canada. Killington.com/events December 5, 2015 SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT: BREWFEST Smugglers’ popular BrewFest bookends the ski and ride season in the winter and spring, with local and regional beers for sampling, music, food, prizes and a souvenir glass. Smuggs.com December 5, 2015 BOLTON VALLEY: SANTA SUNDAY Dress as Santa for your day of skiing or riding and get a free lift ticket for the day. Boltonvalley.com December 20, 2015 OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT: FAMILY NEW YEAR’S EVE Midnight arrives early for those enjoying an assortment of activities such as ice skating, snow tubing, snowshoeing, mountain coaster rides, horse-drawn wagon rides, cookie decorating, bingo, trivia, a DJ dance party and more. Party games, balloons, noisemakers and fireworks add to the celebration, complete with a pizza party dinner in the Roundhouse at Jackson Gore. Okemo.com December 31, 2015 4

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JANUARY IS LEARN TO SKI AND SNOWBOARD MONTH IN VERMONT. Beginners can get a full beginner’s package with lift access, instruction and equipment for just $49, non-holiday dates, in January. Must purchase in advance; see website. skivermont.com/learn January 2016 (Non-holiday) SUGARBUSH RESORT: TOUR DE MOON Take a guided skin or snowshoe to the Glen House at Mount Ellen for some hearty food and drink, followed by a moonlit ski down the mountain. Sugarbush.com January 17, 2016 MOUNT SNOW RESORT: GROMMET JAM SERIES Skiers and riders ages 12 and under are coached in the park in the morning and then compete in the afternoon, all at Grommet Park in Carinthia. Mountsnow.com January 18, 2016 MAD RIVER GLEN: JUNIOR UNCONVENTIONAL TERRAIN COMPETITION The Junior Unconventional Terrain Competition is for skiers 14 and younger. Top finishers will qualify for the Triple Crown Unconventional Terrain Competition as well as all the Ski the East Freeride Tour events. Madriverglen.com January 23, 2016

SUICIDE SIX: FISK TROPHY RACE This year’s Fisk Trophy slalom race, the 79th consecutive running of the event, demonstrates why ski racing is so easy to love! The race has been in existence since 1937 and is the oldest alpine trophy race in North America. Suicide6.com February 7, 2016 SUICIDE SIX: ANNUAL TORCHLIGHT PARADE & DANCE Come celebrate Suicide Six’s 80th Anniversary and Torchlight Parade shortly after sunset with dancing in the lodge—it’s fun for the whole family! Suicide6.com February 13, 2016 SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT: FAMILYFUN WINTER CARNIVAL Smugglers’ teams up with FamilyFun magazine to host the FamilyFun Winter Carnival, an afternoon of games, giveaways, face painting, music, free barbecue and lots of family fun on the snow! Smuggs.com February 18, 2016 MAD RIVER GLEN: TRIPLE CROWN COMPETITION SERIES Three events back-to-back-to-back to determine Mad River Glen’s king and queen of the hill: the Unconventional Terrain Competition on Saturday, the Mogul Challenge on Sunday and the Vertical Challenge on Monday. Madriverglen.com February 20–22, 2016 STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT: 72ND ANNUAL STOWE DERBY Participate or cheer on competitors at the oldest downhill/cross-country ski race in North America. Stowe.com February 21, 2016 MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE SNOW BOWL: WINTER CARNIVAL The Middlebury College Winter Carnival will serve as the Eastern Intercollegiate Ski Championships, with alpine and Nordic competitions for the top college skiers in the East. The Ski Vermont specialty food tour will stop at the carnival on Saturday, February 27. Middleburysnowbowl.com February 26–27, 2016


FRESH TRACKS

MARCH

OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT: LIGHT THE NIGHT RAIL JAM Okemo is lighting up the snow for skiers and riders of all ages with $5,000 in cash and prizes up for grabs. A new rail garden constructed specifically for this event will give skiers and riders an optimal venue for showing off their best moves. Okemo.com March 5, 2016 SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT: EXTREME SKIING CHALLENGE Take on Smugglers’ most challenging lift-accessed terrain in this freeskiing competition, now in its fourth year. Competitors are judged on line, control, fluidity, technique and style. Big prizes. Snscvt.com March 6, 2016 STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT: VERMONT OPEN A 2015 Top Ten Vermont event (as determined by the Vermont Chamber of Commerce), the Vermont Open invites snowboarders of all ages to compete in Vermont’s only open competition, including features such as a retro pipe, slopestyle and rail jam. Stratton.com March 11–13, 2016 OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT: SUGAR DAZE CONCERT When the sap starts running in Vermont’s maple trees, Okemo will be tapping into the sweet sounds of notable musical artists with Sugar Daze, a free outdoor concert extravaganza in the Jackson Gore courtyard. Okemo.com March 12, 2016 JAY PEAK RESORT: THE SKI THE EAST FREERIDE TOUR EXTREME FINALS The East Coast’s best freeriders compete for cash during the two-day Ski the East Freeride Tour finals. Jaypeakresort.com March 19–20, 2016

STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT: 24 HOURS OF STRATTON Skiers and snowboarders of all ages take to the slopes for 24 hours as individuals and teams vying for the most vertical feet skied. The event raises funds for the Stratton Foundation, which helps needy community members. Stratton.com March 19–20, 2016 SUGARBUSH RESORT: SUGARING TIME FESTIVAL Celebrate spring in Vermont with a Kids Pizza and Movie Night, Gelandesprung Championship, maple-themed specials and more. Sugarbush.com March 19–20, 2016 MOUNT SNOW: BUD LIGHT REGGAEFEST Live reggae music, barbecue and beer garden as well as the famous Sink or Skim pond skimming contest and the Duct Tape Derby make this a weekend full of fun for the whole family. Mountsnow.com March 25–27, 2016 BROMLEY MOUNTAIN: SPRING FLING WEEKEND Live music, fun family events and the Trampoline Things will be on hand from Vermont’s Summer Adventure to liven up the weekend both days! Classic spring events include the pond skimming contest on School Slope and the Duct Tape Derby. Bromley.com March 26–27, 2016 STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT: RACE TO THE TOP OF VERMONT All-terrain skiers race uphill on Stowe’s famous Gondolier trail, as they “skin to win” the first title. Stowe.com March 26, 2016 MAD RIVER GLEN: EASTER CELEBRATION A grand Mad River Glen tradition featuring a mountaintop service, Easter egg hunt, costume parade and Tex’s Famous Chicken Barbecue. Madriverglen.com March 27, 2016

Courtesy of Justin Cash

JAY PEAK RESORT: SNOW LEOPARD RANDONEE CHALLENGE See what all the hype is about—check out “rando racing” in this fun ski challenge that takes you up and all around Jay Peak Resort. Jaypeakresort.com March 5, 2016

APRIL

BOLTON VALLEY: POND SKIMMING Test your luck skimming the pond or cheer on others as they try. Boltonvalley.com April 2, 2016 JAY PEAK RESORT: BEACH PARTY Pink flamingos, frothy beverages and a volleyball court made from snow. What more do you need to know about this annual rite of spring? Jaypeakresort.com April 2, 2016 MOUNT SNOW RESORT: WINTER BREWERS FESTIVAL AND GLADE-IATOR Saturday offers the Winter Brewers Festival featuring more than 25 different breweries, great food and a performance by the Jeff Tuohy Band. Sunday features the Bud Light Glade-iator extreme bump competition on the double black diamond trail Ripcord. Mountsnow.com April 2–3, 2016 KILLINGTON RESORT: BEAR MOUNTAIN MOGUL CHALLENGE Bump and jump racing on Outer Limits, where skiers of all ages compete for bragging rights as the best mogul skier in the East. Killington.com April 16, 2016 KILLINGTON RESORT: DAZED & DEFROSTED Killington’s spring music festival returns with hot live tunes, cool drinks and a party atmosphere at Superstar and the Roaring Brook Umbrella Bars, your spring skiing headquarters. Killington.com April 23, 2016

G O N AT IS G O IN T ELSE A H W T F IN D O U

S K IV ER M O N T. C O

M / E V EN T S SkiVermont.com

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FRESH TRACKS

A PASSPORT TO WINTER FUN: FIFTH GRADERS SKI FREE IN VT Imagine receiving a passport that allowed you to ski and snowboard at Vermont resorts over 80 times in one season! Who wouldn’t love that? Fifth graders can ski or ride free all season in Vermont with the Ski Vermont Fifth Grade Passport program.

NEED A LIFT? You don’t have to leave winter in Vermont behind when you head home. Before your memory melts away, scoop up the latest and greatest Ski Vermont poster to adorn your wall. Grab the one that speaks best to your day on snow, or make the entire collection yours. We’ve got you covered at SkiVermont.com/store, where you’ll find pricing details and how to place your order.

Parents or friends of fifth graders can simply sign up online at skivermont.com/FGP to receive a passport in the mail. A passport containing three tickets to each alpine resort and one or three tickets to each Nordic resort in Vermont will be mailed to eligible recipients for the low processing fee of $10. Proof of age is required. Speaking of age, there is no better time to get a child involved with a winter sport than in those grade-school years. Research shows that introducing preteens to lifelong sports can help them develop healthier habits in life. The fifth grade passport helps children embrace a winter sport by getting them started on Vermont’s slopes with free lift tickets. For kids new to the sport, Ski Vermont recommends scheduling a professional lesson with the money saved, so your fifth grader has the best experience possible. Explore our Learn-to-Turn programs at skivermont.com/learn. The passport can also be used as an incentive to pack up the family and start fresh traditions at new-to-you resorts in Vermont. Take it from one of our 2014–15 passport holders: “The program is fantastic. It definitely motivated our family to get out on the slopes more than we would have otherwise. Getting out there this season with my 11-year-old son reignited my love of skiing and will certainly motivate us to ski/ride just as much next season.” Sarah Wojcik ❄

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l AMAZING E H T ENTURES V D A

ä

READY FREDDY t Written by Hilary DelRoss

A Illustrated by Chris Case

ARE YOU AN AVID SKIER OR SNOWBOARDER LOOKING TO TRY A NEW DISCIPLINE? PERHAPS YOUR FRIEND WANTS TO GET IN ON ALL THE FUN AND JOIN YOU ON THE SLOPES? OR ARE YOU TRYING WINTER SPORTS FOR THE FIRST TIME? WHETHER YOU’RE EXPERIENCED OR JUST STARTING OUT, WHETHER YOU WANT TO SKI OR TO RIDE, ONE THING STILL HOLDS TRUE: PROPER PREPARATION LEADS TO A SMOOTHER, MORE ENJOYABLE EXPERIENCE ON THE SLOPES. IF YOU’RE NEW TO SLIDING ON SNOW OR IF YOU’RE HELPING A FRIEND GET INTO SKIING OR RIDING FOR THE FIRST TIME, FOLLOW THE HANDY GUIDE BELOW FOR TIPS ON HOW TO PLAN AHEAD FOR A SUCCESSFUL FIRST DAY FOR YOU OR YOUR FRIEND. 8

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STEP ONE: BOOK A LESSON When you decide to try skiing or snowboarding, we highly recommend signing up for a lesson with a professional instructor. Taking lessons is the best way to learn because the pros teach you how to develop good techniques right from the start. Choose a date to take a lesson and call the ski and ride school. It’s easy to add a lesson to a winter vacation package. We recommend booking a lesson for the first day of the vacation so you start your trip off on the right foot. Alternatively, you may take a day trip to the mountain for your first lesson. Be sure to factor in transportation time and parking when selecting the time of your lesson so you do not feel rushed upon arrival.

STEP TWO: INVENTORY GEAR

d

You’ ll be able to focus on the task at hand—the lesson—if you are warm, dry and comfortable. Opt for moisture-wicking synthetic or wool fabrics instead of cotton. Dressing in layers is the best way to regulate body temperature; layers can be added or removed throughout the day as needed. From the bottom up, you’ ll want to gather the following items:

* SKI OR SNOWBOARD SOCKS * LONG UNDERWEAR BASE LAYERS FOR TOP AND BOTTOM * MID-LAYER TOP, SUCH AS A FLEECE * WATERPROOF JACKET AND PANTS * GLOVES OR MITTENS AND A BACKUP PAIR * HELMET (AVAILABLE TO RENT AT SOME RESORTS) * GOGGLES * LIP BALM AND SUNSCREEN IF IT’S A SUNNY DAY

Did somebody say layers?

w

Arrive at the mountain dressed in these layers. At the rental department you’ ll be fitted for the rest of the gear, including ski or snowboard boots, a pair of skis and poles or a board, and a helmet if you don’t have one.

continued on page 11

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YOU CAN GO TO COLLEGE ANYWHERE, BUT IF YOU LOVE TO SKI AND RIDE, THERE’S ONLY ONE PLACE WHERE YOU CAN EARN A VERMONT DEGREE

FIND YOUR PATH AT VTDEGREES.ORG


4 STEP THREE: GET REST AND FUEL UP

It’s important to arrive at the lesson well rested and with a positive attitude. Finalizing travel plans and laying out gear ahead of time will set you up for a successful day on the slopes. By preparing in advance you’ ll be able to wake up on the morning of your lesson and eat a good meal that gives you enough energy to allow you to focus on the fun new experience.

POSITIVE AT TIT U D E

STEP FOUR: ARRIVE AT THE MOUNTAIN Your first stop when you arrive at the mountain will be the front desk at the ski and snowboard school. At the counter, you’ ll register for your lesson and purchase a beginner package and lift ticket if you haven’t done so already. You’ ll also fill out a form that will help the staff fit you with the right rental equipment. This form is the rental agreement, and it will ask for your height, weight, age, ability level and shoe size (so you get the correct equipment).

STEP FIVE: RENT EQUIPMENT Getting your rental equipment is a step-by-step process in itself. First up are the boots. Your feet do a lot of work when they are strapped onto skis and boards, so it’s important to get ski or snowboard boots that fit properly. Let the staff show you how to use the buckle or lacing system. Once you have a good fit, bring your boots and rental form over to the ski counter to pick up a pair of skis and poles or to the snowboard counter to pick up a board. The technicians will adjust the ski and board bindings according to the information on your form and may ask you a few questions to help them get it just right. Staff will also help skiers choose the pole length that allows the elbow to rest at a right angle when the skier is gripping the pole. continued on page 12

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STEP SIX: TAKE THE LESSON After stowing your street boots in a locker along with any other items you don’t need to take along, head outside to the meetup area. This is usually located near the beginner terrain, often identified with green circles on the trail map key. Instructors will greet you and ask you some questions like “Have you ever skied before?” or “When was the last time you tried snowboarding?” These questions help instructors determine your level of ability so they can place you in the right group or tailor a private lesson. Then it’s off you go— your instructor will take it from there and guide you through your lesson.

x e

UNTIL OUR NEXT ADVENTURE!

STEP SEVEN: ENJOY APRÈS When the lesson is over, it’s time to say goodbye to new friends and thank your instructor. It’s customary to tip an attentive instructor at the end of the lesson. If you have the energy to keep going, there is usually some time remaining to take another run and practice what you learned before the lifts close. When you are done skiing and riding for the day, return your boots along with the rest of your rental gear. Be sure to get a drink of water and some snacks to rehydrate and refuel. Après-ski (app-ray ski), French for “after skiing,” refers to the time you spend reconnecting with friends and family to share stories and photos from your experience. Many resorts have fun activities and entertainment after the lifts close for the day, such as live music and games that you can enjoy while toasting a great day on the snow with beverages. Try a hot chocolate, a hot toddy or a Long Trail Ale.

Even though skiing and snowboarding are individual sports, the resort atmosphere is a social one. Bringing a friend to the slopes is the perfect way to share your passion for winter sports and to ensure that you’ ll have people to ski and ride with as they progress. Bring a Friend lets you share the love of skiing and snowboarding with others by helping them sign up for lessons from the pros. For even more incentives, check out the Bring a Friend campaign, which rewards skiers and snowboarders nationwide for introducing friends to their favorite sport or trying a new sport themselves by taking professional lessons.

VERMONT BRING A FRIEND CHALLENGE

Sign up for lessons at a resort in Vermont and you can win a Ski & Stay package for two. Just tag your photos with #BringAFriendVT on Instagram, Twitter or Facebook and show us how much fun you had learning with your friends. Ski Vermont will choose one winner at the end of the season for a trip to a Vermont resort the following season.

BRING A FRIEND DEALS

Vermont resorts offer deals like discounted or free lift tickets and food when you bring a friend to try skiing or snowboarding. Find the details at skivermont.com/BAF. Some restrictions apply.

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TO

SKI & SNOWBOARD

Serving the Deerfield Valley & Southern Vermont

LEARN TO TURN AT VERMONT RESORTS

There is no better place to experience the thrill of learning to ski or snowboard than in winter’s original state. Here in Vermont, we have some of the best instructors in the world, and plenty of beginner terrain for those just starting out or trying a new sport for the first time.

$49

BEGINNER PACKAGES Lesson, Equipment & Lift Ticket

3

BEGINNER LESSONS

$129

BRING BR

IN G

A FRIEND

A F RIE N D.O

RG

BUT WAIT, THERE’S STILL

MORE

January is Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month nationwide, and Vermont resorts are once again offering a great deal for beginners. FOR JUST $49 DURING THE MONTH OF JANUARY, BEGINNER PACKAGES INCLUDE A LESSON WITH A PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTOR, EQUIPMENT RENTAL AND A LIFT TICKET TO ACCESS BEGINNER TERRAIN. This offer is valid for first-time skiers and snowboarders during non-holiday periods in the month of January 2016. Because of the deeply discounted price, we will offer only one beginner package per person. Lessons must be booked at least 48 hours in advance. For an even better deal and more days on the snow, try Ski Vermont’s Take Three program. TAKE THREE BEGINNER SKI OR SNOWBOARD LESSONS, WITH LIFT ACCESS AND RENTALS INCLUDED, FOR ONLY $129. The three lessons can be redeemed at one, two or three different participating resorts, so you can opt to stick to familiar territory or explore several mountains this season. Lessons are available all season except holidays, are for beginners only, are non-transferable and must be reserved in advance. Do you ski or ride but your buddies haven’t tried it yet? Bring a Friend to the mountain. INTRODUCE YOUR FRIENDS OR FAMILY TO YOUR FAVORITE SNOWY SLOPE THIS SEASON AND YOU COULD BE REWARDED FOR SHARING YOUR LOVE OF SNOW. Post a photo of yourself or your friends learning to love a new sport on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter and tag it #BRINGAFRIENDVT to be entered to win a two-night ski-and-stay package for two for the 2016–17 season. If there is a future powder hound lurking in your midst, Ski Vermont has you covered. Visit SkiVermont.com/learn for more information on all of our Learn to Turn programs and a list of participating resorts.

The Largest Selection of Single Family Homes, Townhomes, Commercial Properties & Parcels of Land

183 Route 100, West Dover, VT 05356 Office: 802-464-3055 Fax: 802-464-2069, Info@HermitageDVRE.com HermitageDVRE.com

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FRESH TRACKS

r e d i s in

3

GEAR e d i gu

4

1

1 THE EXPERIENCE 88 AND TEMPTATION 88 BY ROSSIGNOL

It’s racing DNA meets freeride. Precision and power meet effortless float. It’s everything you need for the ultimate one-ski quiver. The award-winning Experience 88 and Temptation 88 for women now feature Rossignol’s revolutionary Air Tip technology, delivering an elevated all-mountain experience across all terrain and snow conditions. Auto Turn Rocker, our most versatile rocker/camber blend, provides powerful edge grip with effortless maneuverability and speed control while Rossignol’s patented, lightweight Air Tip technology enhances flotation and control even further, keeping tips afloat through variable snow while providing instant turn initiation on hard pack and groomers. The entire mountain awaits—Experience More. www.rossignol.com

2 THE BURTON CUSTOM SERIES Often imitated, never outdone and backed by a 20-year legacy as snowboarding’s one-board answer to all terrain. Since the company’s humble beginnings, 14

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innovation has defined the Burton Custom series and set it apart as the most popular, versatile, and mimicked board in snowboarding. Today, the one-board answer to all terrain celebrates its 20-year reign with a proven formula that combines time-honored design and envelope-pushing ingredients for a lightweight, poppy, and stable board. The Burton Custom board is offered in two versions: The precision and stability of camber is the top choice for pros like Mikkel Bang, while Flying V™ combines camber’s power with the relaxed float of rocker for the best of both worlds. www.burton.com

3 THE M3—

BODE MERRILL PRO MODEL BY ANON. OPTICS The M3 Merrill Pro Model combines 18 rare earth magnets at nine points of connection, creating a seamless and secure lens-to-frame seal with unsurpassed retention. The M3 also features anon.’s proprietary MFI technology, which is the perfect solution for protecting your face from the elements while keeping your goggles fog-free. www.anonoptics.com

4 THE HELO 2.0 HELMET BY ANON.

The Helo 2.0 provides ultimate protection with a sleek, lighter-than-air feel. Delivering the best in customizable helmet fit, anon. continues to collaborate with industry leader Boa® to create fit systems that allow for easy, on-the-fly micro-adjustments with just a turn of the dial. www.anonoptics.com

5 THE RONDANE SWEATER BY DALE OF NORWAY

Dale of Norway, providing Norwegian quality since 1879, offers premium knitwear in authentic, contemporary and technical styles for fashion and sport. Dale of Norway is no stranger to the ski slopes, having designed the official sweater for every Winter Olympics and World Championship since the 1956 Cortina Winter Games. The Rondane Sweater, made with a 100 percent skin-soft superfine merino, features a pattern that was inspired by the St. Moritz Championship sweater. The 1/4-zip Rondane Sweater is available in men’s and women’s sizes and colors and can easily be worn as a first or second layer. For a unique outerwear look, the Glittertind Sweater is 100


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2

8

5

7

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percent Norwegian wool that is water repellent, resists stains and dirt, and is designed with a breathable windproof liner. This 1/4-zip sweater features soft merino cuffs and a sporty design inspired by traditional Norwegian patterns; it’s available in men’s and women’s sizes and colors. All of Dale of Norway’s styles are easily coordinated, along with matching accessories, resulting in a stunning look on and off the trail. www.daleofnorway.com

function is the top-line summary of the Burton Tinder Pack. Digging a bit deeper, this everyday pack features a separate padded laptop compartment and an easy drawstring closure that speeds the task of packing up at work, class or the coffee shop. Faux leather detailing and dressed-up fabrics elevate its appearance over that of ordinary backpacks. www.burton.com

BY BURTON DURABLE GOODS Burton is much more than a company; it’s an attitude, a mind-set and a culture. With over 35 years of experience building the best products in the world, we’re committed to quality, craftsmanship and progress, all built on an unapologetic commitment to having fun. Our Burton Durable Goods Bags collection brings it all together. The next time you hit the road or trail with a Burton bag, pack it with confidence—knowing that all Burton bags are backed by a LIFETIME WARRANTY. Vintage rucksack styling plus minimalist tech

8 THE SOCKS

BY DARN TOUGH

7 THE TOUR 6 THE TINDER PACK

in Vermont Collection by Skida and are the perfect finishing touch for any skier. The folks at Skida Headwear & Accessories believe in local production, limited-edition products and a fresh perspective. www.shopskida.com

BY SKIDA HEADWEAR The Tour is the latest addition to the Made in Vermont Collection by Skida Headwear & Accessories. The Tour is designed using an ultra-soft, breathable and moisture-wicking fabric that is cozy on the inside and bold on the outside. A perfect accessory for any outdoor outing, whether worn skiing or practicing yoga, the Tour is available in an assortment of fun prints for him and her. Skida, known for its colorful, limited-edition prints, also offers new patterns in the fleece-lined, wicking Alpine Hat. The Alpine Hat comes in prints for him, her and the kids and is ideal for any winter outing where performance is a must. Hats, lined and unlined; neck warmers; headbands; and more make up the Made

Three generations’ worth of craftsmanship goes into every pair of socks we knit, and every pair is produced in our Northfield, Vt., mill. We ski, snowboard, hike, bike and run in the most unforgiving climate in the lower 48, making our backyard the perfect proving ground to develop and test the finest premium all-weather performance socks available on the market today. If our socks aren’t the most comfortable, most durable and best-fitting socks you’ve ever worn, return them for another pair. No strings attached. For life. www.darntough.com

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Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

i k S

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― i nsk y z us Op e l Ky By

I HAVE BEEN SKIING SINCE I WAS 2 YEARS OLD. WHEN

I TELL PEOPLE THAT I HAVE SPENT SO MANY YEARS ON

SNOW, THEY ASSUME THAT I CAN CONFIDENTLY CONQUER THE MOUNTAIN. IN REALITY, I’VE BEEN STRUGGLING

TO TAKE MY SKIING TO THE NEXT LEVEL AND WISHING I COULD REALLY FEEL CONFIDENT SKIING BLACK

DIAMONDS AND DOUBLE BLACKS. FOR YEARS, I HAD BEEN SURROUNDED BY EXPERT AND PROFESSIONAL SKIERS, TRYING TO KEEP UP BY WATCHING THEIR TECHNIQUE, BUT I STILL FELT FRUSTRATED. I KNEW I WAS WORKING TOO HARD, FIGHTING THE MOUNTAIN. I KNEW THERE HAD TO BE A BETTER WAY. So last year I did something I’d never done before: I took a lesson. In 30 years, I had never even considered doing so, but I was expending way too much energy slogging through the bumps and the trees. I needed a new approach to the 16

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mountain. So I signed up for four clinics designed specifically for, or by, women, with the goal of gaining confidence in the trees and on moguls. It wasn’t always pretty, and I may have shed a tear or two in frustration, but the results will stick with me for a lifetime. MAD RIVER GLEN, MARCH 7 Mad River Glen offers three women’s clinics per year, in January, February and March. I chose the clinic in March, just in time for spring skiing and bumps. Like a kid on the first day of school, I pulled up to Mad River about an hour before my lesson because I didn’t really know where to go or what was involved. I went to the ski school desk and found a friend of mine greeting me with a smile. She got me set up and told me all the women would be meeting in an hour. I had time for a run, so I rode up the double, too intimidated by Mad River’s famous single chair. I happened to ride up with a fellow student of the women’s clinics. She told me she had done the clinic many times before, enjoyed the camaraderie of the women and felt the clinic had done a lot for her skiing. We met with the rest of the group and went around the room introducing ourselves. Most of the women wanted to improve their skills in the bumps and trees. “I’m here because my husband signed me up for it,” proclaimed one of the women, and a knowing laugh reverberated through the group.

Between coaches and students, about 25 all talked for a bit, and then she said, of us convened atop a groomed slope. The “Let’s go have some fun!” coaches waited about five turns down the hill and we had what I would later We started with a jaunt through some learn was called a “ski off.” Basically the open trees, then alternated among coaches watched us take a few turns and trees, bumps and groomers. Barbour then pointed us to the appropriate group. encouraged us to use our vision to I wound up in a group coached by Tange improve our skiing. “When you look at Barbour, with her pink pants, blond hair the trail in front of you and you have a and kind smile. The ski-off process was plan, it’s easier to execute that plan rather easier than I had expected, and I was than making it up as you go,” she said. astounded at how the coaches could watch us turn just a few times to assess our level We also learned a skill called schmearing. of skiing. Barbour greeted the group, we “Imagine that you are using your skis

Mad River Glen’s slogan (and famous bumper sticker) is “Ski it if you can,” and those on the mountain pride themselves on meeting the challenge. A lack of snowmaking and grooming is just part of the deal. Mad River skiers (sorry, no snowboarders) are proud of their mountain, and know how to rip. Many of the women in my group married Mad River diehards and are raising their kids as such. They wanted the clinic to help them keep up with their families, instead of holding anyone back. The coaches took note of what everyone was looking to improve, and then we got started. SkiVermont.com

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to schmear soft peanut butter on warm toast,” she suggested, which made sense when you thought about it more. The technique helps you slow down gracefully rather than throwing your weight back and freezing up. The same skills came in handy while in the bumps and trees—looking ahead to see where you want to turn makes it easier to carry out your plan, and also control your speed with schmearing. The new skills worked well on the groomers, but when I got into the bumps or trees, I fell apart. I had never thought about body position, ski alignment, hand position, or any of the other techniques. I had just skied. But the lack of those more calculated skills was exactly what had been holding me back. My frustration was mounting through the day because my body wasn’t doing what I wanted it to do. The struggle between my mind and body came from internal pressure to perfect the techniques. But thankfully, Barbour reminded us all that we had come to have fun and enjoy what the mountain had to offer. 18

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Her playful spirit definitely lightened the mood and made me relax. Embracing her Zen feeling of letting go helped me flow down the mountain. Overall, the clinic helped me gain confidence and got me thinking about how I approached the mountain. I was prepped for my clinic at Sugarbush the following week. SUGARBUSH RESORT, MARCH 9–11 Sugarbush Resort’s three-day clinic offered more time than Mad River’s one-day clinic to get to know everyone and allowed for more free skiing time with the group. Since the clinic was midweek, there were fewer working moms than at Mad River, and some women had flown in from nearby cities to take the lessons. Having been a Sugarbush season pass holder for a decade, I felt that I knew the mountain well. But our instructor, M.A. Raymond, not only showed me new skills, but showed me parts of the woods that I’d never seen. We were asked to self-assess our skill level, and that divided us into two groups. One group of skiers spent most of their time on groomed terrain while the other hit the moguls and glades. From there, the two groups free skied with instructors and then (CONTINUED on PAGE 20) were divided yet again by skill level.


sugarbush.com

800.53.SUGAR

#SBCommuniTy

Community is Better at Sugarbush There’s something more to the Sugarbush experience than the legendary terrain variety, the meticulous snowmaking and grooming, the fabled history, and the authentic Vermont mountain setting. Come discover what makes Sugarbush different.


(CONTINUED from PAGE 18)

Raymond frequently took time to pause, giving us something to work on for each piece of the trail. She said, “I want you to repeat these three words in your head as you go down the hill: ‘Flowing. Graceful. Smooth.’ ” On our first tree run, she asked us to “imagine you have baby birds in your hands (rather than poles). Make sure those birds are alive at the end of the run.” No actual birds were harmed, but it did make us conscious of how tightly we gripped our poles.

Raymond’s pep talk at the top of Ripcord had one clear message: Slow down. “I’m sorry ladies,” she said, “but none of you are going to the World Cup. It’s easy to go fast down this trail, so let’s go slow. I want you to make four turns before you get to that first bump.” Nervous laughter rolled through the group, but everyone was up for the challenge. The timing of our turns was reminiscent of an earlier drill on a groomer, the slow cadence from side to side getting us down the hill gracefully and smoothly.

“Don’t fight the mountain: It has been here a long time and will not fall to your attack.” Although the trees and woods were in pristine condition, Raymond also made sure to introduce us to steeper, more challenging conditions. As you ride up the Heaven’s Gate lift, the double-blackdiamond trail Ripcord plummets steeply below you. It’s a run where the fear factor can kick in for many people, making them slide sideways to the next mogul, leaving slick spots between the mounds of soft snow.

I didn’t realize it until later, but Raymond’s knowledge of the mountain allowed us to experience the diverse terrain at optimal conditions. We skied in the woods in the colder temps, and when it warmed up we headed to Castlerock, home to some of the most challenging terrain in Vermont. It also has a double for a lift, which leaves plenty of time for conversation. “When we all get off at the peak,” Raymond

commanded, “I want you to tell me something about your partner that not a lot of people know.” So I learned that my co-rider had been a professional ballerina, and she learned that I speak fluent Spanish. Our group camaraderie turned into a great support system on Castlerock. Some women needed more courage as they navigated the steep bumps, and we cheered each other on and whooped and hollered as we made our way down the trail. Raymond complimented us on our support of one another, particularly when one woman was struggling. We encouraged her, and Raymond did the same for us. When we had a run that was ugly, she made sure we ended on a high note of encouragement. This atmosphere demonstrated why I chose to take a women’s clinic. The women truly supported one another, and that gave us all more confidence. Throughout the three days, Raymond had paused to film us skiing, recording her observations while we navigated the trail. Later, she would send us those videos so we all could analyze our turns. The clips helped me see what my body position looked like and how I could improve. As we said our goodbyes on the final afternoon, Raymond handed us each an envelope filled with thoughts and quotes to remind us of what skiing was all about. My favorite: “Don’t fight the mountain: It has been here a long time and will not fall to your attack. Flow with it.”

Sleepover at Our House boltonvalley.com 20

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All lodging is just steps away from the lifts.

DONNA WEINBRECHT CLINIC, KILLINGTON RESORT, MARCH 21–22 Donna Weinbrecht paved the way for women’s freestyle skiing. She took home Olympic gold in Albertville, France, in 1992, when women’s freestyle moguls first became an event. Weinbrecht honed her skills at Killington Resort, and now hosts an annual clinic for aspiring bump skiers. She teams up with Killington’s ski school to provide coaching to those


looking to get to the next level. Weinbrecht originally started the clinic just for women, but has since expanded to coed classes owing to demand. In my experience, having a coed group and a male coach changed the dynamic of the clinic— there was little to no talk about protecting baby birds. As at Sugarbush, the group was divided into subgroups by selfassessment, and true to Killington’s reputation for après-ski, we did the assessment over cocktails the night before the clinic. I introduced myself to John Lamb, and he told me that I should be in his group according to how I had assessed myself. Our group was more diverse than those at my other clinics. There were younger and older folks, men and women, but in my subgroup we skied with similar ability and goals. Fresh off the two other clinics, I had already been practicing my new

ys

• Go wit h the flo w of the don’t fig mounta ht it in, • Slow d own an d enjoy

your tu r ns • Keep y our weig ht forwa it gives rd; you mo re contr ol • Singin g while you ski rhythm gives yo in your u t u r ns • Don’t b e so h a r d on yo it won’t urself, all chan ge imme diately • Take t ime to p ractice s kills on your ow • When n you tak e a class perk of , enjoy t going to he adde the fron d t of the lift line

Courtesy of Justin Cash

(CONTINUED on PAGE 23)

Top Ta k ea wa

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22

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I followed him through the woods. We were in the Burton Stash where there are natural features built as a park, but we were just playing around on the bumps. It did feel like dancing. Following him closely allowed him to choose the line for me, and I got into the groove of the bumps. (CONTINUED from PAGE 21)

techniques. Lamb taught me that schmearing was also called making short-radius turns. We practiced drills on the groomers and then went into the woods or on the bumps afterward. “Move over your skis to turn with ease and avoid the trees,” Lamb repeated poetically to the group. I kept his advice in my head at all times, my eyes glued to his skis as I tried to mimic his movements. I noticed he constantly moved over his skis and turned with ease. At first it was lost in translation on my body, but I finally did feel it click with repetition. One special treat of taking the Killington clinic is that you actually get to spend time with Donna Weinbrecht. When she was young, her family moved up from New Jersey so Weinbrecht and her sister could improve their skiing. Because mogul skiing was so novel at the time, she was totally selftaught. Now, she has the special skill of being able to pass along her wisdom to others. We worked on a pole drill with her, swinging our poles in tempo on the groomers and then in the bumps. It was a huge boost of confidence to take a run and have one of the world’s best shout, “Nice work, Kyle!” What a rush. At one point during the weekend, however, I was feeling so frustrated with myself that I was nearly in tears. Grunting, yelling and hitting the hard-pack snow were getting me nowhere. My body wasn’t doing what my mind told it to do. Lamb saw my frustration and said, “Come dance with me,” so

At the wrap-up party at the end of the clinic, Lamb’s advice to me was to not be so hard on myself. My technique will not be perfect right away. He told me that I was a level eight out of 10, and I had the potential to improve, but needed to be more patient with myself. To avoid this frustration, I remind myself of my yoga training, which helps me be present in the moment. SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT, APRIL 6 At Smugglers’ Notch Resort, I took a clinic with Julie Silverman, who heads up women’s programming. Her business card shows her middle name as “Woo Hoo,” and she lives up to it. Silverman hosts clinics at Smugglers’ Notch every Wednesday and Saturday. As at the other clinics, Silverman and I got lost in conversation as we rode the lift together, and during each run we worked on techniques on the groomers, then practiced in the trees and bumps. Smugglers’ Notch prides itself on its children’s programming, and many of the women who take Silverman’s clinics drop off their kids and then enjoy the mountain with a group of women who have a variety of skill levels in different disciplines. Because these women spend week after week with the same group, they get to know one another very well, and can share encouragement and lightheartedness with those who need it. As moms, they feel a lot of pressure to not get injured. It’s difficult for a family to function if the mom / storyteller / housekeeper / chauffeur / chef / disciplinarian has a broken (CONTINUED on PAGE 25) SkiVermont.com

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Epic Genuine Unforgettable

Photo credit: ŠBrian Mohr/EmberPhoto

madriverglen.com


(CONTINUED from PAGE 23)

leg. Silverman and her team of coaches give women more confidence in their skiing and riding so the fear of injuring themselves diminishes as they learn to enjoy their day on the hill with a fun group of ladies.

Women’s Clinics KILLINGTON RESORT Women’s Camp January 23–24, 2016 February 20–21, 2016

Courtesy of Justin Cash

Mogul Camp with Donna Weinbrecht March 19–20, 2016

Silverman and I worked on skills similar to those covered at the other clinics, but with new drills and techniques. Under the lift line, she had me practicing getting my uphill ski to lead the turn, which was the opposite of what my body wanted to do. When the uphill ski initiates the turn, it creates a smoother transition to the next turn. The first few tries left me frustrated as I slowly made my way down the slight incline. Later, on the steeper terrain, I could feel what she was trying to get me to practice, and I felt myself moving over my skis to turn with ease. Taking the clinics has changed some women’s lives. Smuggs skier Anjie Watson says, “Julie [Silverman] has created an amazing pro women’s ski environment. Every Saturday I drive to the mountain with a smile on my face knowing I will be treated like a queen for the day. My day will be filled with laughter, camaraderie, great food and drinks, and on top of that I will have a fun-filled lesson.” Looking back at the four lessons, each taught me how to improve my skiing, but each coach had a different way of explaining the techniques and the drills to practice them. They left me with a fully stocked toolbox to confidently approach more challenging terrain than I did before I started the lessons. I also now understand what my form should look and feel like, and I am able to make adjustments. On a bright sunny day in April, I skied for the afternoon with my friend Phil. He noticed that my confidence had improved as well as my skills. “You would have never even tried that trail before, and you rocked it!” he commented. I was graceful, flowing and smooth, navigating the challenging terrain with ease. ❄

MAD RIVER GLEN January 2, 2016 February 6, 2016 March 5, 2016

OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT Women’s Alpine Adventures January 25–29, 2016 February 3–5, 2016 February 25–26, 2016 February 28–29, 2016 March 10–11, 2016

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday, all season

STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT Women on Snow for Skiers December 11–13, 2015 January 24–26, 2016 February 5–7, 2016 March 13–15, 2016 Girls’ Time Out for Snowboarders (offered in conjunction with Burton) December 11–13, 2015 January 29–31, 2016 March 11–13, 2016

SUGARBUSH RESORT Women’s Discovery Camps January 29–31, 2016 March 7–9, 2016

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winter makers. The Longest Season in the East is made, not born.

#beastwinter

Buy one get one free lift ticket, 24-hour advanced registration required at killington.com/skivt Offer valid through 12/13/15


CHILDREN OF

WINTER Native Vermonters are the core of the best women’s cross-country ski team in U.S. history. By Peter Oliver

The final stage of cross-country skiing’s annual Tour de Ski is a notorious brute, a Sisyphean uphill slog in Val di Fiemme, Italy. Climbing an intermediate downhill ski slope with sustained pitches of as much as 28 percent, the best cross-country racers in the world are so physically taxed that they look like awkward, bumbling plodders. Their heads hang, their movements are labored and stiff, and their hearts create a tympanic drumbeat in their ears, pounding at a rate exceeding 180 beats per minute. They are barely able to put one foot in front of the other. SkiVermont.com

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Photos left to right: Liz Stephen, Ida Sargent, and Sophie Caldwell. Courtesy of U.S. Ski Team.

It is a race so hard that some competitors simply give up, as Poland’s Justyna Kowalczyk, a 2014 Olympic gold medalist, did last year. But last January, there was the diminutive American Liz Stephen, flying gracefully up the mountainside as if carried by angels’ wings. She finished fourth, just two seconds behind Marit Bjoergen, the brilliant Nordic skier who is indisputably best in the world. Stephen ended up fifth overall in the seven-stage tour. It would have been unthinkable to consider a U.S. skier in the same caliber as Bjoergen or Kowalczyk a decade ago, when any hope of seeing an American in the top 30 was futile. The destiny of U.S. women seemed to lag behind that of the Norwegians, the Swedes, the Finns, the Russians, the Germans, the Italians, the Czechs and others from countries with deep cross-country traditions. But that has changed in large part due to skiers, led by Stephen, with vital connections to Vermont. U.S. women 28

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are now winning World Cup races, winning World Championship medals, and contending for podium positions and top-10 finishes in virtually every race they enter. And the fabric of the U.S. women’s cross-country team is woven with Vermont threads. Of the six members of the U.S. Cross Country women’s A team, three are Vermonters. Along with the 28-year-old Stephen, an East Montpelier native, there is Sophie Caldwell, a 25-year-old from the village of Peru, and 27-year-old Ida Sargent from Barton. In March, Jessie Diggins and Caitlin Gregg made history by winning the first two World Championship medals ever won by U.S. women. They, too, have some Vermont in their blood. Diggins, a native Minnesotan, honed her talents as a student at the Stratton Mountain School, and Gregg, who now lives in Minneapolis, grew up skiing in the Mad River Valley. Even Matt Whitcomb, the U.S. women’s head coach,

has strong Vermont ties. Whitcomb, a Massachusetts native, now lives in northern Vermont and spent four years as a coach at Burke Mountain Academy before joining the national team. But it is Caldwell, Sargent and Stephen who carry the banner as native Vermonters. And although they are all Vermonters, their stories, their ascents into the elite level of their sport, are very different. Caldwell, from southern Vermont, has arrived at the top of her sport almost as a matter of genetic destiny. The Caldwell family has been producing Olympians and world-class coaches and ski technicians for three generations. Sophie’s father, Sverre, is currently the Nordic program director at the Stratton Mountain School, with perhaps the best scholastic Nordic program in the country. Sargent’s entry into cross-country skiing, not long after she learned to walk, was a product of pure playfulness, just a little


girl being a little girl. Skiing was, she says, “mostly a social thing.” Her friends were skiing in the Bill Koch League (BKL) at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, and she wanted to hang with them. She first began competing as a 5-year-old in the BKL’s Lollipop division.

Sophie Caldwell and Ida Sargent

VSAA Winter Ad FINAL 2015.qxp_Layout 1 8/14/15 10:30 AM Page 1

Stephen came to the sport almost accidentally, a teenage latecomer. She entered Burke Mountain Academy as a 14-year-old Alpine racer, with little experience in cross-country skiing. But weighing in at barely over 100 pounds, she was deemed to lack the substantial muscle mass that is usually a physical attribute of the world’s best downhill competitors. With the support of Whitcomb, Burke’s Nordic coach at the time, a new seed was planted, and it blossomed with astonishing speed. Stephen arrived at the World Cup level just a few years later, in 2007, only 20 years old. Different stories, perhaps, but a common character thread of being a proud Vermonter runs throughout. “There is definitely some pride among Vermonters,” Caldwell says. “This is where we come from.” One senses that “coming from Vermont” means much more than geography to her. Something about where they come from seems to breed the kind of strength, resiliency and tenacity that are at the core identity of a world-class crosscountry skier. “Vermonters are tougher,” Sargent declares with emphasis, and Stephen echoes that sentiment. “Vermonters have a little tougher skin. We are the type of people with that pure desire to really work hard.” (CONTINUED on PAGE 31)

80th Anniversary Celebration! Suicide Six opened to the public in 1936 with its first rope tow on Hill No. 6. Installed by Wallace “Bunny” Bertram, he joked that to ski down the steep pitch of Hill No. 6 would be Suicide, and in jest, the name stuck. Today we are one of Vermont’s most family friendly ski resorts with terrain that suits every ability. The Woodstock Inn & Resort welcomes you to celebrate our 80th Anniversary with amazing skiing & snowboarding, as well as cross country skiing & snowshoeing on over 50km of trails. Plan your Vermont get away today! 866.615.5678 | www.woodstockinn.com | Woodstock, Vermont SkiVermont.com

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BE AMONG THE FIRST TO RIDE THE NEW GONDOLA CABINS LAUNCHING NOVEMBER 2014.

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(CONTINUED from PAGE 29)

Caldwell embodies it; last year, she competed despite having broken both elbows in separate off-season incidents.

Whether cross-country skiing, Alpine skiing or both, most Vermont kids are children of winter, almost umbilically connected to snow.

Top photo: Liz Stephen | Bottom photo: Ida Sargent

The three tell similar stories about their childhood; no matter how cold or foul the winter weather, they went outside. Caldwell compares the Vermont culture to Scandinavia: “It is different from [almost] everywhere else. After school, you put on your skis.” Getting outside was a cultural imperative. Whether cross-

country skiing, Alpine skiing or both, most Vermont kids are children of winter, almost umbilically connected to snow. “I don’t think any of us grew up with a TV,” says Stephen, no doubt exaggerating, but the point is made. “I was sledding, I was snowshoeing and I was building forts. Snow was our thing.” Of course, if you are to become a world-class cross-country skier, it helps to hail from a state where “our thing” is abundant. Six of Vermont’s crosscountry areas have snowmaking, and the remaining ones are dependent on Mother Nature’s generosity. She can be fickle, but for the most part there is plenty of snow for the Stephens, Sargents and Caldwells of the world to log the necessary time for training and technical improvement. So, just how good are these women? The Norwegian women are an indomitable force, holding the top six positions in the World Cup ranking, and the Germans and the Swedes are next in the pecking order. But after that it gets interesting, with the Americans, Finns and Russians competing for the next few spots. Stephen, who focuses mainly on distance events, finished last year 10th in the overall World Cup standings, and she will be named by the U.S. Ski Association as the top cross-country skier in the country this spring. Some call her the best climber in the world, and although that distinction officially goes to Norway’s Therese Johaug, Stephen is close. If every World Cup course were like Val di Fiemme, she’d be on the podium nearly every race. Sargent, with 14 top-10 World Cup finishes to her credit, and Caldwell, with 10 top-10s, are sprint specialists who rank somewhat lower in the overall standings. Caldwell,

who has ranked as high as 10th in the world sprint standings, earned a sixthplace finish in the 2014 Olympic sprint, the best Olympic cross-country result ever by a U.S. woman. Now in their mid- to late 20s, the prime of their athletic lives, they should all get better. Caldwell, for example, is fully recovered from her injuries, and Stephen, a superb skater, has made steady improvement in her classic technique, which has been her weakness. Although Vermonters and a Vermont theme might be the predominant story of the U.S. women’s team, it was an Alaskan, not a Vermonter, who spearheaded the recent leap by American women into the top ranks of the sport. In 2007, Kikkan Randall began winning World Cup races, an unthinkable feat for the generations that preceded her. She went on to win the crystal globe awarded to the world’s best sprinter three years in a row, from 2012 to 2014. Not only did the Anchorage native bring winning to the U.S. team, she brought a winning attitude. According to Stephen, Randall looked at the rest of the world’s top skiers with the mind-set of “I’m no different than you. I can do this.” That self-confidence was infectious, especially on a team that is unusually close; these women aren’t just teammates, they are good friends. “I don’t want to do this for myself,” says Stephen. “The reason I am still skiing is that it is just going out to ski with my friends. They want to help you get better, help you get through a crappy day.” In that kind of a team atmosphere, the success of one skier inevitably provides a contact high for others. It is a powerful and essential (CONTINUED on PAGE 34) SkiVermont.com

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(CONTINUED from PAGE 31)

dynamic for a group of women who spend virtually every minute of the four-month World Cup season in one another’s company—in hotels, on car rides, during meals, on race courses and just being together during time off. Thousands of miles from home, they find empowerment in a team ethos, but the native Vermonters never lose a soulful, familial connection with their home state. Caldwell, Sargent and Stephen all talk of the iconic Vermont things they miss when away from home—the smell of sap boiling during sugaring season, the congeniality of general stores and a powerful sense of community. Sargent used to travel on the World Cup circuit with a bit of maple syrup—a kind of touchstone to connect with her home spirit—although she

discontinued the practice after a syrup container burst inside her luggage (imagine that mess). Put simply, these skiers might leave Vermont, but Vermont never leaves them. As three of the best athletes in their sport, Stephen, Caldwell and Sargent are now national figures and leading lights in the world of skiing. Their time spent at home in Vermont has dwindled, giving way to time spent far and wide—to training time in Utah and other points West; to the many months on the World Cup circuit; to fundraising, coaching, speaking engagements, kids’ clinics, and other duties that go with being national team members. But their identity remains grounded in a Vermont upbringing and in Vermont values. They are pure Vermonters, children of winter. ❄

Vermonters have a little tougher skin. We are the type of people with that pure desire to really work hard. Photo: Ida Sargent. Courtesy of U.S. Ski Team.

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ANOTHERBESTDAY


by Mike Hannigan

We’re pretty lucky. It’s not every sport that ends with a trip to the bar. So while the runners and the tennis players and the spinning class attendees and the yoga folks are heading for the showers, skiers and riders are sitting down in front of a friendly bartender. With all due respect to golf’s 19th hole, is there any other sport so closely tied to the bar as skiing and snowboarding? Are we all just a bunch of lushes using skiing as a convenient excuse to get together? A bunch of drinkers with a skiing problem? Frankly, it isn’t a question I’d ever given much thought to before now. It’s a bit like asking “Why is oxygen so breathable?” SkiVermont.com

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SkiVermont.com

Courtesy of Justin Cash


It’s not like we need a release from stress. Spend a great day skiing and riding in Vermont with friends, and you’ve probably got a pretty good grin on your face. When you live here, or when you have the good fortune to visit often, you can see why you’d want to stretch out the perfect winter day. Sure, the lifts might close around 4:00 p.m. and the sun eventually sets, but that doesn’t mean you have to shut it down. Yes, we skiers and riders demand even more fun after our fun. If the mountain is the party, the bar is the after-party. Pub, tavern, saloon, club, speakeasy, taproom, alehouse, lounge, watering hole, dive. The après-ski bar is not merely an accessory, I would argue. It’s a vital element. It’s where plans get made. Where friendships are renewed and confirmed. It’s a spot where someone might summon up a little extra liquid courage and introduce him- or herself to that attractive stranger across the bar, possibly setting in motion a lifetime together. As they say in New Orleans, laissez les bons temps rouler. Let the good times roll, my friends.

pretzels appetizer before me on the bar, but Prohibition Pig is no slouch as a replacement. The Hyde Away in Waitsfield exudes a warmth and generosity that makes everyone feel like a local. And up the hill a ways, General Stark’s Pub at Mad River Glen might be the best of them all, a quintessential ski bar in every way, complete with a mug with my name on it. In search of answers, I talked to the pros. Sue Mowrer Adamson is a resident barkeep at American Flatbread in Burlington and the namesake of Zero Gravity Brewing’s “A Beer Named Sue.” Her take: “For a perfect après bar, I want something that lends itself to meeting others. ‘What did you ski today? Where are you from? Et cetera.’ A wide-open bar, not too many seats— around 12, but with tables close by for sociable eavesdropping. A fireplace, long tables and cozy/couch seating, with a dartboard, maybe bar shuffleboard and, ideally, a pool table.” Shawn Fuschetto, whom you can find behind the bar at Sugarbush’s Castlerock Pub, is downright deliberative when asked about the essential elements of a great après-ski bar.

There is no simple answer to what makes a great après-ski bar, or bartender, or drink. It’s so subjective.

The bar is where we gather. Where we nurse our wounded bodies and/or egos. It is skiing and snowboarding’s town hall.

When I think about après-ski bars around Vermont, it’s easy to tick off favorites. The Matterhorn in Stowe always feels like there’s a party about to break out. The Belfry on the road to Jay is a welcome, random stop with great wings. The Tower Bar at Jay Peak throws down mean poutine along with its drinks, including a bacon-infused bourbon. I’ve sat at a barstool at the Red Fox near Stratton more times than I can count. The Killington Access Road has countless options, but I always seem to wind up at McGrath’s Irish Pub down at the Inn at Long Trail. I still miss the old Alchemist in Waterbury, a pint of Donovan’s Red and the beer-cheese-and-

Courtesy of Justin Cash

There is no simple answer to what makes a great après-ski bar, or bartender, or drink. It’s so subjective.

“Mountain views?” Fuschetto asks rhetorically. “Nah, the old bar at Jay Peak was in a basement, and that place was a classic. A nano-brew draft selection? That’s great, but honestly, so long as the beer is cold, it’s all good. Sitting at the Glen House with the one draft option on a spring day never drew a complaint from me. Salty locals? Smiling bartenders? Hot servers? That’s all secondary to what the folks who were playing on the mountain bring to the scene, unwinding after a terrific SkiVermont.com

39


day. That is absolutely my favorite thing about every après bar I’ve ever spent time in: Friends, new and old, telling stories with big smiles.”

excited about drinking when they come here.” Seeking guidance, I asked folks from three of Vermont’s best for their take on what makes a great drink when you come off the hill.

Once you’ve found barstools for yourself and your crew, the more important question becomes what to drink. Do you go with a fancy mixed cocktail? A glass of whiskey—neat—that’ll warm your gullet and loosen your mind? Perhaps something delivered in a 12-ounce aluminum vessel, brewed somewhere in the greater Milwaukee area? Although the Norwegians might have started the tradition back in the 1800s in Telemark, and the French affixed the “après-ski” name sometime around the first Winter Olympic Games in Chamonix, it’s fair to argue that Vermont lately has taken the experience to new heights. No other place combines the quality and quantity of skiing with the quality and quantity of homegrown adult beverages that Vermont now offers. Vermont is on its way to becoming the Napa Valley of beer, if it’s not already, with craft brews that regularly rate among the world’s best. A growing number of cider makers and vineyards now dot the land. And then there’s the hard stuff. Today, Vermont has close to 20 distillers of various sizes, creating their own slants on vodka, whiskey, gin and more. For a state with the secondsmallest population, Vermont has an outsized impact on the world of tipplers. “There’s so much excitement around alcohol in Vermont right now,” says Ben Calvi, a cider maker at Woodchuck. “Distilled spirits—we have great spirits distilled locally. Our beer scene has been awesome for 10 or 15 years, and every year it seems like there’s a newer, better microbrewery popping up. And we have eight cideries here in Vermont. There are only probably 100 in the U.S., so to have almost 10 percent of them here in the small state of Vermont is pretty cool. Vermont’s a perfect place for hard cider. We’ve been growing apples here since the first colonists came. Everyone’s just really 40

SkiVermont.com

THE DISTILLERY

“At the end of the day, people like to sit around together and enjoy the afternoon air and talk about the day,” says Steve Johnson. “You’ve been out doing something, you come back and get together again, so there’s a time to talk and people will have a cocktail. “[What’s best is] something that’s not heavy, but I’m just going to enjoy sipping while I’m talking to people,” Johnson says. “Later in the evening, they might go for the Grand Marnier drinks, but if you come off the hill at 4:00, you might want the lighter spirits: vodka or gin.” As the president of Vermont Spirits Distilling Co., Johnson should know a thing or two about cocktails. The Quecheebased distillery has grown steadily since its founding, churning out a mix of products including vodka, bourbon, brandy, whiskey and gin. The company takes a decidedly Vermont approach to making spirits, using local agricultural products as ingredients. “Given that we have more breweries per capita than anywhere else in the country, I don’t think it’s surprising to people that we’re distilling spirits as well,” Johnson says. “I think some of what we do is different—we don’t have a lot of potatoes or grain, so we’re not making vodka out of that. We’re using apples and whey and maple and things like those. That’s probably what surprises people,” he adds, “and that it’s good.” Good may be an understatement. Vermont Gold Vodka and Vermont White Vodka remain leading sellers for the company, and its No. 14 Bourbon (in reference to Vermont, the 14th state) is clearly a hit, according to Johnson. “We can’t keep that in stock, actually.” (CONTINUED on PAGE 43)


THE

OFFICIAL SPIRITS of SKI VERMONT APRÈS-SKI WITH US!

Available Year Round at Your Favorite Ski Destination www.VermontSpirits.com


(CONTINUED from PAGE 40)

THE CIDERY

Hard cider might not have the same close association to après-ski as a cold beer, but it’s a steadily growing part of the market. A big part of the appeal is due to the work of the folks at Woodchuck, aka the Vermont Hard Cider Company.

“I think it’s just so much fun. Skiing or snowboarding—it’s the one sport where you just smile the whole time. And being in such a good mood makes you want to go and celebrate afterward,” offers Ben Calvi. “You’re tired. Your muscles are a little sore. You’re probably a little cold. Your feet have been cramped up all day. So to slip into some comfortable boots and have a cider or cocktail or something is a pretty perfect way to end it.” Calvi’s fellow cider maker, John Matson, explains part of the product development process. “We definitely develop some winter-specific products. Our Winter Chill is oak aged, so it’s a little bit chewier than some of the more sessionable [light] ciders in the summertime,” Matson says. “Some of them go really well with cocktails— bourbon goes really well with cider. So I think a lot of our ciders can transition into that forum.” Founded in 1991, Woodchuck embraces its Green Mountain roots. “We’re a Vermontbased company,” says Calvi. “It’s in our name: ‘Vermont Hard Cider Company.’ We were born here 25 years ago. Sure, you could make hard cider in Florida, and you could buy juice and ship it there and make it on the beach. But it’s not the same thing, right? Vermont is one of the only places in the U.S. that has world-class apples, and to be so close to the source is really a big part of our identity.” With 20 ciders in production, Woodchuck has something for everyone. Can’t decide which one to try? Gumption, made from a blend of common eating apples and dry cider apples, is perfect for wintertime. Better yet, Gumption is now available in 16-ounce cans. (CONTINUED on PAGE 45)

SkiVermont.com

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(CONTINUED from PAGE 43)

“One of the reasons we put ciders into cans was not just for the skiers and snowboarders, but just outdoorsy followers in general,” says Woodchuck’s communications manager, Caitlin Stroupe. “They’re the ones who were requesting it. You can’t bring glass to national parks or the beach, and then at the mountain, it’s a little easier to slip a 16-ounce can in your backpack.”

the amber ale in people’s hands. Long Trail also brewed the seasonal Hibernator for almost 20 years, a hearty brew with a restorative quality that was perfect for recovering from a day on the slopes.

THE BREWERY

Long Trail Brewery really put Vermont beer on the map with its signature Long Trail Ale. Twenty-five years ago, you couldn’t walk into an après bar in the state without seeing pint after pint of

IF YOU GO: „

Don’t take our word for it: After a day on the slopes, go sip for yourself. Woodchuck, Long Trail and Vermont Spirits all have tasting rooms where you can kick back and enjoy the goods. THE WOODCHUCK CIDER HOUSE 1321 Exchange Street Middlebury, VT www.woodchuck.com 802-385-3656 RESORTS WITHIN AN HOUR’S DRIVE:

Sugarbush, Mad River Glen, Killington, Pico, Middlebury Snow Bowl, Bolton Valley LONG TRAIL BREWING COMPANY 5520 U.S. Route 4 Bridgewater Corners, VT www.longtrail.com 802-672-5011 RESORTS WITHIN AN HOUR’S DRIVE:

Killington, Pico, Okemo, Suicide Six, Middlebury Snow Bowl, Magic Mountain, Bromley, the Quechee Club VERMONT SPIRITS DISTILLERY 5573 Woodstock Road (Route 4) Quechee, VT www.vermontspirits.com 866-998-6352 RESORTS WITHIN AN HOUR’S DRIVE:

Killington, Pico, Okemo, Suicide Six, Middlebury Snow Bowl, Magic Mountain, the Quechee Club

Last year the company retired Hibernator and launched Sick Day, which the brewers felt was a better fit for the occasion. It’s got a more modern vibe, a warming body and that same restorative quality that Long Trail beers are known for. Drew Vetere, marketing media specialist at Long Trail, describes where it got its unusual name. “We were throwing around names for something that we thought would resonate with people from Vermont. And I kept thinking one thing that’s synonymous with winter is being ‘sick.’ Whether it’s calling in sick for ‘reasons’ of deep snow or just having a ‘sick’ afternoon out on the mountain. So I thought Sick Day was a pretty appropriate name for that vibe of just carefree wintertime, which is part of the reason beer goes so well with skiing. You’re out there doing something that you really enjoy, with people that you really enjoy, and it’s a reason to celebrate.” “We had an IPA in mind when we first started to design the recipe,” explains Matt Quinlan, Long Trail’s director of operations. “We wanted something with those big piney hop flavors, but because it was more of a wintertime recipe, we wanted to give it some more meat. So we put a lot of darker malts in there that gave it a very interesting flavor—sort of a darker IPA, a wintry version of an IPA. “It’s a beer you can enjoy if you’re not a skier or rider. But this is definitely a beer that we made with the skier and rider in mind: Something they’d really like when they’re done and they come off the mountain. Something that really replenishes them.” The best part of Sick Day? There’s no mixing required. Just order yourself up a pint or grab a sixer the next time you see it. Cheers. ❄ SkiVermont.com

45


m

APRÈS-SKI VERMONT: COCKTAIL RECIPES A selection of cocktail recipes to help you recover from your day on the slopes, featuring ingredients from Vermont Spirits and Woodchuck Hard Cider.

THE NO. 14 MANHATTAN 2 oz No. 14 Bourbon
 1 oz Sweet Vermouth
 5 Dashes Angostura Bitters

Add all the ingredients to a mixing glass and fill with ice. Stir well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry.

THE VERMONTINI

2-1/2 oz Vermont Gold® Vodka Splash of No. 14 Bourbon Twist of Fresh Lemon Start with a splash of No. 14 Bourbon to coat the glass; shake 2.5 oz of Vermont Gold Vodka with ice until the shaker is frosty; pour and garnish with a twist of fresh lemon.

THE LAST RUN

GREEN MOUNTAIN FIZZ

1-1/2 oz Vermont Gold Vodka 1/2 oz Fresh Lime Juice 1/2 oz Fresh Lemon Juice 1-1/2 oz Cream 1/4 oz Grade A Dark Amber Maple Syrup plus 1 tsp 1 Egg White 3 Drops Orange Flower Water Chilled Club Soda Mint Leaf Shake all ingredients except for orange flower water and club soda without ice for about one minute, then add ice and shake again very well for about one minute. Strain ingredients into a tall glass without ice. Top with club soda. Gently place the three drops of orange flower water atop the froth, then gently float 1 tsp maple syrup. Garnish with a mint leaf dipped in maple syrup.

CRANBERRY GUMP 1 oz Cranberry Juice 1/5 oz Banana Rum 12 oz Bottle Woodchuck Gumption Cider

2 oz Vermont Gold Vodka 1 oz Simple Syrup 1 oz Fresh Lemon Juice 2 Shakes Fee Brothers Grapefruit Bitters Club Soda

Combine cranberry juice and rum and top with hard cider.

Combine Vermont Gold Vodka, simple syrup, lemon juice and bitters in a rocks glass with ice. Stir and top with club soda.

WINTER CHILL FASHIONED

MAPLE SOUR

1 oz Maple Syrup 1-1/2 oz Fresh Lemon Juice 2 oz Vermont Gold Vodka 3 Shakes Angostura Bitters Ginger Ale Combine maple syrup, lemon juice, vodka and bitters in a shaker with ice and shake until frosty. Strain into a rocks glass over ice and top with a splash of ginger ale.

1 oz Bourbon 1 Shake Bitters Woodchuck® Seasonal Winter Chill Orange Slice Apple Slice

Combine bourbon and bitters and top with hard cider. Garnish with slices of orange and apple.

14 WOODCHUCKS

2 oz No. 14 Bourbon 12 oz Bottle of Your Choice of Woodchuck Cider Top bourbon with Woodchuck Cider over ice.

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SkiVermont.com

TO TABLE

FARM 48


by Sky Barsch

& BEYOND

You’ve skied or snowboarded our unique Vermont terrain until your legs begged for a rest—and wondered why you ever wasted your time anywhere else. You’ve followed our quirky local road signs, admitting along the way that they knew better than your bossy GPS. You’ve met local folks on the chairlift and gotten killer advice on the best powder stashes (even if it came a little grudgingly). So far, the local goods haven’t let you down, right? Now it’s time to try Vermont’s local foods. And there’s no better place to do that than at Vermont’s ski and ride areas, where local meats, cheeses, fruits, vegetables and breads are starring on menus from mid-mountain lodges and fine dining restaurants alike. You’ll taste Vermont’s landscape in dishes such as toe-warming tomato soup, hearty grass-fed beef burgers, and showstopping pork tenderloin. The link from farm to table continues to get shorter, as chefs shy away from mass-produced products shipped from afar in favor of high-quality, exceptionally tasty ingredients from down the road. More than just a marketing gimmick, “farm to table” means something real to chefs in Vermont, where farmers are our neighbors and farms are in our neighborhoods. Ski and ride areas buy large quantities of food; when resorts invest in the local food economy, they have a big and meaningful impact. Their purchases support healthier land management practices, ensure that animals are treated better, give a boost to the local economy, cut down on transportation and associated pollution, and offer healthier and better-tasting dishes to diners, skiers, and riders. Next time you’re dining at the mountain, make sure to talk to your server about the menu—ask what ingredients are locally grown or produced, as local foods are so commonplace that chefs don’t always point it out on the menu. You’ll be surprised at the incredible variety of foods Vermonters grow, bake, forage and prepare. We’ve long been a state that takes agriculture seriously (Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture, adorns the dome of the Statehouse), so farm-to-table dining is nothing new—we’ve been doing it for years, since before it was trendy. Just like our terrain, our road signs and our residents, local foods are memorable here. And if we do say so ourselves, they’re a little better, too.

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SUGARBUSH RESORT

Local Food by the Ton

When the powder is piling up and the wind is nipping at your face, a ruby-red, garden-grown tomato is probably the last thing on your mind. But at Timbers Restaurant—fine dining at the base area of Sugarbush’s Lincoln Peak—you can taste the sweetness of a Mad River Valley summer even on the coldest of winter days. Timbers’ tomato soup features some of the bumper tomato crop from Gaylord Farm, and it’s just one example of how the restaurant is using local produce. Timbers general manager Bruce Hyde Jr. and his team make concerted efforts to use local foods as often as possible; last season, they purchased one ton of vegetables from the surrounding area and processed them for use throughout the colder months. “It’s easy to be farm to table here in the summer; it’s really difficult to do it in the winter,” says Hyde. “You really have to plan ahead. By having the facilities of a resort, we can do it.” Hyde, who grew up working at his family’s valley inn and restaurant, has longstanding relationships with many of the area’s farmers. He understands that getting access to local foods is not as simple as placing an order on a whim. “You want the farmers to sell their stuff for as much as they can. So if they can sell at the farmers’ market to somebody for $10 a pound, I’m happy for them. But you’ve got to have a good enough relationship with them so that when they have an overabundance of something, they’ll call you up and say, hey, I’ve got 300 pounds of carrots and I need to get rid of them today.”

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STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT

Fresh Eyes on Fresh Food

Chef Jacob Ebel left a job near Mount Denali to become Stratton Mountain Resort’s executive chef, and immediately got to work incorporating more local foods into the resort’s menu. It was a dream opportunity for someone coming from Alaska, where, with the exception of seafood, local foods are tough to come by. “It just made sense, where we are in Vermont,” Ebel says. “I really quickly realized what amazing agriculture we have all around us, like the numerous dairy farms within a 10-mile radius of the resort. I thought that had to be the number one thing to bring to the mountain, to create a food culture at Stratton… We have clientele coming up from big cities. They want a Vermont experience, so we focus on Vermont products as much as we can.” Ebel faced a challenge—an ongoing agreement with a corporate food services company—but he persevered, adding local meats, cheeses, vegetables and breads to the menu. Now, you’ll find BabaA-Louis bread (Chester), Twig Farm cheese (West Cornwall), Vermont Chevon goat (Danville) and Someday Farm pheasant (East Dorset), among other local offerings. Ebel points out that high-quality, locally sourced ingredients often come with a higher price, which is reflected in the menu. “Customers are seeking out a Vermont experience,” he says. “I think once people understand what we’re doing, they’re on board.” That goes for locals as well as visitors. For instance, Green Apron, located at Stratton’s world-class golf course, offered a special farmer’s dinner, with a sixcourse meal all made from one pig, and the pig farmer joined the group for dining and discussion. That event sold out immediately, and it was mostly locals who attended.

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TO TIME HEAT

– THINGS UP Your Ride is Ready!

HEATED SEATS the first chairlift in the Northeast with heated seats

ORANGE BUBBLE provides protection from the wind on even the coldest of days

SEATS SIX whole family or whole group of friends get to ride up together

#itsokemotime 1-800-78 OKEMO (1-800-786-5366) LUDLOW VERMONT okemo.com

!

Be sure to visit okemo.com for great deals on lift tickets and lodging as well as a calendar of all the great events happening at Okemo Mountain Resort.


OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT

Whole Hog

Executive Chef Scot Emerson and Executive Sous Chef Jason Tostrup were discussing menus a few years ago, and realized they had prepared nearly 2,400 orders of pork tenderloin in just four months. Each pig produces four entrees—two tenderloins per pig and two servings per tenderloin—which meant that 600 pigs had to be raised and slaughtered for four months’ worth of this one dish. When Emerson considered how tiny the tenderloin was as a percentage of the pig’s body, he saw room for improvement. “It would be impossible for local agriculture to sustain itself feeding, watering, caring for and slaughtering 600 hogs while left holding 99 percent of the animal,” Emerson says. “We proposed that in order to bring balance we would need to purchase the whole animal and incorporate its different parts throughout our menu. Balance is the key to sustainable agriculture, business and life.” The chefs set out to find a source for whole hogs, and found the Thomas brothers. “Last Thanksgiving we received our first shipment of farm-fresh hog,” explains Emerson. “By the end of our first four-month winter season, we had purchased and utilized 20 whole hogs. Our sales increased. Our guest count increased. Our guest satisfaction increased. Our profit margin increased. The local economy increased. The only things that decreased were the number of hogs needed to feed our guests and the amount of wasted animal, feed, air, water, electricity and greenhouse gases.” That’s just one example of how Okemo is changing its food footprint. Emerson and his team are not done yet. “Through involvement with the Vermont Fresh Network, their Ludlow Farmer’s Market stand, and an ongoing series of field trips to the farm, this culinary team’s goal for 2016 is to increase its year-round partnerships to 100 and purchase $250,000 of local products,” says Emerson.

SkiVermont.com

53


JAY PEAK RESORT Closing the Loop

On peak winter weekends, Alice’s Table Chef de Cuisine Dan Higgins and his crew will serve 1,000 meals a day to hungry skiers, riders, water park patrons and hockey players. Higgins makes sure that a local component graces each of those plates, whether it’s strawberries from Berry Creek Farm, Vermontmade Benito’s Hot Sauce, or summer-picked and -pickled vegetables from nearby farm fields. During the summer, you can taste fresh local lettuce, kale and spinach at the Friday night barbecue. And in spring, the wild ramps and fiddleheads you’ll find on your plate? Higgins himself just might have picked them by a local streambed. But when it comes to local availability and sustainability, Jay Peak is going beyond sourcing food. Jay has instituted pre- and post-consumer composting, and is sourcing eco-friendly service items, including to-go containers, cups and napkins. “We’re working with Black Dirt Farm out of Greensboro, which is collecting all the compost out of Jay,” Higgins says. “That’s pretty hyper-local. We’re really trying to cut back on what we’re putting in the trash can and what’s going in the landfill.” The compost program began in early 2015, and Higgins is hopeful that soon Jay can begin using the composted matter to feed plants and flowers around the resort. “The farm-to-table concept has evolved over the last few years,” Higgins says. “It’s not just veggies from the farm. It’s the compost and the full circle of things, and vendors who have the same mission as us.” These are just some of the many resorts that bring the taste of the Vermont landscape to the après-ski table. When booking your next slopeside vacation, ask your reservation specialist about the resort’s farm-to-table options. And once you’re here, befriend your server or bartender and don’t be shy; ask what on the menu has been sourced locally. You never know what you might learn. Your server might be related to a beef farmer, your bartender might be a hobby beer brewer, or you might be sitting next to a well-known cheesemaker. We’re a small state where everyone is connected, especially through food. ❄

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SkiVermont.com


REAL MOUNTAIN REAL CLOSE REAL VERMONT Located in the Green Mountains of southern Vermont, Mount Snow is home to 589 acres of world-class skiing and riding, the East’s only all-park mountain face, Carinthia Parks, and the Bluebird Express; a six passenger bubble-chair. With the addition of 645 brand new low-energy snowmaking guns, Mount Snow now also boasts one of the strongest snowmaking arsenals in the Northeast. R EAL MOUNTAIN. REAL CLOSE. REAL VERMONT.

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Flash those smiles from

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Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

FRESH TRACKS

Ski Vermont’s Check In to Win program rewards skiers and riders for trying new resorts around the state. Log days spent on Vermont’s mountains using the Trace Snow app on your smartphone and earn medals as you reach milestones, become eligible to win cool prizes, and compete against other skiers and riders on Vermont’s slopes. Download the Trace Snow app on iTunes or Google Play to track stats on the mountain. See your top speed, lift time, air time, total vertical, rest time, and calories burned for the day and broken down by run. You can even compete with your friends! The best part about using Trace Snow at Vermont resorts is that you’ll automatically be entered to win sweet swag from Ski Vermont. We’re giving away a pair of Rossignol skis to the first skier to reach all 19 alpine resorts this season. The first snowboarder to ride at all 18 snowboard-friendly resorts (Mad River Glen is the exception) will win a new Burton board. You’ll also be entered to win prizes along the way from our friends at Dale of Norway, Cabot Cheese, Rossignol, Burton, Skida, anon., Darn Tough and more just by logging mountain stats. Don’t worry about keeping track—we will handle that. All you need to do is log days on Trace Snow and you will be automatically entered to win when earning the Vermont Explorer, Vermont Trailblazer, Vermont Marathoner, Vermont Green Mountaineer or Vermonster medals.

The more mountains you visit in Vermont, the more times you are entered to win! Get ready to feel the burn in your muscles as you compete in the Ski Vermont Vertical Challenge. Ski and ride at Vermont’s 19 alpine resorts and see how many feet of vertical you can amass throughout the season. The person who logs the most vertical this season will

win a two-night ski-and-stay package for two, valid next season. Who will take home the bragging rights? It could be you! Check out SkiVermont.com /checkin to get started.

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FRESH TRACKS

SURFING THE SNOW:

WHAT’S NEW ON SKIVERMONT.COM

Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

At Ski Vermont, we’re always on the lookout for new tools to help skiers and riders have a blast. So this year, in addition to helping you find the perfect resort for your next trip, as well as who’s got the best snow and what events are coming up, we’ve got two new features on skivermont.com that you should definitely check out.

1

First up is the debut of Ride Vermont’s all-new online presence. Featuring snowboarding- and park-specific content from all over the state, ridevermont.com is a must-click before you head to the hill.

2

And second is the launch of the Ski Vermont Social Wall. The wall aggregates social media content from all of Vermont’s resorts into one dynamic page so you can see what’s happening here, now. Check it out at skivermont.com/socialwall.

Take Amtrak and save 20% to your favorite Vermont ski destination.* Find out more at Amtrak.com. ®

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FIRST TRACKS

NEWPORT

12 8

JAY PEAK 10

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH

Ca na da Ma in e

Q BURKE

6

21

Ne w Ha mps h ire

STOWE

BURLINGTON

Ve rmo n t

11

22 26

BOLTON VALLEY

5 20

N e w Yo r k

STOWE ST.

Ma s s ac h us e tts

JOHNSBURY

3

COCHRAN’S

C o n n e c tic ut R h o d e I s la n d

MONTPELIER 13

MAD RIVER GLEN WAITSFIELD

P e n n s y lva n ia New Jersey

SUGARBUSH 17 2

19 MIDDLEBURY

NORTHEAST SLOPES

MIDDLEBURY SNOW BOWL

HOW DO YOU GET HERE? De lawa r e

PICO KILLINGTON

Ma r y la n d

23

1

15

SUICIDE SIX QUECHEE 18 SKI AREA

14

RUTLAND

29

BY CAR WHITE

RIVER JCT.

OKEMO 16

28

MAGIC

Two Amtrak routes operate between Washington, D.C., New York City and Vermont, providing daily passenger service to many of Vermont’s mountain communities. For information, log onto Amtrak.com or call the resort you plan to visit.

7

27

STRATTON 24

MOUNT SNOW THE HERMITAGE CLUB 25 9

4

BY BUS

BRATTLEBORO

Green dots correspond with Nordic ski areas listed below. //

Amtrak Stations

NORDIC SKI AREAS 1. Blueberry Hill Ski Center

16. Okemo Valley Nordic Center

2. Blueberry Lake XC

17. Ole’s Cross Country Center

3. Bolton Valley Nordic Center

18. Quechee Ski Area

4. Brattleboro Outing Club

19. Rikert Nordic Center

5. Catamount Outdoor Family Center

20. Sleepy Hollow Inn Ski & Bike Center

6. Craftsbury Outdoor Center

21. Smugglers’ Notch Nordic Center

7. Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center

22. Stowe Mountain Resort Cross Country Ski Center

8. Hazen’s Notch Association

23. Strafford Nordic Center

9. The Hermitage Inn

24. Stratton Mountain Nordic Center

10. Jay Peak Nordic Center

25. Timber Creek XC Ski Area

11. Kingdom Trails Nordic Adventure Center

26. Trapp Family Lodge XC Ski Center

12. Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation

27. Viking Nordic Center

13. Morse Farm Ski Touring Center

28. Wild Wings Ski Touring Center

14. Mountain Meadows XC Ski & Snowshoe Center

29. Woodstock Inn & Resort Nordic Center

15. Mountain Top Inn & Resort

Vermont resorts are an easy, convenient drive from anywhere in the East. Interstates 89 and 91, and Vermont Route 100, the fabled skiers’ highway, provide excellent access to our mountains and villages. BY TRAIN

BROMLEY MANCHESTER

At l a nt i c O c ea n

Catamount Trail Association

The Greyhound bus system connects Vermont communities with Boston, Montreal, New York and other regional and national destinations. Call 1-800-231-2222 for information. BY AIR

With excellent air service, Burlington International Airport is a convenient point of access to northern and central Vermont resorts. Major air carriers include Continental, Delta, JetBlue, Northwest, United and US Airways, and Porter out of Toronto. For those who prefer charter flights or have a personal aircraft, Heritage Aviation is ideal. Visitors to central and southern resorts often fly to Albany; Boston; Hartford; Manchester, N.H.; Newark, N.J.; and Rutland, Vt. Gateway cities for international visitors include Boston, New York, Montreal, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Rental cars are available at all airports, and many resorts offer ground transportation. SkiVermont.com

59


Courtesy of Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

ALPINE

JAY PEAK RESORT

KILLINGTON RESORT

MAD RIVER GLEN

MAGIC MOUNTAIN

Jay, VT 05859 www.jaypeakresort.com

Killington, VT 05751 www.killington.com

Waitsfield, VT 05673 www.madriverglen.com

Londonderry, VT 05148 www.magicmtn.com

General Info:......... 800-451-4449 Snow Conditions:.... 802-988-9601 Reservations:........ 800-451-4449

General Info:........ 800-621-MTNS Snow Conditions:.... 802-422-3261 Reservations:....... 800-621-MTNS

General Info:......... 802-496-3551 Snow Conditions:.... 802-496-3551 Reservations:............................ —

General Info:......... 802-824-5645 Snow Conditions:.... 802-824-5645 Reservations:........ 802-824-5645

Vertical:............................ 2,153' Trails:......................................78 Trail Acreage:........................385 Lifts:.........................................9

Vertical:............................3,050' Trails:....................................155 Trail Acreage:.....................3,000 Lifts:.......................................22

Vertical:............................ 2,037' Trails:......................................45 Trail Acreage:........................120 Lifts:.........................................5

Vertical:............................ 1,700' Trails:......................................43 Trail Acreage:........................195 Lifts:.........................................4

Snowmaking Coverage:..........80% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....9 of 9

Snowmaking Coverage:..........80% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:..22 of 22

Snowmaking Coverage:.......... 15% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....3 of 5

Snowmaking Coverage:..........70% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....4 of 4

PICO MOUNTAIN AT KILLINGTON

Q BURKE MOUNTAIN RESORT

QUECHEE SKI AREA

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT

Killington, VT 05751 www.picomountain.com

East Burke, VT 05832 www.skiburke.com

Quechee, VT 05059 www.quecheeclub.com

Smugglers’ Notch, VT 05464 www.smuggs.com

General Info:..........866-667-PICO Snow Conditions:.....866-667-PICO Reservations:.........866-667-PICO

General Info:......... 802-626-7300 Snow Conditions:.... 866-496-1699 Reservations:........ 888-BURKEVT

General Info:......... 802-295-9356 Snow Conditions:.... 802-295-9356 Reservations:........ 802-295-9356

General Info:......... 802-332-6841 Snow Conditions:.....802-644-1111 Reservations:.........855-814-7325

Vertical:............................ 1,967' Trails:......................................57 Trail Acreage:........................468 Lifts:.........................................7

Vertical:.............................2,011' Trails:......................................52 Trail Acreage:........................270 Lifts:.........................................6

Vertical:...............................650' Trails:......................................13 Trail Acreage:........................100 Lifts:.........................................3

Vertical:............................ 2,610' Trails:......................................78 Trail Acreage:........................ 310 Lifts:.........................................8

Snowmaking Coverage:..........75% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....7 of 7

Snowmaking Coverage:..........87% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....6 of 6

Snowmaking Coverage:........100% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....3 of 3

Snowmaking Coverage:..........62% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....8 of 8

60

SkiVermont.com


ALPINE

BOLTON VALLEY

BROMLEY MOUNTAIN RESORT

COCHRAN’S SKI AREA

THE HERMITAGE CLUB AT HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN

Bolton Valley, VT 05477 www.boltonvalley.com

Peru, VT 05152 www.bromley.com

Richmond, VT 05477 www.cochranskiarea.com

West Dover, VT 05356 www.hermitageclub.com

General Info:.........802-434-3444 Snow Conditions:...802-434-SNOW Reservations:......... 877-9BOLTON

General Info:......... 802-824-5522 Snow Conditions:.... 866-856-2201 Reservations:........800-865-4786

General Info:......... 802-434-2479 Snow Conditions:.... 802-434-2479 Reservations:............................ —

General Info:......... 802-464-7734 Snow Conditions:........................ — Reservations:........ 802-464-3511

Vertical:............................ 1,704' Trails:......................................71 Trail Acreage:........................300 Lifts:.........................................6

Vertical:............................ 1,334' Trails:......................................47 Trail Acreage:........................ 178 Lifts:.........................................8

Vertical:...............................350' Trails:........................................8 Trail Acreage:..........................15 Lifts:.........................................3

Vertical:............................1,400' Trails:......................................40 Trail Acreage:........................194 Lifts:.........................................6

Snowmaking Coverage:..........40% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....5 of 6

Snowmaking Coverage:..........86% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:......8 of 8

Snowmaking Coverage:..........66% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....3 of 3

Snowmaking Coverage:..........85% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....6 of 6

MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE SNOW BOWL

MOUNT SNOW RESORT

NORTHEAST SLOPES

OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT

Hancock, VT 05748 www.middleburysnowbowl.com

West Dover, VT 05356 www.mountsnow.com

East Corinth, VT 05086 www.northeastslopes.org

Ludlow, VT 05149 www.okemo.com

General Info:.........802-388-4356 Snow Conditions:....802-388-4356 Reservations:............................ —

General Info:.........802-464-3333 Snow Conditions:.... 802-464-2151 Reservations:.......800-245-SNOW

General Info:......... 802-439-5789 Snow Conditions:.... 802-439-5789 Reservations:............................ —

General Info:......... 802-228-1600 Snow Conditions:.... 802-228-5222 Reservations:.......800-78-OKEMO

Vertical:............................1,000' Trails:......................................17 Trail Acreage:........................125 Lifts:.........................................4

Vertical:............................ 1,700' Trails:......................................85 Trail Acreage:........................589 Lifts:.......................................20

Vertical:...............................360' Trails:......................................12 Trail Acreage:..........................35 Lifts:.........................................3

Vertical:............................2,200' Trails:....................................121 Trail Acreage:........................667 Lifts:.......................................20

Snowmaking Coverage:..........45% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....3 of 4

Snowmaking Coverage:..........80% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:..20 of 20

Snowmaking Coverage:.............. — Lifts Serving Snowmaking:........... —

Snowmaking Coverage:..........98% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:..20 of 20

STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT

STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT

SUGARBUSH RESORT

SUICIDE SIX SKI AREA/ WOODSTOCK INN

Stowe, VT 05672 www.stowe.com

Stratton Mountain, VT 05155 www.stratton.com

Warren, VT 05674 www.sugarbush.com

Woodstock, VT 05091 www.suicide6.com

General Info:......... 802-253-3000 Snow Conditions:.... 802-253-3600 Reservations:.........800-253-4SKI

General Info:......... 802-297-4000 Snow Conditions:.....802-297-4211 Reservations:.......800-STRATTON

General Info:........ 802-53-SUGAR Snow Conditions:...802-583-SNOW Reservations:....... 800-53-SUGAR

General Info:......... 802-457-6661 Snow Conditions:.... 802-457-6666 Reservations:........ 888-338-2745

Vertical:............................2,360' Trails:.................................... 116 Trail Acreage:........................468 Lifts:.......................................13

Vertical:............................2,003' Trails:......................................97 Trail Acreage:........................670 Lifts:.......................................11

Vertical:............................2,600' Trails:.................................... 111 Trail Acreage:........................578 Lifts:.......................................16

Vertical:...............................650' Trails:......................................24 Trail Acreage:........................100 Lifts:.........................................3

Snowmaking Coverage:..........90% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:. 11 of 13

Snowmaking Coverage:..........95% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.. 11 of 11

Snowmaking Coverage:..........70% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.. 15 of 16

Snowmaking Coverage:..........50% Lifts Serving Snowmaking:.....3 of 3

SkiVermont.com

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NORDIC

Resort

Location

Email & Website

Phone/ Toll-Free

Blueberry Hill Ski Center

Goshen, VT 05733

info@blueberryhillinn.com www.blueberryhillinn.com

Blueberry Lake X-C

Warren, VT 05674

Bolton Valley Nordic Center

Trails

Machine Tracked/ Skating Terrain

Instruction/ Rental

802-247-6735 -

50km

0km/0km

N/Y

www.blueberrylakeskivt.com

802-496-6687 -

30km

21km/21km

Y/Y

Bolton Valley, VT 05477

info@boltonvalley.com www.boltonvalley.com

802-434-6876 877-9BOLTON

100km

15km/15km

Y/Y

Brattleboro Outing Club

Brattleboro, VT 05302

xc@brattleborooutingclub.com www.brattleborooutingclub.com

802-254-8906 -

33km

25km/18km

Y/Y

Catamount Outdoor Family Center

Williston, VT 05495

mail@catamountoutdoor.com www.catamountoutdoorfamilycenter.com

802-879-6001 -

35km

20km/20km

Y/Y

Catamount Trail Association

Burlington, VT 05401

info@catamounttrail.org www.catamounttrail.org

802-864-5794 -

500km

50km/50km

Y/Y

Craftsbury Outdoor Center

Craftsbury Common, VT 05827

stay@craftsbury.com www.craftsbury.com

802-586-7767 -

135km

85km/85km

Y/Y

Grafton Ponds Nordic Center

Grafton, VT 05146

info@graftonponds.com www.graftonponds.com

802-843-2400 -

30km

15km/15km

Y/Y

Hazen’s Notch Association

Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471

info@hazensnotch.org www.hazensnotch.org

802-326-4799 -

60km

40km/0km

Y/Y

The Hermitage Inn

West Dover, VT 05356

www.hermitageclub.com

802-464-7734 -

14km

14km/14km

Y/Y

Jay Peak Nordic Center

Jay, VT 05859

info@jaypeakresort.com www.jaypeakresort.com

802-988-4693 800-451-4449

20km

10km/10km

Y/Y

Kingdom Trails Nordic Adventure Center

Lyndonville, VT 05851

info@kingdomtrails.org www.kingdomtrails.org

802-626-6005 -

60km

40km/60km

N/N

Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation

Derby, VT 05830

PLHarris969@comcast.net www.mstf.net

802-334-7676 -

30km

30km/30km

N/N

Morse Farm Ski Touring Center

Montpelier, VT 05602

info@skimorsefarm.com www.skimorsefarm.com

802-223-0560 -

25km

25km/20km

Y/Y

Mountain Meadows XC Ski & Snowshoe Center

Killington, VT 05751

basecampvt@mac.com www.xcskiing.net

802-775-7077 802-775-0166

57km

57km/57km

Y/Y

Mountain Top Inn & Resort

Chittenden, VT 05737

stay@mountaintopinn.com www.mountaintopinn.com

802-483-6089 -

60km

40km/40km

Y/Y

Okemo Valley Nordic Center

Ludlow, VT 05149

info@okemo.com www.okemo.com

802-228-1396 800-78-OKEMO

22km

0km/0km

Y/Y

Ole’s Cross Country Center

Warren, VT 05674

ski@olesxc.com www.olesxc.com

802-496-3430 -

45km

45km/40km

Y/Y

Quechee Ski Area

Quechee, VT 05059

info@quecheeclub.com www.quecheeclub.com

802-295-9356 -

25km

25km/12km

Y/Y

Rikert Nordic Center

Ripton, VT 05766

rikertnordiccenter@middlebury.edu www.rikertnordic.com

802-443-2744 -

55km

45km/45km

Y/Y

Sleepy Hollow Inn Ski & Bike Center

Huntington, VT 05462

info@skisleepyhollow.com www.skisleepyhollow.com

802-434-2283 866-254-1524

35km

30km/25km

Y/Y

Smugglers’ Notch Nordic Center

Smugglers’ Notch, VT 05464

ski_ride@smuggs.com www.smuggs.com

802-644-1173 800-451-8752

30km

18km/26km

Y/Y

Stowe Mountain Resort XC Ski Center

Stowe, VT 05672

info@stowe.com www.stowe.com

802-253-3688 800-253-4SKI

75km

45km/30km

Y/Y

Strafford Nordic Center

Strafford, VT 05072

info@straffordnordicskiing.com www.straffordnordicskiing.com

802-765-4309 -

30km

10km/30km

Y/Y

Stratton Mountain Nordic Center

Stratton Mountain, VT 05155

feedback@stratton.com www.stratton.com

802-297-4567 800-STRATTON

12km

12km/12km

Y/Y

Timber Creek XC Ski Area

West Dover, VT 05356

timbercreekxc@gmail.com www.timbercreekxc.com

802-464-0999 -

14km

14km/14km

Y/Y

Trapp Family Lodge XC Ski Center

Stowe, VT 05672

info@trappfamily.com www.trappfamily.com

802-253-5755 800-826-7000

160km

60km/60km

Y/Y

Viking Nordic Center

Londonderry, VT 05148

skiandstay@vikingnordic.com www.vikingnordic.com

802-824-3933 -

39km

35km/30km

Y/Y

Wild Wings Ski Touring Center

Peru, VT 05152

wwxcski@sover.net www.wildwingsski.com

802-824-6793 -

28km

28km/0km

Y/Y

Woodstock Inn & Resort Nordic Center

Woodstock, VT 05091

nvm@woodstockinn.com www.woodstockinn.com

802-457-6674

50km

30km/20km

Y/Y

62

SkiVermont.com

Snowmaking


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SKI VERMONT & RIDE VERMONT PEPSI, the Pepsi Globe and LIVE FOR NOW are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc.


Courtesy of Justin Cash

AND LAST, BUT CERTAINLY NOT LEAST, A VERY SPECIAL THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR PARTNERS.

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Ski Vermont Magazine 2016