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PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID BURLINGTON, VT PERMIT NO. 19

COMPLIMENTARY


THE TEAM PUBLISHER SKI VERMONT Mike Solimano, Chair Molly Mahar, President Adam Rowe, Marketing Manager Adam White, Director of Communications EDITOR Molly Mahar DESIGN Methodikal, Inc. PRINTER Lane Press COVER ART Methodikal, Inc. Visit skivermont.com/store to purchase a Ski Vermont Poster! CONTACT INFO Ski Vermont P.O. Box 368 Montpelier, VT 05601 T: 802.223.2439 E: info@skivermont.com www.SkiVermont.com /SkiVermont & /RideVermont @Ski_Vermont & @RideVermont Ski_VT & RideVermont SkiRideVT

02 COMING HOME A letter from Ski Vermont’s new president.

10 LOVE + FRENCH FRIES One dad’s advice on teaching his young son to ski. By Mike Hannigan

04 MOUNTAIN HAPPENINGS 19 IT TAKES A VILLAGE Where to go and when to be there.

Living long and prospering in Vermont’s ski towns. By Hilary DelRoss


31 GET IN MY BELLY Recipes from four of Vermont’s best après-ski spots. By Mike Hannigan

41 SKI, BABY, SKI A determined new mom gets back on the hill. By Sarah Wojcik

50 LAST SEASON WAS WINTERRIFIC Photographic proof that last winter delivered the goods.

57 HEAD FOR THE HILLS Planning and travel advice for Vermont.

60 JUST THE FACTS, MA’AM Details on Vermont’s alpine and cross country ski areas and resorts.

62 GREEN MOUNTAIN GEAR GUIDE Some new tools of the trade.

Courtesy of Eric Fitzgerald

SkiVermont.com

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Courtesy of Eric Fitzgerald

FRESH TRACKS

COMING HOME No matter where you’re from, Vermont always feels like coming home.

into the fall line and carving those first few glorious turns through Vermont’s legendary snow.

From the irresistible allure of its natural Green Mountain splendor to the welcoming draw of its small towns and villages, Vermont just feels different somehow: more vivid, more alive, more real.

Kicking and gliding along a cross country ski trail through fields and old-growth forests, with the sun sparkling off a fresh layer of snow, affords an unmatched combination of beauty, tranquility and magic that fills your heart — and your lungs with crisp, clean mountain air.

Here, people and place don’t just coexist; they are intertwined and are, in many ways, inseparable. Love and respect for the natural environment aren’t just elements of a Vermonter’s character; they largely define it — whether you are a born Vermonter or a devoted “flatlander” transplant, like I am. The land sustains us — as evidenced by Vermont’s vigorous participation in the localvore movement with its prevalence of fresh, locally-sourced ingredients. The same land also helps to nurture our souls, whether drinking in a gorgeous Vermont vista, taking a simple walk in the woods or the enjoyment of many outdoor sports and activities, about which Vermonters are passionate. Among those outdoor pastimes, skiing and snowboarding are at the forefront. The official winter state sports of Vermont are thriving, thanks to a variety of ski areas and mountain resorts that cater to a wide array of participants with diverse terrain and snowmaking coverage that’s unmatched anywhere in the world. Disembarking from the top of a chairlift at an alpine resort, the scenery that stretches out toward the horizon is breathtaking enough — even before the thrill of dropping

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The ski scene in Vermont delivers an unparalleled mix of vibrancy and tradition, the intersection of state-of-the-art resort facilities, areas that offer a pure and simple experience — all with a rich and storied history tracing back to the very roots of the sport. While skiing in Vermont can provide solitude, it is also one of the greatest gifts we can share with others. Trips to Vermont and even individual runs down its mountains carve indelible tracks in our memories, experiences we can revisit and relive forever. Our friends and families — especially children — leave a ski outing with far more than they brought into it. That’s part of the magic of the sport. Whenever I’ve been away, and the Green Mountains come back into view, I feel a certain sense of comfort and anticipation. The mountains are welcoming me back, with promises of experiences that can’t be had anywhere else — and that I will never forget.

Molly Mahar President


sugarbush.com

Adventure Awaits There’s something more to the Sugarbush experience than the legendary terrain variety, the meticulous snowmaking and grooming, the fabled history, and the authentic Vermont mountain setting. Come discover what makes Sugarbush different. For the best deals on season passes, discount tickets, lodging and more, visit sugarbush.com.

800.53.SUGAR

#liveSUGARBUSH


FRESH TRACKS

2018 MOUNTAIN 2019 HAPPENINGS NOVEMBER

DECEMBER December 16, 2018 BOLTON VALLEY SANTA SUNDAY Dress up as Santa, spread some holiday cheer and ski or ride for free at Bolton Valley. BoltonValley.com

Courtesy of Burke Mountain

December 31, 2018 BURKE MOUNTAIN NEW YEAR’S CELEBRATION Join Burke in the Tamarack Pub and Grill and ring in the New Year with live music, great food and one of the largest fireworks displays in the Northeast Kingdom. Special lodging deals are available. SkiBurke.com

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Courtesy of Jat Peak Resort

November 23-25, 2018 KILLINGTON RESORT XFINITY KILLINGTON CUP Killington will again host the Audi FIS World Cup event, which saw record-breaking attendance in 2016 and 2017. The World Cup event will include the women’s giant slalom and slalom races. Killington.com

JANUARY

January 25, 2019 JAY PEAK RESORT FARMER’S APPRECIATION DAY Now in its 36th year, Jay Peak’s annual Farmer’s Appreciation Day offers a free ski & ride day to Vermont farms on the last Friday of January. Each farm that preregisters gets up to four free tickets for the day, and even discounted admission to the Pump House Indoor Waterpark. JayPeakResort.com January 26, 2019 SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH SNOWSHOE FESTIVAL The Smugglers’ Notch Snowshoe Festival kicks off 1/26/19 and is open to all ages and abilities. Join Smuggs for free demos, family games and guided snowshoe tours, including a “half-K” Kids’ Fun Run. All events are held at the Smugglers’ Notch Resort Nordic Center. Smuggs.com January 29, 2019 MAD RIVER GLEN ROLL BACK THE CLOCK DAY Celebrate Mad River Glen’s 70th Anniversary on Roll Back the Clock Day. Mad River Glen “rolls back” its lift ticket price to what it was in 1948, $3.50. MadRiverGlen.com

FEBRUARY February 2, 2019 SUICIDE SIX FOURTH ANNUAL TUBBS SNOWSHOES “FACE RACE” Enjoy bragging rights that you snowshoed up “The Face,” Suicide Six’s famous black diamond trail, and returned down “Easy Mile.” Suicide6.com February 15-16, 2019 MIDDLEBURY SNOW BOWL MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE WINTER CARNIVAL The winter carnival brings to the Bowl the best collegiate skiers in the east competing in Slalom on 2/15/19 and Giant Slalom 2/16/19. MiddleburySnowBowl.com February 16, 2019 BROMLEY MOUNTAIN FEB FEST Join Bromley for this annual celebration, kicked off with a torchlight parade and fireworks. Then join friends in the base lodge for live music and dancing. Bromley.com February 16-23, 2019 MOUNT SNOW PRESIDENTS’ WEEK WINTERFEST Visit Mount Snow for a full week of events, activities, live music, competitions and fun for the whole family at Presidents’ Week Winterfest. With concerts, competitions at Carinthia Parks, beer-pairing dinners and more, there’s something for everyone during this week-long celebration of winter. MountSnow.com


FRESH TRACKS

MARCH

Courtesy of Jacob Kravitz

March 6-10, 2019 TRAPP FAMILY LODGE NCAA CROSS COUNTRY SKIING CHAMPIONSHIPS The National Collegiate Athletic Association Cross Country Skiing Championships will be held at Trapp Family Lodge for the fifth time to crown the NCAA’s men’s and women’s team champions. TrappFamily.com

March 8-10, 2019 STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT THE VERMONT OPEN Amateurs, pro snowboarders and Olympic medalists compete for a piece of the $20,000 purse in a contest that celebrates the history and progression of a sport born and raised in Vermont. Spectator-friendly events, live music and sponsor village draw fans and family to southern Vermont each spring for the Open, now in its seventh year. Stratton.com

March 16, 2019 OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT SUGAR DAZE CONCERT When the maple sap starts running, Okemo will be tapping into the sweet sounds of notable musical artists with Sugar Daze, a free concert series that culminates with a huge outdoor concert extravaganza in the Jackson Gore courtyard. Okemo.com

April 6-7, 2019 STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT SUGAR SLALOM Originating as a celebration of the arrival of Spring and the tapping of maple trees, the Sugar Slalom is held in a Mardi Gras atmosphere complete with music, barbecue on the hill, fantastic ski racing and festive costumes. To top it all, the race also features a unique Vermont treat, maple syrup on snow, donuts and pickles at the finish. Stowe.com

Courtesy of Sugarbush Resort

March 2, 2019 MAGIC MOUNTAIN MASTER OF THE MOUNTAIN FREERIDE/RACE BIATHLON The second annual Master of the Mountain crowns the best all-around skier and rider in the East. It’s one trail, one run, but two thigh-burning ski specialties in one grueling test. It’s a freeride extreme challenge at the top changing into a Giant Slalom course at the bottom for one timed run with bonus points for extreme hucks. MagicMtn.com

APRIL

March 23-24, 2019 SUGARBUSH RESORT ISLAND WEEKEND Have your beach and your mountain, too. Spring fever takes over Sugarbush with live reggae music, island cuisine, drink specials, volleyball tournaments, tiki bars, hula dancing and more. Sugarbush.com March 23, 2019 KILLINGTON RESORT VERMONT BREWERS FESTIVAL Featuring more than 30 Vermont brewers and numerous ale, IPA and lager choices to sample, this Vermont Brewers Association event returns to Killington for the second year. Killington.com

LOOKING FOR MORE TO DO? Find more events at SkiVermont.com/Events.

Join the Ski Vermont Specialty Food Day Tour as we visit Vermont resorts with delicious treats in tow. Cabot cheese, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and samples from Long Trail, Woodchuck Cider and our spirit sponsors, Barr Hill Gin, Mad River Distillers and SILO Distillery will be waiting for you!

o Mount Snow............................. 01/05/19 o Jay Peak Resort........................ 01/25/19 o Burke Mountain........................ 01/26/19 o Mad River Glen......................... 01/29/19 o Killington Resort...................... 02/09/19 o Pico Mountain............................02/10/19 o Middlebury Snow Bowl...............02/16/19 o Smugglers’ Notch Resort......... 02/19/19 o Okemo Mountain Resort..........02/22/19 o Bromley Mountain.................... 02/23/19 o Trapp Family Lodge.................. 03/09/19 o Magic Mountain....................... 03/10/19 o Sugarbush Resort.................... 03/16/19 o Stratton Mountain Resort........ 03/23/19 o Bolton Valley Resort................. 03/31/19 SkiVermont.com

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FRIENDS DON’T LET FRIENDS SIT INSIDE ALL WINTER THE TAKE 3 BEGINNER PACKAGE

THE 5TH GRADE PASSPORT

“The Take 3 Package was an overall awesome experience! I’m in my 40’s and have lived in VT my whole life, but I had never tried alpine skiing before this (I’ve been snowboarding off and on since I was a teen, but I’d never skied and always wanted to try).

“In the winter, my son’s and my motto is, ‘If there’s snow, we will go.’

In the words of David McGee of Burlington, VT

Because of the Take 3 Pass, I wound up buying a season pass to Sugarbush for 2018-19 (which I was able to use all spring this past season, including those huge, unexpected, lateseason dumps in April!), AND I bought a Five-Year Green Pass to Bolton Valley, AND I already bought backcountry skis, skins, poles and boots for next season. It’s been a dream forever to get into backcountry skiing and it’s finally going to start happening next season. The opportunity for a one-stop package of discounted lessons, equipment rentals and lift tickets, combined with the ability to try different resorts was absolutely the motivating factor that made it happen for me. Whoever’s idea this was...thanks!”

In the words of Michael Poggi of East Longmeadow, MA

I usually get a multi-mountain pass, and this was the first year he got a pass too. It was the Fifth Grade Passport and we used it a lot. Wherever I would go to Vermont, he’d come with me. We’d have a snow day. We would both take a day and go snowboarding. Sometimes, I’d take my daughters with me as well, if they wanted to go. We got to see quite a few different mountains: Stratton, Killington, Mount Snow, Pico. I hadn’t been to Pico in a long time, but because of the Fifth Grade Passport, we wound up going there on February vacation. It came in very handy. For a parent, it’s one less ticket to buy, even though I’m still paying for two other kids and my pass. It just makes it a little easier, and it gets the whole family into it, too. My wife is not a big cold-weather person, so most of the time it was just me and my kids. It was cool and definitely memorable. It gave me some alone time with my kids to keep building relationships with them. Skiing and snowboarding are like golf. It’s one of the only sports you can do for the rest of your life and enjoy it with your kids. I really enjoy snowboarding for that fact. With my kids, it’s the bomb. We love those days in the mountains. Nothing can replace those.”


5 WAYS TO SHARE THE LOVE F ROM SK I V ER MON T FIFTH GRADE PASSPORT Fifth graders ski and ride for FREE in Vermont with the Fifth Grade Passport. This passport to fun includes coupons for free alpine lift tickets and cross country trail passes all over Vermont*. For more information and to apply for the passport, please visit skivermont.com/FGP *Restrictions and blackout dates apply. A processing fee of $10 is included.

TAKE 3 BEGINNER PACK AGE $129

For just , new skiers and snowboarders receive three professional beginner group lessons at participating resorts including equipment rentals and beginner lift tickets. Packages are valid all season*. For more information and to purchase a Take 3 Beginner Package, please visit skivermont.com/Take-3 *Non-holiday, dependent on open terrain. Limited availability.

JANUARY LEARN TO SKI & SNOWBOARD MONTH TO

SKI & SNOWBOARD MONTH

$49

For just , beginner skiers and snowboarders get a special package including a professional beginner group lesson, lift ticket and equipment rental. Ski Vermont’s participating resorts offer this incredible beginners-only deal in January*. For resort-specific details, please visit: skivermont.com/Learn *Non-holiday. Limited availability.

BRING-A-FRIEND VERMONT Folks who introduce friends and family to skiing and snowboarding with Ski Vermont’s Take 3 Beginner Package can receive two free lift tickets to one of Vermont’s resorts and be entered to WIN a two-night ski and stay package for two*! For more information, please visit skivermont.com/Bring-a-Friend-VT

BRING BR

IN G

A FRIEND

A F RIE N D.O

RG

*Limited availability.

LEARN TO CROSS COUNTRY SKI $49

Learn to cross country ski this winter in Vermont for just . Participating Vermont cross country centers will be offering a learn-to special package in January 2019 that includes a beginner lesson, equipment rental and a trail pass*. For more details, please visit skivermont.com/Learn *Non-holiday. Limited availability.

SkiVermont.com

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AUDI FIS SKI WORLD CUP Killington, Vermont November 23-25, 2018 killington.com/worldcup


Home of von Trapp® Brewing & Bierhall Restaurant

Celebrating cross-country skiing traditions for over 50 years.

Skiing and Snowshoeing on 2,500 Acres Austrian Inspired Lodging & Dining Massage & Fitness Center “Top Resorts in New England” - Condé Nast Readers’ Choice Awards 2017

Stowe, Vermont | 800.826.7000

Disc over M ore

VERMONT This Summer & Fall!

The Official Vermont Vacation Planning Guide, Your Resource for the best places to Stay, Eat, Drink and Play.

Stay connected year Round:

VisitVT

visitvermont

SkiVermont.com

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Love + French Fries Thoughts on teaching my three-year-old son to ski Words by Mike Hannigan & Images by Alexis Hannigan

If you’re not a parent, this may come as something of a surprise, but doing anything when you have two kids under the age of four can be challenging.

While I love my children dearly, it ain’t always easy — but my wife and I are also determined that “Going Skiing” will not wind up on that list of impossible things to do. So we’ve been teaching our two kids to ski pretty much since they could walk.

Anything. Navigating a supermarket. Crossing the street. Driving nonstop for any distance greater than a half-hour.

To be fair, I wasn’t without experience in teaching kids how to ski. A while back, in what I now wistfully refer to as the “Remember When” years, I took a winter off from my regular job and taught skiing at Sugarbush in its kids program. I liked it, but I also kept my goals simple: I wanted to get through as many weeks in a row as possible without any of the kids breaking down in tears. I never made it past two weeks.

Reading a book. What could go wrong? Staying awake through a movie. Or even a sit-com. Finishing a sentence. Smiling. Eating. Sleeping.

At three, my oldest, Henry, is technically old enough for professional lessons. There’s just one little hiccup: he vehemently refuses to be potty trained, so joining a formal ski school is off the menu for now. For a parent trying to figure this out, it’s not like there’s some grand written lexicon to turn to for advice on teaching Henry or his younger sister how to ski. Go on Amazon and search for general parenting advice and you’ll find no fewer than 60,000 titles spread across hundreds of pages of results. But look up ‘teaching kids to ski,’ and there are three measly little books.

Blinking. So in the absence of written resources to turn to, I’d like to share a few lessons I picked up while teaching my three-yearold to ski:

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1. Park as close as you can to the lift — bribe someone if you have to

When I put his helmet on him, he cried.

We’re really lucky living here in Vermont. There are at least a half-dozen resorts within an easy drive from our house, and all of them would be perfect for getting our kids up and running on skis. However, in the spirit of everything being more difficult when kids are involved, we chose the path of least resistance, which for us meant the Middlebury Snow Bowl.

Same with his gloves.

At the Snow Bowl, if you’re lucky, you can literally park steps away from the magic carpet and beginners hill. No schlepping of gear needed. The importance of this cannot be overstated.

He cried and protested on the walk to the magic carpet. He kicked and screamed the whole way up the lift. And he wailed incessantly at the top while we — air quotes — “got our act together.”

2. Use French fries We all remember the old ski instructor’s admonition to make either a pizza (a wedge shape) or French fries (parallels) with your skis. And while the learning kind of French fries have their place, I’m referring to the making-it-worth-it-to-my-kid kind: real, honest French fries — cooked in an oily deep fryer, served with a healthy pinch of salt and a gallon of ketchup.

And ski boots. And skis. Cry. Cry. Cry.

With tears freezing to his rosy cheeks and a final whimper of protest, I patiently ignored the crying and we set off down the hill. I kept him between my legs, held him close. We made big, wide turns, letting his legs and skis react to the snow. Either he was crying so uncontrollably that he had ceased making all sounds (“Breathe, Henry”) or he had been stunned into silence.

With all due respect to my business partner, Seth, the guy who designed this magazine, Henry might be the best French fry eater I’ve ever seen, judging on a pound-for-pound basis. I’ll grant Seth his rightful status as a champion-level French fry consumer, but Henry is a child prodigy.

We finally stopped at the bottom. I looked down at him, not knowing what to expect.

So when I mentioned the idea of going skiing to Henry, I also told him, “We can go for French fries after.”

We got in about a half-dozen runs, and at the end of each, he said, “Again.” And when he stopped saying “Again,” we called it a day and went and got those French fries.

“Again,” he said simply, through a huge smile. I had him. Ok, bud. You got it.

This got his attention. The only downside was that once we got to the mountain, Henry wanted the French fries first. Skiing, maybe, would come second. When I told him that we needed to ski first and eat second, that’s when the crying began.

3. There will be tears Ignoring the tears that first day, I put Henry in the back of our truck to get him geared up. When I put on his snowsuit, he cried.

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4. A harness helps

CR F C

My son has an amazing fiendish laugh. Not his normal, spontaneous belly laugh, which is completely infectious in its own right. No, this is a practiced, I’ve-beenpossessed-by-the-devil-and-couldn’t-be-prouder laugh. It drips with sinister intent, but it’s funny as hell because it’s emanating from the body of an adorable three-yearold boy. Adults are regularly impressed when they hear it; sinister adults nod in respect. I half expected Henry to break out the sinister laugh on our first day of skiing. I imagined him taking some


F S E I R C S E I C R S F E I S E R I F R S E I R S C E S I E R I C R S F E I R S F E I S E R I F R S C E I CR SkiVermont.com

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steamed broccoli. There’s something about the lure of crispy potatoes, salt and ketchup that turns Henry into a willing participant in almost any endeavor.

6. Don’t expect a linear progression When you’re three, you get cold easily. You get frustrated easily. You’re a small creature with hardly any body fat to keep you warm. At best, you’ve got a loose grasp on your emotions. Walking in regular shoes is still not a foolproof endeavor, so ski boots and skis can be major complications. It’s much easier for new things to be scary than it is for them to seem fun.

sudden turn or veering off on a trail to lose me, and all I’d hear is that menacing cackle fading off as he skied away. So we got him a harness. Sure, maybe he’d still be cackling away maniacally, but at least he’d be dragging me or my wife with him. I’m not sure what the professional ski-school protocol is on kids’ harnesses, but at the risk of offending PSIA instructors everywhere, the harness has been gold with Henry. Obviously, it keeps him from flying away into oblivion, so that’s nice, but you can also use it to steer him, kind of like the reins on a horse, which helps him get the feel of turning. It’s also got a handle on it, so if you need to hoist him up, or move him around, or prevent him from escaping, you’re in luck.

5. Did I mention French fries? What would it take to get you to do something that you really don’t want to do? Henry doesn’t understand money yet, so that’s out. Thus the fries.

What made him happy one day may seem completely traumatic the next, for no particular reason at all. Three-year-olds wield incredible power for such a small package. If they’re happy and engaged, they can light up a room and make people smile uncontrollably. If they’re surly and petulant, they can clear a space of otherwise patient adults in a matter of seconds. This is how I like to describe it: 90 percent of the time, he’s the sweetest little creature in the world. The other 10 percent, it’s like you’ve been taken prisoner and your captor has strapped a boxful of emotions to your chest that’s set to go boom, and no amount of duct tape, pen springs or bubble gum is going to let you MacGyver your way out of it. Capitulate to his demands and everything will be swell. But make one false move and we’re all going to go up in a cloud of wailing, whimpering and tears. Nobody wants that. I’m not even sure there’s really any rhyme or reason to why it goes one way or another. I’ve gotten better at anticipating what’s going to happen — joy or chaos — but it’s definitely more art than science. The most important lesson I took from the whole experience is that it’s not a linear progression from day to day. On a good day, Henry would have a blast, hardly protest, and really seem to be enjoying it. So naturally, I figured the next day at the mountain, we’d be graduating from the bunny slopes and the magic carpet, and soon we’d be riding up the quad and tackling harder terrain. Nope.

Lest you think we’re horrible parents, we do feed him well, and more often than not, he’ll eat what we put in front of him. However, it’s not like you can get him to do something he doesn’t want to do with the promise of

That’s not what happens. A good day doesn’t necessarily beget another good day. That’s not how a three-year-old works. (CONTINUED on PAGE 17)

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-SKI Magazine Reader Survey 2018

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(CONTINUED from PAGE 14)

7. Keep moving forward

KIDS SKI + RIDE SCHOOL PROGRAMS

They’ll cry. They’ll kick and whine. They’ll say they don’t want to go. They’ll ‘lose’ their gloves. They’ll feign an inability to even stand upright. Don’t fall for it. Just keep pleasantly and patiently moving forward. Do not stop for temper tantrums or crying fits. So long as they’re warm, properly fed and hydrated and nobody’s calling Child Protective Services on you, they’ll be fine.

Vermont’s resorts have some of the best ski and snowboard schools in the country, especially for kids. Programs start at different ages, depending on the resort, with some programs open to kids as young as two years old. Find out more at SkiVermont.com.

8. I t’s ok to go in for a break, but go back out after One of the lessons I’ve learned with my kids is that the more you can give them ownership of decisions, the more likely they are to have fun. Call this a corollary to the French Fry Theory, but we always let Henry decide when it was time to take a break from skiing and go inside. The downside is that he’d start asking for French fries after just a couple of runs. So we’d wind up driving all the way to the mountain, taking two or three short runs, then hitting the lodge and driving all the way back home. Not exactly the best use of our time. Halfway through the winter, I decided that it was fine to take a break, but that we would also always go back out for more runs afterward. Henry never fought it, and we started making way more progress on those days.

9. Make it as fun as humanly possible This is more of a reminder than a lesson. When Henry was losing it, or veering toward emotional anarchy, or just being disagreeable, I let it all roll off my shoulders at the mountain. I was relentlessly positive, way more so than I ever am in any other aspect of life. For me, skiing is pure joy. While there are days that the kids prevent us from doing the kind of skiing we’d prefer to do, I look at this all as investment. If I can get them to like this as much as I do, it’ll be something we can do as a family forever, or at least until they turn into petulant teenagers who want nothing to do with me. In the mudroom of our house, there’s a chalkboard where my wife and I have been tracking our cumulative ski days, pretty much since we started dating about 10 years ago. We track each day in a given year with hashmarks, and then we have a total for each of the years running down the right side.

Aside from being able to discern the epic snow years from the less-than-stellar ones, the biggest trend you can see is when we had kids. The tally dips from a high of 41 days in 2013 to a low of 10 in 2014, the year Henry was born. The numbers stayed low with the birth of his sister in 2016 — but now they’re on the rise, and our kids are adding to the tally, too.

10. Soak in every minute — you’ll remember it your whole life It’s July as I’m writing this, months removed from winter and with a long way to go until the snow flies again. But looking at the pictures of Henry on the mountain last winter makes me so happy. Three is my favorite age for Henry so far. First, you can have a real conversation with him because his language ability is advanced enough. He’s really curious about the world and how things work. And he has a level of creativity and imagination that’s just fun to watch. I hate dropping him off at daycare sometimes, not because I think he’s going to have a hard time but because I know he’s going to have a great time and I won’t be there to soak it all in. The last day we skied this past winter was our best by far. We took a ton of runs. He wiped out in his first spectacular crash and got right back up for more with a smile on his face. We went faster and faster with each run. On the final run of the day, I asked him if he wanted to go faster still. “Yeah,” he said definitively. So we just French fried them straight down the hill. And he loved it. I still do. ❄

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Naturally Epic

Photo credit: ŠBrian Mohr/EmberPhoto

madriverglen.com


IT

TAKES A

VILLAGE Residents of your favorite ski towns reveal why they call the Green Mountains home by Hilary DelRoss

There are no less than 13 official terms ski area snow reporters use to describe the skiing surface on daily condition reports. We agonize about snow all season long, but while some of us pour over conditions after pouring our first cup of coffee, local folks are already getting after it. These guys and gals figured out how to fit more skiing and snowboarding into their lifestyle, and they’ve offered to give us a glimpse into what life looks like for those who settle in just beyond the resort boundaries. Scratch the surface of your favorite mountain community and you’ll see that life is good for the pros who keep our ski towns running — ensuring you’re getting to the tops of the mountains, helping you out of a bind going down them, hosting and feeding you, and even writing your second-homeowners’ insurance policy. These stories highlight a few of the dedicated, hard-working, snow-loving professionals who are carving out a balanced lifestyle for themselves while enriching the vibrant culture across our ski communities. Read on to learn why they were drawn to live in Vermont’s mountain towns (spoiler alert: it was the skiing and snowboarding!) and why they won’t live anywhere else — and be sure to say hi if you see them around this winter.

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I Chris Martin , L I F T M A I N T ENA NCE SU PERV ISOR AT JAY PE A K R ESORT

n his younger days, Chris Martin just wanted to snowboard more, and a winter job in lift ops was his ticket to ride. He started working at Jay Peak as a seasonal employee, helping load people onto chairlifts or the tram, before working his way up the ranks to become the head liftie. He’s come a long way for a guy who bounced between bumping chairs all winter and milking cows during the summer. When he learned how to fix and maintain the very lifts he operated all winter, Chris made an immediate connection with his own family — his dad and brother are also mechanics — while at the same time strengthening his bond with the resort community.

Lift maintenance kicks into high gear once the lifts stop spinning each spring, and unbeknownst to most of us, it takes the entire summer season to get them prepped for the winter ahead. The first thing Chris noticed during his leap into year-round employment was that staff who worked at the mountain through the summer formed a tightly-knit community and enjoyed each other’s company, even during the off-hours. Chris took up disc golf with a couple of work buddies and now helps manage tournaments that come to Montgomery’s four courses. He also loves live music and regularly catches shows at Jay Peak’s Stateside Amphitheatre with friends and family.

“MY TIGHTLY-KNIT COMMUNITY KEEPS ME GROUNDED AFTER I’VE BEEN WORKING UP ON LIFTS ALL DAY.” Speaking of friends and family, Jay Peak makes a big effort to treat its employees as such and that’s exactly what has kept Chris around for so long. He met his partner, Amelia, there. Together they are raising their 18-month-old son, Elon, “the Jay Way” thanks, in part, to the lengthy list of perks that Jay Peak’s employee program offers. Chris and Elon commute together to the mountain, where young Elon has already been out on his first snowboard. He is enrolled in Jay’s year-round childcare program and gets to hang at the mountain while Chris is clocked in. Chris appreciates working for an employer that cultivates a strong community culture, where staff are valued and encouraged to develop their individual pursuits, and where being part of the whole makes the whole thing worthwhile. Chris’s favorite part about working at the resort is seeing the familiar faces that come back year after year, forming friendships with the folks he meets on the mountain. However small those interactions may be, according to Chris, each one plays an integral part in shaping his community.

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S

ean Grzyb grew up skiing at the Middlebury Snow Bowl and, like many powder hounds, he returned to Vermont to raise his family in an environment that fosters more time spent together and less time commuting to work or play. From their home base in Lincoln, Sean’s family maintains a balanced lifestyle by taking advantage of all the activities available right outside their door.

“BIG CULTURAL CENTERS ARE CLOSE BY, BUT WE HAVE IT ALL RIGHT IN OUR OWN BACKYARD.” Many Vermonters find their passion in recreation. It has shaped Sean’s life, and he also credits the breadth of outdoor activities available nearby as the core of the community’s appeal. The local culture has been molded by residents who incorporate hiking, biking or skiing into their daily routine. In addition to stepping out his door for trout fishing in the New Haven River, hiking the Long Trail and cross country skiing on the Catamount Trail, Sean is also surrounded by ski areas, which he explores on his precious days off. Between work and play, he easily racks up more than 100 days on snow per season. Sean has been at the Snow Bowl for 11 years and finds that blending work and family time helps him stay connected to his kids, which is critical to parents committed to raising a ski family. His wife, Lisa, brings the kids to the mountain every weekend while Sean is working — and those are his absolute favorite shifts. His daughter, Sloan, loves hanging out in the patrol hut and taking a few runs with her dad, and her brother, Lochlan, started riding the magic carpet at age two. While Sean eats lunch with the kids in the base lodge, Lisa skins uphill for a little exercise and solitude. Sometimes they can even sneak out for a few runs together, leaving the kids in the capable hands of the Snow Bowl’s childcare staff. Sean credits much of their successful lifestyle balance to his supportive employer and the whole mountain community. “People who choose a career in the ski industry are invested for the long term, and community leaders recognize the value of integrating this kind of balance into the culture.”

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Sean Grz yb , DI R ECTOR OF SK I PAT ROL AT M I DDL EBU RY SNOW BOW L

While Sean prefers living in a rural setting, he’s also impressed by the caliber of arts and cultural events that pass through Vermont’s performance venues, thanks to its proximity to the northeast’s largest urban centers. “All the action comes to us,” says Sean, about frequently catching artists when they stop to perform locally between shows in larger cities, “like during Middlebury College’s renowned Performing Arts Series.” Sean is glad his kids are growing up with exposure to worldly activities in a town that’s also rich with its own history, and stories of past generations who shaped the landscape and infused a sense of place into their passion projects — Middlebury’s marble architecture and the Robert Frost interpretive trail are great examples.


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Eliza Greene & Justin Hyjek , OW N ER S/OPER ATOR S AT HOM EST Y L E HOST EL A N D M A I N + MOU N TA I N MOT EL

E

liza Greene’s passion for the ski industry started when she began snowboarding at age five and grew when she began competing in halfpipe at age 10. She and Justin Hyjek grew up just 10 miles apart — she in Chester and he in Ludlow — and they were weekend warriors together throughout childhood, getting dropped off at the mountain for first chair and staying until the last.

Eliza and Justin got the travel bug after college and spent two years in southeast Asia and South America, where they fell in love with the concept of the hostel. Inspired by their travels and southern Vermont’s favorable real estate market, they returned to their hometown and opened Homestyle Hostel, where they welcome visitors with a unique home-away-from-home experience. According to Eliza, “cheaper real estate has created a lot of opportunity for young people to open businesses, which is one of main reasons we initially chose, and have stuck to, Ludlow.” Just two years into running their first business, the couple purchased a rundown motel across the street and turned it into a modern cocktail bar and boutique motel called Main + Mountain.

“OUR FRIENDS ARE ON THE SAME SCHEDULE, SO WE ALL HAVE A FUN SOCIAL LIFE.” While they might not have been able to open their businesses as easily in a big city, Eliza and Justin never feel like they’re missing out on all the action. Visitors from the city bring that energy to the hostel on weekends and keep this entrepreneurial duo energized. Then, by the time guests head home on Monday, they slow back down to the mid-week speed of life in the Okemo Valley. Eliza’s positive spin also applies to the seasonality of working in a ski community, noting that “our town has very specific high and low times and, luckily, most of our friends have schedules that also revolve around the same cycle.” So, even with two businesses to run, she and Justin (and their friends) can spend their days off together. “This is really special to us, because if we lived in a community where most people worked Monday through Friday, we would miss out on having a social life.” Seasonality is also an asset to their business model and gives the entire staff the flexibility and freedom to travel for up to eight weeks during the off-season each year. “The opportunity to balance our love of travel is a huge perk of owning our business and keeps us loving what we do.” Their dedication doesn’t waver while they’re away. “We are surrounded by an incredible group of enthusiastic, young entrepreneurs running creative businesses, which has stirred up a renewed sense of pride in southern Vermont that keeps us connected to the area.”

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ever in his wildest dreams did Dylan Richardson expect to move back to Vermont and put down roots in his hometown after living and traveling across the country. Yet here he is, operating a thriving restaurant in the same building that once housed the circa-1828 general store where he worked the deli counter as a kid. When the opportunity to take over the historic space came up, Dylan and his family jumped at the chance to bring new life to the community gathering place.

“I DO BUSINESS WITH MY NEIGHBORS, ALL OF WHOM I KNOW BY NAME.” The Eatery is truly a family affair, but it also supports a wider family of neighboring businesses. By sourcing ingredients and menu items locally, Dylan keeps more money circulating in the community and supports other agricultural entrepreneurs he does business with, such as farms, suppliers, brewers and butchers — all of whom he knows by first name. His commitment to drawing from and giving back to the landscape year-round has earned the restaurant the “Snail of Approval” designation from Slow Food Vermont for fostering outstanding quality, ethical and sustainable practices. The Eatery was also awarded Vermont Fresh Network’s “Gold Barn Honor” for partnering with Vermont farmers. In addition to fare that fosters accolades from far and wide (including a recipe on page 34 you can try yourself) the Richardsons renovated the general store to create a relaxed communal space. The Eatery is a lively place where strangers bond over stories about their day at Mount Snow. It’s also helped Dylan reestablish connections with people he grew up with, and meet other like-minded folks passionate about agriculture, the outdoors and the restaurant industry. “At the end of the day, we created a space we like to be in — a space where we’d like to eat on our days off.”

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D ylan Richardson , OW N ER /OPER ATOR AT W I L L I A MSV I L L E E AT ERY

Dylan lives and breathes all things localvore and celebrates the terroir of his community by infusing it into the Williamsville Eatery’s farm-to-table menu. He forages for wild ingredients, sometimes on his mountain bike or tele skis, stopping to collect tasty morsels along the way. His dad and business partner, Glenn, manages the bar and his mom, Lauri, maintains massive gardens, raised beds and a greenhouse that supply the kitchen.


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WELCOME TO VERMONT. HAVE AN IPA!

COME FOR THE SKI TRAILS, STAY FOR THE LONG TRAILS... NO GREAT DAY IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A REFRESHING, WELL-EARNED BEER AT THE END, SO CRACK OPEN A VT IPA AND LET THE CITRUS AND TROPICAL FRUIT FLAVORS TRANSPORT YOU BACK TO YOUR MOST EPIC RUNS AND SICKEST DAYS ON THE SLOPES.

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I

n the back of his mind, Jon Jamieson always knew he’d return to the Mad River Valley. Despite attending college away and chasing powder around the U.S., his roots here run deep — his family has lived in the Valley since it was first settled. Jon grew up racing and always thought skiing was a normal part of life. Yet even as a child, he knew there was something special about having weekend friends who visited from the Jersey Shore and Connecticut, in addition to his friends in Vermont. “The exchanges I had with these kids and their families opened my eyes to travel.”

“I CAN CUT OUT FOR A FEW RUNS DURING THE LUNCH HOUR AND STILL MAKE IT BACK IN TIME FOR AFTERNOON MEETINGS.” Jon Jamieson , PR I NCI PA L AT JA M I ESON I NSU R A NCE You might not think of insurance as a tourism profession, but the success of the family business is directly tied to the health of the resort community, and neither the business nor Jon’s family would be here without it. When the resort economy took off during the 1970’s and 80’s, business grew as the hospitality and vacation home sectors boomed. Jon has always been able to leverage the Valley’s outdoor assets as a recruiting tool to attract great employees who want to live in a beautiful Vermont community and ski at Sugarbush and Mad River Glen. The Mad River Valley community is deeply grounded with rich relationships, solid connections to the past and a soul shaped over time by generations of ski enthusiasts. “It’s a special experience to duck out for a few runs during the lunch hour or spend a powder day with family when it coincides with the kids’ snow day. Living in a community that supports and embraces the ski lifestyle makes it so much more accessible for everyone.”

Have you ever wanted to set up shop in Vermont or hone a skill while pursuing your passions in the mountains? Maybe you just dream about spending more time on the slopes before, during and after work? If these folks can do it, you can, too, and there’s never been a better time to take the leap. Take the next step in discovering how to live, work, play and grow your business in Vermont by visiting www.ThinkVermont.com. ❄

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THIS IS HOW WE APRÈS IN VERMONT

THE OFFICIAL WHISKEY OF SKI VERMONT FERMENTED, DISTILLED AND BOTTLED IN WARREN, VERMONT BOOK DISTILLERY TOURS ONLINE: WWW.MADRIVERDISTILLERS.COM BURLINGTON TASTING ROOM AND COCKTAIL SHOP 137 ST. PAUL ST., BURLINGTON, VT 05401 30 SkiVermont.com


in my

get Belly

a quad of vermont’s most sought-after après-ski food destinations share some recipe love By Mike Hannigan

You can’t take Vermont’s legendary mountains home with you, nor can you pack up the state’s amazing restaurant scene and transplant it to your town. In the interest of sharing the goods and giving you something special to fill your belly after a big day on the slopes, we asked four of Vermont’s finest après-ski restaurants for recipes you can try at home. Bon appétit!

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wWw.woOdchuck.com

the- waterbury, reservoir vermont chicken pot pie While there aren’t any ski resorts directly in Waterbury, it is most assuredly a ski town. When you’re heading home from Bolton Valley, Stowe, Sugarbush, Mad River Glen or Cochran’s, chances are you’ll pass right through the center of town. If you’re either hungry or thirsty, you’re in luck, because there’s more good food and legendary beer within a stone’s throw than just about any other place we can think of. Chief among them is the Reservoir, whom we can thank for this rib-sticking rendition of Chicken Pot Pie. Try it at home, and be sure to visit ‘The Res’ next time you’re nearby. What you’ll need 2 lbs. boneless skinless chicken thighs 1 sweet white onion 2 cloves garlic 8 oz red radish 1 carrot 1 parsnip 1 turnip 4 Yukon Gold potatoes 1 tsp black pepper 1 tbsp kosher salt ¼ lb. unsalted butter ¼ lb. flour 2 cups heavy cream 4 cups chicken stock 6 branches thyme 1 branch oregano 1 pinch red pepper flakes 1 oz brandy 1 sheet puff pastry

What to do Preheat oven to 350°. In a roasting pan, roast the chicken thighs in the chicken stock and the herbs at 350° for 20-25 minutes. Allow to cool and save the liquid for later. Dice the onion finely and add to a 1-gallon pot with butter. Cook on low for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onion is translucent and tender. While the onion is cooking, peel the carrot, parsnip and turnip and cut them into bite-sized pieces. Rinse the radishes and cut in half. Toss all the root vegetables in oil and add salt and pepper. Place the root vegetables on sheet trays and bake at 350° for 15-20 minutes until tender. Cut the potatoes into bite-sized pieces and bake on sheet trays at 350° for 15-20 minutes until tender. Once the onion is tender, slowly whisk in the flour and cook for a few more minutes until the flour has been fully incorporated. Deglaze the pot with the brandy. After the alcohol is cooked off, slowly whisk in the heavy cream and chicken stock from the roasted chicken pan. This is your pot pie base. Cut the chicken into bite-sized pieces and mix into the pot pie base. Add the potatoes and root vegetables to the mixture and leave on a low simmer for about 20 minutes until completely hot. Taste and season as needed. This can be eaten right away or refrigerated for later.

OFfICIAL hard CIDER of

If you would like to eat this as a casserole, pour the pot pie into a baking pan and cover with puff pastry. If you want to enjoy individually, pour into bake-safe bowls and cut the puff pastry to fit each individual bowl. Bake for about 10 minutes at 400° until the pie top has puffed and is golden brown.

Ski Vermont

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wWw.woOdchuck.com

being the original is not hard,

but our cider is.

OFfICIAL hard CIDER of Ski Vermont COME VISIT US AT THE CIDERY IN MIDdLEBURY, VT


williamsville eatery - Williamsville, vermont roasted tomatoes + seared organic polenta cakes Not far from Mount Snow is one of the gems of southern Vermont’s dining scene. In an unassuming former general store, the Williamsville Eatery is a place meant to gather the community around and share food sourced from and inspired by local farms. This recipe is a little slice of the Eatery you can try making at home, but the real deal is worth the trip the next time you’re in town. While this dish requires some advance planning and prep, the final assembly is pretty straightforward — perfect for a good après dish. It’s wholesome, nutritious, colorful, aromatic and it also tastes really good.

roasted tomatoes

What you’ll need 20 (+/-) plum tomatoes, cored, halved lengthwise and seeded 3-1/2 cups (or more) extra virgin olive oil 4-1/2 tsps dried oregano 2-1/4 tsps sugar 1-1/2 tsps sea salt 3 to 4 garlic cloves, minced Minced fresh Italian parsley Fresh Vermont chèvre or aged goat cheese (such as Bûcheron) What to do Preheat oven to 250°. Prep the tomatoes. Pour half the oil into a glass, ceramic or stainless baking dish. Arrange tomatoes in dish, cut side up. Drizzle with remaining oil. Sprinkle with oregano, sugar and salt. Bake for 1 hour. Using tongs, turn tomatoes over. Bake for 1 hour longer. Turn tomatoes over again. Bake until deep red and very tender, transferring tomatoes to a plate when soft (the time varies, depending on ripeness of tomatoes), about 15 to 30 minutes longer. Layer tomatoes in medium bowl, sprinkling garlic and parsley over each layer; reserve oil in baking dish. Drizzle tomatoes with reserved oil, adding more if necessary to completely cover. Let stand at room temperature for 2 hours. Cover with wrap and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before serving.

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Polenta

What you’ll need 1 cup coarse organic polenta 3 cups water 1 cup whole milk 1/2 cup shredded parmesan Nub of butter 1/2 tsp sea salt What to do Bring water, milk and butter to a gentle boil, add salt and reduce to a simmer. Slowly add polenta while whisking continuously. Cook over low heat, whisking frequently during the first 5 minutes or so. Add extra boiling water as needed throughout cooking process. Stir using a large rubber spatula for the balance of cooking, about 15 to 20 additional minutes. It’s ready when it has achieved a nice creamy consistency. When ready, remove from heat, stir in the parmesan, cover and let rest for about 10 minutes. Stir again to fully incorporate the cheese, pour into a loaf pan and level by shaking side to side and smacking pan on the table. Cool uncovered in refrigerator, then cover tightly with plastic wrap. Chill for a minimum of 4 hours, overnight is best. To sear the polenta: Loosen polenta in the pan and release upside down onto a cutting board. Divide equally into 10 slices using a wet chef’s knife. Heat a robust amount of good quality oil and a nub of unsalted butter in a heavy-bottomed


THE OFFICIAL GIN OF SKI VERMONT BARRHILL.COM | HARDWICK, VERMONT sauté pan, then place a comfortable number of slices into the pan. Don’t overcrowd. Gently shake the pan then don’t move anything for 3 to 4 minutes so you can get a nice sear. Gently flip the slices over until nicely seared. Final Assembly Allow the tomatoes to come to room temp (if roasted the night before). The only stove time required after skiing is searing off the polenta pieces, then plate and eat. For plating, place two warm seared polenta pieces on the plate, then nest two or three roasted tomatoes in front of polenta. Using a small baller or small ice-cream scoop, put a dollop of goat cheese on the tomatoes, drizzle entire dish lightly with the roasted tomato oil, and finish with chopped fresh basil or flat-leaf parsley.

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doc ponds rhode island calamari - stowe, vermont -

There’s no shortage of places to hit along the Mountain Road in Stowe, but Doc Ponds stands out, not least because of the mustachioed logo pointing skyward from the top of the chimney. Doc Ponds is the brainchild of chef Eric Warnstedt, whose Hen of the Wood restaurants in Burlington and Waterbury have earned James Beard accolades. Doc Ponds is dedicated to more casual fare, served with one of the state’s best beer lists and an impressive vinyl collection for your après-ski soundtrack. Eric calls this recipe “super simple and awesome,” and we’re not inclined to argue with him.

What you’ll need: 2 tbsp virgin olive oil 1 clove chopped garlic 8 oz calamari cut into 1/2" rounds Hearty pinch of smoked chili flakes (crushed chipotle chilies) 1/2 lemon Several basil leaves, chopped Salt Seasoned breadcrumbs if you have some

What to do: Working quickly and with everything ready to go: Get a sauté pan very hot. Pull off of the heat momentarily and add oil, then add large pinch of the chili flakes, the garlic and a large pinch of salt. Add the calamari and place back on the heat and cook quickly, about 1 minute, stirring or tossing continuously. Turn off the heat, squeeze all of the lemon juice from the 1/2 lemon and toss with fresh basil and breadcrumbs. This serves two as an appetizer.


Miso hungry japanese onigiri - jay peak, vermont -

Miso Hungry’s food cart has built a dedicated following around Vermont for the past few summers, so when they opened up last winter in Jay Peak’s retired tramcar, ramen lovers rejoiced that they could get their fix in winter, too. We begged and pleaded with them to share their miso recipe with us for this article, but alas, it’s top secret. Instead they gave us one for Onigiri, aka Japanese rice balls. According to the Miso team, “Onigiri is an absolute staple in Japanese backcountry shredding. You will find at least two Onigiri in every backpack in the endless backcountry pow of Japan. They’re easy, sustaining and can be made with any leftover protein you have in the fridge.”

What you’ll need: 2 cups fancy sushi rice 2.2 cups water 4 oz sesame seeds, toasted 3 tsp Celtic sea salt Any darn protein you desire — Miso’s recommendation is chopped bacon and scrambled eggs or teriyaki chicken Seaweed sheets (usually next to the sushi rice in most supermarkets) What to do: First off, the secret that Asian restaurants don’t want you to know about making perfectly cooked sushi rice is the need to wash the rice 5-7 times (depending on how cheap-o you went with buying the rice). You do this by flooding the pot with cold water, mixing the rice with your hands and carefully draining the water. Next up, after you wash the rice, add a ratio of 1.1 cups of water to every 1 cup of rice. When cooking the rice, cover and bring the water to a boil. As soon as it starts to rumble, turn it to low until it smells like it may be burning. We prefer a little crisp to the rice at the bottom. It adds good texture and flavor. To toast the sesame beforehand, pour a couple ounces into a saucepan and cook on high, shaking it the entire time until the sesame has an oily brown glow. Be sure to empty the sesame into a different dish immediately or else the hot pan will continue to burn the sesame on the bottom. Once the rice is cooked, empty it into a mixing bowl and

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sprinkle the freshly-toasted sesame and Celtic sea salt. Do this to taste. (You should be able to taste the sesame in all its beautiful flavor, and the salt should be added to bring out the sweet flavor of the rice without recognizing that salt was used.) Once the rice is done, it’s time to form each rice ball. We recommend a deep 10oz bowl (an 8oz cup will also do the trick). Lightly place a piece of plastic wrap over the bowl so it extends well over the edges. Fill the bowl up halfway with rice. By this time, you should already have cooked or re-heated the desired protein to go inside. This could be as elaborate as fresh-made chicken teriyaki or scrambled bacon and eggs, or as simple as diced up bits of last night’s chicken cordon bleu dinner, steak or tofu salad. Or if you really want to keep it traditional, add a single sour plum (ume boshi). Add a heaping tablespoon of your desired protein, then fill to the brim with rice. Once the bowl is full, wrap the plastic wrap tight around the ball and take it out of the bowl. The secret to forming a perfect rice ball is to use your ring and middle fingers of both hands, as well as your palms, in opposite directions, extending your fingers to form a right angle with your palm. Be careful not to squeeze too tight as you’ll abuse the rice so it tastes like mashed potatoes instead of perfectly-cooked and seasoned rice. The final step is to fold the seaweed sheets in half. You will use these to wrap the rice ball like a taco, but be sure to keep them separate until you are ready to indulge atop an epic, steep backcountry line. ❄


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ANOTHER BEST DAY

EXPERIENCE

KNOW NO LIMITS

rossignol.com


Ski, Baby, Ski Getting Back on the Mountain after Having a Child By Sarah Wojcik

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huffed and puffed and my legs were like Jell-O. I still had half the run to make, but had to stop repeatedly to catch my breath and re-center. This was hard and exhausting, but also incredibly rewarding. I was so happy to be on the mountain and smiling so much I almost started laughing hysterically from giddiness. It was my first day on the slopes since having my first child a month earlier, my first day of the season and Valentine’s Day, to boot. I did it! I overcame the obstacles, got on the mountain with a baby in tow and was enjoying the snow under my feet and the sun on my face. And skiing after having a baby

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wasn’t my only feat that day. Just getting to the mountain was actually a bigger obstacle than the challenge of skiing itself. What a change from before we had a baby, when my husband and I would ski as we pleased on the weekend, sometimes grabbing a midweek ski day to dodge the crowd. We’d wake up when we felt like it, throw our gear in the car and hit the road. When we found out I was pregnant we knew that lifestyle was over — for the most part — and that we’d need to be a bit more structured if we wanted to ski. But we were also incredibly excited to introduce our new baby to our favorite pastime, even if he couldn’t jump on skis

right away, and so we committed to getting our act together. I just didn’t realize quite how challenging that would be. Now, I have to include a disclaimer. I ski a lot. I’ve volunteered and worked in the ski industry for most of my adult life and have many opportunities to get on the mountain. But even with my access to skiing, my insider information and experience with Vermont ski areas, it still wasn’t easy for me to get back in the skiing groove after my son was born in 2017. I know how hard it is — and exactly why it’s worth it — and that’s why I want to share what I’ve learned with all the Mamas (and Papas) who are trying to get back on the mountain


Baby Steps to the Mountain STEP 1:

Talk to your doctor

This step is for the mamas giving birth. Adopting or reading as a partner? Skip ahead to Step 2.

and sliding on snow. Joining the All Mountain Mamas (allmountainmamas.skivermont.com) last season, I plan to do just that, starting with a little inspiration and guidance to getting back on the mountain after having a child.

Why Make Skiing and Snowboarding a Priority? So, you’re expecting your first child, or second, or third — or you have a very young child. How do you keep your ski or snowboard traditions alive? And why should you? We all know that bringing kids into the family changes our priorities, as it should. So where do skiing and riding fit? The answer to these questions is of course a bit different for all of us. Some of us are season pass holders who ski or ride routinely, others one-trip-aseason skiers or riders. But no matter how often you make it to the mountains, keeping those traditions alive gives you a healthy outlet every winter. Perhaps even more importantly, by prioritizing mountain fun in your family life you will eventually teach your little ones that unplugging and getting outdoors, especially in the winter, is important for their mental and physical health. Studies show the benefits of outdoor play for young children, pointing to lower stress levels, higher confidence, broader imagination and better understanding of consequences. Taking a ski trip with your family when your children are very young might seem like a mountain of its own to conquer. Establishing the tradition of family ski vacations will not only give you the confidence you need to do it year after year — it will offer you and your entire family great rewards and shared experiences that you’ll look forward to every winter and cherish forever.

How soon after birth is it safe for you to ski or ride? As I’m sure you know, birth does crazy things to your body, whether you deliver naturally, with meds or have a C-section. We all recover differently, and just like parenting, we’re all going to have slightly (or drastically) different experiences. Before you decide whether or not to hit the slopes, it’s important to know your body’s limitations. Talk to your doctor about any concerns you might have and then make your decision based not on what you think you should be doing, but what feels best and right for you. This might mean you spend some time on easier, more groomed terrain than you’re used to for a while — or it might mean more rests in between runs. Only you know what’s truly right for you. Which leads to the next step: STEP 2:

Have realistic expectations

You won’t necessarily be able to jump right back into your pre-baby skiing life. If you’ve always been a season pass holder who skis every weekend, maybe aim to ski once a month post baby. Your first time out, don’t expect to get a full day and epic vertical. In all likelihood, you and your partner will be swapping time on the mountain with time in the lodge to watch the baby or nurse. Just enjoy the time you do have as much as you can and go easy on yourself. What if you’re someone who usually plans a trip or two with a group of friends or family? Before you head far from home, try booking a weekend at a resort within driving distance and test the dynamic. Maybe purchase your lift tickets from day to day, so there is no pressure to ski or ride when you don’t really feel like it. Spending time at a beautiful destination with loved ones is half the enjoyment, so relax and enjoy. No matter if you live near the mountains or are visiting, enlisting friends and family can be a great way to get (CONTINUED on PAGE 45)

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Sit Back &

Connect

We’re 30 feet off the ground. It’s the middle of winter and we’re flying through the air in a chairlift with an orange bubble overhead. Sometimes the best memories are made in unexpected places. TOP RATED LIFTS IN THE EAST

1 - 800- 78 O K E MO

121 UNIQUE RUNS

L U D LO W, VE RM O NT

NINETY EIGHT % SNOWMAKING COVERAGE

O K E M O.CO M


(CONTINUED from PAGE 43)

yourself back out there. Not only will they be your cheerleaders, they can also act as babysitters if you’re aiming to get out with your partner. Joining other families with children? Swap days out and have a lady date on the lift — or make plans at a resort with daycare. You’ll of course have to pay if you make this last choice, which leads to my next piece of advice: STEP 3:

Your goal should be to find not just what you can afford, but what you can afford that will give you the support you need to actually enjoy yourself knowing that your child is well cared for. This is where your support network is so vital, as my final step shows.

STEP 4:

Find your village

Skiing and snowboarding with a baby is easiest with a support group. Don’t be afraid to ask grandparents and friends to join you at the mountain and help watch your baby. The base lodge scene is a fun, vibrant one to be a part of, and buying a beer for a friend or treating grandma to lunch is worth having

VSAA Winter Ad FINAL 2018 FINAL.qxp_Layout 1 8/17/18 3:11 PM Page 1

Set a budget

There are additional expenses that come with skiing with kids, making it important to plan for your ski trips. You also want to avoid being overly ambitious and paying for skiing or riding that you can’t do because you haven’t arranged for childcare.

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If you have a bigger budget, book trips in advance and include insurance in case you need to cancel. If you can afford it, things like slopeside lodging, resort childcare and spa treatments can all make ski trips with kids relaxing and fun.

Pure. Joy. CK INN & TO

T SOR RE

Before winter comes around, and after you’ve set realistic expectations, outline how much you’re willing to pay for them. Have a limited budget for the season? Look for lift ticket deals that are flexible or transferable, so you have options. For the best lift ticket deals, buy ahead of time. Then include the cost of a day or two of ski resort daycare in the budget. Don’t forget to make daycare reservations, so you can be assured of a spot. Other options include bringing along or finding a local babysitter you pay, or having a grandparent come with you or stay home with the kiddo so you can get a full day or two on the hill.

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The Woodstock Inn & Resort invites you to celebrate winter with luxurious accommodations, fine dining, a full service spa & many recreational activities. Woodstock Nordic Center offers 45km of groomed trails for skate & classic cross-country skiing. Snowshoers & fat bike riders may utilize the groomed ski trail areas in addition to a series of ungroomed trails for a more invigorating experience. Suicide Six is Vermont's most family friendly ski area, offering a world-class ski and ride school (the longest continually operating program in the country), diverse terrain with excellent snowmaking and grooming, a beautiful lodge with fresh farm-to-table fare, and hyper-local brews. Plan your winter getaway today! 866.615.5678 | www.woodstockinn.com | Woodstock, Vermont SkiVermont.com

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folks around to hang with — and possibly watch your baby as you slide on snow.

How I Became an All Mountain Mama I started out talking about the joy and freedom I felt my first day on the mountain after I had my son. Now allow me to back up and tell you just what went into making that happen. First of all, we decided to make our first foray into skiing on a weekday. My husband Chris took the day off and we packed the car with everything we needed: skis, boots, poles, helmets, diapers, extra milk, my pump ( just in case), baby books, toys, a baby sling…and I’m sure many other items that I’m not even remembering now. It was an hour drive to the mountain, so we stopped to grab breakfast and I fed Oliver in the car. He napped the rest of the way and when we got there my husband dropped me and the baby off at the base area around 10:45 am. I found a table in the pub that was empty and out of the way, and set up camp, first checking in with a waitress to see if she was OK with me setting up there for the day. She was very accommodating, and I ordered lunch and a drink, vowing to leave a nice tip for her. By the time my husband rolled in with the rest of our gear, I was raring to go and headed out for three runs, before I came back to the pub to relieve Chris. After I changed the baby, he napped again, and I read a book in my pub nook until Chris returned. We sipped a local beer, fed him again and packed up to head home. This may seem like a lot of work for a few runs — but the day was wonderful, and I was so proud of us for getting out. Once we did it, it became less of a mountain of its own to conquer and we gained the confidence to do it again and again, even planning a destination trip with friends later that season. The first step is the hardest. You’ll likely feel nervous about how it will all pan out. Will the baby fuss and cry? Will there be a place for us at the mountain? How are we going to get all the gear there? Is all this worth it? I assure you, once you’re settled in and baby is happily napping, feeding or watching the people going by, you’ll be so happy to be on top of that mountain — a proud All Mountain Mama. ❄ For more stories from the All Mountain Mamas, visit allmountainmamas.skivermont.com

46 SkiVermont.com


SAVE UP TO 50% ON LIFT TICKETS With just 24-hours notice, purchase Pico E-tickets online at picomountain.com/tickets and pick them up at the Pico Sales Center upon arrival. You won’t get a better deal anywhere else– we guarantee it. Open THURSDAY thru MONDAY & PEAK PERIODS 57 trails ° 7 lifts ° 1,967’ vertical

(866) 667 PICO

picomountain.com ©

2018-19 Killington/Pico Ski Resort Partners, LLC.

The Official Vermont Vacation Planning Guide, Your Resource for the best places to Stay, Eat, Drink and Play.

Disc ov er M ore

VERMONT This WINTER!

Stay connected year Round:

VisitVT

visitvermont

SkiVermont.com

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Last Season Winterrific

WA S

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Abbie Silverstein of Wellesley, MA, finds a powder paradise. Photo by Jeb Wallace-Brodeur LEFT:

Getting deep in 27” of fresh snow. Photo by Mike Dawson TOP RIGHT:

Jarlath O’Neil-Dunne of Burlington, VT, sports a smile and an icy beard after a cross country outing. Photo by Jeb Wallace-Brodeur MIDDLE RIGHT:

Chris Novak throws down a joyous arc for his first tracks. Photo by Eric Fitzgerald BOTTOM RIGHT:

SkiVermont.com

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POP OF THE

PEAK PROUD PARTNER OF

SKI VERMONT

PEPSI and the Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc.


Vermont mountain vista. Photo by Eric Fitzgerald TOP:

A black-and-white view of mountain splendor. Photo by Chip Allen MIDDLE:

Adaptive skiing activist Kelly Brush, second from left, pauses with friends on a bluebird day. Photo by Jeb Wallace-Brodeur BOTTOM:

SkiVermont.com

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TOP: Basking in the warm glow of an early-season day. Photo by Josh Campbell

Kirk Kardashian and his son Brian stop to mug for the camera. Photo by Justin Cash

MIDDLE:

Matt Cote rips it up amid powdery pine tree perfection. Photo by Justin Cash

BOTTOM:

54 SkiVermont.com


2011’ vertical • Home mountain to over 50 Olympians • Zero judgements

skiBURKE.com

The Last Little Corner of Vermont


GET YOUR LIFT TICKETS ONLINE AND SAVE MOUNTSNOW.COM/TICKETS


TRAVEL

IT’S TIME TO HEAD FOR THE MOUNTAINS. 11 8

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Burlington

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3 Montpelier

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Rutland 

White River Jct.

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Brattleboro 

SkiVermont.com/Resort-Finder CROSS COUNTRY SKI AREAS 1. Blueberry Hill Ski Center 2. Blueberry Lake XC 3. Bolton Valley Nordic Center 4. Brattleboro Outing Club 5. Catamount Outdoor Family Center 6. Craftsbury Outdoor Center 7. Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center 8. Hazen’s Notch Association 9. Jay Peak Nordic Center 10. Kingdom Trails Nordic Adventure Center 11. Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation

12. M  ountain Meadows XC Ski & Snowshoe Center 13. Mountain Top Inn & Resort 14. Okemo Valley Nordic Center 15. Ole’s Cross Country Center 16. Quechee Ski Area 17. Rikert Nordic Center 18. Sleepy Hollow Inn Ski & Bike Center 19. Smugglers’ Notch Nordic Center 20. S  towe Mountain Resort XC Ski Center 21. Strafford Nordic Center

22. Stratton Mountain Nordic Center 23. Timber Creek XC Ski Area 24. Trapp Family Lodge XC Ski Center 25. Viking Nordic Center 26. Wild Wings Ski Touring Center 27. Woodstock Inn & Resort Nordic Center Catamount Trail Amtrak Stations Airports SkiVermont.com

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You know you’re headed to Vermont this winter, but how are you getting here? At Ski Vermont, we know the ins and outs and do’s and don’ts when traveling to and around the Green Mountain State. We are here to help you get to Vermont in just three easy steps.

Take Amtrak and save 20% to your favorite Vermont ski destination.* Find out more at Amtrak.com. ®

*Restrictions apply.

STEP 1:

POP OF THE

PEAK PROUD PARTNER OF

SKI VERMONT

Choose your perfect Vermont ski or snowboard destination. Not sure which resort is best for you? Check out our Resort Finder at skivermont.com that allows you to sort Vermont’s resorts by type, region and amenities.

STEP 2: Decide how you want to travel. Vermont is very accessible with plenty of options to suit the needs of everyone from every destination. Check out the best ways to access the Green Mountains of Vermont with some insider tips.

STEP 3: Grab your skis and boards, pack your bags and get ready for an amazing time in the Green Mountains. PEPSI and the Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc.

58 SkiVermont.com


TRAVEL

BY AIR

Most of Vermont is accessed by four major Interstate Highways. Interstates 87, 89, 91 and 93 all provide easy access to Vermont.

There are many ways to fly to Vermont and the Northeast. If you are visiting a northern or central resort, Burlington International Airport (BTV) is a great option. Direct service is available to BTV from Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Newark, New York City, Orlando, Philadelphia, Toronto and Washington, DC.

SKI VERMONT PRO TIPS:

AIRPORTS ✈

If you are looking for a scenic route, make sure to check out the network of Vermont Byways. Route 100, which runs the length of Vermont along the Green Mountains, is often referred to as the “Skiers Highway,” since many Vermont resorts lie along this famous route.

Vermont ski resorts can also be accessed from Montreal, Canada (YUL), Albany, NY (ALB), Manchester, NH (MHT), Hartford, CT (BDL), Boston, MA (BOS) and New York City (JFK & LGA) airports via a rental car, bus, rail or shuttle service.

In addition to the Interstate system, Vermont features a well-maintained network of local roads and State Highways. US Routes 2, 4 and 7 provide convenient access points east to west and north to south. State and local road crews work tirelessly in the winter months to provide ease of passage through the many networks of roads.

BY RAIL

If you do not have a car, you can also get to Vermont by Megabus, Greyhound or even the Jitney. Check with the resort you are visiting to see if it has any specific bus offerings or tour groups. Make sure to check your drive time online and seasonal directions, as some roads close for the winter season — and we don’t want you to end up in the wrong spot!

Amtrak offers two routes with daily service to Vermont. The Ethan Allen Express provides daily service between New York Penn Station and Rutland, VT, with great access to southern and central Vermont. The Vermonter provides daily service between Washington, DC and Vermont via Philadelphia, PA and New York City, then heads through Connecticut and Western Massachusetts completing its journey through scenic Vermont all the way to St. Albans near the Canadian border with access to almost every resort area along the way.

Vermont’s ski and snowboard resorts are closer than you may think. You can be at a Vermont resort in just two hours from Montreal, three hours from Boston and four hours from New York City.

Courtesy of Killington

BY CAR OR BUS

In addition to major airports, Vermont has several smaller airports near resorts for a more personalized experience. SKI VERMONT PRO TIP:

If you are flying internationally, spend a day or two in Boston, Montreal or New York City. Vermont skiing and snowboarding are an easy drive from these cities.

SKI VERMONT PRO TIP:

Check with your resort ahead of time to find out the best way to get to and from the train stations. Resorts provide shuttle services or can recommend transportation.

BY FERRY We bet you never even knew you could get to Vermont by water! Vermont’s Lake Champlain Ferries have been providing passage across Lake Champlain from New York State since 1826. SKI VERMONT PRO TIP:

If you are traveling on I-87, the ferries are a unique way to get across the lake into the Green Mountains — just make sure the ferry you want to use operates in the winter and at the time you plan to cross.

NEED SOME ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE? Give us a ring at 802-223-2439 and we’ll help steer you in the right direction. SkiVermont.com

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ALPINE

BOLTON VALLEY Bolton Valley, VT www.boltonvalley.com 802-434-3444

BROMLEY MOUNTAIN Peru, VT www.bromley.com 802-824-5522

BURKE MOUNTAIN East Burke, VT www.skiburke.com 802-626-7300

JAY PEAK RESORT Jay, VT www.jaypeakresort.com 802-988-2611

VERTICAL.......................... 1,704'

VERTICAL..........................1,334'

VERTICAL.......................... 2,011'

VERTICAL.......................... 2,153'

LIFTS/TRAILS........................6/71

LIFTS/TRAILS........................9/47

LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 5/50

LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 9/78

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 300

TRAIL ACREAGE......................178

TRAIL ACREAGE......................270

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 385

MAD RIVER GLEN Waitsfield, VT www.madriverglen.com 802-496-3551

MAGIC MOUNTAIN Londonderry, VT www.magicmtn.com 802-824-5645

MIDDLEBURY SNOW BOWL Hancock, VT www.middleburysnowbowl.com 802-443-7669

MOUNT SNOW RESORT West Dover, VT www.mountsnow.com 800-664-6535

VERTICAL.......................... 2,037'

VERTICAL..........................1,500'

VERTICAL..........................1,000'

VERTICAL.......................... 1,700'

LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 5/54

LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 6/50

LIFTS/TRAILS........................4/17

LIFTS/TRAILS..................... 20/86

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 120

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 205

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 120

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 600

PICO MOUNTAIN Killington, VT www.picomountain.com 802-422-6200

QUECHEE SKI AREA Quechee, VT www.quecheeclub.com 802-295-9356

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH RESORT Jeffersonville, VT www.smuggs.com 802-332-6841

STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT Stowe, VT www.stowe.com 802-253-3000

VERTICAL.......................... 1,967'

VERTICAL.............................650'

VERTICAL.......................... 2,610'

VERTICAL..........................2,360'

LIFTS/TRAILS........................7/57

LIFTS/TRAILS.......................3/13

LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 8/78

LIFTS/TRAILS................... 13/116

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 468

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 100

TRAIL ACREAGE......................310

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 485

COMMUNITY SKI AREA

COMMUNITY SKI AREA

LYNDON OUTING CLUB Lyndonville, VT www.skilyndon.com 802-626-8465

SUGARBUSH RESORT Warren, VT www.sugarbush.com 802-583-6300

SUICIDE SIX SKI AREA Woodstock, VT www.suicide6.com 802-457-6661

COCHRAN’S SKI AREA Richmond, VT www.cochranskiarea.com 802-434-2479

VERTICAL..........................2,600'

VERTICAL.............................650'

VERTICAL.............................350'

VERTICAL.............................433'

LIFTS/TRAILS....................16/111

LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 3/24

LIFTS/TRAILS......................... 3/8

LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 2/10

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 581

TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 100

TRAIL ACREAGE....................... 15

TRAIL ACREAGE....................... 32

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CROSS COUNTRY

KILLINGTON RESORT Killington, VT www.killington.com 802-422-6201 VERTICAL..........................3,050' LIFTS/TRAILS................... 22/155 TRAIL ACREAGE.................. 1,509

OKEMO MOUNTAIN RESORT Ludlow, VT www.okemo.com 800-78-OKEMO VERTICAL..........................2,200' LIFTS/TRAILS................... 20/121 TRAIL ACREAGE..................... 667

STRATTON MOUNTAIN RESORT Stratton Mountain, VT www.stratton.com 800-STRATTON VERTICAL..........................2,003' LIFTS/TRAILS..................... 11/97 TRAIL ACREAGE......................670

COMMUNITY SKI AREA

NORTHEAST SLOPES East Corinth, VT www.northeastslopes.org 802-439-5789 VERTICAL.............................360' LIFTS/TRAILS....................... 3/12 TRAIL ACREAGE....................... 35

CROSS COUNTRY CENTER

LOCATION

WEBSITE

TRAILS

BLUEBERRY HILL SKI CENTER

Goshen, VT

www.blueberryhillinn.com

50km

BLUEBERRY LAKE X-C

Warren, VT

www.blueberrylakeskivt.com

30km

BOLTON VALLEY NORDIC CENTER

Bolton Valley, VT

www.boltonvalley.com

100km

BRATTLEBORO OUTING CLUB

Brattleboro, VT

www.brattleborooutingclub.com

33km

CATAMOUNT OUTDOOR FAMILY CENTER

Williston, VT

www.catamountoutdoor.com

35km

CATAMOUNT TRAIL ASSOCIATION

Statewide

www.catamounttrail.org

500km

CRAFTSBURY OUTDOOR CENTER

Craftsbury Common, VT

www.craftsbury.com

105km

GRAFTON PONDS NORDIC CENTER

Grafton, VT

www.graftonponds.com

21km

HAZEN’S NOTCH ASSOCIATION

Montgomery Ctr., VT

www.hazensnotch.org

40km

JAY PEAK NORDIC CENTER

Jay, VT

www.jaypeakresort.com

20km

KINGDOM TRAILS NORDIC ADVENTURE CENTER

Lyndonville, VT

www.kingdomtrails.org

12.3km

MEMPHREMAGOG SKI TOURING FOUNDATION

Derby, VT

www.mstf.net

40km

MOUNTAIN MEADOWS XC SKI & SNOWSHOE CENTER

Killington, VT

www.xcskiing.net

30km

MOUNTAIN TOP INN & RESORT

Chittenden, VT

www.mountaintopinn.com

60km

OKEMO VALLEY NORDIC CENTER

Ludlow, VT

www.okemo.com

21km

OLE’S CROSS COUNTRY CENTER

Warren, VT

www.olesxc.com

45km

QUECHEE SKI AREA

Quechee, VT

www.quecheeclub.com

27km

RIKERT NORDIC CENTER

Ripton, VT

www.rikertnordic.com

55km

SLEEPY HOLLOW INN SKI & BIKE CENTER

Huntington, VT

www.skisleepyhollow.com

35km

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH NORDIC CENTER

Jeffersonville, VT

www.smuggs.com

30km

STOWE MOUNTAIN RESORT XC SKI CENTER

Stowe, VT

www.stowe.com

45km

STRAFFORD NORDIC CENTER

Strafford, VT

www.straffordnordicskiing.com

30km

STRATTON MOUNTAIN NORDIC CENTER

Stratton Mountain, VT

www.stratton.com

12km

TIMBER CREEK XC SKI AREA

West Dover, VT

www.timbercreekxc.com

13km

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE XC SKI CENTER

Stowe, VT

www.trappfamily.com

160km

VIKING NORDIC CENTER

Londonderry, VT

www.vikingnordic.com

35km

WILD WINGS SKI TOURING CENTER

Peru, VT

www.wildwingsski.com

25km

WOODSTOCK INN & RESORT NORDIC CENTER

Woodstock, VT

www.woodstockinn.com

45km

SkiVermont.com

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GREEN MOUNTAIN GEAR GUIDE Here’s some of the latest gear that’s designed to help you get the goods in Vermont this winter.

DARN TOUGH The Fall Line’s shin-to-heel wrap cushioning is ideal for hardcharging skiers and riders, and is available for both men and women. Knit from Darn Tough’s silkiest yarn, this sock hits the sweet spot between lightweight feel and durable comfort. www.darntough.com

DALE OF NORWAY The Seefeld Masculine and Feminine Sweaters are the new official sweater for the Norwegian Cross Country Team, made for the Nordic World Ski Championships in 2019 in Seefeld, Austria. This sporty retro-modern look has a unique pattern that symbolizes mountains and snow. They’re made from 100% skinsoft merino wool and feature a ¼ zip for the perfect fit for a day at the mountain. www.daleofnorway.com

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BURTON For her, there’s Burton’s Evergreen Down Collar Insulator. With sustainably-minded materials and responsibly-sourced down insulation, this versatile, packable puffy jacket stokes the fire no matter how frigid it gets. For him, go with the Mallett Bomber Jacket, with quilted patterning, a rib-knit collar and street-ready or field-worthy performance. Its water-repellent fabric sheds mist, sleet and snow. Both include Burton’s Living Lining® tech so you won’t overheat as it adapts to ups and downs in activity for consistent all-day comfort. www.burton.com

SKIDA The Kids Alpine Hat is a pint-sized version of Skida’s bestselling Alpine Hat that’ll keep your little ones warm and cozy, even on the coldest days. The printed poly-blend is fully lined with soft mid-weight fleece to fend off cold winds and the urge to run inside. Plus, Skida’s bold prints (shown here in Oh My Darling) make kiddos easy to spot, even in a flurry. www.skida.com


Making memories since 1936. Family, Friends and Fun.

Vermont’s Sun Mountain 3984 Route 11, Peru, VT, 6 miles from Manchester 802-824-5522

bromley.com

The more things change...

ROSSIGNOL Experience all-mountain freedom, whether you’re carving high-speed groomers or exploring further off-trail. The EXPERIENCE 88 Ti is Rossignol’s most versatile all-mountain ski, blending the heart of a high-performance carving machine with a freeride-inspired profile for more playful fluidity and ease. If you’re seeking rock-solid power, stability and control in any conditions, look no further. www.rossignol.com

the more they stay the same! Step into a timeless alpine experience at Vermont’s home mountain. 877-9Bolton

boltonvalley.com

Bolton Valley Vermont. Naturally.

SkiVermont.com

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Courtesy of Eric Fitzgerald

ce Logo

AND LAST, BUT CERTAINLY NOT LEAST, A FACE FULL OF THANKS TO ALL OF OUR PARTNERS.

DALE OF NORWAY MADE IN NORWAY SINCE 1879 Primary Burton Logo Primary Logo to be used when speaking about Burton as a whole. When in doubt, use this logo.

Primary Burton Lifestyle Logo

Logo

Primary Burton Collaborations Logo

Primary Burton Girls Logo

rimary Burton Sustainability Logo

Secondary Burton Sustainability Logo

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Primary Burton Presents Logo

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Stacked Mountain Logo


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Our Farmers Thank You Pepperoni Pizza Empanadas SERVES 8 2 small Roma tomatoes 1¹⁄₃ cups Cabot Seriously Sharp Shredded Cheddar Cheese ½ cup marinara sauce ½ cup diced pepperoni King Arthur All-Purpose Flour for dusting 2 14 oz. boxes chilled refrigerated pie dough, 4 rounds 1 egg yolk

R S U P P O RT YOU MEANS THE WORLD TO OUR FARM FAMILIES

Since 1919, the farm families of Cabot Co-op have been passionate about making the world's best dairy products. We use only the purest ingredients to cra’ our creamy, delicious classics. Just maybe, that's why we've won every major award for taste. Learn more at cabotcheese.coop

PREHEAT oven to 400°F. Grease a large rimmed baking sheet. CUT Roma tomatoes in half along the equator and squeeze out the seeds. Remove core and finely chop the tomatoes. Stir the tomatoes, Cabot cheddar, marinara and pepperoni in a medium bowl. DUST work surface with flour. Cut six 5½-inch rounds out of the dough and lay on the floured surface. Spoon tomato mixture onto the center of each round, dividing evenly, about ¼ cup each. Fold rounds over to make half moon shape and crimp edges to seal, using a fork if desired. Brush yolk over empanadas and transfer to the prepared baking sheet with a metal spatula. BAKE until golden and set up, 20 to 22 minutes. Let cool 5 to 10 minutes before serving.


That’s the number of towns and cities that are in Vermont. No two are the same, and every single one is worth a visit.

Profile for Ski Vermont

2019 Ski Vermont Magazine  

2019 Ski Vermont Magazine  

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